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SO U RC E 1.

joel hawkins, mfa


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SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

m

.m.x.i.i.

presented with a multitude of color photographs and sketches. As part of a portfolio of t h i n k i n g a n d d e s i g n . presented in one volume.

Printed for Joel M. Hawkins

san fr ancisco, usa


CONTENTS

Print / Web

PROSTHETIC SOUL

8

Print

QUESTIONING THE

32

SUBURBAN DREAM ONE FOR YOU, ONE FOR ME

50

BOYS TO MENNEN

68

Print

WHAT IF NOTHING CHANGES?

94

Poster

PARAMETER

112

THIS DID NOT GO WELL

120

BEST CASE

146

Print Branding / Packaging / Print / Web

Identity / Packaging / Web / Print Web / Print / Identity


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SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

m

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concept

Inspired by classic encyclopedias and other reference books, this portfolio serves as a repository for all my best work from my time at AAU in San Francisco. My design process involves lots of research and scouring source materials for insights and opportunities. At a personal level, everything reminds me of something else, and I'm always trying to connect ideas back to an original thought or condition.

Printed for Joel M. Hawkins

san fr ancisco, usa


Printed for Joel M. Hawkins dissection to separ ate them. the sk in w ill no longer slide upon the fascia, but w ill have to be car efully dissected from it and tur ned back lik e a sleeve ; the muscles, too, can not be r etr acted, at the time of the oper ation, w ithout much difficulty, but w ill mak e up for this by excessive shr ink age at a later per iod. ther e is danger, ther efor e, that the bone may not. the sk in saved for this pur pose need not he in the for m of a cuff; in feet, this for m is not that best adapted to the for mation of a symmetr ical stomp,

uments ar e easily r etr acted to the r equisite extent by simply

ting the few br idles of loose con nective tissue w hich tie it

n to the fascia, and the muscles ar e as easily separ ated from

bone by dividing their attachments at the linea asper a. this

ation is, ther efor e, w ell adapted to cases of pr imary a mpu-

ion for injury, and to such chronic cases as have not been at-

ded w ith infla mmation of the parts in w hich the incisions ar e

e made. if, on the other hand, w e have to deal w ith a case in

san fr ancisco, usa differ ent parts of the circumfer ence of the limb made two very

the edge of the a mputating k nife, by changing its dir ection in

elliptical flaps. sir char les bell cut the sk in in this for m w ith

the first incision of the sk in by cutting it in the for m of semi-

oper ation, or w hat a mounts to near ly the sa me thing, to modify

been proposed to r emove the projecting angles at the time of the

the cuff fit, and the mor e prominent ar e the " ears " of sk in. it has

e. the flatter) the for m of the muscular section, the worse does

of the wound, w hich never w holly disappear . the mor e per fect (i.

for ther e w ill always be prominent " ears " of sk in at the angles

car e, how ever, that their united lengths shall somew hat exc

for m, and may be either of equal or unequal dimensions, ta

other hand, two flaps be made, they must be cut of a r ectangu

be slightly gr eater than the dia meter of the limb. if, on

chosen, its fr ee extr emity must be rounded, and its length sho

to or a little gr eater than the dia meter of the limb. if a singl

ioning it in the for m of either one or two flaps of a br eadth eq

of the sk in to the subjacent cut sur faces may be obtained by f

the soft parts by a circular incision. the most per fect adapta

thin naps by tr ansfixing the limb, and completed the sectio

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tissues so fir mly glued together that it w ill r equir e a labor ious

m

w hich the limb has become infla med, w e shall find the var ious

SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

may be easily and expeditiously per for med; the divided in-

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he nor mal condition of the tissues of the thigh, this oper a-

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project

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Printed for Joel M. Hawkins be effected by first intention or by gr anulation. the end of the stump w ill be flat, or per haps slightly rounded, w ith a centr al depr ession cor r esponding to the end of the bone, and w ill in most instances be capable of sustaining consider able pr essur e. the w hole stump tapers symmetr ically, and is admir ably fitted to support the w eight of the body in the conical sock et of a moder n artificial limb. if this method is adopted in cases in w hich the tissues have become consolidated and adher ent to each other

r ee, upon the natur e of the lesion for w hich the a mputation

r for med. be sufficiently protected by the soft parte, and a

stump may be the consequence. this oper ation, ther efor e, an-

rs better for pr imary than for secondary a mputations, and i

k it can be show n that for the latter class of cases, another

hod (the double-flap oper ation of ver male) is to be pr efer r ed.

r esults of this oper ation, w hen per for med upon a proper class

san fr ancisco, usa

er ent sides of the limb, and w ill ther efor e depend, in a gr eat

in which, the phenomenon k now n as ph a ntom limb sy n drome is ex plor ed a n d used as a meta phor for emotiona l or u ni v ersa l loss. the book is used as a promotion for a ppleton's new pa per li ne ca lled r ecov er . demand a special descr iption. its chief peculiar ity consists in

is, nevertheless, so differ ent from the common oper ation as to

tion of the thigh and ar m, a method by circular incisions w hich

of a hollow cone. lar r ey and dupu ytr en adopted, in the a mputa-

the incisions ar e so managed as to give to the section the for m

tion of the soft parts. circular a mputation of the thigh, in w hich

the bone at the highest possible point above the level of the sec-

car e must be tak en to r etr act the muscles strongly, and to saw

sect up the sk in in the for m of flaps than of a cuff, and especial

project 01

the limb, dividing everything to the bone. a thir d, and, if ne

base of w hich the k nife is again applied, and again car r ied ro

sur face of the muscles at once assumes the for m of a cone, at

divides all the soft parts near ly or quite to the bone. the

possible, and the surgeon, by a single circular sw eep of the k

dupu ytr en. an assistant dr aws up the sk in and flesh as muc

circular incisions, and is most r eadily obtained by the metho

the bone the apex. this for m is the r esult of sever al consecu

w hich the cut margin of the sk infor ms the base, and the en

the for m of the section, w hich is that of a deep hollow cone,

PROSTHETIC SOUL Or, an experiment in Promotion and Amputation.

from the effect of pr evious infla mmation, it w ill be easier to dis-

.m.x.i.i.

mer ated, ar e such as leave little to be desir ed, w hether the cur e

m

of subjects and w ith a due r egar d to the thr ee points above enu-

SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

s must often be decided by the state of the integuments on

1.

dia meter of the limb. the choice betw een these differ ent

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project

» Prosthetic Soul

c l a s s » Type 3

term

» Fall 2011

i n s t r u c t o r » Ariel Grey

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1.

SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

Printed for Joel M. Hawkins

m

.m.x.i.i.

san fr ancisco, usa


project

» Prosthetic Soul

c l a s s » Type 3

term

» Fall 2011

i n s t r u c t o r » Ariel Grey

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SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

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the bone. a thir d, and, if necessary, a fourth or fifth, circular

parts would be produced by mak ing an incision through them all

one sw eep of the k nife. in this a mputation, w hich as simplified by

gr a n ul a

tion of the deepest muscular layers may be made with the gr eat-

in a conical for m ; but that such an incision is impr acticable in the

dupu ytr en is extr emely r apid and br illiant, the natur e of the cur e

rou nded

r apidity, and the bone is saw n in the tr ack of the last incision.

or dinary mode of oper ating, nor is it necessary for the for mation

will depend almost wholly upon the height above the first incision

importa

this way the bone may be saw n as high even as six inches above

of a good stump." the extr emity of the stump pr esents the for m of

at which the bone is saw n. if the conical cavity be made too shallow,

this r es

e first in. sever a l older surgeons use this expr ession as appli-

a deep conical cavity w ith the bone at its apex. lar r eyt oper ated

or if it become so from subsequent shr ink ing of the soft parts, the

ar r ived

ble to their ow n oper ations, but it does not appear that they

in the sa me m an ner, w ith the single exception that in the first

oper ation w ill approach in char acter the very imper fect one of

the firs

lly attained, or indeed aimed at, an ything mor e than a flat, or

incision he divided only the sk in and subcutaneous tissue which

par e ; but if, on the other band, it be of sufficient depth to admit

equal at

most a slightly concave section of the muscles. mr . hey, w hose

w er e r etr acted by a n assista nt, dur ing the per for m a nce of the

of the coaptation not only of the sk in but also of the muscular

m ay gen

cr iption of his method is near ly identical w ith that of lar r ey,

r est of the oper ation. default m a de sever a l circula r incisions,

sides of the cavity, extensive union may take place by first intention

danger,


project

Âť Prosthetic Soul

term

Âť Fall 2011

13

ati ng sur faces, a n d the en d of the stump w ill be w ell

tr eatment of the case, and ending per haps in a conical stump. no

both of muscle and of integument; a condition eminently favor able

ver male and

d, w ith the bone deeply bur ied at its centr e. it is highly

har m can ar ise from a r edundancy of soft parts, and much evil may

to extensive union by first intention. the sides of the wound ar e

a modified cir

nt to k now the measur ements w hich w ill probably ensur e

r esult from not saving enough. the r apid per for mance of this op-

easily brought together, and may be k ept in place by a few str ips

is pr eserved,

ult. the question has been discussed by sedillot, w ho has

er ation, in the way descr ibed, depends, as in the older circular

of a dhesi ve plaster, w hile the deeper muscula r sur faces a r e as

by means of t

at the conclusion that the distance betw een the level of

method, upon the la x condition of the subcutaneous and inter-

easily held in contact w ith each other by soft compr esses placed

limb. in its r

st incision and that of the section of the bone should be

muscular ar eolar tissue ; if ther e has been much infla mmation of

on opposite sides of the stump and confined by a few tur ns of a

w ith the adv

t least to thr ee fourths of the dia meter of the limb, and

the limb it w ill be difficult, if not impossible, to r etr act the soft

roller . e xcellen t stumps m ay be m a de by this m ethod, w hich,

w ith much gr

ner a lly be m a de even gr eater w ith a dva ntage. the gr eat

parts sufficiently. the principal advantage of this mode of amputat-

how ever, except in the man ner of its per for mance, has less r esem-

mor e lik ely t

particular ly in a very long stump, is that the bone w ill be

ing is the facility w hich it affor ds for the per fect adaptation to

blance to the ordinary circular, than to the double-flap oper ation.

the section o


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SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

Printed for Joel M. Hawkins

m

.m.x.i.i.

san fr ancisco, usa


project

» Prosthetic Soul

c l a s s » Type 3

term

» Fall 2011

i n s t r u c t o r » Ariel Grey

15


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m

.m.x.i.i.

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o

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Printed for Joel M. Hawkins

san fr ancisco, usa

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war ds. the r esult is substantia lly the sa me as in the method of

the deepest muscular fibr es, w hich ar e attached immediately to

then car r ied dow n war ds w ith a saw ing motion, still gr azing the

the l

r evenue, but, from the man ner of cutting the flaps, they ar e mor e

the femur and therefore retr act but little, are preserved of near ly

bone, until about ha lf the length of the flap has been cut ; the

thigh

or less rou nded a nd thin ned at their fr ee extr emities, so as to

the sa me length as the super ficial muscles; and, finally, ther e ar e

edge of the k nife is now to be tur ned obliquely outwar ds, and the

finge

admit of the margins of the sk in being dr aw n together to for m a

no angles of sk in to for m "ears," as in the common circular oper a-

section completed, thus gi v i ng to the extr emit y of the fla p a

in th

cover ing for the end of the stump. in this oper ation the w hole

tion. the double-flap a mputation is gener ally per for med in one of

curved outline. the other flap is for med in the sa me man ner . an

lang

muscula r substa nce of the limb is pr eserved for sever a l inches

two ways — either by tr ansfixing the limb and cutting the flaps

inexper ienced oper ator m ay fail to tr ansfix the limb symmetr i-

w ith

below the point of section of the bone ; the tissues, of w hich the

from w ithin outwar ds, or by cutting them from w ithout in war ds.

cally — that is, he may not mak e the k nife come out through the

in a d

flaps ar e for med, lie in their or iginal position, and in most cases

in the oper ation by tr ansfixion, the point of the k nife is plunged

sk in at a point ex actly opposite to that at w hich it enter ed. this

pr ese

r eadily adher e to each other, for ming a round and fleshy stump ;

at once to the bone, with which it should be kept closely in contact

is a matter of very little consequence, but a begin ner may easily

for m


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SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

Printed for Joel M. Hawkins

m

.m.x.i.i.

san fr ancisco, usa


project

» Prosthetic Soul

c l a s s » Type 3

term

» Fall 2011

i n s t r u c t o r » Ariel Grey

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SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

Printed for Joel M. Hawkins

m

.m.x.i.i.

san fr ancisco, usa


project

» Title

c l a s s » Title

term

» Title

i n s t r u c t o r » Name

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SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

Printed for Joel M. Hawkins

m

.m.x.i.i.

san fr ancisco, usa


project

Âť Prosthetic Soul

term

Âť Fall 2011

23

of a semi-circle, whose r adius was equal to a fourth of the circum-

facilitates the coaptation of the soft parts and diminishes the

where the bone is to be saw n. great care should be taken to preserve

dir ec

fer ence of the limb at the point selected for the section of the

danger of injur ious tension upon the sutur es. another, and by no

the w hole thick ness of the muscles at the base of the flaps, and

some

bone. an incision was made in the course of the lines thus mar k ed

mea ns the least, mer it of this oper ation is the certa int y w ith

not to thin them except in the dista l ha lf of their length. the

of gu

out, through the integuments first, w hich w er e dr aw n upwar ds

w hich it enables an inexper ienced oper ator to mak e a good stump.

oper ation by tr ansfixion is the most r apid, and is the one gener-

plan

by an assistant, and then obliquely through the muscles. after the

in this oper ation the length of the flaps must depend in some degr ee

a lly to be pr efer r ed, but ther e is no objection to either of the

gene

soft parts wer e thus completely divided, the r etr actor was applied,

upon the r ange of contr actility of the muscles w hich enter into

other methods. in cutting from w ithin outwar ds, a little a ddi-

to la

and the bone saw n as high as possible bet w een the flaps. in this

their for mation, or, in other wor ds, the near er to the k nee the

tional skin may be saved by dr awing the integuments gently upwards

r ath

oper ation the for m of the flaps, owing to the tapering of the thigh,

a mputation is per for med the longer should the flaps be cut. as a

towar ds the body befor e cutting them through. the flaps may be

m ay e

is almost ex actly the sa me as in the method by tr ansfixion as just

gener a l rule, the length of the flaps should be equa l to thr ee

held in pr etty good contact w ith each other by str ips of adhesive

musc


Printed for Joel M. Hawkins u nion by first intention or by the a dhesion of the gr a nulating sur faces. the vascular connections of the flaps ar e not distur bed, and their nutr ition is ther efor e mor e per fect than in the case of a cuff or flaps of integument only. the end of the bone is deeply bur ied betw een the flaps, but it does not pr ess upon them, for it is protected by the projection beyond it of the deep muscular fibr es. the stump bears neglect and bad usage dur ing the after-tr eatment r em ar k a bly w ell, and w ill gener a lly tur n out w ell even in the

he cicatr ix and cause a painful or tender stump. the double-flap

ation may be per for med w ith near ly equal facility in all con-

ons of the tissues, from the . state of per fect hea lth, as in

ary a mputation for sudden injury, to the fir m consolidation

he parts w hich r esults from the effusion and organization of

a mmatory products. in the latter class of cases, ther efor e, it

rs m ater i a l a dva ntages ov er a n y of the a pprov ed circula r

hods, both in ease and r apidity of per for mance and in the per-

san fr ancisco, usa should then be divided, the r etr actor applied, and the femur saw n

sweep of the knife. the attachments of the bone at the linea asper a

and the section of the soft parts is completed by a single circular

wher e the bone is to be saw n. after cutting the flap it is lifted up,

it should somew hat exceed the dia meter of the limb at the point

the whole cut surface without stretching; in length and in breadth

over the face of the stump, and it must be large enough to cover

flap should be cut r ather thin, in or der that it may be easily bent

either by tr a nsfixion or by cutting from w ithout in wa r ds. the

hands of a very unskillful dr esser. the oper ation may be per for med

in the for m gi v en to the cov er ing of integument, by w hich

from the common circular method; the chief differ ence cons

per for med in this man ner, does not differ mater ially in pr inc

aided by str ips of adhesive plaster. the single-flap oper ation, w

the end of the stump and r etained in its place by a few sutu

stump. in dr essing the wound, the flap should be folded neatly

of secondary hemorrhaging, or, in the latter, of a painful or te

thickness of the flap, else ther e w ill be danger, in the for mer c

must be ta k en not to i nclude a n y la rge v essel or nerv e i n

an inch or two above the tr ansverse section of the muscles. c

.m.x.i.i.

to the ex act coaptation of the soft parts, w hether w e hope for

m

fection of the immediate r esult. the for m of the wound is favor able

SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

flap ; if this happens to be the case, it should be dr aw n out of

1.

heath and divided as high as possible, lest it become engaged

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project

» Prosthetic Soul

c l a s s » Type 3

term

» Fall 2011

i n s t r u c t o r » Ariel Grey

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SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

Printed for Joel M. Hawkins

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san fr ancisco, usa


nal length ; the short flap may then be cut off at the same point

her point and cut the long flap at once of the r equisite addi-

k e a separ ate incision, for w e need only tr ansfix the limb at a

osite side of the limb. for this pur pose it is not necessary to

the pr incipal flap, and for ming a second shorter flap upon the

litting up the soft parts for a couple of inches, thus lengthen-

nudation of the bone in the last oper ation may be effected also

an if it w er e centr a l. method w ith t wo u nequa l flaps. — the

s, per haps, mor e in the way of pr essur e and of accidental injury

fit admir ably to each other, for ming a w ell-rounded stump, w ith

if, now, the flaps have been cut of just the r ight length, they w ill

flap is cut from the tissues of the calf, and a short one in front.

knee, as per for med by liston, fergusson and others, in which a long

wound. such, in fact, is the well-k now n flap a mputation below the

th at it m ay be bent ov er a nd m a de to fit the w hole face of the

one of the flaps elongated and rounded at its fr ee extr emity, so

oper ation then r esembles the double flap method of eavaton, w ith

of the bone been effected as in the common circular oper ation. the

upon the r ange of contr actility of the muscles w hich enter into

in this oper ation the length of the flaps must depend in some degr ee

w hich it enables an inexper ienced oper ator to mak e a good stump.

no means the least, mer it of this oper ation is the certainty w ith

thick cushion of soft tissues over its extr emity. another, and by

arc immediately attached to it, and not by attempting to mak e a

to lie protected by the projection beyond it of the muscles w hich

common circular oper ation, and for the sa me r eason; the hone is

a fter . this m a noeu v r e is of the sa me importa nce her e as in the

other methods. in cutting from w ithin outwar ds, a little a d

a lly to be pr efer r ed, but ther e is no objection to either of t

oper ation by tr ansfixion is the most r apid, and is the one gen

not to thin them except in the dista l ha lf of their length. t

the w hole thick ness of the muscles at the base of the flaps, a

where the bone is to be saw n. great care should be taken to prese

fourths or seven eighths of the dia meter of the limb at the po

gener a l rule, the length of the flaps should be equa l to th

a mputation is per for med the longer should the flaps be cut. a

i n s t r u c t o r » Ariel Grey

c l a s s » Type 3

» Fall 2011 term

» Prosthetic Soul project


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SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

Printed for Joel M. Hawkins

m

.m.x.i.i.

san fr ancisco, usa


project

» Prosthetic Soul

c l a s s » Type 3

term

» Fall 2011

i n s t r u c t o r » Ariel Grey

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Printed for Joel M. Hawkins

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project

» Title

term

» Title

31

a house may be str ictly adapted to its uses and clear ly expr ess its

devotion to mer e liter a l utilit y, is too fr equently displayed in

sate the lack of a salubr ious atmospher e. such a defect, unless its

air a

pur pose, and yet be a very unsatisfactory dw elling for a person of

rur a l house-building in this cou ntry. it w ill disappear as taste

causes come clea r ly w ithin the purch aser's control, should be

sa me

taste and cultur e and a per petual blemish in the landscape. it may

and cultur e advance, and the love of the beautiful, inher ent in

consider ed fatal. the vicinity of stagnant swa mps and marshes ;

shou

h av e comforta ble rooms, w ell distr ibuted in r elation to each

every man and woman, is called out and developed. let the r eader

the bor ders of sluggish str eams ; and all situations wher e the soil

satis

other and their uses ; w indows, doors, chimneys, etc., of the proper

bear in mind, then, the fact, that every house, how ever humble,

is too r etentive of moistur e and can not be easily and thoroughly

can b

size and in their proper places; and air, water, and war mth w ell

dr ained, shouldi nbe avoided. a house in such a situation s t car r u c tefully o r » Name is no less uncomfortable than healthful, being continually da mp

ings

provided for, and yet mak e a very unsatisfactory impr ession.

should may be char acter ized by these thr ee qualities: adaptac l a s sand » Title tion to use; expr ession of pur pose; and, manifestation of beauty.

the sentiment of beauty may find no expr ession in it. the w indows

in selecting a site for a country house, man y circumstances should

and chilly. elevated grounds in the immediate vicinity of extensive

ser io

majo


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project 02

QUESTIONING THE SUBURBAN DREAM Is this still how we define success? in which, the impacts of a lack of susta i na ble subur ba n pla n ni ng on the hea lth a n d h a ppi ness of this a n d futur e gener ations is consider ed. as w ell as ways to use cur r ent methods a n d idea ls to cr eate a pr agm atic li v i ng space w ith the r esources w e a lr ea dy h av e. the book is the summ ation of a semester's worth of r esea rch a n d field wor k .

ok ing, as w ell as for washing. con venience of access: in m a n y

habits of the fa mily w ill have a controlling influence. one w ill

ground, w hich must, ther efor e, always enter into the account. it

tude: a s

es near ness to one's place of business, or to the r ailway station

seek the fr equent«d str eet or highway, while another will choose

sometimes costs mor e to pr epar e the grounds for building than to

prospect

stea mboat la nding, has natur a lly consider a ble influence in

a quiet lane or an out-of-the-way nook. it is not necessary, as man y

build the house. this is w ell enough w hen advantages ar e secur ed

— but is

er mining the choice of a lot. this circumsta nce should not,

seem to suppose, th at a fa r m-house or the r esidence of a m a n of

w hich r ea lly war r ant the outlay; but the circumstance should

shelter e

w ever, have too much w eight. an additional quarter of a mile

leisur e should be close to the highway. a sufficient distance from

have its due w eight in deter mining ones choice. the adaptation of

tr ees, bl

ded to the tr i-daily walk of a man of sedentary employments may

it to avoid the noise and dust, and secur e pr ivacy and quiet, is far

the sur rounding soil to the pur pose of cultur e and the grow th

ar e equa

an advantage r ather than otherw ise ; and often a much better

pr efer able; but at the sa me time, unless one desir es to cut himself

of tr ees may be consider ed under the same head. a good gar den plot

unk now

e can be obtained for the sa me a mount of money by for egoing

off from all intercourse w ith the wor ld, his house should be easy

in the vicinit y of the house is very desir able, but w e find little

of hilly

e slight a dva ntages of a mor e centr a l loca lit y. w her e mer e

of access. suitableness of ground: the cost of building, digging

soil in this country that may not easily be brought to the desir ed

stands f


project

Âť Questioning the Suburban Dream

term

Âť Fall 2010

33

somew h at elevated site h as m a n y a dva ntages, beaut y of

another behind. one of the worst sites is the steep unifor m side of

all climates we should, if possible, secure a barrier either of higher

should be so

t, salubr ity and dry ness of air, facilities for dr ainage, etc.

a hill, closely sur rounded by other hills equally high and steep.

grounds or thick belts of tr ees (evergr eens ar e best) on the side

pear ance, bei

s gener ally compar atively difficult of access, and unless

the style of building you propose to er ect (if first decided upon)

of the house look ing in the dir ection from w hich violent stor ms

tr ees, etc.: a

ed on the north and w est by higher grounds or by belts of

must be considered with reference to this point. a plain, low cottage

most fr equently come. the north side of a high hill or r idge, wher e

a shelter and

leak and uncomfortable in w inter . some valleys, how ever,

very proper ly nestles in some quiet nook at the base of a hill or

the dir ect r ays of the sun would be excluded for a large portion

to the va lue

ally bleak, the w ind sw eeping through them w ith a pow er

r idge, while the mor e pr etending or namental villa may with equal

of the time, is entir ely u nfit for a building site, su nlight being

point, that w

n even on the hill-top. loudon says, that of all var ieties

propr iety crow n its summit. aspect: the choice of an aspect should

every where essential to health and comfort. in a northern climate,

such situati

sur face, the most desir able site is wher e a prominent knoll

be deter mined mainly by local and climatic consider ations ; a fr ee

a souther n or southeaster n exposur e w ith shelter ing hills on the

doubtless, pr

forwar d from a lengthened r idge, and w her e the latter

play for the cooling br eeze being essenti a l in one place, a nd a

north is gener ally pr efer r ed. in r efer ence to the main points from

not hope to l


34

1.

SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

Printed for Joel M. Hawkins

m

.m.x.i.i.

san fr ancisco, usa


project

» Questioning the Suburban Dream

c l a s s » Visual Communication Lab

term

» Fall 2010

i n s t r u c t o r » Phil Hamlett

35


36

1.

SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

Printed for Joel M. Hawkins

m

.m.x.i.i.

san fr ancisco, usa


project

» Questioning the Suburban Dream

c l a s s » Visual Communication Lab

term

» Fall 2010

i n s t r u c t o r » Phil Hamlett

37


Printed for Joel M. Hawkins situation of the var ious rooms, halls, closets, pantry, etc., and the ex act place of stairs, chimneys, doors, and w indows, should all bo deter mined befor e the first stak e is dr iven to mar k its outlines upon the ground if this course be not adopted, ser ious and expensi v e mista k es a r e a lmost sur e to be m a de, a n d money wasted i n needless alter ations. if you do not k now w hat you want, you ar e not pr epar ed to build, and should wait till your necessities and tastes have assumed definite for ms. "w hile your house is yet only

a clear run ning str ea m, a sheet of water in r epose, a pic-

ue ledge of rock, a shaded, naiad-haunted r avine, etc. ; but

r e not gener ally included in a village lot, and do not come

the r each of all. let each secur e w hatever of beauty and

t he can in his house and its sur roundings, and "lear n ther e-

be content." no man should commence the er ection of even

llest cottage w ithout having pr eviously adopted a w ell

d and fully matur ed plan. it is not enough that he may have

san fr ancisco, usa r able in itself, and yet unsuited to a particular spot. it must be

must be a dapted to the site you have chosen. a plan may be a dmi-

things to be taken into consider ation. in the first place, your house

every light, look ed at from every point of v iew. ther e ar e m an y

or offer ed by another. it should be car efully studied, ex a mined in

poster ity. adopt no plan hastily, w hether conceived by yourself

to it that it be such a r ecor d as you ar e w illing should be r ead by

br ick and mortar, it has become a matter of endur ing r ecor d. see

changing w hims; but w hen your thought has once shaped itself in

a pa per cottage or v illa it m ay easily be ch a nged to meet your

a nd so on, a r e certa inly desir a ble; but if you h ave but seven o

of his plan. r eception-rooms, dr aw ing rooms, libr ar ies, boudoirs

can appropr iate to building w ill gr eatly influence the char acter

pecu niary r esources ar e limited, the a mou nt of money w hich he

in m asses, is equa lly subject to the gr eat law of fitness. if one'

scape around, but its outlines upon the ground, its ar r angemen

influenced by the contour and aspect of the featur es of the land

w ith it. not mer ely the style and gener al char acter of a house ar

the plan be adopted first, the site must be selected in accor danc

look ed at, then, in r efer ence to the ground it is to occupy ; or if

.m.x.i.i.

er ect. a ll the details of its inter na l ar r angement, the size and

m

a gener al idea of the for m and size of the building he pur poses to

SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

t sacr ificing other a nd mor e importa nt consider ations,

1.

t is desir able to include in one's grounds, when pr acticable,

38


project

» Questioning the Suburban Dream

c l a s s » Visual Communication Lab

term

» Fall 2010

i n s t r u c t o r » Phil Hamlett

39


40

1.

SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

Printed for Joel M. Hawkins

m

.m.x.i.i.

san fr ancisco, usa


r site, and what amount of accommodations the sum you purpose

u in debt. having decided what sort of a house is best adapted to

all house wholly paid for, than in a large one which has involved

end upon it, you w ill enjoy a much larger sum of happiness in a

con venience or luxury you ca n a dd. do not pla n too largely.

olutely essential to your comfort, and then w hat appliances

thr ee distinct uses. consider first w hat accommodations ar e

mber of rooms, mak ing, if necessary, sever al of them serve two

t them a ll into your pla n. you must be content w ith a sm a ll

ingly, r emember ing th at the first gr a nd r equir ement of ev ery

household constantly in view, and adopt, modify, or r eject accor d-

adoption of one of them, keep the r equir ements of your particular

study ing those w hich w e offer in this wor k, w ith a v iew to the

proba bly to a da pt it to your pur pose; so in m a k ing a pla n, or in

finds "just the thing," would r equir e consider a ble modification

in their domestic habits, and a house w hich your neighbor brow n

tastes of yourself and family. no two households ar e ex actly alike

a mount of accommodation best subserve the particular wants and

circle in shape and in economy of outside wall. this for m is, in our

on, this shape is not a desir able one. the octagon approaches the

although round houses have been built, as w e shall show further

the extent of the wall may be included in the circular for m, but,

choice of a plan. gener al for m: the largest space in proportion to

gener a l pr inciples w hich should gover n in the development or

suit indi v idua l cases ; but w e w ill her e br iefly a dv ert to some

sible for us to give either dir ections or plans that w ill ex actly

individual wants and tastes ar e infinitely var ied, r enders it impos-

ar r angement of rooms. man y pr efer it to all others. a squar e ho

economical in point of outside wall, and allows the most comp

common for ms adopted in house-building, the squar e is the m

those w ho may desir e to see w hat can be said in its favor . of t

tion of its super ior ity over all others. to that wor k we must r e

with an ear nestness which could only come from thorough con v

chapter. o. s. fowler, in his " home for all," has advocated this fo

a nd disa dva ntages, w e gi ve pla ns of octagon houses in a noth

portunity to judge for themselves in r efer ence to its advanta

i n s t r u c t o r » Phil Hamlett

c l a s s » Visual Communication Lab

» Fall 2010 term

» Questioning the Suburban Dream project


42

1.

SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

Printed for Joel M. Hawkins

m

.m.x.i.i.

san fr ancisco, usa


i n s t r u c t o r » Phil Hamlett

m pr evailing w inds and stor ms enjoyment of particular views

compass, the pr incipa l objects to be k ept in v iew ar e: shelter

d the disposition of its var ious rooms in r efer ence to the points

d stor ms. aspect: w ith r egar d to the aspect of a dwelling-house,

lter another and mor e important one from pr evailing w inds

r e var ied aspects. one part can also often be so projected as to

ation to the high-pitched roof, gr eater pictur esqueness, and

nged for m, in its var ious modifications, ar e a mor e per fect ad-

o often ar e, a mer e char acter less box. on the advantages of the

n not easily be made pictur esque, but need not be, as such houses

ments of a dw elling. the con venience of the house as a whole must

have an influence in deciding the disposition of the var ious apart-

besides those mentioned in the pr eceding section should of course

of its coolness. ar r angement of booms: but other consider ations

in hot climates, a northern exposure is sometimes chosen on account

be avoided, our most disagreeable stor ms coming from that quarter.

middle states gener ally, a northeaster n aspect is, if possible, to

sur e is most desir able for the pr incipal rooms. in the norther n and

in cold and temper ate climates a souther n or southwester n expo-

affor ded by the situation; exposur e to or protection from the sun.

i n the pla ns pr esented i n other ch a pter s. h av i ng utilit y con-

together w ith those of other persons, w ill be found elabor ated

offer a few hints for gener al application. our ideas on this point,

families r equir ing pr ecisely the same accommodations. we can only

featur es, mode of construction, etc., will vary accor dingly, no two

the a r r a ngement of rooms, in common w ith the a rchitectur a l

pur pose, in its details, being a lmost infinitely var ied, of course

the entir e structur e to the pur pose for w hich it is er ected. this

the end to be secur ed is the most per fect adaptation possible of

not be sacr ificed to promote the comfort of a single apartment.

rooms, too, most closely r elated in their uses should be broug

consider ations w ill per mit, extended w ings and long passages. t

w e should study compactness, avoiding, so far as other importa

and con venience in per for ming the domestic labors of a househo

employ as few of them is possible. to promote the saving of lab

i n differ ent ones, r ather it desir a ble for ev en the w ea lth y

and the car es and vex ations attending the employment of bad

r ich as well as of the poor. the difficulty of getting good servan

ar r angement of rooms. this is necessary in the habitations of t

stantly in view, labor-saving must be made a prominent idea in o

c l a s s » Visual Communication Lab

43 » Fall 2010 term

» Questioning the Suburban Dream project


44

1.

SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

Printed for Joel M. Hawkins

m

.m.x.i.i.

san fr ancisco, usa


project

» Questioning the Suburban Dream

c l a s s » Visual Communication Lab

term

» Fall 2010

i n s t r u c t o r » Phil Hamlett

45


46

1.

SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

Printed for Joel M. Hawkins

m

.m.x.i.i.

san fr ancisco, usa


i n s t r u c t o r » Phil Hamlett

iate, in part at least, the objections to this plan. the entr ance

an having them on the sa me floor . a dumb waiter, how ever, w ill

or . this is a mor e elegant but a less con venient ar r angement

chen and its offices in it, and the dining-room on the pr incipal

chen. w hen ther e is a basement, some w ill pr efer to place the

ould be prov ided for in con nection w ith the dining-room and

o the other . to the sa me end, a pantry, sink-room, closets, etc.,

me time it is desir a ble that the one should not open dir ectly

affor d easy ingr ess and er ase from the k itchen, w hile at the

ar each other ; the dining-room, for instance, being so placed as

admit it. for spar e cha mbers, a par lor, etc.; w e do not, how ever, or

neglected, and provision must be ma de, in every plan w hich w ill

sick ness or other need. the duties of hospita lit y should not be

and ventilation, w hich can be used as a sleeping-room in case of

one room on the first floor provided w ith the means of war mth

towar d the north. when it is pr acticable, ther e should be at least

it should open towar d the south, east, or west, if possible, and not

or der to economize space, it is advisable to deviate from this rule.

access to every room on the first floor . in some plans, how ever, in

hall should gener ally be centr al in position, and if possible furnish

comforta ble room i n your house, w hether it be ca lled pa r lor ,

a dv ice, a n d if you h av e a peculi a r ly h a n dsome, agr eea ble, a n d

man y country dwellings, scarcely a dozen times in a year? take our

the only handsome room in the house, to be used, as is the case in

r eally pays to provide an elegant and comfortable par lor, per haps

be w ell for our very utilita r i a n people to consider w hether it

of entertaining occasional visitors mor e elegantly. would it not

family con venience and home-comfort, often made, for the pur pose

ourselves a nd fa milies, a nd w e protest aga inst the sacr ifice of

at least w e should not, build our houses for our guests, but for

gested by that of the rooms below. every house should have a ba

cor r idor, or passage. their distr ibution w ill gener a lly be s

lated, and each should have separ ate means of access to a ha

apartments should be of good size, w ell-lighted, and w ell-ven

on their a r r i va l for the first time in a month or t wo. sleep

feel much mor e at home ther e than in a room which has been open

guests ar r ive, w elcome them also to all its advantages. they w

efits by throw ing it open for daily fa mily occupancy ; and w h

your means w ill per mit, and then use it. avail yourself of its b

saloon, or dr aw ing-room, fur nish and ador n it in the best man

c l a s s » Visual Communication Lab

47 » Fall 2010 term

» Questioning the Suburban Dream project


48

1.

SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

m

.m.x.i.i.

shall be discussing these numbers in the chapter on the bino-

out, the contents fa ll into the t wo compa rtments below. each

thr ee compartments again have a single sheet of metal for their

pascal t

l theorem, and mentioning their relevance to problems of hered-

compartment r eceives approximately the sa me a mount, and at this

floor - it is not possible to r elease the mater ial from one of them

the appa

and of statistics. the appar atus has a pane of glass at the front.

stage w e have the mater ial divided in the r atio 1 to 1. the floor

w ithout at the sa me time r eleasing it from the others. w hen this

desir ed.

ind the glass can be seen var ious metal containers, ar r anged

of the two compartments, wher e the mater ial now is, consists of

floor is r emoved, the mater ial falls into the four compartments

somethi

how n in figur e 13. the floors of these containers ar e r emovable.

a single piece of metal. w hen this piece is pulled out, the mater ial

at the fourth level, and w e have r eached the situation show n in

binomia l

ey can be pulled out from behind the ca binet. in the diagr a m,

falls into the thr ee compartments at the next level. the middle

the illustr ation. it w ill be found that the mater ial is now shar ed

feeling

tially, all floors would be in position, and the top compartment

at the second level, while the end compartments ar e fed from only

tion, as you would expect, the r emaining floor piece is r emoved and

ematics

uld be filled w ith some suitable mater ial, such as sand, small

one. thus at this level the mater ial divides itself in the r atio 1:2:1,

the mater ia l divides itself a mong the five compartments of the

in figur e

Printed for Joel M.rHawkins e dotted lines indicate floors which have alr eady been r emoved. compartment eceives contr ibutions from both the compartments

san fr ancisco, usa out in the proportions 1 :3:3: 1. at the next stage of the demonstr a-

simply w


project

» Title

term

» Title

49

tr iangle. ther e is of course no need to stop at this point;

an equation may be lik ened to a balance. but we k now that to man y

v ided a bov e the bea m of the ba la nce, so th at negati v e w eights

ances. thus t

ar atus could be extended to show mor e stages if this w er e

students wor ds mean very little. w hy talk about a balance? w hy

pulling upwar ds could be ar r anged. the situation show n in figur e

a false step, a

. the a dva ntage of this dev ice was th at it gav e a class

not have a balance ther e in the room?' accor dingly he construct-

14 cor r esponds to the equation 4 — x = x — 2 . on the left, w e see

if the studen

ng to look at and think about dur ing a discussion of the

ed a balance, on which a simple equation could be r epr esented. for

four nuts pulling dow n and a matchbox x counter acting them; on

he might r ea

l theor em, and con veyed a certain fa miliar it y w ith and

w eights w hitworth nuts w er e used. matchboxes w er e mar k ed x,

the search for patter n r ight, a matchbox x pulls dow n, w ith two

stage the ma

for the cor r esponding distr ibutions of mater ia l, w hich

nuts counter acting it. the best way of using the balance is for the i n s t r u c t o r » Name student to w r ite dow n w hat he thinks the next step should be,

thr ee nuts. in

w r iting the numbers might w ell have failed to give. math-

and a teacher would put nuts into these boxes, the sa me number c l a s s » Title in each. even a homemade balance is r emar k ably sensitive, and this

through the hand the algebr aic balance the device show n

sensitivity had to be cut dow n by putting in some extr a fr iction;

and then to alter the w eights on the balance so as to r epr esent

the idea see

e 14 was used r ight at the begin ning of an algebr a course.

otherwise the scale might appear to be out of balance simply because

the new equation. if he has made a mistak e, the scales w ill imme-

question abo

piece. r ather


50

1.

SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

m

.m.x.i.i.

cess in mathematics is very much a matter of having a feeling

a lways be consider ed as a possible a pproach. gr a phs ther efor e

it is all about, is as much an emotional as an intellectual thing.

human h

what is going on, not blindly following the steps of the for mal

should per meate all mathematical wor k; one should for m the habit

it comes only from r epeated use. it is no use, the first time you see

of giving

cess but seeing the wor k in the fr a mewor k of some intelligible

of per petua lly ask ing oneself. would a gr aph help to m a k e this

a gr aph, mak ing an immense effort to dig out its secr et message.

that str

uation. the first thing to do in approaching an y piece of math-

mor e meaningful? the mor e you do this, the mor e helpful gr aphs

this w ill only discour age you. i can not find an ything to put into

becomes

atics is to cast a rou nd for some way of appr eci ating w h at is

become, since you gr adually build up a sort of a lbum of fa miliar

this chapter that str ik es me as at all unusual or profound. but i

t w ins th

olved, some way of m a k ing the question v i v id to yourself so

gr aphs; when you have met the same gr aph in half a dozen situations,

believe that an yone w ho r epeatedly uses the simple ideas in this

gr aphs h

at you w ill be a ble to think a bout it just as you think a bout

it natur a lly con veys mor e to you than it possibly can the first

chapter w ill eventually gain very much in confidence and insight.

w ill be e

miliar things in every day life. gr aphs ar e one way of br inging

time you meet it. it has acquir ed all k inds of extr a associations;

w hat then can w e lear n by look ing at a gr aph? a mong the first

yet w e a

t the meaning of a mathematical situation. they ar e not a magic

it has become fa miliar . it is important to r ealize that this fa mil-

things to look for ar e high points and low points - mountain peaks

a gr aph;


project

Âť One for You, One for Me

term

Âť Spring 2011

51

project 03

ONE FOR YOU, ONE FOR ME A meditation on Coincidence and Convergence. in which, the themes of dr . law r ence w eschler's w r iti ngs on natur a l con v ergences bet w een seemi ngly r a n dom objects or ev ents a r e ex a mi ned w ithi n the context of our da ily li v es a n d cur r ent globa l issues. the book's i ntent is to encour age awa r eness of our sur rou n di ngs a n d help fi n d mea ni ng i n u nex pected places.

her edity (penguin books, 1962). it shows how the lik elihood

m a k ing gr aphs for oneself of things w hich ar e inter esting and

simply speaks of the r ate as being 'fair ly constant betw een thr ee

r ise from nea

g birth to twins is r elated to a woman's age. the first thing

fa miliar, a nd in schools quite you ng childr en ar e incr easingly

and four births in a thousand'. it may be that the appar ent r ise is

accomplished

r ik es us is the peak around 37 years of age. a woman w ho

being given the opportunity to do this. if someone questioned our

not significant; one would have to go back to the or iginal data

gr aph tells u

s pr egnant betw een 35 and 39 is mor e lik ely to give birth to

inter pr etation of the tw in ning gr aph, w e could i suppose, point

to judge this. it w ill be noticed that w e have passed quite natu-

shr ink ing, if

h a n either a you nger or a n older wom a n. i believ e th at

to the figur es; at 37 years ther e ar e 16 chances in 1,000 of a pr eg-

r ally from the topic of peaks and valleys to the question whether

illustr ated b

have become so much a part of our civilization that this

nancy leading to tw ins, as against two somewher e in the teens or

something is rising or falling, and how r apidly. for fr aternal twins

(penguin boo

evident to most r eaders, and does not call for explanation.

around the age of 45. in this sa me figur e, the dotted line shows

the gr aph climbs the hill between the ages of 15 and 37 and descends

the first fiv

ar e certainly not bor n w ith the ability to inter pr et such

the chance of producing identical tw ins. this line does not have

after 37. the descent is steeper than the climb. this means that the

the gr aph be

; ther e must be a time w hen one first sees the meaning of

a pea k. the chance appears to r ise stea dily, though very slow ly,

lik elihood of t w ins decr eases mor e r apidly after 37 th a n it in-

faster. the m


52

1.

SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

m

.m.x.i.i.

s

i

1

t

a

Printed for Joel M. Hawkins

san fr ancisco, usa

w

t

b

t


project

Âť One for You, One for Me

term

Âť Spring 2011

53

steep, and finally the gr aph becomes flat ; the plant has r eached

after the age of 10. it should be bor ne in mind, as cattell himself

this cor r esponds to the pupil who does not car e at ail whether he

othe

its matur e height; grow th in height has ceased. figur es 17, 18, and

points out, th at these curves a r e based on aver ages. they show

succeeds or fails. a pupil w ith moder ate anxiety does better; he is

gr ap

19 ar e tak en from cattell's the scientific analysis of personality.

w hat happens in most cases as the individual r eceives the nor mal

wor r ied by the thought that he may not do w ell, so he wor ks and

wobb

they purport to show how a person's intelligence, social confidence,

a mount of batter ing from life. the search for patter n they need

pays attention. but if anxiety passes a certain stage, achievement

hum a

and enthusiasm ar e lik ely to change in the course of a lifetime. it

not apply to those w ho ar e particular ly shelter ed, particular ly

begins to fall again; the pupil does badly because he is wor rying

signi

w ill be seen that intelligence seems to r each the top of the moun-

successful, or particular ly tough. those w hom the gods love may

too much. very high anxiety can produce a k ind of par alysis and

score

tain around 25 years of age, and to go steadily dow nhill until one

still be young at 70. cattell also gives a gr aph indicating the kind

the pupil achieves almost nothing. figur e 21 is tak en from stabil-

at 6 y

becomes old enough to be a pr ime minister. social confidence tends

of relationship that may be expected between the amount of anxiety

ity and change in human char acter istics (wiley, 1964) by b. s. bloom,

to 93

to r ise steadily; as you grow older you become less shy, mor e thick-

a pupil feels and how w ell he does at school. this gr aph is show n

of the u niversit y of chicago. the gr aphs show the i.q. scor es of

(d), fo


54

1.

SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

Printed for Joel M. Hawkins

m

.m.x.i.i.

san fr ancisco, usa


project

» One for You, One for Me

c l a s s » Experimental Type

term

» Spring 2011

i n s t r u c t o r » Stan Zienka

55


56

1.

SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

Printed for Joel M. Hawkins

m

.m.x.i.i.

san fr ancisco, usa


project

» Title

term

» Title

57


58

1.

SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

Printed for Joel M. Hawkins

m

.m.x.i.i.

san fr ancisco, usa


project

» One for You, One for Me

c l a s s » Experimental Type

term

» Spring 2011

i n s t r u c t o r » Stan Zienka

59


60

1.

SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

Printed for Joel M. Hawkins

m

.m.x.i.i.

san fr ancisco, usa


project

» One for You, One for Me

c l a s s » Experimental Type

term

» Spring 2011

i n s t r u c t o r » Stan Zienka

61


62

1.

SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

m

.m.x.i.i.

iness. an i.q. test may deter mine simply how far a child is awar e

w ith adopted childr en. the question in vestigated is this; suppose

ficient is a number th at tells you how closely t wo thi ngs a r e

number

the things th at a r e r ecognized by the child of a prosperous

ther e is a group of adopted childr en and you want to pr edict which

connected. the two things that ar e in volved her e ar e the achieve-

per for m

mily in a big city. they may not test at all a child's gr asp of negro

of them w ill be the clever est. w hich w ill it be mor e helpful to

ments of the childr en on the i.q. test and the achievements of their

ther e ha

tur e or his exper ience of the rur al south. on the other hand

k now. the i.q.s of the childr en's actua l mothers, or the educa-

r eal mothers. a cor r elation of +10 would mean that the child with

ligence

s possible that philadelphia, w hile being far from providing an

tiona l level of the a dopting mothers, the women w ho ar e actu-

the highest scor e h a d the mother w ith the highest scor e, the

tion of w

cational par adise, may awaken mental powers that would remain

ally looking after them? the only difficulty in understanding this

child w ith the second highest scor e h a d the mother w ith the

and, i wo

ever dor mant in the south. the truth may well contain elements

gr a ph is due to the r ather a bstr act natur e of the qua ntit y it

second highest scor e, and so on, r ight dow n to the child w ith the

be very u

both these contentions. figur e 22 is tak en from carter's book,

portr ays. it is not a gr aph show ing how the childr en's i.q. scor es

low est scor e h av ing the mother w ith the low est scor e. such a

situatio

man her edity, that has alr eady been quoted. it also deals w ith

incr eased. it is a gr aph of a cor r elation coefficient, something

r esult is extr emely unlik ely, for it would mean that the father's

views. th


project

Âť One for You, One for Me

term

Âť Spring 2011

63

w e should expect to find for the r elation of childr en's

placed tended to r esemble the or der in which their actual mothers

child is tr eated. this how ever would completely ignor e a factor

points increa

ances to mothers' is 0-5, and in fact in nor mal homes (wher e

placed. it will be seen from the figur e that when the childr en wer e

that does not appear in the gr aph. the aver age i.q. scor e of the

achievement

as been no adoption) the cor r elation betw een the intel-

2 years old, the cor r elation was 0; that is, at this stage it would

mothers was 86; the aver age scor e of the childr en was 106. so our

the jour nal

of one par ent and that of a child is around 0-5. a cor r ela-

be impossible to tell w hich childr en h a d the mor e intelligent

conclusion that the above-aver age mother was lik ely to produce

a r at's br ain c

would mean there was no connection. a correlation between

mothers. how ever the cor r elation grows stea dily as the yea rs

an above-aver age child still stands, but the two aver ages in ques-

of grow th. a

ould indicate an opposite con nexion. such a number would

pass. by the time the childr en ar e 14, the cor r elation has r eached

tion ar e separ ated by 20 points. the effect of placing the childr en

sudden chan

unlik ely in an inher ited quality; it might be found in some

0-4, very near ly the figur e for nor mal homes. the cor r elation with

in good homes h a d not been to w ipe out their inher ited differ-

the bend, the

on w her e childr en tended to r eact against their par ents'

the educational level of the adopting mothers is negligible. one

ences, but it did r esult in lifting the per for mance of the group as

w eight as qu

he gr aph then in figur e 22 does not show how the childr en's

might be tempted to conclude that intelligence goes its ow n way,

a whole. (owing to a technical statistical effect, know n as r egr es-

flat; the bod


66

1.

SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

Printed for Joel M. Hawkins

m

.m.x.i.i.

san fr ancisco, usa


in sh av ing themselves, a nd m a n y w ho, a fter a few u nsuccessful

thus in point of time, money and health, the man who shaves himself

given, will, with some little pr actice, soon be able to shave himself

bott

attempts, give it up in despair and go to the bar ber shop. we believe

is a decided gainer . ther e ar e few things in life that ar e r ea lly

easily and even better than the bar ber can do it for him. first-class

lotio

most of these would much pr efer to shave themselves if only they

tools ar e necessary at the very outset. no matter how sk illfully » ior Titletools, they w ill in var iably produce poor one may handleterm infer

artic

could do as w ell as a bar ber . the a dvantages, indeed, seem to be

difficult to per for m w hen one thoroughly k nows how to do them. project » Title shaving is no exception. the art of shaving can be easily acquir ed

w holly w ith the m a n w ho shaves himself. in the first place the

if one only has the w ill, and the necessary pr actical infor mation.

r esults. probably as man y failur es have r esulted from the use of

penc

shaving is done in the pr ivacy if his ow n room. he has his ow n r azor,

this book, w hich, as far as w e ar e awar e, is the only one tr eating

poor r azors, strops, or soap as from the lack of k now ledge how to

will

cup, soap, brush and tow els, w hich can be k ept scrupulously clean

the subject at all completely, endeavors to supply such infor mation

use them. in or der that the best possible r esults may be attained,

of th

and sanitary. thus avoiding a constant danger of infection. ther e

; as w ell for the improvement of men accustomed to shave them-

good tools and sk ill in using them should go hand in hand. the

of co

is no long wait for the call of "next.'' after the first cost of the

selves, as for the instruction of begin ners. w e believe that a n y

shaving outfit should consist of one or two good r azors, a first-

in sel

c l a s s » Title

67

i n s t r u c t o r » Name

good


68

1.

SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

m

.m.x.i.i.

project 04

BOYS TO MENNEN Or, an examination of Branding and Masculinity. in which, the differences between strength and empathy are deeply considered and re-examined. this r ebr a n di ng of men nen focuses on the importa nce of lea di ng by ex a mple a n d how v ita l h av i ng some sort of mentor is to m aturi ng you ng men w ho a r e often a fr a id to ask questions or feel m a rgi na lized by a n older a n d gruffer gener ation of men.

Printed for Joel M. Hawkins

san fr ancisco, usa


not the cheapest, but the best. a good r azor if r ightly used, w ill

purchaser should give attention. by w hat means though, can he

pr actically infallible. it w ill be r eadily admitted that the r eal

even

last for years, and w ill be a source of continua l pleasur e w hen

judge of the temper of a r azor w ithout using it ? the unassisted

excellence of a r azor is in dir ect proportion to the fir mness and

of th

used, wher eas a poor r azor will do infer ior wor k, ir r itate the skin

eye is not sufficient. its pow er extends no further th a n to the

unbrok en r egular it y of its edge. w hen a r azor is too br ittle, in

off q

and mak e the face sor e, and be a continual source of trouble and

discovery of defects the most str ik ing and injur ious. the ir r egu-

consequence of having been either to much heated in the process

that

an noyance. if you have such a r azor, the sooner you throw it aside

lar ities in a r azor's edge, which ar ise from improper temper ing and

of har dening, or not sufficiently cooled in that of temper ing, it

is an

and substitute a good one, the better . the pr incipa l point to be

lack of sk ill in wor k ing, a r e usua lly so minute, th at they m ay

ca n not possibly ta k e a good cutting edge, no m atter how much

edge

consider ed i n selecti ng a r azor is the qua lit y of the steel. by

remain undistinguished until the r azor is used. they will neverthe-

sk ill may be employed in honing and stropping it. such defects ar e

as th

"quality" is meant its temper or degr ee of solidity, and its conse-

less very sensibly add to the fr iction the r azor produces on the

quick ly detected by the use of a microscope in the h a nds of a n

r azo

quent capability of r eceiving, even after a ser ies of years, a fir m

sk in and particular ly if it happens to be thin and tender . ther e

exper ienced and attentive observer . the other method of testing

ment

c l a s s Âť Nature of Identity

i n s t r u c t o r Âť Hunter Wimmer


70

1.

SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

Printed for Joel M. Hawkins

m

.m.x.i.i.

san fr ancisco, usa


project

» Boys to Mennen

c l a s s » Nature of Identity

term

» Fall 2011

i n s t r u c t o r » Hunter Wimmer

71


72

1.

SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

Printed for Joel M. Hawkins

m

.m.x.i.i.

san fr ancisco, usa


project

» Boys to Mennen

c l a s s » Nature of Identity

term

» Fall 2011

i n s t r u c t o r » Hunter Wimmer

73


74

1.

SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

Printed for Joel M. Hawkins

m

.m.x.i.i.

san fr ancisco, usa


project

» Boys to Mennen

c l a s s » Nature of Identity

term

» Fall 2011

i n s t r u c t o r » Hunter Wimmer

75


76

1.

SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

Printed for Joel M. Hawkins

m

.m.x.i.i.

san fr ancisco, usa


r emely thin, back to a line some distance from the edge. w hen

ncave. in a very deeply hollow ground r azor, the blade is ground

not so good for sh av i ng most bea r ds as the thr ee-qua rter s

r impr ession is that this is a mistake; that the full concave blade

uld natur ally conclude that the full concave blade is the best.

e edge the shar per the instrument, most purchasers of a r azor

de is of course the thinnest. in view of the fact that the thinner

either half, thr ee-quarters, or full concave. the full concave

ier to k eep shar p. almost an y desir ed mak e of r azor may be had

of the r azor ought to be slightly rounded as show n in the illustr a-

face mor e closely, and in gener al is managed mor e easily. the point

so r eadily as the w ide blade, yet it follows the contours of the

4-8 is the best for most pur poses, as it does not spr ing on the face

w ide a blade. a compar atively nar row one, in the size k now n as the

r eceive attention. as a rule w e believe the begin ner selects too

the bla de. the w idth of the bla de is another point that should

lik ely to bend and spr ing, and a cut w ill be the r esult. w idth of

bear d, unless the blade is held very flat upon the face, it is quite

entir ely on the car e given it. never put it away until it has first

neglect on the part of the user . the life of a r azor w ill depend

your r azor . man y a fine r azor has been spoiled by car elessness and

heated and that would quick ly spoil its temper . tak e good car e of

a nd spoil it. use water fr eely otherw ise the bla de w ill become

this pur pose, for if you do you ar e quite likely to scr atch the hone

of the hone. you should not use the top sur face of the hone for

have a r azor w ith a shar p point, you can round it off, on the edge

probably occasioned mor e cuts than almost an y other cause. if you

causing the metal to soften and crumble at that point, w ill so

other part of the blade. a tin y rust spot on this delicate line

cially upon the edge, w hich seems to rust mor e quick ly than a

condition w hen you next use it. rusting must be pr evented, es

the r azor in its case w ith the expectation of finding it in go

not r emoved by the cloth have evapor ated. then you may r epl

to the air for a few moments until the little particles of moistu

should be dr aw n across the strop a few times, or else left expo

pur pose. even this w ill not r emove all the moistur e, so the bl

i n s t r u c t o r » Hunter Wimmer

c l a s s » Nature of Identity

» Fall 2011 term

» Boys to Mennen project


78

1.

SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

Printed for Joel M. Hawkins

m

.m.x.i.i.

san fr ancisco, usa


project

» Boys to Mennen

c l a s s » Nature of Identity

term

» Fall 2011

i n s t r u c t o r » Hunter Wimmer

79


80

1.

SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

m

.m.x.i.i.

ound r azor is thin ner and ther efor e cuts better, and is much

such an edge, almost as thin as paper, comes in contact w ith a stiff

tion. w hile this is seemingly a small matter, yet a shar p point has

been w ip

ier to k eep shar p. almost an y desir ed mak e of r azor may be had

bear d, unless the blade is held very flat upon the face, it is quite

probably occasioned mor e cuts than almost an y other cause. if you

pur pose.

either half, thr ee-quarters, or full concave. the full concave

lik ely to bend and spr ing, and a cut w ill be the r esult. w idth of

have a r azor w ith a shar p point, you can round it off, on the edge

should b

de is of course the thinnest. in view of the fact that the thinner

the bla de. the w idth of the bla de is another point that should

of the hone. you should not use the top sur face of the hone for

to the ai

e edge the shar per the instrument, most purchasers of a r azor

r eceive attention. as a rule w e believe the begin ner selects too

this pur pose, for if you do you ar e quite likely to scr atch the hone

not r em

uld natur ally conclude that the full concave blade is the best.

w ide a blade. a compar atively nar row one, in the size k now n as the

a nd spoil it. use water fr eely otherw ise the bla de w ill become

the r azo

r impr ession is that this is a mistake; that the full concave blade

4-8 is the best for most pur poses, as it does not spr ing on the face

heated and that would quick ly spoil its temper . tak e good car e of

conditio

not so good for sh av i ng most bea r ds as the thr ee-qua rter s

so r eadily as the w ide blade, yet it follows the contours of the

your r azor . man y a fine r azor has been spoiled by car elessness and

cially u

ncave. in a very deeply hollow ground r azor, the blade is ground

face mor e closely, and in gener al is managed mor e easily. the point

neglect on the part of the user . the life of a r azor w ill depend

other pa


project

Âť Boys to Mennen

term

Âť Fall 2011

81

ped thoroughly dry, using a piece of cha mois sk in for this

end the usefulness of the r azor, unless the edge is ground back

theirs ar e super ior to all others and that they have at last pro-

r azors ar e di

. even this w ill not r emove all the moistur e, so the blade

past the rust spot. in such a case ther e is always the liability of

duced a r azor that is destined to r evolutionize shaving. if a man

rust; and ow

be dr aw n across the strop a few times, or else left exposed

not getting a good edge. in w iping the lather off the blade never

uses one he is less lik ely to cut himself, but this is a ll that can

if not quite

ir for a few moments until the little particles of moistur e

use a glazed or coarse paper. tissue paper is the best. man y over look

r easonably be said in their favor . of course, if it w er e impossible

mak e the cor

oved by the cloth have evapor ated. then you may r eplace

this point and by dr aw ing the blade str aight across a glazed or

to shave w ith the or dinary r azor w ithout cutting one's self, then

safety r azor

or in its case w ith the expectation of finding it in good

har d finished paper, tur n the edge, and then wonder why the r azor

the safety r azor would become a necessity. the truth is, how ever,

few years an

on w hen you next use it. rusting must be pr evented, espe-

has lost its keenness. dr aw the blade over the paper obliquely, away

that an yone w ho has a good k een smooth-cutting r azor, lathers

now in use. t

upon the edge, w hich seems to rust mor e quick ly than an y

from the edge, in the same dir ection as when stropping it. of r ecent

the face thoroughly, and w ill lear n if he does not alr eady k now,

microscope, p

art of the blade. a tin y rust spot on this delicate line, by

y ea rs a gr eat number of sa fet y r azors h av e been i n v ented a nd

how to handle the r azor proper ly, w ill run almost no danger. such

by the unaide


82

1.

SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

Printed for Joel M. Hawkins

m

.m.x.i.i.

san fr ancisco, usa


project

» Boys to Mennen

c l a s s » Nature of Identity

term

» Fall 2011

i n s t r u c t o r » Hunter Wimmer

83


84

1.

SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

Printed for Joel M. Hawkins

m

.m.x.i.i.

san fr ancisco, usa


project

» Boys to Mennen

c l a s s » Nature of Identity

term

» Fall 2011

i n s t r u c t o r » Hunter Wimmer

85


Printed for Joel M. Hawkins lik ely to bend and spr ing, and a cut w ill be the r esult. w idth of the bla de. the w idth of the bla de is another point that should r eceive attention. as a rule w e believe the begin ner selects too w ide a blade. a compar atively nar row one, in the size k now n as the 4-8 is the best for most pur poses, as it does not spr ing on the face so r eadily as the w ide blade, yet it follows the contours of the face mor e closely, and in gener al is managed mor e easily. the point of the r azor ought to be slightly rounded as show n in the illustr a-

ither half, thr ee-quarters, or full concave. the full concave

e is of course the thinnest. in view of the fact that the thinner

edge the shar per the instrument, most purchasers of a r azor

ld natur ally conclude that the full concave blade is the best.

impr ession is that this is a mistake; that the full concave blade

ot so good for sh av i ng most bea r ds as the thr ee-qua rter s

cave. in a very deeply hollow ground r azor, the blade is ground

r emely thin, back to a line some distance from the edge. w hen

san fr ancisco, usa entir ely on the car e given it. never put it away until it has first

neglect on the part of the user . the life of a r azor w ill depend

your r azor . man y a fine r azor has been spoiled by car elessness and

heated and that would quick ly spoil its temper . tak e good car e of

a nd spoil it. use water fr eely otherw ise the bla de w ill become

this pur pose, for if you do you ar e quite likely to scr atch the hone

of the hone. you should not use the top sur face of the hone for

have a r azor w ith a shar p point, you can round it off, on the edge

probably occasioned mor e cuts than almost an y other cause. if you

tion. w hile this is seemingly a small matter, yet a shar p point has

causing the metal to soften and crumble at that point, w ill s

other part of the blade. a tin y rust spot on this delicate lin

cially upon the edge, w hich seems to rust mor e quick ly than

condition w hen you next use it. rusting must be pr evented, e

the r azor in its case w ith the expectation of finding it in g

not r emoved by the cloth have evapor ated. then you may r epl

to the air for a few moments until the little particles of moist

should be dr aw n across the strop a few times, or else left exp

pur pose. even this w ill not r emove all the moistur e, so the bl

been w iped thoroughly dry, using a piece of cha mois sk in for

.m.x.i.i.

bear d, unless the blade is held very flat upon the face, it is quite

m

such an edge, almost as thin as paper, comes in contact w ith a stiff

SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

er to k eep shar p. almost an y desir ed mak e of r azor may be had

1.

und r azor is thin ner and ther efor e cuts better, and is much

86


project

» Boys to Mennen

c l a s s » Nature of Identity

term

» Fall 2011

i n s t r u c t o r » Hunter Wimmer

87


88

1.

SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

Printed for Joel M. Hawkins

m

.m.x.i.i.

san fr ancisco, usa


project

» Boys to Mennen

c l a s s » Nature of Identity

term

» Fall 2011

i n s t r u c t o r » Hunter Wimmer

89


90

1.

SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

Printed for Joel M. Hawkins

m

.m.x.i.i.

san fr ancisco, usa


project

» Boys to Mennen

c l a s s » Nature of Identity

term

» Fall 2011

i n s t r u c t o r » Hunter Wimmer

91


92

1.

SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

Printed for Joel M. Hawkins

m

.m.x.i.i.

san fr ancisco, usa


i n s t r u c t o r » Name

m pr evailing w inds and stor ms enjoyment of particular views

compass, the pr incipa l objects to be k ept in v iew ar e: shelter

d the disposition of its var ious rooms in r efer ence to the points

d stor ms. aspect: w ith r egar d to the aspect of a dwelling-house,

lter another and mor e important one from pr evailing w inds

r e var ied aspects. one part can also often be so projected as to

ation to the high-pitched roof, gr eater pictur esqueness, and

nged for m, in its var ious modifications, ar e a mor e per fect ad-

o often ar e, a mer e char acter less box. on the advantages of the

n not easily be made pictur esque, but need not be, as such houses

ments of a dw elling. the con venience of the house as a whole must

have an influence in deciding the disposition of the var ious apart-

besides those mentioned in the pr eceding section should of course

of its coolness. ar r angement of booms: but other consider ations

in hot climates, a northern exposure is sometimes chosen on account

be avoided, our most disagreeable stor ms coming from that quarter.

middle states gener ally, a northeaster n aspect is, if possible, to

sur e is most desir able for the pr incipal rooms. in the norther n and

in cold and temper ate climates a souther n or southwester n expo-

affor ded by the situation; exposur e to or protection from the sun.

i n the pla ns pr esented i n other ch a pter s. h av i ng utilit y con-

together w ith those of other persons, w ill be found elabor ated

offer a few hints for gener al application. our ideas on this point,

families r equir ing pr ecisely the same accommodations. we can only

featur es, mode of construction, etc., will vary accor dingly, no two

the a r r a ngement of rooms, in common w ith the a rchitectur a l

pur pose, in its details, being a lmost infinitely var ied, of course

the entir e structur e to the pur pose for w hich it is er ected. this

the end to be secur ed is the most per fect adaptation possible of

not be sacr ificed to promote the comfort of a single apartment.

rooms, too, most closely r elated in their uses should be broug

consider ations w ill per mit, extended w ings and long passages. t

w e should study compactness, avoiding, so far as other importa

and con venience in per for ming the domestic labors of a househo

employ as few of them is possible. to promote the saving of lab

i n differ ent ones, r ather it desir a ble for ev en the w ea lth y

and the car es and vex ations attending the employment of bad

r ich as well as of the poor. the difficulty of getting good servan

ar r angement of rooms. this is necessary in the habitations of t

stantly in view, labor-saving must be made a prominent idea in o

c l a s s » Title

93 » Title term

» Title project


94

1.

SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

Printed for Joel M. Hawkins

m

.m.x.i.i.

san fr ancisco, usa


i n s t r u c t o r » Arvi Raquel-Santos

e can be obtained for the sa me a mount of money by for egoing

an advantage r ather than otherw ise ; and often a much better

ded to the tr i-daily walk of a man of sedentary employments may

w ever, have too much w eight. an additional quarter of a mile

er mining the choice of a lot. this circumsta nce should not,

stea mboat la nding, has natur a lly consider a ble influence in

es near ness to one's place of business, or to the r ailway station

ok ing, as w ell as for washing. con venience of access: in m a n y

of access. suitableness of ground: the cost of building, digging

off from all intercourse w ith the wor ld, his house should be easy

pr efer able; but at the sa me time, unless one desir es to cut himself

it to avoid the noise and dust, and secur e pr ivacy and quiet, is far

leisur e should be close to the highway. a sufficient distance from

seem to suppose, th at a fa r m-house or the r esidence of a m a n of

a quiet lane or an out-of-the-way nook. it is not necessary, as man y

seek the fr equent«d str eet or highway, while another will choose

habits of the fa mily w ill have a controlling influence. one w ill

state of fertility, although or iginally w hat is called poor . alti-

soil in this country that may not easily be brought to the desir ed

in the vicinit y of the house is very desir able, but w e find little

of tr ees may be consider ed under the same head. a good gar den plot

the sur rounding soil to the pur pose of cultur e and the grow th

have its due w eight in deter mining ones choice. the adaptation of

w hich r ea lly war r ant the outlay; but the circumstance should

build the house. this is w ell enough w hen advantages ar e secur ed

sometimes costs mor e to pr epar e the grounds for building than to

ground, w hich must, ther efor e, always enter into the account. it

has a valley w ith a r iver in front and higher hills r ising one ab

stands forwar d from a lengthened r idge, and w her e the lat

of hilly sur face, the most desir able site is wher e a prominent kn

unk now n even on the hill-top. loudon says, that of all var iet

ar e equally bleak, the w ind sw eeping through them w ith a pow

tr ees, bleak and uncomfortable in w inter . some valleys, how ev

shelter ed on the north and w est by higher grounds or by belts

— but is gener ally compar atively difficult of access, and unl

prospect, salubr ity and dry ness of air, facilities for dr ainage, e

tude: a somew h at elevated site h as m a n y a dva ntages, beaut y

c l a s s » Type Systems

cellars and w ells, etc., is gr eatly influenced by the natur e of the

this is the secon d book i n a ser ies ex a mi ni ng the immedi ate r isks to the hea lth a n d w ell-bei ng of the a mer ica n subur ba n population. it ex a mi nes va r ious theor ies as to w h y qua lit y of life is decli ni ng so quick ly, i ncludi ng pea k oil theory a n d u nsusta i na ble buildi ng pr actices.

iness moti ves m ay be left out of the accou nt, the tastes and

WHAT IF NOTHING CHANGES? The Dark Future of the American Suburbs

e slight a dva ntages of a mor e centr a l loca lit y. w her e mer e

project 05

95 » Fall 2010 term

» What If Nothing Changes? project


96

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SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

Printed for Joel M. Hawkins

m

.m.x.i.i.

san fr ancisco, usa


project

» What If Nothing Changes?

c l a s s » Type Systems

term

» Fall 2010

i n s t r u c t o r » Arvi Raquel-Santos

97


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SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

Printed for Joel M. Hawkins

m

.m.x.i.i.

san fr ancisco, usa


project

» What If Nothing Changes?

c l a s s » Type Systems

term

» Fall 2010

i n s t r u c t o r » Arvi Raquel-Santos

99


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SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

Printed for Joel M. Hawkins

m

.m.x.i.i.

san fr ancisco, usa


project

» What If Nothing Changes?

c l a s s » Type Systems

term

» Fall 2010

i n s t r u c t o r » Arvi Raquel-Santos

101


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SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

Printed for Joel M. Hawkins

m

.m.x.i.i.

san fr ancisco, usa


project

» What If Nothing Changes?

c l a s s » Type Systems

term

» Fall 2010

i n s t r u c t o r » Arvi Raquel-Santos

103


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SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

Printed for Joel M. Hawkins

m

.m.x.i.i.

san fr ancisco, usa


project

» What If Nothing Changes?

c l a s s » Type Systems

term

» Fall 2010

i n s t r u c t o r » Arvi Raquel-Santos

105


106

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SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

Printed for Joel M. Hawkins

m

.m.x.i.i.

san fr ancisco, usa


project

Âť What If Nothing Changes?

term

Âť Fall 2010

107

another behind. one of the worst sites is the steep unifor m side of

all climates we should, if possible, secure a barrier either of higher

should be so placed, if pr acticable, as to pr esent an agr eeable ap-

if pos

a hill, closely sur rounded by other hills equally high and steep.

grounds or thick belts of tr ees (evergr eens ar e best) on the side

pear ance, being neither too closely scr eened nor too much exposed.

of tr

the style of building you propose to er ect (if first decided upon)

of the house look ing in the dir ection from w hich violent stor ms

tr ees, etc.: a grove or belt of w ell-grow n for est tr ees, to serve as

the d

must be considered with reference to this point. a plain, low cottage

most fr equently come. the north side of a high hill or r idge, wher e

a shelter and a basis for future oper ations in planting, adds greatly

the n

very proper ly nestles in some quiet nook at the base of a hill or

the dir ect r ays of the sun would be excluded for a large portion

to the va lue of a site ; indeed, so important do w e consider this

sun w

r idge, while the mor e pr etending or namental villa may with equal

of the time, is entir ely u nfit for a building site, su nlight being

point, that we should make it an essential one in our ow n case. but

unfit

propr iety crow n its summit. aspect: the choice of an aspect should

every where essential to health and comfort. in a northern climate,

such situations a r e not a lways r ea dily fou nd, a nd some would,

heal

be deter mined mainly by local and climatic consider ations ; a fr ee

a souther n or southeaster n exposur e w ith shelter ing hills on the

doubtless, pr efer to plant their ow n tr ees, even w hen they can

easte

play for the cooling br eeze being essenti a l in one place, a nd a

north is gener ally pr efer r ed. in r efer ence to the main points from

not hope to live long enough to see them in their fully developed

pr efe


108

1.

SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

Printed for Joel M. Hawkins

m

.m.x.i.i.

san fr ancisco, usa


project

» What If Nothing Changes?

c l a s s » Type Systems

term

» Fall 2010

i n s t r u c t o r » Arvi Raquel-Santos

109


Printed for Joel M. Hawkins befor e columbus, not only demonstr ated that the earth is a globe but measur ed its circumfer ence w ith a pr ecision that is astounding. this r emar k able man a lso estimated the size of the sun and the moon and wor k ed out their approximate distances from us. on the other side of the earth, the maor is of new zealand knew about the rings of saturn and jupiter's moons, and passed this infor mation dow n through the centur ies as part of their legends. yet ther e is no mention of an ything lik e a telescope in their history. how they

h of the basic infor mation about the heavens had been gathered

catalogued long before the first telescope made its appear ance.

has always studied the stars and speculated about their origin

natur e, and dur ing the sw eep of the centur ies he has piled up

ss of k now ledge w ithout benefit of optical aid for his observ-

eye. the planets and their appar ent motions, the wander ers of

e ca lled comets, the groups a nd patter ns of the sta rs, the

n, the earth itself in r elation to its neighbors in space, all ar e

san fr ancisco, usa him they had found a way to br ing a distant church steeple so close

some of his less valuable spectacle lenses, ca me rushing in to tell

year 1608, jan's childr en, w ho ha d appar ently been play ing w ith

mak er w ho lived in middelburg, holland. at some time dur ing the

the cor r ect spelling of his na me. jan lippershey was a spectacle

is k now n of its in ventor that histor ians ar e not even certain of

the telescope ca me into being through a happy accident. so little

an ything as faint as satur n's r ings. lik e man y gr eat in ventions,

gists tell us it is physically impossible for the human eye to discer n

k new this is one of the unsolved myster ies of antiquity, for biolo-

telescopes w ith the production of a pair of wor k able binocul

so expert in the art that he crow ned his efforts at mak ing si

of making various combinations of the new device. he finally bec

and, from that day on, spectacles w er e ignor ed in the fascina

steeple. to his cr edit, he r ealized the importance of w hat he

foot or t wo apart in such a way th at they w er e tr a ined on

in vestigate. he found that they had lined up two of his lens

bother ed, and, again lik e man y fathers, he follow ed them ou

ja n proba bly told them somew h at testily he didn't wa nt t

that they could see birds nesting under the spire. like many fath

.m.x.i.i.

infor mation was uncannily accur ate. er atosthenes, born 1700 years

m

as much a part of r ecor ded history as m a n himself. some of this

SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

ntion of the telescope, and to a large measur e this is true. but

1.

hink of the progr ess of moder n astronomy as being due to the

110


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» Title

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111


Printed for Joel M. Hawkins was unable to believe that w hat he saw was r eally true, and was even mor e astounded at the appear ance of the planets her e was venus w ith a chunk bitten from her side, jupiter sur rounded b\ f our little disks w hich consta ntly ch a nged their position, a nd satur n look ing sometimes lik e thr ee planets and sometimes lik e a double-handled sugar bow l (this gives an idea of the qua lit y of ga lileo's telescopes; a n y a m ateur today ca n build better ones). these heavenly wonders caught the imagination of the wor ld; in

at new invention spread across europe. the incompar able galileo

ileo, in far-off ita ly, listened to descr iptions of lippershey's

e and proceeded to mak e one for himself. in common w ith the

teur telescope m a k ers of today he wasn't satisfied w ith his

t attempt. he m a de larger a nd longer tubes, using lenses of

er ent char acter istics and pow ers until he finally achieved a

scope w hich had a magnification of about 30. ga lileo's tele-

san fr ancisco, usa

patent laws w er e still in the far-distant futur e), wor d of the

this poster ex plor es the pow er of econom y i n design by v i v idly ex pr essi ng a n idea usi ng a one-wor d concept. the context of this concept is th at u nseen factors gov er n our ev ery moment a n d w e populate those empt y fr a mewor ks w ith our ex per iences a n d a pply our ow n persona l mea ni ng to them, though the system r em a i ns neutr a l a n d consta nt. w ith this tubeless device he discover ed the fine black line that

eyepiece attached to the end of the long pole that guided the lens.

telescope" w hich consisted of a lens hu ng from a tow er a nd a n

dominique cassini developed for the observatory in par is an "air

the sev enteenth century beca me the golden age of astronom y.

images, but the discover ies made w ith them w er e tr emendous and

ungainly contr aptions which produced dancing, br ightly color ed

their in ventor would not have r ecognized them. they w er e huge,

gr eater m agnification. ja n lippershey's m agic tubes gr ew u ntil

project 06

astronomical wor kshop other men wer e searching for better

sun. every wher e in europe men wer e watching the skies, and in e

and he was the first to watch mercury pass across the face of

for his observatory in danzig. his maps of the moon ar e still fam

wealthy br ewer tur ned astronomer, built a telescope 130 feet l

m a rs a nd the equator i a l bulge on jupiter . joh a n nes hev eli

eyepiece for his telescope and w ith it watched the polar cap

of jupiter . the dutchm a n chr isti a n hu ygens m a de a t wo-le

division — as well as four of satur n's moons and the dar k belt

divides the r ings of satur n — and w hich is still called cassi

PARAMETER Finding one among billions.

or der to observe them, men m a de telescopes longer a nd of ever

.m.x.i.i.

ever suspected w er e ther e. w hen hr pointed them at the moon he

m

scopes r evealed featur es in the heavenly bodies which nobody had

SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

ttempted to conceal his method of mak ing them (in those days

1.

ershey's "magic tubes" became locally famous; and, even though

112


project

» Parameter

c l a s s » Experimental Type

term

» Spring 2011

i n s t r u c t o r » Stan Zienka

113


114

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SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

m

.m.x.i.i.

make telescopes. the giant devices used for observing fine detail

to use. the man was not far away. isa ac new ton, only tw enty-one

newton ground his telescope mir rors and diagonals from a special

the mir r

the moon and planets could be affor ded only by observator ies

years of age, had alr eady decided that the r efr acting telescope

meta l a lloy, still ca lled speculum meta l. the im age for med was

instrume

d wealthy men. the wor ld was still looking for a telescope which

had too man y in nate defects to mak e it useful and look ed around

shar p and clear but not very br ight since speculum metal is not as

seems no

ht have universal use, for the small galilean telescopes w er e

for some other means of producing a r eally shar p image in a tele-

r eflective as moder n metal coatings. in or der to gather mor e light

dwar fs t

from per fect. ( john dollond, the english optician w ho finally

scopic device. he found it in a paper published by the astronomer

and produce a br ighter im age, men began to incr ease the size of

tor was g

r k ed out the pr inciple of the achromatic [color-fr ee] lens, in

nicolas zucchi, in w hich the idea of the r eflecting telescope was

the r eflector, lik e that of the r efr actor befor e it. it culminated

being ev

ich two pieces of glass of differ ent indices of r efr action ar e

descr ibed. the r esult of new ton's wor k was the prototype of the

in such monstrous devices as the huge r eflector of w illia m her-

scottish

d, was not to ar r ive on the scene until 1785, and this was still

telescope w e have discussed ear lier, and such instruments still

schel, 4 feet in di a meter a nd 4 0 feet long, a nd the ev en la rger

system w

the 160 0's). as is so often the case in scientific discovery, the

bear his na me, the new tonian r eflector . since the art of coating

telescope on telescopes in gener al. this one was so big that a man

instead


project

Âť Parameter

term

Âť Spring 2011

115

ror was 6 feet in dia meter . the quest for light-gather ing

small concave secondary mir ror in front of the pr imary mir ror in

successful idea was that of g. cassegr ain, a fr ench sculptor, w ho

tion but also

ents still goes on, although the ultimate in optical devices

such a way that the r eflected r ays w er e bounced back through a

in 1672 designed a r eflector similar to gr egory's except that the

is compact, ea

ow to have been r eached in the palomar telescope, w hich

hole in the pr imary. the difficulty was that special curves had to

secondary mir ror was grou nd to a con vex hyper boloida l figur e

ar e sever al v

the gr eatest ones of the past. while the newtonian r eflec-

be ground into each one, a par aboloid in the pr imary mir ror and

and the main, or pr imary, was to be a par aboloid. these curves wer e

each easier t

grow ing to its final stages, other types of telescopes wer e

an ellipsoid in the smaller one. neither gr egory nor his contem-

as difficult to for m as those of the gr egor ian and for two centu-

both the gr e

volved. even befor e new ton per fected his r eflector, the

por ar ies wer e able to produce such sur faces because of limitations

r ies little mor e was hear d of the design. w hen the techniques of

na me "compou

h mathematician ja mes gr egory had wor k ed out an optical

in the gr inding sur faces, or laps, upon w hich mir rors w er e then

mir ror mak ing beca me mor e advanced, however, the cassegr ainian

sur faces whi

w hich, although little used today, still deserves mention.

grou nd to curve. sixt y years later a mir ror-m a k er na med short

telescope ca me into its ow n. today it is a "popula r" instrument,

about the ca

of using a plane mir ror to tr ansfer r eflected r ays outside

succeeded in producing the desir ed curv es, a nd the telescopes

used by observator ies and amateurs alike. it has sever al excellent

bilities of th


116

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SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

Printed for Joel M. Hawkins

m

.m.x.i.i.

san fr ancisco, usa


project

» Title

c l a s s » Title

term

» Title

i n s t r u c t o r » Name

117


ta k es for ev er). the thing you need is a n a lien w r ench set (very small). these should be small enough to fit into the k eyhole slot. now, bend the long end of the alien w r ench at a slight angle (not 90$. now, tak e your pick to a gr inder or a file, and smooth the end until it is rounded so it won't hang inside the lock. test your tool out on door k nobs at your house to see if it w ill slide in and out smoothly. now, this is w her e the scr ew dr iver comes in. it must be small enough for it and your pick to be used in the same lock at the sa me time, one above the other . in the coming instructions, please

open a lock in fifteen seconds, then go to holly wood, because

t is the only place you ar e ever going to do it. even exper ienced

ksmiths ca n spend fi v e to ten minutes on a lock if they a r e

ucky. if you are wanting extremely quick access, look elsewhere.

follow ing instructions w ill perta in mostly to the "lock in

b" type lock, since it is the easiest to pick. first of all, you need

k set. if you k now a locksmith, get him to mak e you a set. this

l be the best possible set for you to use. if you find a locksmith

illing to supply a set, don't give up hope. it is possible to mak e

a bly ta k e you a bout t w ent y to thirt y minutes your first time.

w ill open. do not get discour aged on your first try! it w ill prob-

w ill be a click, the scr ew dr i ver w ill tur n fr eely, and the door

the back of the lock to the front, and when you ar e through, ther e

w ill k eep the "solved" pins from falling back dow n. now, wor k from

comes in. insert the screwdriver into the slot and turn. this tension

tendency is to fall back dow n, right? that is where the screwdriver

pin is level w ith the cylinder wa ll. now, if you push a pin up, it's

the pin up so that the space betw een the upper pin and the low er

ox ygen, you must have an energy source for an explosion. the

the w w ii er a. since solidox is liter ally w hat the na me says: s

potassium chlor ate, a filler used in man y military applicatio

needed to melt meta l. the most acti v e ingr edient in solido

in w elding applications as an oxidizing agent for the hot fl

and var ious har dwar e supply shops for around $7.00. solidox is

aluminum can containing 6 grey sticks, and can be bought at k-m

chemica l ca n be bought ov er the cou nter . solidox comes i

most people ar e not awar e that a volatile, extr emely explo

118 1.

SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

Printed for Joel M. Hawkins

m

.m.x.i.i.

san fr ancisco, usa


project

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119


in the entir e process. avoid fr iction, heat, and fla me. a few years back, a teenager i k new blew 4 fingers off w hile trying to mak e a pipe bomb w ith solidox. you have been war ned! 8. high tech r evenge: the beige box. have you ever wanted a linem an's handset? sur ely every fr eak has at least once consider ed the fun that he could have w ith one. after searching unlock ed phone compan y trucks for months, w e had an idea. w e could build one. w e did, and na med it the "beige box" simply because that is the color of ours. the beige box is simply a consumer lineman's handset, w hich is a phone that

ar, or sucrose. in theory, glucose would be the pur est energy

rce, but it is har d to find a solid supply of glucose. mak ing the

tur e: 1. open the can of solidox, and r emove all six sticks. one

ne, gr ind up each of the sticks (pr efer ably w ith a mortar and

le) into the finest pow der possible. 2 . the r atio for mixing the

a r w ith the solidox is 1:1, so w eigh the solidox pow der, a nd

d up the equivalent amount of sugar. 3. mix equivalent amounts

olidox pow der, and sugar in a 1:1 r atio. it is just that simple!

now have an extr emely pow er ful substance that can be used

yellow and black w ir es can be r emoved, although i would only them aside so that you can use the modular jack in futur e proje now insert your telephone's modular plug into the modular j that's it. this particular model is nice because it is can be ea made, is inexpensive, uses common parts that ar e r eadily availa is small, is lightw eight, and does not r equir e the destructio a phone. ther e ar e man y uses for a beige box. how ever, befor e can use it, you must k now how to attach it to the output dev this device can be of an y of bell sw itching appar atus that incl

beige box, follow along. the construction is very simple. first you must understand the concept of the device. in a modular jack, there ar e four w ir es. these ar e r ed, gr een, yellow, and black. for a single line telephone, however, only two matter: the r ed (r ing) and gr een (tip). the yellow and the black ar e not necessary for this project. a lineman's handset has two clips on it: the r ing and the tip. tak e a modular jack and look at the bottom of it's casing. ther e should be a gr ey jack w ith four w ir es (r ed, gr een, yellow & black) leading out of it. to the end of the r ed w ir e attach a r ed alligator clip.

1.

SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

Printed for Joel M. Hawkins

m

.m.x.i.i.

project 07

THIS DID NOT GO WELL Doomed Schemes and Damned Fools in the films of the Coen Brothers

in which, some of the gr eatest fools a n d crooks on film a r e celebr ated. the film festi va l r evolv es a rou n d the idea th at sometimes m a k i ng a n y pla ns at a ll is a mista k e, especi a lly w hen the moti v es a n d perspecti v es of others a r e disr ega r ded entir ely. k ey components i nclude a lcohol, homem a de w ea ponry a n d cursi ng.

san fr ancisco, usa


project

» This Did Not Go Well

c l a s s » Integrated Communications

term

» Spring 2011

i n s t r u c t o r » Christopher Morlan

121


122

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SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

Printed for Joel M. Hawkins

m

.m.x.i.i.

san fr ancisco, usa


project

» This Did Not Go Well

c l a s s » Integrated Communications

term

» Spring 2011

i n s t r u c t o r » Christopher Morlan

123


124

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SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

m

.m.x.i.i.

ace a

can non fuse, or an m-80 t ype fuse, but fir ecr ack er fuses wor k, if

dc con verter lik e the one used on a tr ain set. cut the con nector

positive w ir e into the jar . now put the negative w ir e in the other

vice.

you ca n ru n lik e a black m a n ru ns from the cops a fter r a ping a

off, separ ate the w ir es, and str ip them both. now you need a jar of

end. now let it sit over night and in the mor ning scr ape the rust

aced

w hite gir l.) now, light it and run lik e hell! it does wonders for a

water w ith a tablespoon or so of sodium chlor ide (w hich is salt!)

off of the nail & r epeat until you got a bunch of rust on the bottom

ed on

row of m a ilbox es (lik e the ones in a pa rtment complex es), a ca r

a dded to it. this m a k es the water conducti v e. now insert both

of the glass. be generous with your rust collection. if you ar e going

se up

(place under the gas tank), a pictur e window (place on windowsill),

w ir es into the mixtur e (i a m assuming you plugged the con verter

through the trouble of mak ing ther mite, you might as w ell mak e

nail,

a phone booth (place r ight under the phone), or an y other devious

in.) and let them sit for five minutes. one of them w ill start bub-

a lot, r ight? now r emov e the excess water a nd pour the crust y

it in

place. this thing throws shr apnel, and can mak e quit a mess! 10.

bling mor e than the other . this is the positive(+) w ir e. if you do

solution onto a cook ie sheet. dry it in the sun for a few hours, or

her e

ther mite ii ther mite is nasty shit. her e is a good and easy way to

not do this test r ight, the fi na l product w ill be the opposite

inside over night. it should be an or ange-brow n color (although i

rface

m a k e it. the first step is to get some iron-oxide (w hich is rust!).

(chemica lly) of rust, w hich is rust acid. you have no use for this

have seen it in man y differ ent colors! sometimes the color gets


project

» This Did Not Go Well

c l a s s » Integrated Communications

term

» Spring 2011

i n s t r u c t o r » Christopher Morlan

125


126

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SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

Printed for Joel M. Hawkins

m

.m.x.i.i.

san fr ancisco, usa


project

» This Did Not Go Well

c l a s s » Integrated Communications

term

» Spring 2011

i n s t r u c t o r » Christopher Morlan

127


128

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SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

Printed for Joel M. Hawkins

m

.m.x.i.i.

san fr ancisco, usa


project

» This Did Not Go Well

c l a s s » Integrated Communications

term

» Spring 2011

i n s t r u c t o r » Christopher Morlan

129


130

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SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

Printed for Joel M. Hawkins

m

.m.x.i.i.

san fr ancisco, usa


project

» This Did Not Go Well

c l a s s » Integrated Communications

term

» Spring 2011

i n s t r u c t o r » Christopher Morlan

131


132

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SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

Printed for Joel M. Hawkins

m

.m.x.i.i.

san fr ancisco, usa


i n s t r u c t o r » Christopher Morlan

ur output device, you should see a mass of w ir es con nected to

ver encounter ed a lock ed output device. once you have opened

ow ledge of destroying and/or pick ing locks. how ever, w e have

n. if your output dev ice is lock ed, then you must h av e some

y bolt(s) approximately 1/8 of an inch counter-clock w ise and

r dwar e stor e. w ith your hex dr iver (or pliers), tur n the secu-

r k also). this piece of equipment can be pick ed up at your local

ve a 7/16 inch hex dr i ver (or a good pa ir of needle nose pliers

.) to open most bell telephone sw itching appar atus, you must

minal sets (i.e. r emote sw itching centers, br idging heads, cans,

a di a l tone. di a l a ni to find out the number you a r e using (you

mak e sur e they ar e fir mly attached. by this time you should hear

tor clips so that they ar e not touching each other ter minals. also

note: if instead of a dial tone you hear nothing, adjust the alliga-

na l. attach the gr een a lligator clip (tip) to the(tip) ter mina l.

must attach all the r ed alligator clips (r ing) to the (r ing) ter mi-

"thr ee r's" ar e a simple way to r emember w hich is w hich. now you

la beled, usua lly on the r ight). r emember: r ing - r ed - r ight. the

"t" (tip: if not labeled, it is usually on the left) and "r" (r ing - if not

ter minals. on most output devices, the ter minals should be labeled

do not panic; but r ather hang up, wait, and pick up the r eceiver

best to be neither seen nor hear d. if you hear someone dialing out,

tential suspicion of your victim. w hen eavesdropping, it is always

static caused by con necting the box, ther efor e r educing the po-

first attach the beige box then your phone. this eliminates the

gr eatly r educed chance of getting caught. to be most effective,

bother ing the oper ator at little r isk to yourself, blue boxing with

dialing dir ect to alliance teleconfer encing, fuck ing people over,

tions: eavesdropping, long distance, fr ee phone calls to fr iends,

wouldn't want to use your ow n). her e ar e some pr actical applica-

concerning your accomplishments), in or der to make sur e the ene

low profile (i.e., do not post under your r eal na me on a public

to do your beige boxing, use mor e than one output device, k ee

problems. ther efor, i would r ecommend you: choose a secluded s

box may cause suspicions w ithin the gestapo, and r esult in leg

on the number. potential r isks of beige boxing: overuse of the be

to k now w ho you ar e listening to, after dialing ani, pull a co

you w ill find infor mation worthy of black mail! if you would l

their call again. if the latter is true, then listen in, and per h

again. the person w ill either have hung up or tr ied to compl

c l a s s » Integrated Communications

133 » Spring 2011 term

» This Did Not Go Well project


134

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SOURCE Âť a mfa portfolio

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» Title

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o a fine pow der and heat it in a cast-iron pot until it is r ed. now

w ith the blow torch. now chuck le as you watch it bur n through

(in other wor ds, just let it sit over night!). be car eful now because

this br in

the pur e iron oxide w ith pur e aluminum filings w hich can be

the hood, the block, the a xle, and the pavement. be car eful! the

these crysta ls a r e now your touch explosi ve. ca r efully w r ap a

an insul

ught or filed dow n by hand from an aluminum tube or bar . the

ideal mixtur es can vapor ize car bon steel! another idea is to use

bunch in paper (i mean car efully! fr iction sets 'em off!) and throw

layer ed

tio or iron oxide to aluminum is 8 gr a ms to 3 gr a ms. congr ats!

ther mite to get into pay phone cash boxes. 11. touch explosives:

them around., pr etty loud, huh? they ar e fun to put on someone's

m ain sec

u have just made ther mite! now, to light it: ther mite r equir es

this is sort of a mild explosive, but it can be quite dangerous in

chair . add a small fish sink er to them and they can be throw n a

pow der i

ot of heat (mor e than a blow torch!) to ignite. how ever, magne-

large quantities. to mak e touch explosive (such as that found in

long distance (good for crow ds, football games, concerts, etc.) 12 .

is the tr

m r ibbon (w hich is sort of har d to find, ca ll around) w ill do

a snap-n-pop, but mor e powerful), use this r ecipe: mix iodine crystals

letter bombs: you will first have to make a mild version of ther mite.

until yo

e tr ick. it tak es the heat from the bur ning magnesium to light

into a mmonia until the iodine crystals w ill not dissolve into the

use m y r ecipe, but substitute iron fillings for rust. mix the iron

explosiv

e ther mite. now when you see your victim's car, pour a fifty-cent

a mmonia a n ymor e. pour off the excess a mmonia a nd dry out the

w ith aluminum fillings in a r atio of 75% aluminum to 25% iron. this

you migh


project

Âť This Did Not Go Well

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Âť Spring 2011

137

ng us to our next ingr edient: go to the post office and bu y

m agnesium). w hen the touch explosi ve is tor n or even squeezed

of dry ice to paint to the size of the can to how full it is. if you

that w ill di

lated (padded) en velope. you k now, the type that is double

har d it w ill ignite the pow der ed magnesium (sort of a flash light)

ar e r eally pissed off at someone, you could place it on their door-

or an ything

. separ ate the layers and place the mild ther mite in the

and then it w ill bur n the mild ther mite. if the ther mite didn't

step, k nock on the door, and then run!! paint w ill fly all over the

stuff 'em up i

ction, w her e the letter would go. then place m agnesium

blow up, it would at least bur n the fuck out of your enemy (it does

place! 14. ways to send a car to hell: ther e ar e 1001 ways to destroy

light it. stea

in the outer layer. ther e is your bomb! now to light it: this

wonders on human flesh!). 13. paint bombs: to mak e a pain bomb you

a car but i a m going to cover only the ones that ar e the most fun

br eak into t

r ick y part a nd har d to expla in. just k eep exper imenting

simply need a metal pain can w ith a r efastenable lid, a nice br ight

(for you), the most destructive (for them), and the har dest to tr ace

slide it into

ou get something that wor ks. the fuse is just that touch

color paint (gr een, pink, pur ple, or some gross color is per fect!),

(for the cops). place ther mite on the hood, light it, and watch it

you catch th

ve i have told you about in another one of my anarchy files.

and a quantity of dry ice. place the paint in the can and then drop

bur n all the way through the pavement! tape some coy bomb to the

is also called

ht want to w r ap it lik e a long cigar ette and then place it

the dry ice in. quick ly place the top on and then run like hell! w ith

hood, a x le, gas ta nk, w heel, muffler, etc. put the ta mpon, dirt,

tor, etc. now


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project

» This Did Not Go Well

c l a s s » Integrated Communications

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» Spring 2011

i n s t r u c t o r » Christopher Morlan

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» This Did Not Go Well

c l a s s » Integrated Communications

term

» Spring 2011

i n s t r u c t o r » Christopher Morlan

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» This Did Not Go Well

c l a s s » Integrated Communications

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» Spring 2011

i n s t r u c t o r » Christopher Morlan

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k e fr iends w ith student assistants and have them change your

swor ds & k eys. or steal the 80 column car ds inside if they ar e.

ool!). use a smok e gr enade in the hallway. steal the computer

d flush it dow n the toilet (smells aw ful! stinks up the w hole

mmer). get some pur e potassium or pur e sodium, put it in a capsule,

estigate (of course, you w ill probably have to mak e it up in the

ker but yours!). they might cancel school for a week while they

ay for a n hour or t wo. you ca n even place a fa k e bomb (in a n y

a lock er . then they have to check them all, w hilst you can slip

some others in the neighbor hood) w ith the major lines. these can

the gr een ju nction box that inter faces their line (and possibly

phone life very easily. all you must do is go to their house and find

there are underground lines then you will be able to ruin someone's

your imagination! 16. phone r elated vandalism: if you live w her e

is a fascist. stick a potato in the tailpipe of the pr incipal's car . use

dr aw on lock ers or spr ay paint on the building that the pr incipal

w hatever and gr ind it into the car pet. watch the janitors cry!

r eport car ds. spit your gum out on the car pet in the libr ary or

signal is not pr esent until the cop has your car in his sights and

w ill not wor k against a gun type r adar unit in w hich the r adar

in one of those expensive r a dar detectors. how ever, this dev ice

dr ivers wanting to mak e better time on the open road w ill in vest

w eek's worth of wor k for 'em!!) 17. highway r a dar ja mming: most

into segments so it can't be fixed but must be r eplaced (ther e is a

and destroy the insides and pull up their phone cable. now cut it

on the r ight. then just tak e clippers or a sledge ha mmer or a bomb

the near est phone pole. tak e a sock et w r ench and loosen the nut

12v system. how ever, the cor r ect construction and tuning of t

ter mina l r egulator can be used to get this voltage from a ca

a n d enclosed i n the cor r ect size cav it y (r esonator). a n 8 t

w ill gener ate microwaves w hen supplied w ith the 5 to 10 volt

tr a nsmitter . a nift y little semiconductor ca lled a gu n n dio

approached him. it is sur pr isingly easy to mak e a low pow er r ad

cop and found that his unit r eads r andom numbers w hen m y c

your ow n. i have tested this idea w ith the cooper ation of a lo

method is to continuously ja m an y signal w ith a r adar signal

i n s t r u c t o r » Christopher Morlan

c l a s s » Integrated Communications

» Spring 2011 term

» This Did Not Go Well project


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MFA THESIS »

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» Best Case

term

» Spring 2012

project 08

BEST CASE A simple research tool for design programs. a simple r esea rch tool for design progr a ms. best case prov ides students w ith gr eater access to specific projects from their school a n d a llows i nstructors to sh a r e gr eat wor k w ith their students.

c l a s s » Various

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“The immense size of modern databases gives us a feeling of meaninglessness. It is our tasks as humans to bring meaning back into this wasteland. As finite creatures who think and feel, we can create islands of meaning in the sea of information.” — Freeman Dyson

c l a s s » Various

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FINDING SPECIFIC STUDENT DESIGN PROJECTS IS AN UNREFINED AND NEEDLESSLY COMPLEX PROCESS.

DESIGN STUDENTS NEED BETTER ACCESS TO SPECIFIC EXAMPLES OF GOOD PROJECTS.

INSTRUCTORS NEED A BETTER WAY TO SHARE EXISTING PROJECTS WITH THEIR STUDENTS.

HOW CAN MORE SPECIFIC RESEARCH PARAMETERS HELP DESIGN STUDENTS MAKE BETTER USE OF THEIR TIME AND ENERGY?

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HUNTING FOR BETTER ACCESS Looking for anything, together Throughout the time spent in this program, access to projects has always been an issue for students. Tracking down good examples or rather, any example, of a specific project has always been unnecessarily complex. My email archive is full of group messages from practically every student in the program, each one sent out when someone strikes contextual gold and finds another example of the project we’re currently working on. Before these projects are found, there is a sense of straw-grasping, of not knowing what to expect and not knowing what is expected. It is not that we are unable to think originally, but rather that nothing can be made in a vacuum.

Opposite page: A “map” of the Internet.

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INSTRUCTOR AVAILABILITY A look at some numbers regarding the eight instructors that keep office hours on the fifth floor of 79 New Montgomery. Things to keep in mind: most of the instructors have other jobs to attend to and are not expected to work 40 hours a week. Obviously, they may still do work involving their AAU responsibilities outside of the building, but that still doesn’t give students access to the projects they keep in their offices.

* These numbers are specific to the faculty with offices on the fifth floor of 79 NM.

TOTAL HOURS PER WEEK

119.5

TEACHING

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project

» Best Case

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» Spring 2012

Access to actual physical projects is both better and worse. On one hand, students know exactly where to go to find what our instructors consider to be the best solutions to the design problems they have assigned us. On the other, the projects are usually organized in a way that is most convenient to the instructor, and each one seems to have a different style and purpose for doing things that way, which is completely valid. This makes it almost mandatory that the instructor is present in the room and has the time and inclination to guide you through their bookcases to find a particular project. Their collection of projects is usually housed in their personal office, and while it is reasonable to expect that instructors are willing to help, a lack of free access to these materials given instructor availability obstructs the research process.

45.5

IN-OFFICE (BY APPT.)

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IN-OFFICE (DROP-IN)

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LACKING CONTEXT Addressing the lack of context and meaning within databases dovetails with my Midpoint idea the best. By adding more specific research parameters (namely, by separating student projects by school, instructor and class) users can get to the most pertinent information faster. There are a number of online project indexes that separate work based on the program the student is in, Behance recently began developing more and more of these, but that solution doesn’t provide enough context. After filtering projects by school, the next logical step would be to filter by instructor and class, but for some reason this isn’t the direction Behance wanted to take things, focusing instead on keeping their site more about social media and the subjective and arbitrary rating of designer’s work.

Opposite page: Directory

INWARD-FACING

in AAU Library for MFA Theses area.

Best Case Computerlove

Hunie Portfolios.aau.edu ACADEMIC

Forrst

Dribbble

Krop

Harvard GSoD

PROFESSIONAL

CarbonMade Coroflot Behance OUTWARD-FACING

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HOME

STUDENTS

INSTRUCTORS

FORMS

CLASSES

PROJECT LIST

CLASS LIST

FORM LIST

CLASS LIST

NOTES

Printed for Joel M. Hawkins

THE CASE

RESOURCES

san fr ancisco, usa


project

» Best Case

term

» Spring 2012

DIRECTIONS

EMAIL: PASSWORD

FORM

SUCCESS

EMAIL: CONFIRMATION

c l a s s » Various

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EVERY OUNCE OF THANKS Phil Hamlett Hunter Wimmer Carolina de Bartolo Mary Scott Michael Kilgore Scott Underwood Emily Shields Spencer Harris EP Brock Dara Weinberg Every other classmate Mike and Diane Hawkins Erin Hawkins You

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Joel Hawkins phone email web school

dept. chair dept. director

816.695.4847 fromjoel@gmail.com joel-hawkins.com Academy of Art University School of Graphic Design 79 New Montgomery Street San Francisco, CA 94105 Mary Scott Phil Hamlett

typefaces

Gotham Garamond

software

Adobe Creative Suite CS6 Live Surface

printing

+ binding Blurb.com

copyright

Š Joel Hawkins No portion of this book may be used or reproduced in any manner without the written consent of Joel Hawkins. All rights reserved.

Source  

MFA Portfolio