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Contents

Studiowork

Boulder Farmers Market

Boulder Farm Stand

Pan-American Pavilion

Paper-Weight Digital Fab

Travelingwork

IMMERSION Studio

Professionalwork

Shinsegae International tower


Marcel De Lange This project was completed for a fourth year studio. we were asked to design a Farmers Market for the city of Boulder.

Marcel De Lange This project was completed for a fourth year studio. we were asked to design a farm stand that reacted to stake-holders needs. specifically farmers and the city of Boulder. Scott Lawrence This project was a competition for a vinyl Pavilion in Toronto, Canada. we were required to use vinyl in innovative ways to design a pavilion for the 2015 pan am games. Marcus Farr This project was completed for a digital fabrication class. using only two materials we were able to create a structural paper wall.

Scott Lawrence This project was completed through a travelling studio that focused on contextually responsive design. the project is an abalone dive center that also acts as a scaffolding for understanding the vertical cliff face where the site is located. Olson-Kundig Architects This is a tower project in Seoul, South Korea that I was fortunate to work with Tom Kundig on during my time at Olson Kundig Architects. Shinsegae international tower is the flagship office for Shinsegae International; Koreas largest retail chain.


Studiowork

farmersmarket


BOULDERFARMERSMARKET Justin Hazelwood. Charles Kennedy Awards: Selected as a senior project of the year Displayed at the end of the year graduation exhibit Displayed at the 2012 Young Architects Awards Gala

SITE GENERATION (Site map and existing/future context) Identified space for market vendor expansion. Trimmed ribbon paths according to program space. Filled in hardscape between ribbons to strengthen circulation, and softscape between ribbons to accommodate program. Used grid points to locate certain objects/nodes. possible nodes: tree, bench, bike rack, light post, etc.

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market building vendor expansion green courtyard for market dushanbe teahouse BMoCA sculpture garden for BMoCA future residential courtyard for residential main park

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FORM GENERATION 1. two main circulation arteries 2. arteries are ramped to create overlap and crossover 3. expanded and compressed ramps to accommodate program sizes 4. assigned ramps active and passive program. active focused inward. passive focused outward 5. connected ramps to create an interior “closed� courtyard


PROGRAM GENERATION Program is separated between Active and Passive ramps. Likewise, the activities associated with each of these ramps is categorized as either Active or Passive. The proximity of Active program to Passive program allows very unique program slippages. The strength of the project is the ability of relatively unassociated program to bleed into one another. 1. (Program diagram) illustrates the allocated amount of space for both active and passive program ramps through simple sqft bars that are then applied to a massing model of the market. 2. (Unrolled floor plan) the linearity of the ramps provides all occupants with an easily-understood organizing system Lobby 23625sqft

Lecture hall Coffee shop Art gallery Class rooms Roof terrace

16500sqft

16500sqft

Entrance/seating Food court Media library (present) Media center (produce) Storage Community kitchen Demonstration space Closed market space

Passive Ramp

Active Ramp

Active Market


The parti for the building was conceived of as a series of program boxes that established visual cues with one another in an attempt to become a catalyst for activating spaces like the main Market space, that may only be used 2 (two) or 3(three) times a week. 1. (Rendering of indoor media library) the active and passive program ramps create unique slippages and visiual cues between program. 2. (Section A) section cut through the middle of open air market. section clearly establishes the design intent and achieves the initial conception for parti.


1. (Rendering of outdoor market space) the function of the outdoor market is to act as a gathering space, not only on market days but everyday. the exterior market spcae is surrounded on all sides by the active ribbon of the buiding. A

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MARKET PLAN 1’= 1/128” 1 2 3 4 5

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open-air market community kitchen flexible demonstartion space closed market space storage

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B FLOOR PLAN 1’= 1/128” 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

interior food court media viewing library media rental space media center (black-box) flexibile classroom space culinary classroom space art gallery coffee shop lecture hall lobby/ book shop

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1. (Section B) section cut through community kitchen/coffee shop/auditorium. 2. (Market Plan adjacent page) market plan focuses on community spaces and takes advantage of an exterior courtyard that can be used for more than simply a farmersmarket. 3. (Floor plan adjacent page) floor plan consists of an active and a passive ramp, which jest for height as they intertwine unique program, creating interesting slippages and cues.


farmersstand


FARMERSMARKETFARMSTAND Justin Hazelwood. Awards: Selected as a senior project of the year Displayed at the end of the year graduation exhibit

PROJECT OVERVIEW

The midterm project for the fourth year studio was a farm stand for Boulders Farmers Market. The objective of the project was to analyze the current construction and distribution of the Markets tents and stands and with the farmers needs in mind, design a new more functional farm stand. With easy and accessible erection being a key issue, the stand utilizes a simple aluminum frame system that can be towed and easily raised using only one person. Farmers also mentioned that current stand systems did not allow them the freedom of display they wished to have. With this in mind the designed stand employs concentric display boxes that can be mounted anywhere on the aluminum skeleton. The boxes would be loaded with fresh goods prior to sale and would then be transported to the market where they could be easily attached and displayed on the aluminum frame in countless dynamic compositions.


PROJECT COMPONENTS 1. Rendering shows the stands set up as they would be during a market day. each of the wooden display boxes detaches for easy transportation and dynamic display. 2. Plan of the farm stand shows the stand fully functional with swing arm out holding canopy up. 3. Swing arm made of tube aluminum is light weight and easy to erect and disassemble.

Detail swing arm

Detail tube aluminium into brackets


Pan-AMpavilion


PAN-AMERICANGAMESPAVILION

Justin Hazelwood, Colin Ostman, Michelle Han, Domonique Kletter Faculty Advisor: Scott Lawrence Awards: Third place AIAS Vinyl Competition First Place University of Colorado Awards Gala: Unbuilt Arch. First Place University of Colorado Awards Gala: Digital Media Permanent display at the University of Colorado School of Arch. Publications: AIAS Crit Journal Borderless, Fall 2011 issue 72

FORM GENERATION

1. circulation from downtown Toronto, the Pan Am village and

the new riparian area meet on the site 2. circulation is split to access seating and a fly over ramp is added to bypass seating and event space 3. seating is lifted while stage and back of house are pushed down for protection against lake winds 4. fly over ramp is lifted 24’ to protect seating from wind while allowing uninterrupted views and movement

Site on the Toronto Waterfront

Future development


ENTRY SEQUENCE 1. (Entry across bridge from Queen’s Quay) Entrance along the waterfront from the future residential development

2. (West entry acts as node and pinch point) one of two entrances. ticketing and crowd control occurs here. bypass ribbon above funnels pavilion goers through this node 3. (East entry from newly developed Riparian zone) second entrance. across the lake from the future riparian zone. second pinch point for ticketing and crowd control

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AFTER THE GAMES After the 2015 Pan-Am games the Pavilion would become a place for community events like concerts and city events. The pavilion would become a social attraction for the waterfront with varied functions including an outdoor cinema projected on the side of the historic Victory Soya Mills silo, several pools and interactive fountains, multi-use park areas, children’s play areas a small beach, and plaza spaces that can hold community events.

VINYL DESIGN ELEMENTS 1.(vinyl canopy and space frame system) The competition being sponsored by the Canadian vinyl institute, required that we attempt to incorporate inovative vinyl elements. Accordingly a translucent vinyl panel cladding system is employed for the pavilion’s canopy. these panels provide shade, rain and wind protection with minimal interruption of the lake and sky views. vinyl is an ideal material for the canopy due to its clean translucent aesthetics and UV resistance


DESIGN STRATEGIES Pavilion is positioned to optimize shading for the audience during summer evenings. This is done in response to the fact that the majority of events will take place during this time. While there was no requirement to utilize the old Victory Soya Mill on the site, we felt that along with acting as a shade structure it provided us with a great opportunity for possible renovation and future event space.

July 5 pm

July 6 pm

July 7 pm


paperweight


PAPERWEIGHT Justin Hazelwood, Colin Ostman, Dominique Kletter Awards: Selected as a senior project of the year Displayed at the end of the year graduation exhibit Displayed at the Dairy Center for the Arts Boulder

Paperweight is a digital fabrication project aimed at creating the perception of mass using a light and flexible material, in this case paper. The juxtaposition between heavy and light is central to the project contributing tactility to visual queues. The initial concept for the project involved the relationship between module and cut sheet. Paperweight* utilizes 95% efficiency per cut sheet while producing one module for each sheet with a laser cut time under 4 minutes. The achieved mastery of this module allows the project to achieve the scale necessary for metaphorical weight while also remaining structural at its core. The projects necessary size creates its own unique problems. To solve this problem the project is capable of becoming a massive accordion for easy transportation.

32�

18�


MODULAR GENERATION 1. (cut-sheet adjacent page) 2. (sheet) original cut sheet produces four identical half diamond pieces ready for folding 3. (fold) tabs are folded backwards while the half diamonds are folded in to create one of four components of the module 4. (attach) each piece is connected to its identical counterpart using prong fasteners. the tabs allow the connection to remain hidden creating uniformity between the modules 5.(connect) once the clips are connected to both tabs one half of the module is created 6. (module)


DOCUMENTATION

1.(render of paper weight in front of the guggenheim) easily erected structure that is both functional and beautiful. the perceieved weight of the wall provides oppurtunity’s we would not have initially thought possible usinga a material like paper. 2. (series of desaturated images) being built work we were able to document the process of physically putting the wall together. this is a simple series from cut sheet to final pin-up and crit.


PHOTOGRAPHS

1. (photograph of paper weight) paper weight turned out to be a very photogenic project, as light would play with the apertures and give the thick paper a radiant glow. 2. (Grass-hopper definition) gross-hopper was crucial in the design process. it allowed us to quickly prototype multiple interations of our wall before achieving the final design. 3. (render of paper weight in the clyfford still museum) the wall has the ability to appear heavy while offering a light weight easy-to-erect barrier between spaces. mobility was a goal of ours from the outset of the project, to accomplish this we relyed on a lite material and an accordian-like construction method.


Travelingwork

IMMERSIOnsonoma


IMMERSIONSONOMACOAST Justin Hazelwood One of 15 students selected Contextually responsive studio Instructor. Scott Lawrence IMMERSION is a travelling studio focused on contextually responsive design. The week long studio was held at Charles Moore and Lawrence Halprin’s legendary Sea Ranch community and lodge in Sonoma California. This part of California is known for its Abalone diving. An incredibly dangerous sport that has recently become highly regulated due to over fishing of this beautiful creature. The purpose of the dive center is both for sport and research. Divers would only live and work in the dive center for a few weeks out of the year, however while they were there they would need access to and space for research equipment to monitor Abalone populations in the surrounding area. On top of this they would also need access to basic living accommodations adjacent to research space and Abalone diving sites. Each student was given free range to choose a site along a 3 mile stretch of coast.

“touch this earth lightly”

Glen Murcutt


1.(site) in accord with contextually responsive design, the site I chose was an existing stair from the soft plateau where the lodge and the majority of houses sit, down an eroded rock face and to the water. 2. (diagram set showing existing and new condition) the new condition would redevelop the existing stair into a series of public and private spaces so as to remain a public access point to the beach while also becoming private work and live spaces for researchers and divers.


1. (diagram set showing existing and new condition) the diagram shows the process of design in plan. the most important aspect of the diagram is separation between public and private uses. 2.(spread from IMMERSION sketchbook) this spread shows sketches that embrace the concept of stepping over the edge. views east are restricted until one steps out onto the cantilever and over the edge of the cliff opening views 270 degrees. 3.(photograph of the existing approach) the choice of this site was very easy for me. the abruptness and stark contrast of landscape between the top of the plateau and beach made the stair a scaffolding for understanding the landscape as well as the rock wall that it was nestled against. The fact that the construction was already present made the idea of contextually responsive design and “touching the earth lightly�, even more relevant


1. (section showing circulation through the dive center) circulation winding down the dive center intertwining public and private spaces. 2.(sketchbook spreads showing process sketches. plan elevation) 3.(photograph of existing interior stair structure) the existing stair is a beautiful weathered wood and concrete system.


Professionalwork

shinsegaetower


shinsegaetower Olson-Kundig Architects Seoul, South Korea Schematic Design/Design Drawings Project Architect: Tom Kundig Project Manager: Dan Wilson Shinsegae international tower is an 18 floor, mixed-use building that will act as the headquaters for Shinsegae international, one of Seoul’s largest corporations and the country’s first chain of department stores. The bottom 2 floors will house retail space while the next 14 envelope the office spaces for the company’s executives and call systems. The 17th floor will be an office for Mrs. Chung, the company’s CEO and the 18th and final floor will be her personal penthouse. The project went through 3 years of schematic design before construction began in September of 2013. My role in the project included everything from schematic design and diagramming to construction drawing and model building.

SCHEME 2: GLASS VEIL • • • •

ET HER EAL G L ASS B OX ON A MON OL I T HI C B ASE SHI MMER ON A UN I F OR ML Y F L AT F AC AD E L AYER S OF V EI L / G L ASS P R OV I D E SUN C ON T R OL HOR I ZON T AL V EI L ON SOUT H, V ER T I C AL V EI L

ON EAST AN D W EST • L I F EST Y L E B ASE: R UN W AY , C AF ES, AR T D I SP L AY

S H I NS E G A E C H E O NG - D A M D O NG O F F I C E • 5


JUSTINHAZELWOOD contact

hazelwoodjustin5@gmail.com 303.378.1431

“A meaningful architectural experience is not simply a series of retinal images. The elements of architecture are not visual units or ‘gestalt’; They are confrontations and encounters. A building is encountered; it is approached, confronted, related to one’s body, moved through, utilized as a condition for other things. Architecture directs, scales and frames actions, perceptions and thoughts.”

experience

2013 Olson Kundig Architects intern architect 2012 Don Parker Architects intern architect 2011 Workshop8 Architects student intern

education

2011 University of Colorado, Boulder. bachelors of environmental design architecture gpa 3.65

awards

2011 University Exhibition 4 projects selected 2010 Project of the year 1st place for second year studio

Juhani Pallasmaa -encounters

2010 AIAS Pan American Games Pavilion 3rd place

publications

2013 Architecture Record-July 2013 Issue drawings for gethsemane church designed by jim olson 2011 AIAS Crit Journal Issue 73 pan american competition winners 2011 Architect Colorado freedom by design deck build

references

Kimberly Shoemake-Medloc olson kundig architects (206)624-5670 Scott Lawrence university of colorado (303)550-9921 Elizabeth Conklin olson kundig architects (206)624-5670

skills

hand drafting/sketching revit autocad sketchup rhinoceros 3d creative suite maxwell render kyrkethea vector works


Olson Kundig Architects intern architect

Whitefish Residence tom kundig whitefish, montana schematic design Henson Residence tom kundig hollywood hills, california pre design/schematic design Shinsegae Tower tom kundig/jim olson seoul, south korea pre design/schematic design/digital and physical model Gethsemane Church jim olson seattle, washington construction drawings/presentation drawings Smith College Dormitory tom kundig northampton, massachusetts pre design/schematic design Mehta Residence jim olson mehta, california construction documents


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