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Blessed Sacrament Catholic Elementary/Middle School has been engaged in character education since 1986. Our mission is to nurture the whole child spiritually, academically, emotionally, and socially. We have established a learning environment where students feel safe, secure, and an integral part of the community. The staff goes beyond academics to serve as role models to students as they begin their journey of becoming life-long learners with a strong, value-centered foundation from which to grow and are diligent to incorporate teaching, learning, and virtues across the curriculum. The foundation of our values and the philosophical approach we take to incorporate our Character Education Program is a direct result of a strategic planning process and an in-depth study undertaken during our rigorous accreditation process in 2008. All students, parents, staff and faculty were asked to complete surveys. We had an overwhelming 85% response rate. Committees comprised of students, parents, staff, faculty, administration, and outside community members agreed upon school-wide learning expectations. For the 2009-2010 school year, we are incorporating a virtue (character trait), service-learning experience (action), and Saint (role model) each month into the curriculum. (2010 National Promising Practice Award) By integrating virtues, service, and role models into our comprehensive curriculum, by fostering a healthy partnership between family and school, through deliberate and continual collaboration of staff and faculty, and by firmly establishing a goal of systematic improvement and implementation of our programs, we are confident that we will achieve our school-wide learning expectations of graduating a mature, confident individual who can accept his/her strengths & weaknesses, work cooperatively and independently, and accept responsibility for his/her actions. We seek to produce a graduate who is a faith-filled Christian, who is a life-long learner with a global vision, who is a socially responsible citizen who treats others with respect and dignity, who is an active and motivated citizen, and who is respectful of God’s gift of body and mind.


2011 Utah State School of Character Portfolio Table of Contents Principle 1: Promote core ethical values………………………………………….……1 Beliefs, vision and mission statements, core values pictured, yearly theme, signed vision statement, Buddy Program, School Wide Learning Expectations, modes of communication Principle 2: Defines character comprehensively………………………………………2 Christian Award, student reflection, leadership opportunities, student written class rules, community meetings Principle 3: Uses a comprehensive, proactive, effective approach……………...……2 Integration of virtue with core, staff meetings, clearly defined expectations Principle 4: Creates a caring community……………………………………….……..4 Home & School Association, student-parent-grandparent letters, staff reflection, principal’s volleyball team Principle 5: Opportunities for moral action……………………………………..….…5 Student led projects, response to moral action, Buddy activities, Peace Poles, local-statenational participation Principle 6: Differentiated instruction = success for all………………………………6 Guest lecturers (authors), talent show, student reflection, Invention Convention, professional development, drama, technology integration, collaboration, middle school language arts performances Principle 7: Development of self-motivation………………………………………..…8 Christian Award, prayer group, D.A.R.E., student reflection, discipline cycle, community meetings, Reality Town, innovative core curriculum, student work displayed Principle 8: Engaging school staff……………………………………………...……....8 Communication school wide learning expectations, agenda staff meeting, agenda administrative council, participation at National Character Education Forum 2008 & 2010, Home & School Association Principle 9: Leadership and support………………………………………….….…..10 Monthly parent communication, parent volunteerism, agenda administrative council, student reflection, community correspondence, Home & School Association, school website Principle 10: Parent and community support………………………………….….....10 The President’s Volunteer Service Awards, Grandparents’ Day, active school board, weekly e-mail blasts, school website, alumni outreach Principle 11: On-going assessment…………………………………………………....11 Character Education on web site, curriculum enhancement, letters from those we serve, quality standards score sheets comparison


P1: Blessed Sacrament Catholic School continually implements and improves the incorporation of virtues across the curriculum and strives to enhance the promotion of its character education program in a variety of communication avenues to students, parents, staff, and outside community members.(1,2,4,8,10,11,12) Core values (virtues) are introduced monthly along with a Saint (role model) and action (service learning experience). The monthly virtue program is a direct result of the schoolwide learning expectations that were developed with input from students, parents, staff, and outside community members. Nine new virtues, actions, and Saints are introduced each year. All students in Grades PK-8 are involved in the character education initiative.

All faculty and staff

participate.(1,2,3,4,10,11,13) Expectations, vision statement, mission statement, philosophy, and graduate profile including the school-wide learning expectations encompassing the areas of faith, academics, and character are clearly defined in the Student/Parent Handbook and Faculty/Staff Handbook. (1) Deliberate steps have been taken to include desired results, indicators, and types of assessments with each learning expectation. The vision statement is posted in the school foyer and signed by each student. Schoolwide learning expectations are prominently posted in each classroom and strategically placed throughout the school.(1,4) School website, articles in our school newsletter, weekly parent email blasts, fence banners, outdoor marquee, and articles in local newspapers provide information about our Character Education Program, reinforcement to the parents and community that the school is pursuing its mission, and provides opportunities to engage the community in the character education initiative at Blessed Sacrament School.(1,2,4,6,7,8,9,10,11,12) These avenues strengthen the partnership with the parents and foster the practice of the core values on the home front. Service learning experiences, reflection opportunities for staff and students, community-building assemblies, prominently displayed monthly core values, and professional development opportunities for faculty, staff, and parents create and 1


reinforce a climate that fosters character development that will then empower students to be all that they can be.(1,3,4,7,8,9,10,11,12,13)

P2: There are a variety of programs in place to ensure that the pillars of faith, academics and character are visible on a daily basis. Expectations are clearly defined on the first day of class through teacher instruction and at the first school assembly by the Principal. The Parent/Student Handbook is mailed to each family in the summer along with a form to be signed by both the parent and student reinforcing their commitment to our lifelong learning expectations.(1) Weekly class “Community Meetings” provide students the forum to discuss topics or participate in activities that build class community, increase rapport and respect among the students, and enhance the overall character education experience.(3,9) The staff takes proactive measure with the Blessed Sacrament Christian Award program to provide positive reinforcement to students modeling virtue.(3) Quarterly Student Assemblies honor students who are involved with academic, sport, and/or extracurricular activities.

All students are given the opportunity to shine with this recognition.

Leadership

opportunities such as Student Council give students hands-on experiences dealing with school government, designing and implementing service-learning projects while building community and school spirit. Students are given the opportunity to reflect on various subjects such as their favorite service learning experience, field trip experience, or school activity.(1,3,4,6,7,8,9,10) All staff is committed to helping students develop positive character traits by modeling these traits through service to the school, community, and church.

P3: With each passing year, the character education initiative takes on a more comprehensive, intentional, proactive, and collaborative approach.

An all-inclusive theme for the year is chosen

such as, “We have seen remarkable things today,” which was a result of the summer faculty 2


retreat.(1,4) After this collaboration, a teacher and staff member coordinates the communication of the virtue, service project, and Saint.(2,8,10,13) Each individual teacher is then free to integrate the three concepts into their academic core. Classes have paired up with their Buddies to participate in the service learning experience, teachers have had their classes participate on their own, and at times Student Council heads up the projects. By promoting appreciation and respect of different cultures, we teach our students to be global citizens.(1,2,6,11) We have sponsored a Persian artist, welcomed Rohit Patel, a Gandhi associate, to speak to students and to lead a faculty/staff in-service, hosted authors, and collected coins to build a home in Haiti.(1,8) There is deliberate staff collaboration. Character Education is now being addressed at the monthly faculty meetings, monthly administration council meetings, in-service opportunities, professional development opportunities, and monthly grade-level meetings.(2,3,4,8,10,11) The staff meets each morning for prayer and daily announcements. This year, three in-services on the topic of Love and Logic have been presented. There was such an overwhelming response from the faculty, that it was decided to offer a six-week course to our parents. The school’s five-year Strategic Planning Committee, made up of parent volunteers, has included Character Education questions on the strategic planning survey that will be sent out to all parents and all staff members. The concerted effort on the part of the school administration to make character education a priority has filtered down to the parents and the inclusion on the survey is evidence of that. The school-wide learning expectations were broken down into sections, published, and discussed in the parent newsletters last year.(1,2,10,13) With each passing year, academics are being infused with more deliberate attempts to highlight positive character traits. Last year, the middle school studied the Holocaust, took a field trip to see the Anne Frank exhibit, and then discussed compassion and respect at great length. Virtues, service and Saints are discussed daily during religion at all grade levels. Language Arts has started to include student reflections. The presidential elections provided the perfect forum for 4th grade to hold a mock election and to discuss the character 3


traits a president should possess and what good citizenship means.(1,4,9) During 2010, the art classes (PK-8) created a 3’x5’ cross made entirely of individual ceramic fingerprints from each student. This hangs proudly in the art studio as a sign of unity and community.(4) This year, the art classes (PK-8) will create a metal Character Tree with each student creating their own metal leaf to hang as a sign of unity and community. Class rules, rules of respect in the lunchroom, library, and Extended Day room, and playground rules are strategically and prominently displayed. Upper level grades have the opportunity to discuss and make up their own class rules.(3,4) Many grades have specific class jobs such as morning attendance, delivery of afternoon mail, being in charge of school-wide recycling, etc. Students develop a sense of belonging, responsibility, and caring for others by holding these jobs. “Be respectful, Be Responsible, Be a Bobcat” carries over into the after- school activities and extracurricular sporting events.(4) Prior to participating in sporting events, all parents and students must sign a citizenship/conduct agreement that they will act with integrity at all times. Quarterly Spirit Assemblies recognize outstanding students in academics, sports, and citizenship achievements. Students are also honored at monthly All School Mass for their outstanding achievements in good citizenship with the Blessed Sacrament Christian Award.(3) In the past, the school has given out posters, gift cards, and ice cream socials as rewards for positive behavior. This year, we have moved beyond the physical reward system and are focusing on the intrinsic value of positive behavior, a huge transitional step in our character education initiative.

P4: A positive learning environment is most successful when a healthy partnership exists between the family and school. To foster this partnership, the school hosts Back-to-School nights, concerts, graduation, science fair, and Math & Science Night. The Home & School Association, H.S.A., hosts general meetings, community building events such as Books and Bagels, spaghetti dinner, and Newcomer’s BBQ, with the staff attending many of these after school events.(5,7,11) The staff serves 4


on many extracurricular committees such as School Board, H.S.A. Board, and Parish Council, and are Diocesan PARA-sport coordinators for the school, and are moderators for Student Council, Yearbook, Website Committee, and host the semi-annual book fair, etc. Many teachers provide after school tutoring. The principal coached a middle school volleyball team last year and regularly attends other Diocesan-wide sporting events to cheer on the students.(5) Supporting the students in these extracurricular, character-building activities is a passion and priority of his. A highlight each spring is the annual 8th grade vs. staff volleyball game. Students, parents, and staff speak positively of our peer-to-peer Buddy program, a mentor program that matches up students from an upper grade with students from a lower grade.(2,6) An activity that was done in November 2010 with our 1st and 4th grade buddies was making 30 quilts that will be sent to the University of California, San Diego, for participants of an Alzheimer’s Study Group with over 70 locations and 3,000 participants nationwide. Both classes will read What’s Happening to Grandpa, authored by Maria Shriver. The book explains Alzheimer’s at an age appropriate level. A quote from the book describes what the students wish for the participants when they receive their quilts, “It felt good. It felt warm. It felt peaceful.” Hands-on activities, service learning, and building global awareness are all incorporated into this project. There is a parent-mentoring program that is an outreach of the H.S.A. All new families are paired up with an “old” family. The “new” and “old” meet at the Newcomer’s BBQ before school begins and start to build a bond. The new family then has someone to call with questions about events, concerns, etc. (2009 National Promising Practice Award) Teachers, parents, and students join to promote and create a successful, academic learning environment and a caring community.(12)

P5: Service is not new to our students. Service learning experiences are conducted monthly and integrated with the virtue and Saint of the month. Students in various grades are responsible for morning and afternoon car duty, library help, mail delivery, flag duty, recycling, leading prayer, etc. 5


School-wide opportunities include participating in the yearly UNICEF collection campaign, walking as a team for the American Cancer Society “Making Strides Against Breast Cancer” campaign, Candy Cane Corner clothing drive, Diocesan-wide 8th grade Unity Mass, Red Ribbon week, collecting used postage stamps for the Holy Cross Sisters and their missions in Africa, reaching out to the soldiers in the Middle East, “Souper Bowl” canned food drive, etc.(1,2,3,4,6,7,10,12) This year, 1st & 4th grade Buddies made 30 quilts for the University of California, San Diego, for their Alzheimer’s Disease Cooperative Study Group. We are starting to reach out to the schools in the neighborhood by having each class, PK-8, make a 2’x3’ poster that are then bound together to form a mural. The murals are then delivered to the other schools as a show of friendship and unity among the schools. The service learning opportunities not only reach out to the local community but also across the state, nation, and world. The students are learning to become responsible global citizens. The Interfaith Meditation Garden (2008 National Promising Practice Award) has hosted student-led prayers groups over the past three years.(3,6,11) Students participate in academic, athletic, and social activities with the other Diocesan schools each year including Science Fair, 7th & 8th grade Science Challenge (this will be expanded to the 5th & 6th grades in 2011), middle school dances, and PARA-sports. Our students recognize Catholic Schools’ Week with the other 2.1 million students in over 7,000 Catholic schools nationwide. In 2009, each student (PK-8) created a peace heart. During Language Arts, they wrote about peace on their hearts with 4th grade writing Haiku. The hearts were then placed on two, 10’ PVC poles connected at the top by a ribbon with all the staff photos attached. The “Peace Poles” were displayed in the school foyer throughout the second semester.(6)

P6: Self-esteem is essential to the learning process and the school is cognizant that our student body encompasses a wide spectrum of learning abilities and styles. To adequately reach this diverse group, an on-site Learning Resource Center (LRC) is available to help them succeed. The LRC provides 6


individualized attention to students needing specialized assistance as well as those who are accelerated (Horizon Program.) Approximately 100 students use the LRC on a weekly basis with 40 of these students attending daily. Students who access the LRC are those who may slip through the cracks in other school environments. All new students are tested for placement and potential needs. All K-3 students are tested annually to determine specific needs. Math Club is an incentive for students in grades 2-5. This spring we will host our 1st Family Literacy Day. There will be a journaling station where each student, PK-8, will receive a “Character Journal� where they will begin to write (draw) about positive character traits and reflect on them. After school exploratories in science, art, band, choir, etc. enhance the curriculum.(8) Differentiation is a continual process in each classroom with lesson plans in all subject areas addressing different learning levels. As textbooks are replaced, deliberate attention is taken to make sure the new textbooks contain on-line resources for enrichment opportunities and that the book addresses differentiation. Individual assessment action plans are required on students who fall below average on the Fall SAT tests. SAT testing is completed in the spring and further action is taken if necessary. Guest lecturers (all grades), Science Fair (middle school), Invention Convention(5th grade), County Fair(4th grade), Mammal Reports(2nd grade), Reading Ticket(1st grade), choir, band, drama, etc. are all key components of the equation, guaranteeing success for students of all abilities and learning styles.(5,8,9) These projects help to develop critical thinking skills in the students. We welcomed M’Lin Rowley, a Utah high school senior and author of the book series, Knights of Right, to speak to all students not only about writing skills, but also choosing to do what is right.(8)

Teachers provide opportunities for individual class

work, group projects, presentation opportunities, etc. to help build confidence in the students.(1,8,9) To help students succeed, teachers are given ample opportunities for professional development through in-services on differentiated instruction, Love and Logic, anti-bullying tactics, Motivating the 7


Unmotivated, etc. By blending service learning, virtues, role models, and core curriculum we are reaching our school-wide learning expectations for all graduates.(2,4,8,10)

P7:

Extracurricular opportunities further enhance spiritual, academic, social and physical

development. Individual work displayed in the hallway instills a sense of pride in the students and communicates to visitors that our students are motivated to succeed.(9) Middle school students participate in student-led Parent-Teacher conferences in the spring. Self-esteem is at the core of the Drug Abuse Resistance Education (D.A.R.E.) program that has been part of the school for 15 years for grades PK-5.(9) Weekly class meetings help eliminate potential conflicts and allow for students to share good messages.(3) In 2009, we introduced individual class talent shows to help build student self-esteem. Civic responsibility and real life scenarios are experienced by participation in Junior Achievement, PK-5, and Reality Town, a financial literacy program for grades 6-8.(9)Upper grades have the opportunity to develop their own set of class rules that are then prominently posted in the classroom.(3) Student achievement is recognized in the classroom, school-wide over the intercom, at the quarterly Spirit Assemblies, and at monthly All School Mass with the Christian Award.(3) Staff recognition is done during Morning Prayer, at faculty meetings, and/or during quarterly Spirit Assemblies. Monthly in-service meetings and professional development meetings have included topics such as Motivating the Unmotivated, classroom management, etc. To ensure consistency, the school discipline cycle is outlined in the Parent/Student Handbook and clearly lists the steps that will be taken once an offense has occurred. Steps include warning, discussion, conflict resolution, and parental involvement if necessary. At no time is the discipline cycle demeaning to the student.(9)

P8: All staff members share the responsibility to teach and model positive character traits. Monthly staff meetings, monthly administrative council meetings, monthly grade level meetings, bi-monthly 8


faculty in-services, and professional development opportunities offer the avenues to all staff to develop new ideas, share feedback, and receive opinions on character education, curriculum, etc.(2,4,8,10) Staff attends Diocesan-wide events such as grade level meetings (every 2 years) and Faith Formation conferences twice yearly. There has been an increased focus on character education over the past four years as evidenced by Blessed Sacrament School receiving a 2008, 2009, and 2010 National Promising Practice award. Being named a 2010 State School of Character added excitement to the character education initiative and teachers have begun to get creative in the integration of character and curriculum.(10,11) For example, the art teacher will have all students help to make a metal Character Tree that will be a permanent display in the school. Each student will pound his or her own metal leaf that will then be attached to a metal tree trunk. This will be created during National Catholic Schools Week and the teachers will integrate into their earth science discussions that the roots represent the positive character traits that we are highlighting this year and that they are the keys to survival; the trunk is the school being held up by the root foundation; and the branches are the classrooms that grow from the positive root foundation. Students will be the leaves hanging from the branches. A school representative attended the 2008 and 2010 National Forums on Character Education.(10) Staff facilitate many extra-curricular activities after-hours, on their own time without compensation, such as choir, Student Council, and volleyball, and they regularly volunteer at local non-profits, serve as Scout leaders, etc. The staff looks for ways to bond with classes at other grade levels with multi-grade level field trips and our annual Spring Forward Day, where the lower class “springs” forward for a day to the next grade level. This eases transition anxiety and gets the student excited for the next year. Many grades decide on appropriate class rules and behavior.(3) The faculty has low turnover with most teachers on staff from 23 to 15 years. Sponsorships and grants enhance the learning experience. In 2009, two grants in excess of $415,000 paved the way for the “Center for Science & the Arts.”

The students, parents, and community are aware of the unwavering 9


commitment to graduate students prepared for future challenges with a strong, value-centered foundation from which to grow.

P9: Leadership responsibilities are shared and enhance the long-range character education initiative. The principal, Matt DeVoll, leads the Administrative Council (Principal, Advancement, Department Heads) that meets monthly.(2,4,10) Information is disseminated back to grade level meetings where decisions are made and then sent back to Admin Council for final approval. The very active Home & School Association and School Board meet monthly for parental input and community-building and fundraising events.(5,11,12) Student Council holds monthly meetings to decide on community-building activities and service-learning opportunities. Opportunities exist for student leadership in Student Council, Buddy Program, recycling team, flag duty, mail delivery, choir, band, parking lot duty, etc. Many classrooms develop their own class rules.(2,3,6,7,10)

P10: Our school could not exist without our partnership with parents. The mission statement clearly states that parents and teachers are partners in the education journey.(12) The website homepage reaffirms the parental role in education.(13) The Presidential Volunteer Award Program annually recognizes families who have contributed over 200 hours of volunteer time. In 2009-2010, our families logged in over 10,300 hours with 30 families completing 200-499 hours of service and one family completing over 1,000 hours of service.(12) Parental commitment is evidenced by the National PTO organization recognizing H.S.A. with a national honorable mention as a family organization and in 2010 recognizing them as runner-up to the national winner!(12) In Spring 2010, H.S.A. and the School Board hosted the 1st Family Math & Science Night. This brought together students, parents, grandparents, and community member for a night of education and fun activities.(12) H.S.A. continues to run the New Family Mentoring Program (2009 National Promising Practice Award) and hosts 10


myriad community events, and the volunteer parent Webmaster communicates via the school website and via email about all community and school events (including always-vital fundraising events), and recruits and tracks volunteers. The School Board is comprised of parents and grandparents. This Board is active as a sounding board of parents in the community, and helps with strategic planning. This year, the Board has formed the Partnership in Education Program to link local businesses and the school together for funding opportunities.(12) There is consistent communication with the parents and community with an up-to-date website including monthly class updates, monthly newsletters, and weekly email blasts, semi-annual parent teacher conferences with the spring conference being student-led at the middle school level, report cards, teacher phone calls and emails as necessary, and invitations to school activities such as assemblies, All School Mass, etc.(1,2,5,8,10,11,12,13) The invitation to volunteer at the school is extended to grandparents and there are several who regularly volunteer in the classroom, library, and lunchroom! In honor of all grandparents, we host a Grandparents’ & Grandfriends’ Day in September of each school year. Over the past five years, this event has grown from 60 to 300 in attendance! The school reaches out to students, parents, staff, grandparents, the parish community, and outside community to become partners in educating the whole child in faith, academics, and character.(5,6,7,12)

P11:

Assessment is both qualitative and quantitative toward our goal of school-wide learning

expectations and consists of ACRE tests, cooperative groupings, religion tests, Sacrament classes, SAT’s given twice a year, group and individual class projects, integration of technology, teachermade tests, text tests, written and oral assessment, community class meetings, participation in student leadership opportunities, participation in school-wide service learning opportunities, participation in monthly linking of virtue/action/Saint, Christian service awards, completion of D.A.R.E. program, completion of Life Skills program, etc.(1,2,4,6,7,8,9,10,11) With the deliberate and consistent enhancements 11


of the character education initiative over the past four years, absenteeism has decreased from 7.64 days per child to 5 days per child. Student retention, which is extremely important at a parochial school, went from 70% in 2007-2008 to 80.987 in 2009-2010. For the 2010-2011 school year, we have 51 new families at the school and enrollment has increased from 248 students at the end of 2009-2010 to 276 as of October 2010. SAT scores reflect simultaneous academic achievement from 2008 to 2009 with the complete battery increasing in all grades 2-8 as follows:

Grade 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

2009 65 58 65 72 70 72 70

2008 47 54 59 61 67 70 68

Prior to the start of the school year, we asked all staff and faculty if we should go through the rigorous process of applying for a State/National School of Character designation.

It was a

resounding, “Yes!� From the first application process begun in October 2007 until present, we have experienced a tremendous growth pattern in our deliberate attempt to integrate our character education initiative. The feedback from parents, faculty, and board member surveys, feedback on our applications from judges in areas of strengths and areas needing improvement, feedback and reflections from faculty on implementation strategies, communication from parents, grandparents, community members, and students provide valuable information on how as a team we can fine-tune and revise our program. Obtaining the feedback, working on the portfolio, and then viewing the portfolio solidified the fact that we as a team are here for the students to ensure that they are lifelong learners.(13) The Character Education portfolios are on display at community building events; and as parents and other guests browse through these portfolios, they are reminded that the learning 12


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Community of CaringY Research and Results! National Evaluation Efforts An Evaluation of the Nationwide Community of Caring Program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Community of CaringX Research and Results! National Evaluation Efforts, Continued Attitudes Regarding Students with Mental Retardation "#!$%%&'$%%()!*+,!-##!./00/#1!23-45116#2+7!78!97+2:6;!<#/=5+1/>?)!@7#2A@>52!6!1>A2?!78!6>>/>A251!>7B6+2!1>A25#>1!B/>:! /#>5445@>A64!2/16C/4/>/51!6#2!6417!61151152!1@:774!@4/;6>5,!!D:/1!+5156+@:!25;7#1>+6>52!>:6>!E7;;A#/>?!78!E6+/#0!1@:7741!:62! 1/0#/8/@6#>4?!;7+5!@6+/#0!1@:774!@A4>A+51!>:6#!#7#'E7;;A#/>?!78!E6+/#0,!!FG5@/8/@644?)!E7;;A#/>?!78!E6+/#0!1@:7741!B5+5! 1/0#/8/@6#>4?!C5>>5+!/#!>:5!87447B/#0!B6?1H! Ƈ!1>A25#>!>7!>56@:5+!+546>/7#1:/G1! Ƈ!1>A25#>!>7!1>A25#>!+546>/7#1:/G1! Ƈ!1>A25#>1!8554/#0!>:5?!:6=5!6!16?!/#!B:6>!:6GG5#1!/#!>:5!1@:774)!6#2!C5/#0!6C45!>7!1G56I!AG! Ƈ!1>A25#>1!8554/#0!>:5?!:6=5!0772!52A@6>/7#64!7GG7+>A#/>/51!/#!>:5!1@:774! !

Community of Caring Implementation Survey "#!E7;;A#/>?!78!E6+/#0!1@:7741!6@+711!>:5!#6>/7#)!4562!>56@:5+1!+5G7+>!7#!>:5/+!1@:77431!45=54!78!/#=74=5;5#>!/#!>:5!G+70+6;! /#!6#!6##A64!E7;;A#/>?!78!E6+/#0!/;G45;5#>6>/7#!1A+=5?,!!*6>6!8+7;!>:5!$%%(!1A+=5?)!@7;G/452!6#2!6#64?J52!C?!! *+,!K/@:654!.6+2;6#!6>!>:5!<#/=5+1/>?!78!<>6:)!/#@4A252!>:5!87447B/#0!8/#2/#01H! Ƈ!LMN!78!1@:7741!>:6>!@7;G45>52!>:5/+!1A+=5?!+5G7+>52!>:6>!5=5+?!1>A25#>!G6+>/@/G6>52!/#!E7;;A#/>?!78!E6+/#0!6@>/=/>/51)! /#@4A2/#0!>:715!B/>:!;5#>64!+5>6+26>/7#,! Ƈ!L%N!78!1@:7741!+5G7+>52!>:6>!5=5+?!1>A25#>!B/>:/#!>:5!1@:774!:61!>:5!7GG7+>A#/>?!>7!G6+>/@/G6>5!/#!@7;;A#/>?!15+=/@5! 6@>/=/>/51,!-C7A>!OMN!78!>:5!1>A25#>1!6@>A644?!@:715!>7!C5@7;5!/#=74=52!/#!@7;;A#/>?!15+=/@5P15+=/@5!456+#/#0,! E7;;A#/>?!78!E6+/#0!1@:7741!+5G7+>52)!>:6>!61!6!+51A4>!78!>:5!G+70+6;)!>:5/+!1@:774!5#=/+7#;5#>!B61!;7+5!7G5#!6#2!! G71/>/=5)!>:5+5!B61!0+56>5+!A#25+1>6#2/#0!6#2!6@@5G>6#@5!78!644!1>A25#>1)!>:5+5!B61!;7+5!86;/4?!/#=74=5;5#>)!0+56>5+!1>A25#>1! 45625+1:/G)!6#2!;7+5!5885@>/=5!@7446C7+6>/7#!6;7#0!>56@:5+1!6#2!1>A25#>1,! !

An Evaluation of the Community of Caring-In-Schools Initiative "#!QLLQ)!R+/6#!S,!R64/@I/!78!>:5!E5#>5+!87+!.564>:!T74/@?!F>A2/51!/#!E74A;C/6)!K6+?46#2)!@7;G45>52!6!>:+55'?56+!5=64A6>/7#! 78!>:5!E7;;A#/>?!78!E6+/#0!;/2245P:/0:!1@:774!G+70+6;,!D:5!5=64A6>/7#!@7;G6+52!7=5+!Q)U%%!1>A25#>1!/#!E7;;A#/>?!78! E6+/#0!=5+1A1!#7#'E7;;A#/>?!78!E6+/#0!1@:7741!/#!>:+55!1@:774!1?1>5;1!6@+711!>:5!@7A#>+?)!+5G+515#>/#0!2/=5+15!5>:#/@)!! @A4>A+64!6#2!17@/75@7#7;/@!C6@I0+7A#21,!D:5!5=64A6>/7#!87A#2!>:6>!1>A25#>1!/#!E7;;A#/>?!78!E6+/#0!1@:7741!>:6>!B5+5!8A44?! /;G45;5#>/#0!>:5!G+70+6;!:62H! Ƈ!1/0#/8/@6#>4?!:/0:5+!0+625!G7/#>!6=5+6051! Ƈ!1/0#/8/@6#>!+52A@>/7#1!/#!>55#!G+50#6#@?! Ƈ!1/0#/8/@6#>!+52A@>/7#1!/#!6>!+/1I!C5:6=/7+1)!1A@:!61!>:5!A15!78!64@7:74! !

An Option to ‘Just Say No’: Schools as Communities *+,!K6+?!V754I5+!@7;G45>52!6!+5156+@:!1>A2?!87+!:5+!27@>7+64!G+70+6;!7#!E7;;A#/>?!78!E6+/#0!/#!4LL(!6>!>:5!<#/=5+1/>?!78! <>6:,!!F:5!1>A2/52!:7B!>:5!G+70+6;!/;G6@>52!>:5!87447B/#0!545;5#>1!/#!1@:7741H! Ƈ!45625+1:/G! Ƈ!1@:774!@4/;6>5! Ƈ!/#>50+6>/7#!78!=64A51!/#!>:5!@A++/@A4A;! Ƈ!5WG5+/5#>/64!456+#/#0! F:5!87A#2!significant positive differences!87+!G6+>/@/G6#>1!/#!E7;;A#/>?!78!E6+/#0!1@:7741!=5+1A1!@7#>+74!0+7AG1!/#!644!! 6+561)!6>!>:5!1@:774!45=54)!6#2!87+!>56@:5+1)!62;/#/1>+6>7+1)!6#2!1>A25#>1,!


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2011 Utah School of Character Award and Portfolio