__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

Winter 2018 B’Yachad: The Newsletter of Jewish National Fund

jnf.org


Together Winter 2018 B’Yachad has the largest circulation of any Jewish-American newsletter. We hope you enjoy this issue. Send your feedback to newsletter@jnf.org.

INSIDE THIS ISSUE 08

- B’Yachad Editorial Staff

Breaking the Nonprofit Glass Ceiling The philanthropic glass ceiling is ready and waiting to be broken, and Jewish National Fund’s Women for Israel is paving the way. Read about JNF women and their impact on philanthropy and Israel.

B’ YACHAD STAFF PUBLISHER

Russell F. Robinson EXECUTIVE EDITOR

Jodi Bodner EDITOR IN CHIEF

Daniel Peri MANAGING EDITOR

16

The Green Issue

32

National Conference Recap

Adam H. Brill ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Donna Breitbart CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Don Morris ART DIRECTORS

Gaby Garuz Jessica Herschler DIGITAL PRODUCTION

Greg Weber

JEWISH NATIONAL FUND (JNF) began in 1901 as a dream and vision to reestablish a homeland in Israel for Jewish people everywhere. Jews the world over collected coins in iconic JNF Blue Boxes, purchasing land and planting trees until ultimately, their dream of a Jewish homeland was a reality. Today, JNF continues to give all generations a unique voice in building and ensuring the prosperity of the land of Israel through their generosity and partnership with the people of Israel. JNF strives to bring an enhanced quality of life to all of Israel’s residents, and translate these advancements to the world beyond. JNF is greening the desert with millions of trees, building thousands of parks, creating new communities and cities for generations of Israelis to call home, bolstering Israel’s water supply, helping develop innovative arid-agriculture techniques, and educating both young and old about the founding and importance of Israel and Zionism. JNF is a registered 501(c)(3) organization and United Nations NGO, which continuously earns top ratings from charity overseers. For more information on JNF, call 800.JNF.0099 or visit jnf.org.

Long before Israel’s founding, Jewish National Fund was greening the deserts of the Jewish homeland and creating a modern-day oasis. Read how JNF’s environmental work continues on as we rehabilitate hazardous waterways into popular recreational areas, work to save a desert icon, set a global example in afforestation, and harness the healing and therapeutic powers of nature for society’s most vulnerable.

Missed out on Jewish National Fund’s 2017 National Conference in South Florida? Check out some of the great moments and book your spot for National Conference in Phoenix now! You won’t want to miss it.

A note from the editor: Jewish National Fund wishes a hearty mazel tov to the winner of our Wine Label Contest, Danielle Halpern (@designer.dani)! Over the past couple of months, we set out in search of the best, most creative, and engaging label to adorn Stern Winery’s soon-to-be released line of kosher wines. Out of the dozens of designs that came pouring in (pun intended), Danielle’s was chosen for its aesthetics and connection to the Stern brand. Stern Winery is a family-owned boutique winery in Israel’s Western Galilee, whose business not only contributes to region’s growth and development, but also shares JNF’s Go North vision. Visit Stern Winery’s website at stern-winery.co.il/en. Jewish National Fund is always brewing up new and innovative contests, so keep a look out for them by following our Instagram account—@JNFUSA. Who knows, you might be our next winner! And don’t forget to flip to page 34 to read about the winners of our other recent contest.


Water Update The Essence of Life

Creating a Positive Impact on Israel’s Natural Beauty

By Giora Shaham, Director General of the Israel Water Authority

A Message from Our President, Dr. Sol Lizerbram

ISRAEL’S WATER SECTOR is one of the most advanced in the world. I emphatically

believe this and state it with pride. To arrive at this point, it was understood 20 years ago that the State of Israel’s natural water resources would not be able to supply the long-term quantities and needs of the country. In the last decade, decision makers—already facing a water shortage and population growth—adopted and implemented the Integrated Water Resources Management Approach. The results have transformed Israel’s water economy: high efficiency was attained in agricultural production per water unit, an aggressive educational and media campaign reduced domestic water consumption by nearly 20%, government-supported treatment plants and hundreds of Jewish National Fundbuilt reservoirs around the country enabled the reuse of 86% of treated sewage for agricultural irrigation, and funds were invested into desalination plants that now provide 30% of Israel’s drinking water. These are major accomplishments, and today we are working on finalizing a master plan for Israel’s water sector to ensure a water secure future for the land and people of Israel through 2050. To regulate and manage its water resources, Israel’s Water Authority strictly enforces the National Water Laws. Passed in the 1950s, these laws ensure the proper allocation of water resources for optimal use in all sectors and for the country’s development, preserve and protect existing natural water reserves, set water tariffs and levies, and so on. Despite all of our advances and the major steps taken, we are not immune from the forces of nature. For four consecutive years, Northern Israel has suffered from severe and unprecedented drought, leaving the Sea of Galilee ​​ and water reservoirs in poor conditions. Without significant rainfall we will inevitably cross the “red line” and see negative effects on our underground aquifers and the Sea of ​​Galilee. Fortunately, no impact is expected on the public’s drinking water supply thanks to desalination. The agricultural industry, however, will be acutely affected by persistent drought—particularly in the agriculturally rich Upper Galilee, Sea of Galilee basin, and Beit She’an Valley. But, where there’s a problem, a solution can be found. Since the 1980s, Jewish National Fund has built over 250 reservoirs across Israel, each of them storing recycled and runoff water for agricultural use. A potential solution to Israel’s pending agricultural crisis is to build more reservoirs. With an additional 80 to 100 million cubic meters of water Rainwater Harvesting Program at a local Israeli school available, Israel’s agricultural industry would be in a different condition—even during consecutive drought years. Such an endeavor has a cost of $350-$400 million—a considerably low expenditure to avert an even greater economic loss—and can be accomplished within a decade. Water is the essence of life and is needed to keep Israel green. It is the most important environmental resource that has enabled us in the past, and will again in the future, help make our deserts bloom. Jewish National Fund has the knowledge and experience, and together we can accomplish anything. Giora Shaham is the Director General of the Israel Water Authority. To learn more about JNF’s National Water Task Force, contact Talia Tzour Avner at ttzour@jnf.org.

IT’S NOT JUST the earthy smell or the texture of rich

soil between your fingers that reaches deep down into your soul as you plant a young green sapling into the fertile ground beneath you. Anywhere else in the world, this mere act of planting a four-inch sprout that will one day mature into a 70-foot mighty oak would be just that—a tree planting. In Israel, however, it’s a spiritual experience; a connection to a storied past and a future bound by sacrifice, Zionism, and a land that defines a people and her nation. At its heart is Jewish National Fund. While Israel is only one of a few countries in the world that entered the 21st century with a net gain in its number of trees, amazingly, Israel was not blessed with natural forests. For over 116 years, Jewish National Fund has greened the Jewish homeland with more than 260 million hand-planted trees throughout the country, providing luscious belts of green covering more than 250,000 acres. Our forests provide an invaluable green canopy for both the people of Israel and the roughly 2,241 different species of animals who call it home. From the olive, carob, almond, cypress, and the exotic Atlantic cedar, every tree makes a difference, every tree connects to the future, and each one calls out, “Am Yisrael Chai.” Today, we must grapple with the challenge of balancing the phenomenal growth and development Israel has experienced over the last decade, with the maintenance of an ecologically sound environment. That’s why our role as guardian of the land has become ever more critical. After all, taking care of the earth and making it better is what we are all about. Long before Arbor Day and Earth Day became movements to channel environmentalists, Jews were mandated to respect, honor, and cherish this important practice—evidenced by the ancient festivals of Passover, Shavuot, and Sukkot. Each Tu BiShvat we welcome and celebrate the New Year for Trees when nature, in Israel and around the world, approaches the spring cycle of rebirth. In this issue of B’Yachad, we spotlight our work on Israel’s environment and the efforts taken to care for the vast natural resources in Israel. Equally important is the laborious task of rehabilitating those areas in need of care. Repairing the riverbed in Be’er Sheva—a pinnacle goal in the development of the Be’er Sheva River Park and Lake—and filling it with clean, recycled water to not only serve to replenish this often dry channel, but potentially return wildlife that has long since disappeared from this desert oasis, is a priority. Israel’s dramatic and colorful landscape is meant to be experienced with all the senses. Jewish National Fund offers powerful tools for people with disabilities and special needs to be able to take part in activities no matter their ability level. Nature comes within reach for countless Israelis on accessible paths and trails that wind through lush vegetation at our parks, allowing them to take part in both environmental and therapeutic programming to heal, explore, and relate to the world around them. Few nations can match the eco-friendly accomplishments of Israel. This is thanks to our donors, but it is also indicative of our history as a people. Over the millennia, Jews have been caretakers of the land of Israel and Jewish National Fund’s work every day ensures growth and life. There can be no better reward for mankind than leaving the world greener than we found it, and to me this is just one of the many practices of tikkun olam. You can always reach me at slizerbram@jnf.org. Jewish National Fund

B'Yachad

03


Campaign Update

Campaign All-Star

Bruce K. Gould Vice President, Campaign/President-Elect

Ted Koenig 2017 Chicago Tree of Life™ Honoree

JEWISH NATIONAL FUND is probably best

known as “the tree people”­—still. I often hear that from people unfamiliar with Jewish National Fund’s long history of accomplishments in developing the land of Israel and our vision to build and revitalize the Negev and Galilee. As much as I’d like to shout out from the rooftops that “JNF is so much more than trees!” the truth is that the 260 million trees planted by Jewish National Fund over the last 116 years is remarkable. It is part of our DNA and something we should take great pride in. Consider this: long before Jewish National Fund began purchasing land for the establishment of the State of Israel, two millennia had passed since the Jewish exile, and with it the desert had reclaimed much of the land of Israel. Today, across the whole country, Israel is green. JNF’s work continues to evolve and adapt as new necessities arise throughout the country, such as improving and building physical infrastructure and housing in the country’s north and south. Still, JNF remains undisputedly the largest environmental organization in Israel. As part of our ambitious One Billion Dollar Roadmap for the Next Decade, Jewish National Fund is committing $200 million toward water solutions, forestry and green innovations, and environmental research and development. Our environmental work also acts as a catalyst to move our community building forward. Such is the case in Be’er Sheva, the capital of the Negev and the fastest growing city in Israel. Ten years ago, the city was best known for the garbage dump that filled the riverbed running through town. In 2007, JNF stepped in and committed $10 million to remediate that brownfield ecological disaster. Three years later, in cooperation with JNF partners, the Be’er Sheva Be’er Sheva River River was rehabilitated, and cleaned, and today, including a $60 million investment by JNF, the former eyesore is part of a beautiful 1,300acre park enjoyed by city residents. The Be’er Sheva River’s clean-up has had a positive ripple effect. It has spurred housing development, new business, an expansion of the park with a 12,500 seat amphitheater, and the renovation of Abraham’s Well for tourists. It doesn’t stop there: in the near future Be’er Sheva will boast Israel’s second largest lake—filled with recycled water. All of Jewish National Fund’s work develops and secures the land of Israel, but our efforts to rehabilitate the environment may still be our best known, and perhaps justifiably so. Jewish National Fund was green before being green was considered cool, and future generations deserve a healthy Israel. To get involved, contact Bruce Gould at bgould@jnf.org.

04

B'Yachad

Jewish National Fund

someone relatively new to Jewish National Fund to become a Campaign All-Star, but Ted Koenig is rare. In a few short years, he went from being a guest at Jewish National Fund’s Chicago Tree of Life™ Award Dinner to becoming a Jewish National Fund superstar and honoree. When Chicago was considering beginning a Corporate Advisory Board, he was the first person that came to mind. “Ted is always among the first to step up to the plate,” said Eric Goldstein, JNF Chicago Director of Major Gifts and Corporate Giving. “His passion for Jewish National Fund and Israel has been infectious in the Chicago corporate community.” Ted is President, CEO, and founder of Monroe Capital LLC, a leading provider of senior and junior debt and equity co-investments to middlemarket companies in the U.S. and Canada. His business record has gained him recognition among his associates and he has been the recipient of several industry and civic awards, including the Academy of Alumni Fellows of the Kelley School of Business at Indiana University for his contributions to the art and science of business management, and the Torch of Liberty Award from the Anti-Defamation League. “Ted is a talented orator and frequently speaks at Advisory Board meetings,” said Beth Cherner, JNF Executive Vice President for Illinois. “He has a passion for sharing his love of Israel and Jewish National Fund with community leaders, particularly with young professionals. His very first lecture to JNFuture members on philanthropic leadership attracted over 40 young professionals to Jewish National Fund. Ted’s dedication to growing the next generation of Israel supporters is admirable.” In 2016, Ted took his first trip to Israel. Along with Rob Rubin—a friend, business colleague, and JNF Chicago Board Member—he did more than sightsee and visit Jewish National Fund projects. He made friends with many JNF partners, and developed a deep appreciation for the breadth and scope of the work we do every day in Israel. A few months later, Ted returned to Israel with his wife, Nancy, and their four children, Michael, Stephanie, David, and Jonathan. IT’S RARE FOR

“We were thrilled when Ted was named the Tree of Life Honoree for 2017,” said National Board Member and 2017 Tree of Life™ Chair Harold Kaplan. “He promised that we would break records by having 1,000 attendees and raising over one million dollars, and through his hard work we broke past records! It is Ted’s passion for the land and people of Israel that make him our Campaign All-Star.”

Reduce Your Carbon Footprint In a single year, one acre of trees offsets the CO2 produced by driving a car for 26,000 miles. Plant trees in Israel now. jnf.org/trees 800.542.TREE (8733)


PLANNED GIVING

An Engaging Experience in Israel for Active Adults By Matt Bernstein, CFP, JNF Chief Planned Giving Officer FIFTY STRANGERS FROM the U.S. met in Tel Aviv on a Sunday

evening last September. For some, it was their first visit to Israel; others had visited many times. The reasons for their visit varied, but the common denominator was clear: all sought to reconnect with their childhood memories of putting coins in the Blue Box and with Israel. JNF’s 10-day Sunshine Tour met that criteria but did even more: many characterized the trip as life-changing. “It had been at least 18 years since our last visit to Israel, but we were prepared for the enormous changes we would find in today’s modern Israel with JNF’s Sunshine Tour,” said Marsha and Burt Henry of North Caldwell, NJ. Jewish National Fund’s Sunshine Tour is unique in that it is designed for people ages 55+ who lead active lives, and offers more time to explore and experience Israel. At Independence Hall, we learned about the history of Zionism and were treated to a re-enactment of that momentous occasion in 1948 when David Ben Gurion announced Israel’s establishment. It was an amazing, and moving experience as our group sang the Israeli national anthem, Hatikvah. In Jerusalem, we visited Yad Vashem (Israel’s national Holocaust memorial) where the group formed a bond while partaking in an emotional journey to better understand this tragic period of our collective Jewish history.

We visited the Galilee and learned about JNF’s Go North initiative that is growing regional tourism and new economic opportunities in Northern Israel. In the Negev, we saw firsthand the effect JNF contributions are having in the revitalization of Be’er Sheva, the crown jewel of JNF’s Blueprint Negev initiative. “Of the many sights we were exposed to, one in particular touched my and Burt’s souls,” Marsha said, adding, “Seeing the differences ALEH Negev-Nahalat Eran makes for the special needs community really hit home.” We also visited JNF’s Sderot Indoor Recreation Center, a signature JNF project, designed to provide a safe playing environment for children. At Mitzpe Ramon we watched the sunrise while learning about the many JNF projects our donors support on behalf of the land and people of Israel. Jeanne Samet, a participant from Montclair, NJ, was also moved by JNF’s impact in Southern Israel. “Being a social worker, I was so impressed with all the social and economic projects JNF is involved in,” she said. We went back to Jerusalem and greeted Shabbat at the Kotel. After dinner, we shared our experiences and while many were aware of JNF’s history of planting millions of trees, they were in awe at JNF’s role in making Israel a strong and vibrant part of all our lives. “Everything our group saw expanded my knowledge

Sunshine Tour participants visit the old city of Akko

of Israel and JNF, and truly touched my heart,” Samet said during our final group discussion. Others agreed, and said, “This trip and Jewish National Fund has changed our lives.”

Join us for our next Sunshine Tour from August 26 – September 4, 2018. Whether it will

be your first or 100th visit to Israel, we can promise you an experience you will not forget.

For information, please contact Matt Bernstein at 800.562.7526 or visit jnf.org/sunshinedetails.

How Will You Be Remembered After You're Gone? are gone, will you be remembered? Many will certainly be remembered in the hearts and minds of their immediate family and loved ones, but also for the legacy they leave and their lasting impact. Two such individuals were Jack and Shirley Liebowitz of New York, NY, who left not just one, but two lasting legacies upon their passing—Jack in 2000 and Shirley in 2013. One was left through Jewish National Fund and the other through Jack’s involvement in the company that has become known the world over as DC Comics. Born in Proskurov (present-day Ukraine) in 1900, Liebowitz and his family immigrated to New York City in 1910. By age 24, he had earned a degree in accounting from New York University and subsequently set up shop as an accountant with the International Ladies Garment Workers Union (ILGWU). In 1929, Liebowitz became the personal accountant to Harry Donenfeld for his publishing company and, along with Paul Sampliner, co-founder of the Independent News Company. But it was in 1935 when Major Malcolm WheelerNicholson came to Independent News looking for a new distributor for his comic book projects—among them Detective Comics, Inc.—that Leibowitz’s career took off. By 1938, Liebowitz became the sole owner of the LONG AFTER YOU

company. He came up with the series, Action Comics, and hired writer Jerry Siegel and artist Joe Shuster, the creators of “Superman.” Liebowitz remained in the forefront, bringing “Superman” to radio, theatrical animated Jack Liebowitz shorts, and television. DC Courtesy: DC Comics Comics went public in 1961 and was sold to Kinney National Services in 1967. Jack and his second wife, Shirley, who was an accomplished painter, traveled extensively throughout Europe and to Israel. In addition to being an accomplished artist, Shirley was also an avid collector of valuable paintings and sculptures and friends with Pierre Matisse, a Frenchborn American art dealer and the son of Henri Matisse. Throughout their lives, the Liebowitzes remained passionate about caring for Jews in need and supporting Israel.

“Ms. Liebowitz was a very caring woman, deeply concerned with the less fortunate both here and in Israel,” said Dennis Drebsky, executor of the Liebowitz Estate. “She was especially sensitive to the challenges facing Israel and wanted to use her wealth to help as much as possible,” he added. Subsequently, it was made clear that part of Shirley’s residual estate be dedicated to these causes. As a result, because of all the work Jewish National Fund did and continues to do, JNF received $1.4 million to support a senior residence in Be’er Sheva dedicated in memory of Shirley W. and Jack S. Liebowitz. Shirley will be remembered as a creative painter, a talented pianist, and as woman of culture and compassion for seniors in need. Jack will be remembered as the man that brought the world “Superman” and as a superman in his own right, with his and Shirley’s legacy of helping the land and people of Israel through Jewish National Fund. To leave your legacy and read other stories of people who have left their estates to Jewish National Fund, visit jnflegacy.org or call 800.562.7526. Planned Giving

B'Yachad

05


FOOD & WINE

Souvlaki: Greek Food in the Heart of Israel WHEN CHEF URI Arnold

was growing up in South Tel Aviv, Greek cuisine still wasn’t trendy in Israel. Today, however, it is a constant in many of Israel’s modern restaurants, and with good reason: Greek food embodies the core spirit of the Mediterranean— hearty, home-style cooking that celebrates local ingredients and the fruit of the sea with passion and finesse. Chef Arnold’s new restaurant and taverna, Souvlaki, is perfectly situated on Netanya’s gorgeous beachfront and offers the Greek classics he watched the neighborhood yayas (grandmothers) preparing when he was a child. Guests can feast on delectable mezze salads, dolmas (stuffed grape leaves), gyros, and, of course, juicy souvlaki meats, while sipping on glasses of traditional ouzo, a must at any authentic Greek taverna. Looking to capture the essence of Greek cuisine while keeping things kosher? This parve tzatziki dip recipe (right) is perfect for dolloping on top of grilled chicken or meat, or just enjoyed with grilled flatbread. For more information on Souvlaki, please visit goo.gl/gcaZ9c, or call +972.9.770.2080. Restaurant is kosher.

Chef Uri Arnold’s Parve Tzatziki—Greek Yogurt Dip Serves 5-7

INGREDIENTS:

·· ·· ·· ·· ·· ··

2 lbs. tofu spread 4 medium Persian cucumbers, diced (set some aside for garnish) 4-5 cloves of garlic, minced 1/2 bunch of fresh dill, finely chopped (set some aside for garnish) 1/2 cup of fresh-squeezed lemon juice Salt and pepper to taste

INSTRUCTIONS:

·· Place all ingredients in a food processor and pulse until a chunky dip has formed. ·· Transfer dip into a decorative bowl and garnish with cucumber, dill, olive oil, and coarse black pepper before serving. For a dairy version, substitute labane or Greek yogurt in place of tofu.

BRING ISRAEL INTO YOUR COMMUNITY Find the best speakers for meetings, community events, synagogue gatherings, and more. Gain insight and unparalleled perspectives on Israel, JNF, and other important topics. jnf.org/speakers ∙ speakers@jnf.org ∙ 212.879.9307

06

B'Yachad

Food & Wine

June 25  –  July 16, 2018

SPEND 3 WEEKS IN ISRAEL ON A SERVICE LEARNING ADVENTURE Ages 14   –18

To learn more or register, contact Marni Heller at 212.472.9300 x485   ·   MHeller@RootsIsrael.org   ·   RootsIsrael.org


TRAVEL & TOURS

Come 'Green' Israel

Join us and volunteer with Jewish National Fund Israel is one of the most ecologically diverse countries in the Middle East, with an abundance of environmentally-themed tourist adventures for everyone’s taste. But did you know that you can also make a lasting impact on Israel’s environment while having a great time?

Volunteer with Jewish National Fund for a day

Be A Modern-Day Farmer

Lend A Helping Hand

Volunteer with modern-day pioneers farming tomatoes and other local produce in the flourishing greenhouses of Halutza, where JNF is making the desert bloom.

Explore the outdoors while creating lasting memories and bonding with special needs children at LOTEM, an ecological oasis in the Western Galilee.

Join a Jewish National Fund Volunteer Trip to Israel

JNFuture Volunteer Vacation (ages 25-35)

Canadian American Active Retirees in Israel (CAARI)

Get your hands dirty while volunteering to build and improve the land of Israel.

Learn the land and lend a hand through rewarding community service and various tourist destinations.

Learn More About JNF’s Travel Opportunities 877.JNF.TOUR (877.563.8687) ∙ travel@jnf.org ∙ jnf.org/travel There’s still time to celebrate Israel@70 with Jewish National Fund in April 2018! See back page for more details. Travel & Tours

B'Yachad

07


WOMEN FOR ISRAEL

Breaking the Nonprofit Glass Ceiling Creating the changes we want through Women for Israel By Myra Chack Fleischer I AM THE proud daughter

of a woman who, in many ways, went against the traditional conventions of her times. It was 1943 when she enrolled in pharmacy school at the age of 16. After marrying my father, who was employed by the same pharmaceutical company, she continued working, stopping only when she had children. There was no such thing as daycare and my father earned significantly more, so it made sense for her to be the stay-at-home parent. It was a decision that many parents made—and still make. Today, women are the backbone of the U.S. economy in a way they couldn’t be when my mother gave up her career to raise her family. Women are educated, we work or own businesses—more than nine million U.S. companies are women-owned, employing nearly eight million people and generating $1.5 trillion in sales—and we raise our families. On top of that, we find time to give back and are engaged in various philanthropic activities. However, there still remains a gap in leadership roles even in the philanthropies that women champion. The philanthropic glass ceiling is ready and waiting to be broken—it’s time. If we women are 50.8% of the population, we should be 50% of the leadership too. Join me and the thousands of other women, and make your mark with Jewish National Fund’s Women for Israel. Zionism and love of Israel has always been part of

“The philanthropic glass ceiling is ready and waiting to be broken—it’s time. If we women are 50.8% of the population, we should be 50% of the leadership too.“ my family legacy, and I first got involved with Jewish National Fund in 2010 when I joined my local San Diego Board. Joining the JNF family has provided me with the privilege of working in many capacities for the benefit of the land and people of Israel. One of my proudest roles is serving as National Vice President of Jewish National Fund's Women for Israel. I am thrilled to be able to continue the rich history and legacy of the group of women who came together in 1997 to form the Sapphire Society and Women for Israel. Of significant note: In 2013, women contributed a little more than $11 million to our annual campaign. In just four short years, that number has ballooned to more than $22 million…an incredible 100% increase! Myra, her husband Charlie, their children, and her mother Fredelle Chack

We have worked hard to play a more active role in leadership roles on both the local and national levels. And we are making headway. Many women have stepped up to the plate and become more involved on their local JNF boards. Where many philanthropic organizations are inherently led by men, change is taking place at Jewish National Fund. Positions that have historically been held by men are now being led by women. This year, 11 women were named to JNF’s National Board and many took on the role of area Board President across the country. The women at Jewish National Fund are changing the status quo, but true change must come from us women philanthropists banding together. I am proud of these changes, but there is more to do. This is a rallying call for all women. Join a committee, or your local board. Take on a leadership position. I guarantee you people want the help. I’m sure when my 16-year-old mother walked into her first pharmacy school class, people wondered: “What’s she doing here?” She, and they, got over it. March is Women’s Month, and what better time to get involved in one of Women for Israel’s many events across the country. Join us and together we will make history and shatter the philanthropic glass ceiling. Myra Chack Fleischer is National Vice President of Women for Israel and President of JNF’s San Diego Board. To get involved in WFI, please contact Sharon David at sdavid@jnf.org or at 212.879.9305 x242.

Jewish National Fund

Queen of Sheba: Women for Israel Tour November 8 – 14, 2018 Join us for a women’s only trip­— an unforgettable experience of Israel through women’s eyes. R EGI S T ER T ODAY

Wonder Women The heroes of our nation. 08

B'Yachad

Women for Israel

Be part of Women's Month March 2018. jnf.org/women 800.jnf.0099

jnf.org/Queenofsheba18 sdavid@jnf.org ∙ 212.879.9305 x242


JNFUTURE

Rising to the Challenge Continuing a Family Legacy with JNFuture By Stephanie Kelman IF THERE IS a gene for being part

of Jewish National Fund, I must have it. My grandparents and parents always instilled a strong Zionist spirit and love of Israel at home. There were Blue Boxes sprinkled around our house, and tree certificates were given for every milestone. My father and grandfather were both involved with Jewish National Fund’s Phoenix Board, and in time, their passionate and dedicated work with Jewish National Fund was passed down to me. Today, I proudly carry the torch and work to inspire that same passion and dedication among my generation—millennials—as National Chair of JNFuture. Getting involved in JNFuture wasn’t instantaneous. It wasn’t until college when I felt the connection and pull to continue my family’s legacy of involvement with Jewish National Fund and Israel—but in my own way. I began interning in Jewish National Fund's Marketing Department in New York, learning firsthand how JNF’s work positively affects the lives of nearly every Israeli. It was then that I knew I had to do more to influence my generation to stand up and be proactive in securing Israel’s future, and JNFuture was the means to do that. JNFuture’s vision has been clear since its founding in 2007—to engage young adults and professionals (ages 22–40) who share a passion for Israel, and prepare them to become future leaders. In 2007, we were just a handful of members. Today JNFuture has more than 1,000 members nation-wide and over 20 chapters in the U.S.! My father taught me that one must do whatever one can to make sure Israel exists, because the Jewish State ensures the continued existence of the Jewish people. With those words in mind, my involvement with JNF

“Millennials must continue supporting Israel. It’s our responsibility to keep Israel safe, because no one else is going to do it for us.“

snowballed: I co-founded the Arizona JNFuture chapter—now the second largest chapter in the country—created the vision behind our successful annual Shabbat in the Desert and have twice been the JNFuture Chair at National Conference. In 2015, I further expanded my knowledge of JNF’s work for the land and people of Israel by going to Israel with the JNFuture Leadership Institute Mission (JLIM)—a program founded by Dr. Toby Mower for dedicated JNFuture members. Dr. Mower and Julie Schoen are generous supporters of this vital program. JLIM transformed my path in Jewish National Fund. I began my two-year tenure as National Vice Chair, learning and growing through the mentorship of Lauren France, then national chair of JNFuture. Lauren and I increased our focus on leadership development and launched the first annual JNFuture Leadership Institute Seminar (JLIS) in Phoenix, a gathering for JNFuture National Board members, Major Donors, JLIM alumni, and JNFuture chapter leaders to meet for leadership development. It is this leadership development work that drives me every day as National Chair of JNFuture, and I have made it a central goal. I want to help grow and motivate national and local board members to be active leaders for Jewish National Fund and Israel. Effective leadership ensures that our generation is confident and prepared to carry on JNF’s legacy, and inspires future generations to do the same. Millennials must continue supporting Israel. It’s our responsibility to keep Israel safe, because no one else is going to do it for us. We may support our homeland in different ways than our grandparents and parents once did, but the vision and drive will remain the same, and it begins with JNFuture. I want to make sure Israel’s future is bright for my children and grandchildren, but that won’t happen without us. JNFuture members are not only the leaders of tomorrow; we are the leaders of today.

Jewish National Fund: Israel@70 Tour

Young Leadership Experience April 12 – 19, 2018

Optional extension in Eilat: April 19 – 22

TOUR HIGHLIGHTS

• See a different side of Israel with other young professionals ages 25  –  40. • Explore the hidden gems of the northern region, Tel Aviv’s exciting culture and culinary scene, and Jerusalem’s mosaic of ancient historical sites. • An insider’s look into Israel’s deep-rooted history dating back 70 years to the fight for independence through present day.

Register today at jnf.org/70youngleadership M O R E I N F O R M AT I O N

Jessica Milstein jmilstein@jnf.org   ·   212.879.9305 x978 Anna Richlin arichlin@jnf.org   ·   212.879.9305 x826

Stephanie Kelman is the National Chair of JNFuture. To learn more about JNFuture, contact Anne Tishkoff at atishkoff@jnf.org or call 212.879.9300 x297. JNFuture

B'Yachad

09


JEWISH NATIONAL FUND

ACROSS THE COUNTRY FOR INFO ON UPCOMING JNF EVENTS, VISIT JNF.ORG AND CLICK ON “JNF IN YOUR AREA”

SOUTHERN

MIDWEST

3

1 1.

2

(L-R) Carly Bierman, Chantal Itzhakov, Ilene Bierman, Deborah Gaspar, Fonda Arbetter, and Marcel Solman at a VIP reception in Dallas.

2.

Terry Milman and David Goldstein at JNF’s Breakfast for Israel in Austin.

1 1.

Gail and Hunter Eisenberg at the annual Chicago JNFuture Family Apple Picking Trip in Wisconsin.

2 2.

(L-R) Tree of Life™ Award Honoree Ted Koenig and his wife, Nancy, with Bonnie and Michael Balkin at the Chicago Tree of Life™ Award Dinner at the Hyatt Regency Hotel.

4 3.

(L-R) David Weintraub, Dana Randel, Eshley Spitzer, and Amanda Feder at JNFuture’s Windy City Shabbat in Chicago.

4.

(L-R) Alan and Diane Weber, Honoree Arn Bortz, Rhonda Sheakley, and Honorees Neil Bortz and Alana Gerson at the Ohio Valley Tree of Life™ Award Dinner at the Cincinnati Hilton.

MID-ATLANTIC

2

5

6

7

1

4

9

8

10 9

3

11

5

12

5.

(L-R) Rhonda Sheakley with Eddie and Nina Paul at the Ohio Valley Tree of Life™ Award Dinner at the Cincinnati Hilton.

10. Guest

1.

Leonard and Gabriela Bebchick visit students at Alexander Muss High School in Israel (AMHSI-JNF) in Hod HaSharon, Israel.

6.

Morry and Michelle Weiner at the Ohio Valley Tree of Life™ Award Dinner at the Cincinnati Hilton.

11. (L-R)

2.

(L-R) Betsy Narrow with JNF National Campaign Director Diane Scar and Lynn Kapiloff at a barbeque in Baltimore.

7.

(L-R) Nancy Sandler, Eileen Graves, Susan Strait, Cindy Levy, Enid BootzinBerkovitz, and Dr. Neena Florsheim at a Guardian of Israel Award Dinner in Milwaukee.

12. (L-R)

3.

(L-R) Orly Shalem with Tremayne Smith and Joe Marzouk at JNF’s 2017 National Conference.

Leonard Senkfor and Gilda Cohen at a Major Donor Thank You event in Cleveland.

4.

Dr. Harold and Anne Podell at a meeting in Washington, D.C.

8. 9.

(L-R) Harrison Manyoma, JoAnn Magnuson, and Marshall Mintz at a JNF-Heroes to Heroes luncheon in Minneapolis.

5.

(L-R) Nanci Seff presents Phyllis Brown with a Chai Society necklace at a JNF dinner in Baltimore.

6.

David Rubin visits with an IDF lone solider in Israel on JNF’s Sunshine Tour.

100 10

B'Yachad

Across the Country

Speaker Rabbi Joseph Telushkin visiting the Gross Schechter Day School 8th Grade Class in Cleveland.

6

Chuck Whitehill receives olive oil from JNF-Halutza Liaison Yedidya Harush in Cleveland. Nancy Siegel, Idy Goodman, and Susan Pittelman at a Makor meeting in Milwaukee.


NEW ENGLAND

8

7

9

10

11

12

1

2

3

4

5

7.

(L-R) Marcia Greenfield receives her Chai Society necklace from Nanci Seff at a Women for Israel (WFI) event in Baltimore.

1.

8.

(L-R) Galina Gurok, Yoel Malashock, Steve Postal, Matthew Memberg, Michael Hantgan, and Stephen Shaul at JNFuture Margate Meets Tel Aviv at Lucy the Elephant in Margate.

(L-R) Women for Israel (WFI) Chair Risa Aronson, National Co-Chair of WFI’s Professional Women’s Division Jessica Abo, Event Host Jodi Sokoloff, and JNF New England Executive Director Sara Hefez at a parlor meeting in Chestnut Hill.

2.

(L-R) Alan Lobel, Deb Lust Zaluda, Kenneth Segel, and Board President Robert Ganz at a Capital Regions event in Albany.

(L-R) Cary Feldman with Deborah and David Yaffe at a dinner meeting in Washington, D.C.

3.

(L-R back row) Capital District Board Members Alan Lobel, Richard Weisz, Board President Robert Ganz, and Vice President Israel Relations Kenneth Segel. (L-R front row) Capital District Board Member Karen Hausler and JNF New England Campaign Executive Rina Wagman.

4.

(L-R) JNFuture Boston Chair Liz Harris, JNF Chief Development Officer Rick Krosnick, and JNFuture Vice Chair Leonard Aronson at a JNFuture event in Boston.

5.

(L-R) Boston Board of Trustee Member Zev Steinmetz, JNFuture Campaign Executive Gali Gordon, and JNFuture Boston Chair Liz Harris at a Boston Board of Trustees meeting in Boston.

9.

10. (L-R)

Frank and Debbie Spector, with Rosalyn and Charles Schweitzer, and Danica and Larry Guttman at JNF’s Maryland Breakfast for Israel at Temple Oheb Shalom in Baltimore.

11. (L-R)

Lisa and Mark Biegal, David and Lori Burman, and Rita Chiappetta at JNF’s Maryland Breakfast for Israel at Temple Oheb Shalom in Baltimore.

12. (L-R)

Steve Cohen, Brianna Cohen, and Leslie Goldberg with Jane and Robert Zweig at JNF’s Maryland Breakfast for Israel at Temple Oheb Shalom in Baltimore.

NORTHEAST

7

6

10

8

11

9

1

12

4

2

3

5

6.

(L-R) Jonathan Plaut, Melissa Sydney, and Kim Rubin at a Lawyers for Israel (LFI) Breakfast hosted by Lawrence Cohen and Nixon Peabody in Boston.

1.

(L-R) Larry Rein, JNF Central NJ Senior Campaign Executive Anna Richlin, and Barbara Beiss Muskin at a parlor meeting in West Orange.

7.

(L-R) Eli Orkin, Lisa Shakun, Brandon Pinsker, Leonard Aronson, JNFuture Boston Chair Liz Harris, Caitlin Whittemore, and Gali Gordon at a JNFuture Board Meeting in Boston.

2.

(L-R) Event Co-Chairs Sheila Friedman, Judy Galler, and Gail Stanger with JNF Southern NJ Campaign Executive Dara Gever and Michele Bronkesh at JNF’s “Food, Wine and Artisanal Businesses” event in Atlantic County.

8.

Clark University students at a “Spinning Through Israel” event organized by JNF Campus Fellow Becky Davidoff at the JCC in Worcester.

3.

9.

(L-R) Colin Adams, Lisa Shakun, Eli Orkin, and Andrew Fishman at JNF’s MetroWest Breakfast for Israel at Temple Israel of Natick

(L-R back row) Karen Berger, Western Galilee Now CEO Michal Shiloach Galnoor, JNF Central NJ Executive Director Celine Leeds, Maida Richlin, Eta Gershen Cohen, and Stacey Rosenberg. (L-R front row) Marci Robinson, Melissa Segal, Cheryl Becker, and Alyson Chananie at a Women for Israel (WFI) meeting in Livingston.

4.

(L-R back row) Marvin Weinberg, Boris Vishnevsky, Steve Dabrow, Dale and Jackie Danilewitz, Richard Gottlieb, Jay Minkoff, Scott Kaminsky, Terry Katz, Scott Barsky, Robert Kitchenoff, William Kramer, David Rittenberg, and Joe Wolfson. (L-R front frow) Peter Martin, Lori Dabrow, Marina Furman, Samantha van Adelsberg, Louise Dabrow, Elana Dean, Alan Dabrow, and Paul Feldman at JNF’s Eastern PA Board Installation in Gladwyn.

10. Roberta

Jacobson displays her Blue Box after joining JNF’s Women’s Alliance.

11. Zeev

Ben Shachar, Breakfast Chair Dubi Gordon, Sara Hefez, and President Emeritus Jeffrey Woolf at JNF’s MetroWest Breakfast for Israel at Temple Israel of Natick.

12. (L-R) Board Members Steven Aronson, Luba Levin, and Robert and Phuli Cohan at an event honoring Amy Parsons in Chestnut Hill.

Across the Country

B'Yachad

11


GREATER NEW YORK

5 6

6 7

8 1

2

4

7

8

5.

(L-R) Danielle and Alexander Hankin, Elise Holtzman and Henry Holtzman, Chad Holtzman, and Molly Crane at JNF’s Eastern PA Board Installation in Gladwyn.

6.

(L-R back row) Richard Gottlieb, Roberta Kitchenoff, Dale Danilewitz, Louise and Alan Dabrow, Robert Kitchenoff, Joe Wolfson, Jeffrey Schwartz, Scott Barsky, Andi Barsky, JNF Executive Director of Eastern PA Marina Furman, Emma Barsky, and Andrea Gottlieb. (L-R front row) Jackie Danilewitz, Ellen Holtzman, Evelyn Spritz, Samantha van Adelsberg, and Susan Schwartz at JNF’s 2017 National Conference.

3

5

7.

(L-R) Ron Adelman, Joe and Jeanne Samet, Lorna Adelman, Marsha and Burt Henry, Sandy and Michael Podell, and Andrea and Michael Katz with Police Officers from New Jersey at JNF’s 9/11 Living Memorial in Jerusalem on JNF’s Sunshine Tour.

1.

(L-R) Rabbi Zev Goldberg, Director of Special in Uniform Lt. Col. (Res.) Tiran Attia, with Rabbi Ilan and Dina Acoca at JNF’s Fort Lee Breakfast for Israel at Young Israel of Fort Lee.

8.

(L-R) Southern NJ Board Members Eric Clayman, Mark Kramer, Eva Schlanger, Betsy Fischer, Robert and Pamela Benedon, Rita Shrayberman, and David Bross at JNF’s Southern NJ Breakfast for Israel in Voorhees Township.

2.

Simone Wilker and HaShomer HaChadash Missions and Visits Coordinator Dov Solomont volunteering in the Lachish region in Israel.

3.

(L-R) Westchester Board Members Betty Berenson and Susan Davidowitz with Westchester and Southern CT Board Co-President Caren Hammerman at a dessert reception in Scarsdale.

4.

Westchester Young Moms Circle fall season Kick-Off event at the home of Westchester Board Member Lynn Jacobs in Scarsdale.

WESTERN

6

7

8

1

2

4

10 9

10

11

(L-R) JNFuture Campaign Executive Esti Marcus, Gabby Einstein-Sim, Rachel Firestone, and JNFuture NYC Chair Lauren Roberts at JNF’s 2017 National Conference.

5.

(L-R) Carolyn Ziegler, Marcia Beck, New York Board Member Joan Muss, Susan Chadick, and Ruth Pomerantz at a Women for Israel (WFI) event at the Jewish Museum in New York City.

9.

6.

(L-R) Debbie Lane, Host Mindy Unger, Chef Susie Fishbein, JNF Westchester and Southern CT Director Stephanie Risa Balkin, and Rhonda Nathan at the Cooking Demo & Dinner in Mount Kisco.

10. (L-R)

7.

Rabbi Angela Buchdahl with JNF CEO Russell F. Robinson at JNF’s New York City Real Estate Leonard Litwin Tree of Life™ Award Dinner.

8.

Westchester Young Moms Circle at the “Parenting Through a Jewish Lens” event at the home of Caren Hammerman in Scarsdale.

12

B'Yachad

Across the Country

12

Lary Wolf, Kathy Gantz, and Laureine Greenbaum at JNF’s New York City Real Estate Leonard Litwin Tree of Life™ Award Dinner.

11. (L-R)

Bruce Azus, Mark Engel, JNF Long Island Associate Executive Director Howard Ingram, and Rubin Pikus at JNF’s 10th Annual Long Island Golf and Tennis Classic in Glen Head. Marty Rosenman, David Singer, and Jim Slattery at JNF’s 10th Annual Long Island Golf and Tennis Classic in Glen Head.

3

5

1.

(L-R) Blaine Light, Evan Fehler, Joshua Steinberg, McKenzie Regan, and Ian Sachs at JNF’s 2017 National Conference.

2.

(L-R) Jim Aresty and Steve Schlafer at a Special in Uniform event in Aspen.

3.

(L-R) Pam Meyer, Kim Kotzin, Guest Speaker Linda Cohn, Judy Bassett, Jill Beck, and Shirli Borenstein at JNF’s annual Women for Israel (WFI) Luncheon in Phoenix.

4.

(L-R) San Francisco Deputy Chief of Administration Raemona Williams, Consul General of Israel Shlomi Kofman, SF Chief of Fire Department Joanne Hayes-White, JNF Education Emissary Tal Shaked, and Dick Berman at a 9/11 ceremony honoring the city’s fire department and first responders.

5.

(L-R) Director of Special in Uniform Lt. Col. (Res.) Tiran Attia, Brian Harmatz, Geri Kate Pearce, and Andrew Grier at JNF’s 2017 National Conference.

12. (L-R)


6

7

8

9

10

15

11

12

13

(L-R) Rep. Dafna Michaelson Jenet and Loretta Cawelti at a WFI Speaker Series event 11. (L-R) Scott Sussman, Marc Garelick, Warren Morten, JNF Orange County Director in Denver. Lisa Grier, Dr. Jeff Glass, Glynne and Ann Miller, and JNF National Campaign Director Sharon Freedman at JNF’s Orange County Breakfast for Israel in Newport Beach. 7. Janet Wellish and Alex Woogmaster at a Major Donor Appreciation Event in Las Vegas. 12. Linda and Len Eckhaus at an AMHSI-JNF parlor meeting in Las Vegas. 8. (L-R) Rhoda Berman, Libby Weingarten, Allen Weingarten, and JNF National President Dr. Sol Lizerbram at a reception honoring JNF President Dr. Sol Lizerbram 13. (L-F) Lauren Lizerbram receives a tiara from JNF National Campaign Director in San Diego. Sharon Freedman at a reception honoring JNF President Dr. Sol Lizerbram in San Diego. 9. (L-R) Ian Sachs, Jonathan Medved, George Weisz, and Dan Bock at JNF’s annual Men’s Club Event in Scottsdale. 14. (L-R) Rick Stein, AMHSI-JNF Co-Executive Director Leor Sinai, and Marcia Stein at an AMHSI-JNF parlor meeting in Palm Springs. 10. Linda and Bruce Berry at an Alexander Muss High School in Israel (AMHSI-JNF) parlor meeting in Las Vegas. 6.

14

16

15. (L-R)

Helen Strait, Cheryl Morrison, and Jennifer Kraft at a WFI Speaker Series event in Denver.

16. (L-R) Joel Johnson and Jimmy Borax at an AMHSI-JNF parlor meeting in Palm Springs.

FLORIDA

17

18

1

19 17. (L-R)

3 Sheri Borax and Jean Carrus at an AMHSI-JNF meeting in Palm Springs.

18. Robin

4

5

6

(L-R) South Palm Beach Board Member Bruce and Sherri Schreiber, David Kay, Lindsey Hooge, JNF South Palm Beach Director Lee Lebovich, Lisa Kaufman, Rosa Golish, and South Palm Beach Board Member Glen Golish at JNF’s 2017 National Conference.

4.

(L-R) Susan Cain and JNF Palm Beach Director Laura Sherry in Highland.

5.

(L-R) Mark Glick with Jason Glick and Broward Board Member Mark Gendal on JNF’s 2017 Israel Ride.

2.

Jean and Norman Gould at JNF’s 2017 National Conference.

6.

3.

Bonnie and Mark Lotterman at JNF Miami’s Doctors for Israel (DFI) Kick-Off event in Aventura.

Sara Armet and Tampa Bay JNFuture Board Member Jon Solomon at JNF’s 2017 National Conference.

1.

Greenberg at a donor luncheon in Orange County.

Myra Chack Fleischer, JNF San Diego Director James Kimmey, Shari Schenk, and Paul Segal at JNF’s 2017 National Conference.

2

19. (L-R)

Across the Country

B'Yachad

13


7

11 7.

12

(L-R) Dane Berkowitz, Lee Ossin, Orlando Board Member Jen Steinlauf, JNFuture Co-Chairs Shira Glickman and Joe Davis, JNF-Halutza Liaison Yedidya Haurush, and National President-Elect and VP of Campaign Bruce Gould at JNF’s Israeli Wine Tasting event in Winter Park.

8.

(L-R) Women for Israel (WFI) Orlando Chair Meril Salzburg with Orlando Major Gifts Chair Debbie Meitin at an Orlando Board Meeting.

9.

(L-R) Broward Board President Rabbi Sheldon Harr with Board Members Eric Assouline, Alan Chon, and Lance Ross at the 2018 Broward Campaign Kick-Off event in Fort Lauderdale.

8

9

13

14

10. (L-R)

Director of JNF’s Task Force on Disabilities Yossi Kahana and Issac Azered at Temple Beth Israel in Longboat Key.

11. Susan

Turner and Alexander Muss High School in Israel (AMHSI-JNF) Co-Executive Director Leor Sinai at a parlor meeting in Tampa Bay.

12. Shena

and Eli Dominitz at a Special in Uniform parlor meeting at their home in Bal Harbour.

10

13. Yossi

JNF Israel Operations Development Officer Ariel Kotler, Rabbi David Baum, Rabbi Ruvi New, JNF-Halutza Liaison Yedidya Harush, Rabbi Moishe Denberg, Rabbi Yaakov Gibber, JNF-Green Horizons Liaison Ido Eisikovitz, Rabbi Efrem Goldberg, and Rabbi Philip Moskowitz at JNF’s 2017 National Conference.

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

Members Anton Merbaum and Barri DeFrancisci at the JNFuture Saturday Night Party during JNF’s 2017 National Conference.

15. JNFuture

19. (L-R)

21. (L-R)

16. (L-R)

20. (L-R)

22. (L-R)

JNF National Vice President Israel Relations Committee Ken Segel, Nily Falic, Miami Board President-Elect Maia Aron, and Miami Board Member Alex Bokor at a Special in Uniform parlor meeting in Bal Harbour.

17. Orlando

Board Member Shira Glickman with JNF-Halutza Liaison Yedidya Harush at JNFuture’s Water & Wine event in Orlando.

18. (L-R)

Donna Klein Jewish Academy students Moshe Gad, Jewish Academy JNF Club President Layla Sherry, Alex Starr, and Josh Hodes at JNF’s 2017 National Conference.

14

B'Yachad

Across the Country

Rabbi Philip Moskowitz with South Palm Beach Board Member Arye Corbett at JNF’s 2017 National Conference. Rabbi Yosef Weinstock with Miami Board President Ron Kriss and Broward Board President Sheldon Harr at the 2018 Broward Campaign Kick-Off event in Fort Lauderdale.

Kahana and Rabbi Nicole Luna at Temple Beth El in Ft. Myers.

14. (L-R)

Phyllis Aronson, Yossi Kahana, and Bernie Aronson at Temple Beth El in Ft. Myers. Farouk Smith, Warren Butler, Vaughn Sayers, JNF CEO Russell F. Robinson, Fabian Donate, and Brittany Blevins at JNF’s 2017 National Conference.


SOUTHEAST

LOS ANGELES

1

2

3

1

4

5

6

2

3

1.

(L-R) Shirley Mills, Jerusalem Post columnist Gil Hoffman, Mike Mills, and JNF Southeast Director Kate Samuels at Synagogue Emanu-El in Charleston.

1.

(L-R) JNFuture Campaign Executive Steffanie Altman, Civia Caroline, JNF National Campaign Director Sharon Freedman, and Alyse Golden Berkley at the Los Angeles Tree of Life™ Award Dinner.

2.

Dora Manela at the first Atlanta Women for Israel (WFI) Beyond the Blue Box event in Dunwoody.

2.

Robin and David Frank at the Los Angeles Tree of Life™ Award Dinner.

3.

(L-R) Michelle Horesh, Marlene Sukienik, and Barbara Kaplan with JNF-Green Horizons Liaison Ido Eisikovitz at the first Atlanta (WFI) Beyond the Blue Box event in Dunwoody.

3.

Alyse Golden Berkley, Allen and Marilyn Golden, and JNF Israel Operations Development Officer Ariel Kotler visit the fire truck the Goldens donated in Netivot, Israel.

4.

(L-R) Barbara Lincoln and Anita Stein at the 10th Annual Sam P. Alterman Memorial Annual Golf Tournament in Johns Creek.

5.

(L-R) Richard Jacobson and Michael Feldman at the 10th Annual Sam P. Alterman Memorial Annual Golf Tournament in Johns Creek.

6.

(L-R) Sharon Levison, Rachel Einstein-Sim, and Heidi Geller planning for Atlanta’s celebration of Israel@70.

Support Israel and Achieve Your Financial Goals “What could be better? A Jewish National Fund Gift Annuity pays us over 8% annually, partially tax-free, and gives us the opportunity to improve the quality of life of our Israeli brothers and sisters at the same time.” – Robert and Helen Levine, Teaneck, NJ

JEWISH INSPIRATION. SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITIES.

Age

Rate*

65

5.5%

70

5.8%

75

6.4%

80

7.2%

85

8.1%

90 & Over

9.5%

Single-life Gift Annuity (Two-life rates are also available.) *

Up To 9.5% Annual Income!

800.562.7526 ∙ JNFLEGACY.ORG

Across the Country

B'Yachad

15


IF JEWISH NATIONAL FUND’S

founding mission was to only purchase land for what became the State of Israel—mission completed. Of course, its vision reaches far beyond and includes improving, developing, and caring for the precious land of Israel. In this issue of B’Yachad, we look at how Jewish National Fund protects and cares for Israel and her people through an environmental lens. What was once an eyesore and health hazard, today the Be’er Sheva River anchors a booming urban revival of the Negev’s capital. The Be’er Sheva River Park and Lake is combining green land use and water reclamation to spur community development and population growth. Israeli, Palestinian, Jordanian, and students from across the world gather at the Arava Institute for Environmental Studies to learn about cross-border environmental collaboration, and in cooperation with Jewish National Fund, efforts are underway to save a symbolic icon found in the Israeli and Jordanian

By Dan Cohan

— Leviticus 19:23

deserts that doesn’t recognize borders— the ancient acacia tree. There’s the healing and therapeutic power of nature that can be harnessed to promote self-development of people with special needs and disabilities. Jewish National Fund’s accessible paths and trails make it possible for individuals of all ability levels to make contact with the natural world in an enriching way. Israel is a leader in afforestation and sets a global example in modern sustainable forest management. Jewish National Fund foresters are the preeminent experts in protecting the health of Israel’s forests and its ecosystems, and continue to share this knowledge with the world. For more than 116 years—and with over 260 million trees planted—Jewish National Fund’s environmental commitments create green spaces, protect against desertification, and provide a better home for the Jewish people and our neighbors.

‫כי תבואו אל הארץ ונטעתם‬

“WHEN YOU SHALL COME TO THE LAND, YOU SHALL PLANT TREES”

Dan Cohan is the Chair of the Green Innovations Task Force. To join or for more information, please contact Beth Gluck at bgluck@jnf.org.


Seeing the Forest Through the Trees

Sustainable Forest Management in Action in Israel By Leiba Chaya David

the prevailing color of Earth when seen from space, but there is still a lot of green on our globe. In fact, forests cover approximately 31% of the earth’s surface, representing one of the planet’s most valuable ecosystems. They are essential to the overall health of our planet, filter water, control runoff, protect the soil, store nutrients, provide habitat for countless wildlife species, and offer space for human recreation. As one of the world’s largest storehouses of carbon, forests are the lungs of the Earth and also play a vital role in mitigating climate change. BLUE MAY BE

SUSTAINABLE FOREST MANAGEMENT With a menacing host of environmental issues threatening the balance of life on earth, the need to protect and enhance the world’s forests has become increasingly critical. Around the world, those entrusted with the care of forests are responding by implementing the principles of sustainable forest management, a system defined by the United Nations Forum on Forests as “a dynamic and evolving concept that aims to maintain and enhance the economic, social and environmental value of all types of forests, for the benefit of present and future generations.” 18

B'Yachad

The Green Issue

As each forest is a highly complex ecosystem, sustainable forest management is an ongoing process that varies greatly from region to region. Each requires unique strategies that must consider not only local and regional ecology, but also the forest area’s cultural, economic, social, and political dimensions, as well as local and unique wildlife habitats. Not surprisingly, Keren Kayemeth LeIsrael-Jewish National Fund (KKL-JNF), the forestry-arm of Jewish National Fund ( JNF-USA), has been working toward sustainable forest management in Israel for decades. Since its establishment in 1901, KKL-JNF has planted over 260 million trees all over Israel, serving to combat desertification, improve air quality, enhance biodiversity, and provide recreational spaces for the country’s growing population. Afforestation efforts prior to statehood in 1948 focused on rapid growth and drought resistance, with coniferous pine species exclusively used to plant huge swaths of forests throughout much of the country. Unfortunately, this short-sighted approach led to high incidence of pests, dangerous levels of flammability, and debilitating disease in many planted areas. Yet, in true Israeli pioneering spirit, KKL-JNF continually adapts its forestry strategies to accommodate

and complement the country’s rapidly developing and evolving priorities. Today, its vision includes working toward long-term solutions for sustainable forest management and conducting academic and field research, drawing forestry experts from countries around the world seeking to learn more on how to manage forests in the face of climate change, water scarcity, and changing social and economic demands. In 1995, KKL-JNF spearheaded the ratification of a National Master Plan for Forests and Afforestation, a policy document that provided general guidelines for the preservation and maintenance of forests and woodlands across Israel. The policy led the way for future regional planning and development. “The National Master Plan set guidelines that eventually led to greater environmental protection and practices,” explained KKL-JNF Chief Forester and Forestry Division Director Dr. David Brand. “Given KKL-JNF’s history in afforestation, fire containment, and combating desertification, it is considered a global leader, but methods are always in need of being updated.” In 2014, building on its earlier plan, KKL-JNF published an updated Forest Management Policy (FMP). Drawing on the expertise of foresters, environmentalists,


sociologists, and ordinary citizens, the 80-page document detailed sustainable forest management in Israel according to the latest trends in forestry, ecology, and social and economic sciences. “This is cutting edge as it is highly specific to the region,” said Dr. Brand. As weather patterns continue to change and drought conditions persist, the FMP reviews the various types of forests in Israel and outlines exactly how to plan and manage them. They codify everything, including optimal tree density for fire prevention and ecosystem health for collaborative community planning to minimize impact on local wildlife—all is taken into account. ISRAEL’S STRATEGY FOR THE FUTURE A component to the success of the FMP is its guiding theory—ecosystems services—that forests are providers of services, from soil enrichment to spiritual rejuvenation. The interdependence between social systems and ecosystems is also of particular importance, and foresters determine their planning and management goals by taking into account benefits to the natural ecosystem as well as recreational visitors to forests. By utilizing goal-oriented and adaptive management, today’s KKL-JNF foresters place greater emphasis on natural processes, plant native species, promote landscape diversity, and ensure minimal human intervention in protected areas. The latter is becoming increasingly significant, according to Dr. Brand. “It is easy to just take what we want from the forest or to impose our ideas onto a landscape,” he explained. “We are moving toward a different model where we actually listen to what the land has to say—we try to use only what the forest gives us to ensure that its resources remain for generations to come.”

ONE FOREST, ONE PLAN Since introducing the new plan, foresters in different parts of the country have developed specific blueprints reflective of the connection between the local ecosystem’s health and the wellbeing of neighboring communities. One of the best areas where this has been implemented is the Sataf Forest, an area covering more than 17,000-acres in the Western Jerusalem hills. A popular tourist site, which includes the restoration of ancient agricultural landscapes combined with the preservation of indigenous woodlands, the master plan for the forest now defines goals for the next 25 years, dividing the acres into recreational areas, natural assets and sensitive habitats, firebreaks, heritage sites, and more. “This level of detail is essential,” said Hanoch Tzoref, KKL-JNF’s highland region supervisor. “The better our master plan is, the less we can and will intervene.” When intervention in a particular area is deemed necessary, it is governed by the goal for that area. For example, on a designated trail near the Sataf Spring, pine trees were thinned out on a neighboring slope to widen the scenic view for hikers. Likewise, the olive trees in the valley receive year-round care and include community harvesting activities. Forestry guidelines are also revised to incorporate practical experiences and lessons learned from previous forest fires, such as allowing for the natural regeneration instead of immediate replanting. “Following the Sataf fire in 2016, we let the land speak for itself. There will be a significant waiting period—up to two years—before any restoration efforts begin,” Tzoref said. “We’re following methods and protocols based on lessons learned from

previous fires, so for now, we’ll watch what Mother Nature decides to do by herself.” Tzoref is proud of the site-specific planning and management strategies that he and his team have adopted for Sataf. “The science of forestry has been fairly uniform throughout the world for a long time, but goal-oriented forestry is a new concept. Because Israelis routinely adapt to changing and adverse conditions, we are in a unique position to develop an effective strategy for ourselves, and are prepared to share that knowledge with the world.” Ongoing implementation of the new Forest Management Plan is a complex endeavor. It requires long-term commitment and support from a variety of agencies, and is subject to shifting environmental conditions such as fires and drought. For over 116 years, KKL-JNF has proven that as the caretaker of the land, it is capable and up for the task, and it has made sustainable forest management a top priority for the coming years. Alon Tal, a KKL-JNF international board member and leading Israeli environmental activist, believes that the organization’s work in this field is more important than ever. “Israel’s population is expected to double in the next 30 years, bringing us to unprecedented levels of overcrowding,” Tal said. “With demographic growth, reckless efforts to take down forests for different reasons will only increase. As nature recedes, we are really going to need healthy forests. I can think of no other organization or institution than KKL-JNF to lead the way and continue to green the land of Israel.” To plant a tree in Israel, visit jnf.org/trees.

“We are moving toward a different model...we try to use only what the forest gives us to ensure that its resources remain for generations to come.” — DR. DAVID BRAND, KKL-JNF CHIEF FORESTER The Green Issue

B'Yachad

19


Harnessing the Healing Powers of Nature

Creating an inclusive Israeli society through environmental interaction By Leiba Chaya David some of Israel’s most stunning natural beauty. Its hiking trails are favored by families and outdoors enthusiasts alike, and the soothing countryside offers city dwellers respite from the daily grind. Throughout much of history, the natural world has also served as a powerful tool for maintaining health and wellness, with many cultures and traditions using its elements for healing purposes. Even in Israel there is a long history of native plants, trees, and other wildlife being used as agents for both physical and spiritual healing. THE GALILEE OFFERS

The Shalom Valley (Emek HaShalom), located near the bustling Galilean town of Yokne’am, is home to one of Israel’s lesser-known, but critically important resources for health and wellness—the Shalom Valley Ecological Farm. Established in 1993 by Jewish National Fund partner LOTEM-Making Nature Accessible, a group of educators, therapists, and dedicated volunteers are harnessing nature’s gifts to bring therapeutic healing, environmental awareness, and inclusion training to help thousands of Israelis with special needs each year. The Farm also offers innovative programs designed to ensure that all people have access to the sights, sounds, smells, tastes, and stories the valley has to offer. The Farm is situated at the edge of the Keren Kayemeth LeIsrael-Jewish National Fund (KKL-JNF) Ramat Menashe Park—a UNESCO-recognized sustainable biosphere—with its entranceway located at the end of a sun-dappled forest road that leads to a wide open valley. The location provides ample space for individuals of all ability levels, and the valley’s biodiversity includes rare species of flowers, indigenous oak woodlands, wildlife, and ancient agricultural artifacts, which help promote understanding and effective communication between people. And then there’s the flowing Shofet River where JNF built Israel’s first wheelchair-accessible hiking trail, providing individuals with disabilities the opportunity to enjoy an outdoor activity favored by most Israelis. “People often think of a linear relationship between humans in nature when it comes to nature reserves—how we use resources, what to protect, and so forth,” said Amos Ziv, founder and director of LOTEM. “At the Farm, we not only explore how people with special needs relate to nature, but also see how they develop themselves and their relationship to others through the lens of the natural world.” 20

B'Yachad

The Green Issue


NATURE’S THERAPEUTIC BENEFITS Recent studies suggest that encounters with nature can help people with special needs to reduce stress levels, increase self-awareness, develop sensory skills, and strengthen self-confidence. However, for individuals with a physical, sensory, or cognitive disability, complex issues of mobility, safety, sensitivity to change, and other concerns can make traveling and being outside in natural elements challenging. More often than not, therapeutic and educational experiences typically take place indoors where sensory stimulation needed for optimal growth and development is limited. The Shalom Valley Ecological Farm enables people with special needs to realize their potential by providing direct access to the therapeutic and educational experiences nature has to offers. Through hikes and workshops based on seasons and the Jewish calendar, children and adults are able to experience the natural shifts and changes of the environment throughout the year and the important role nature plays in celebrating Jewish holidays. Professional guides also tailor all activities to suit the needs of participants, including three-dimensional models and explanations in Braille for the visually impaired, illustrated communication tables for autistic participants, simplified linguistic explanations for the intellectually disabled, and accessible trails for the physically disabled. Ziv believes the methodology of using nature in an enjoyable and informative way greatly benefits the special needs community, and is an invaluable and therapeutic tool. “We are seeing that exposure to nature empowers people to develop themselves physically, emotionally, and cognitively,” he said. “In some cases, therapists and educators have seen that it can actually reduce the need for therapeutic intervention in the future.” One of the newest and empowering experiences at the Farm has been “The Path of Creation” hiking trail. Made possible through a gift to Jewish National Fund by Ben and Susan Gutmann of Norwood, NJ, the trail is the only challenging hike accessible for wheelchairs in Israel, and explores the six days of creation and the Sabbath.

“We are seeing that exposure to nature empowers people to develop themselves physically, emotionally, and cognitively.” — AMOS ZIV, DIRECTOR OF THE SHALOM VALLEY ECOLOGICAL FARM

Participants make their way through a range of sensory experiences and cognitive exercises, eventually reaching high above the Farm, giving them the added value of expansive views of the surrounding forest, and a tremendous sense of accomplishment. The hike is steep—even for an all-terrain wheelchair! According to Yael Bar, a former service volunteer at the Farm, the hiking experience is therapeutic and also helps create an equal space in nature for everyone: “Regardless of one’s limits in life, each person deserves to enjoy nature, to hike in the land of Israel, and to be equal to all others. This hiking trail JNF helped build provides that opportunity to all.” Educators also instill and expand a sense of self and care for the environment by teaching sustainability values, such as resource conservation, recycling, and organic farming. For example, the roof of one of the Farm’s buildings—wheelchair accessible, of course— is equipped with a solar-powered oven. This has allowed educators to impart the importance of energy conservation, a message rarely taught in the average special needs classroom, while enjoying the use of the sun’s energy to bake a pizza together. NATURE AS A BRIDGE BETWEEN PEOPLE The Shalom Valley Ecological Farm experience is not limited to people with special needs. “One of our areas of expertise is making information accessible to people of all abilities,” Ziv said. Several years ago, JNF and the Farm’s educators developed the only pedagogical center for inclusion training in the Galilee, called Nagish L’hakir, meaning “accessible to meet you,” a play on the Hebrew expression na’im l’hakir, or “nice to meet you.” The site’s seasoned counselors share their knowledge with government officials, Knesset staff, educators, museum guides, and service providers from around Israel, providing them with tools to adapt their spaces and services to people with special needs and disabilities. For example, a group of bus drivers learned how to identify and communicate respectfully and effectively with a customer who has an

intellectual disability. Other activities include simulation exercises, such as riding in a wheelchair or following one of the trails while blindfolded. “Nagish L’hakir exposed our group to important information in a concrete way,” said Ori Erlich, education and community director at the Israel Nature and Parks Authority. “The programming helped us broaden our understanding of several types of disabilities that are relevant to our work with the general public.” “There is a reason people come all the way to the Shalom Valley for this training,” Ziv added. “The quiet, uncomplicated natural environment is an ideal setting for recognizing differences and similarities, and can be a key to bridging the differences.” ALL TRAILS LEAD TOWARD INCLUSION Ziv envisions the entire Shalom Valley as a gateway for an inclusive experience and interaction with nature, with the Farm as the epicenter for therapeutic healing. With support from Jewish National Fund, there are plans in motion for new projects, including a bird sanctuary, an ecological pond, a field biodiversity reserve, a rooftop water harvesting system, and an accessible trail connecting the Farm to the Shofet River accessible trail. The projects will not only increase accessible green areas for Israel’s special needs community, but will also protect the valley’s delicate and sensitive ecosystem from potentially harmful development. Whether they are hosting a group of autistic teenagers, a team of hi-tech executives, or a family out for a weekend hike, the Shalom Valley Ecological Farm has created an inclusive, open space where people of all ages, cultures, and abilities can develop their skills while connecting with the natural beauty of the land of  Israel. To donate toward Jewish National Fund’s work with Disabilities & Special Needs, visit jnf.org/givetospecial. The Green Issue

B'Yachad

21


Protecting a Desert Icon Environmental Cooperation to Save the Acacia Tree By Jennifer Tzivia MacLeod A GROUP OF ISRAELIS, Palestinians, and Jordanians

gather in Israel’s Negev Desert to talk about the one thing they all have in common: the planet. It may sound like a joke—only without the rabbi, priest, and imam—but this in fact does happen in the most unlikely of places—the Arava desert, a stretch of land straddling the Israeli-Jordanian border from the port city of Eilat in the south to the Dead Sea to the north. It is there that the Arava Institute for Environmental Studies, a Jewish National Fund-supported research institute, is transcending national and political differences for the greater good, conducting research on the importance of plants and animals, and learning to manage the region’s precious water resources. Founded in 1996, following the Oslo Accords, the Institute’s motto is “Nature knows no borders,” and it proudly strives to hew to this policy in its programming and projects. The Institute welcomes students from around the world, including Israel, Palestine, Jordan, Europe, and North and South America, to learn about shared resources and protection from desertification, as well as environmental and cross-border cooperation. Amgad Hijazin, a Jordanian student, came to the Institute in 2014 to study more about cross-border environmental cooperation between neighboring states, particularly on environmental matters shared by Jordan and Israel. Before coming to the Arava, Hijazin worked at the Jordanian National Research Center, an environmental research organization based in Amman, and like many students he had reservations about coming to the Jewish State for his studies. To help ease this transition, all new students attend the Peace-Building Leadership Seminar. This mandatory seminar is designed to help create mutual understanding, empathy, and friendship among students from varying backgrounds. Together, they work to develop environmental practices, public policies, and grassroots environmental activism that they can then utilize in their home country. “In the beginning, students came together to talk about the conflict,” Hijazin said. “We were discussing difficult topics, and even though it was hard at times, that’s when you become friends.” Today, Hijazin says he has met many Israelis working towards peace and has also gained a better understanding of his own country. “I’m part of this conflict. We, in Jordan, are part of it. Environmental and ecological issues persist despite a border here or there.” Dr. Clive Lipchin, an expert on water resources management at the Institute, credits Jewish National Fund and its support for the successes in cross-border relationship building and education with students from 22

B'Yachad

The Green Issue

neighboring states, as well as an increase in mutual cooperation. He claims that this assistance helps the Institute engage Palestinians, Jordanians, and Israelis while promoting mutual cooperation through improving or protecting something that affects all of them—the environment. “JNF is an essential partner in helping us achieve that mission.” While the Arava Institute pursues many environmental rehabilitation projects, one focus now is tracking and mitigating damages following a massive oil spill in the Arava’s Evrona Nature Reserve in 2014. Viewed by many as Israel’s greatest ecological disaster, approximately 20,000 barrels of crude oil gushed from a breach in the Trans-Israel pipeline, contaminating the soil, threatening plants and wildlife, and affecting the health of and hospitalizing over 80 people in Israel and Jordan.

Three years later, cleanup efforts continue and researchers are studying the long-term consequences of the spill on the Arava’s fragile ecological system and local species, such as the doum palm and acacia trees. “Animals can outrun the effects of a spill,” Dr. Lipchin said, “however, there’s a greater concern for vegetation, especially the acacia.” As part of his research and studies, Hijazin—who decided to stay in Israel to pursue a master’s degree from Ben Gurion University—has been involved in the oil spill cleanup. He also shared Dr. Lipchin’s concern that the spill’s main effect has been on the second generation of plant life. Based on tracking and measurements over the last three years, he believes older acacia trees can be saved through soil remediation and other measures, but he’s also seeing fewer young trees in the area now than there should be. The spill didn’t cross into Jordan, but Hijazin has noticed a decrease in new acacias on the Jordanian side as well.

“In Jordan, the acacia is one of the main food sources for desert animals and it is also important for people, as it provides shade and charcoal,” he said. Residents in the Central Arava have noted that the iconic tree has been facing problems over the last decade. Acacias are classified as a “keystone” species, meaning that they not only anchor the soil and prevent further desertification, but they also enrich it. They are a type of legume, similar to beans or clovers, adding nitrogen to the soil, which in turn helps other species grow and thrive. When residents began noticing the trees were vanishing, the Central Arava Regional Council, along with Jewish National Fund, stepped in and created the Adopt-an-Acacia program. The Council and JNF began the project by asking local residents to collect seeds from trees already growing on and around their properties. The seeds were germinated and raised in a nursery, then returned to the areas where they had been collected. As part of his research into the acacia’s decline, Hijazin has been collecting seeds and experimenting with four types of germination treatments to find the one best suited for Jordan’s dry climate. He is hopeful of replicating the successes seen in the Arava in his country once he returns. “In Wadi Araba, it can sometimes reach up to 45 degrees Celsius [113 degrees Fahrenheit],” he said. “Remarkably, this plant remains alive, out here in the desert, in the middle of the summer, and without any rain!” Although the spill continues to have long-lasting effects, it has sparked an increase in cross-border cooperation. “We have launched the Track II Environmental Forum in order to bring decision makers from the area together,” said David Lehrer, executive director of the Arava Institute. “The forum will help advance cross-border environmental agreements between Israel, Palestine, and Jordan— we all share the same ecosystem and its health is important, especially with such events.” This makes the acacia a fitting symbol for the Arava Institute—it is a place where dedicated students from all backgrounds, nationalities, and religions can come together and forge a deeper understanding of the world we share through environmental conservation and rehabilitation. Together with Jewish National Fund, environmental challenges and disasters can also be faced and remedied for the benefit of future generations and the land of Israel. After all, nature knows no borders. To donate toward Jewish National Fund’s work in Research and Development, visit jnf.org/aravainst.


From Polluted Stagnation to Recycled Innovation Reinventing a city through environmental rehabilitation By Megan E. Turner

THE BE’ER SHEVA RIVER PARK and the popular River

Walk surrounding it have become an integral part of this sprawling desert city. Residents and visitors alike flock to the Danielle A. and Irving J. Grossman Jewish National Fund Amphitheater for big name concerts and events. Families gather on weekends to picnic at Bell Park or barbecue on the banks of the river. And then there’s the excitement over what will be Israel’s largest man-made, recycled water lake within the park, and the beautiful residential area that will sit on its banks. A few decades ago, one would have been hardpressed to find any semblance of greenery, not just in 24

B'Yachad

The Green Issue

Be’er Sheva, but in many industrialized Israeli cities. With the fledgling state’s focus on rapid development in the 1950s and 1960s, waterways and rivers throughout Israel were seen as sources for urban and industrial needs, not as natural resources and ecosystems in need of protection and preservation. Already under natural stress due to the region’s high temperatures and arid climate, many of Israel’s delicate ecosystems, particularly its waterways, could not survive the rapid abuse stemming from this development. Waterways, rivers, and wetlands became conduits for municipal sewage and repositories for garbage and refuse.

“As a child, I remember the river was full of trash and basically a giant dump,” recalled Be’er Sheva native Anat Haliva-Nachshon, 40. “During the winter, the water would rise, flooding and cutting off the Neve Noi neighborhood from the rest of the city with disgusting, smelly water. The Be’er Sheva River was a place we weren’t proud of; no one wanted to invest in cleaning it up.” Dvora Zak, 35, also grew up in Be’er Sheva and was warned to stay away from the river. “The river was in such bad shape that it was infested with flies. There was no water flowing through it, only sewage, and we were told to not go near it because it was a real health hazard.”


“I can’t wait to bring friends from the center of Israel and from abroad to visit—I’ll do so with pride.” — ANAT HALIVA-NACHSHON, BE’ER SHEVA RESIDENT

For many, the Negev’s neglected waterways were not a primary concern, or at least not something to lose sleep over, but one person thought differently. In 1997, Dr. Nehemya Shachaf of Moshav Nevatim, a small community just outside Be’er Sheva, was appointed head of the Shikma-Besor Drainage Authority, the body responsible for the cleaning up and rehabilitation of over 60 million dunams of waterways in the Negev. Shachaf’s attention quickly turned toward the Be’er Sheva River, believing if the polluted waterway and its weakened ecosystem could be rehabilitated and brought back to a healthy state, it would have a positive effect on the residents and city of Be’er Sheva and potentially see the return of local wildlife. “When we started this project, I understood that cleaning up the river was something for the benefit of the public,” said Shachaf. But he dreamt bigger—Shachaf also wanted to build a park around the river, one that would not only increase the value of the immediate surroundings, but also attract tourists and new residents to the city. The dream was bold and it needed an equally bold partner to bring it to fruition. Jewish National Fund was a natural fit to realize this dream, and already had a history of successfully rehabilitating other rivers and waterways in Israel— such as the Alexander River in Israel’s Hefer Valley. What caught Jewish National Fund’s attention was Shachaf’s ambitious plan to revitalize and breathe new life into Be’er Sheva through nature: restoring and having clean, recycled water flow through the Be’er Sheva River and building a large lake surrounded by a massive green park. The partnership became an essential element in Jewish National Fund’s Blueprint Negev initiative, which focuses on developing Southern Israel to attract 500,000 new residents to the area. With Jewish National Fund’s matching grants and collaboration, as well as support from regional and government partners, Shachaf’s dream began taking shape. In the early 2000s, the first section of the larger Be’er Sheva River Park—containing a promenade along the southern bank of the river and the lush green Bell Park—opened to the public. A 12,500 seat

amphitheater (that can accommodate a staggering 30,000 spectators including the surrounding park) was built, and headlining acts from around the world began performing in Be’er Sheva. The beautiful Pipes Bridge—a pedestrian walkway connecting the Neve Noi neighborhood to the Old City—was built to help facilitate foot traffic, while historic sites like Beit Eshel, the Turkish Bridge, as well as Abraham’s Well and its world-class Visitors Center, were all renovated to attract more tourists and reopened to the public. “With all the work that’s been done so far, the river is healing and there’s even some water flowing now,” said Haliva-Nachshon. “I can only imagine how it’ll be in the future when more of these projects are completed. I can’t wait to bring friends from the center of Israel and from abroad to visit—I’ll do so with pride.” Endless stretches of dusty desert that once surrounded the river have been replaced with vibrant greenery, and there’s daily progress being made on the Be’er Sheva River Park Lake. Known as Neve Midbar, or “desert oasis” in Hebrew, the 23-acre lake will be Israel’s largest man-made lake. More importantly, the lake will double as a reservoir to irrigate and care for the park’s needs. Water for the reservoir will be supplied by treated and recycled sewage and waste water from the city so as to not waste precious and scarce fresh water.

The lake’s construction will continue to transform Be’er Sheva into an even more attractive city for younger Israelis and their families, living up to its name as the crown jewel of JNF’s Blueprint Negev initiative. Once completed, plans are in place to build eco-friendly residential high-rises, a bike and walking path around the lake, restaurants, shops, galleries, and more. The lake has also interested bird-watchers with the prospects of attracting oasis birds, such as Arabian babblers, desert larks, and scrub warblers. Although it is not certain that the lake will directly increase Be’er Sheva’s wildlife, JNF’s success in restoring the Hula Lake in Northern Israel, which has attracted the return of migratory cranes and has been become a major tourist destination, has residents optimistic about the lake’s potential positive ecological impact. “The Be’er Sheva River Park is one of the main anchors of the city of Be’er Sheva, and it serves as a green lung in the heart of the Negev,” said Mayor Ruvik Danilovich, Be’er Sheva’s young and dynamic mayor, who has been a big proponent of the environmental initiatives brought forth by Jewish National Fund and the Drainage Authority from the start. “I am delighted to see what was once a hazardous environmental site become a center for recreation, leisure, culture, and tourism. I have no doubt that with Jewish National Fund’s help, the park will continue to be developed and so will Be’er Sheva.” To donate toward the Be’er Sheva River Park Lake construction efforts, visit jnf.org/B7lake.

The Green Issue

B'Yachad

25


OUT & ABOUT WITH

JNF’S MAJOR DONORS

World Chairman’s Council $1,000,000 Lifetime

Century Council $100,000 Lifetime

King Solomon Society $100,000 Annual

Negev Society $25,000 Annual

President’s Society $10,000 Annual

Sapphire Society $5,000 Annual

Herzl Society $5,000 Annual

JNFuture Root Society $1,000 Annual

MID ATLANTIC

Joe Marzouk (Century Council, President’s Society) and Nanci Seff (Century Council, President’s Society, Sapphire Society) visit Ammunition Hill on JNF’s President’s Society Mission to Israel.

(L-R) Jayne (World Chairman’s Council, King Solomon Society, Sapphire Society) and Andy (World Chairman’s Council, King Solomon Society) Klein with JNF-Halutza Liaison Yedidya Harush at JNF’s 2017 National Conference.

Rita (Century Council, Negev Society, Sapphire Society) and Dr. Chet (Century Council, Negev Society) Stein receive a certificate of appreciation at a Doctors for Israel (DFI) event in Bethesda.

Dr. Cliff Faber (President’s Society) and Debbie Zager (Sapphire Society) at JNF’s Maryland Breakfast for Israel at Temple Oheb Shalom in Baltimore.

(L-R) Ira and (Century Council, Negev Society) Kathryn (Century Council, Negev Society, Sapphire Society) Bartfield with Joe Marzouk (Century Council, President’s Society) and Nanci Seff (Century Council, President’s Society, Sapphire Society) in Israel on JNF’s President’s Society Mission.

(L-R) Tsipi (Century Council, Negev Society) and Michael (Century Council, Negev Society) Renbaum in Haifa with their family.

(L-R) Andy Klein (World Chairman’s Council, King Solomon Society) receives a “JNF Onesie” from JNF CEO Russell F. Robinson to commemorate the birth of his granddaughter at a Campaign Planning Summit at the Ronald S. Lauder JNF House in New York City.

(L-R) Erika Pardes Schon (Sapphire Society) and Orly Shalem (Sapphire Society) at JNF’s Maryland Breakfast for Israel at Temple Oheb Shalom in Baltimore.

(L-R) Naomi Amsterdam (Century Council, President’s Society, Sapphire Society) with David (Century Council, Negev Society) and Lori (Century Council, Negev Society) Burman as they receive a Century Council Blue Box at a Major Donor Reception in Baltimore.

(L-R) Michael Hantgan ( JNFuture Root Society), Zack Garber ( JNFuture Root Society), Guest Speaker Ambassador Ron Prosor, and Nicole Talor ( JNFuture Root Society) at JNF’s Maryland Breakfast for Israel at Temple Oheb Shalom in Baltimore.

Tsipi Renbaum (Century Council, Negev Society) dedicating a fire truck in Haifa, Israel.

26

B'Yachad

JNF’s Major Donors

Dr. Elllie Taylor (Century Council, President’s Society, Sapphire Society) with Leonard Attman (Century Council, Negev Society) at a Major Donor Reception in Baltimore.


NORTHEAST

(L-R) Eva Schlanger (World Chairman’s Council, Negev Society, Sapphire Society), Helene Blumenfeld (Century Council, President’s Society, Sapphire Society), and Joachim (Century Council, President’s Society) and Gerrie (Century Council, President’s Society, Sapphire Society) Rudoler at JNF’s Southern NJ Breakfast for Israel in Voorhees Township.

(L-R) Andy (Century Council, Negev Society) and Vicki (Century Council, Negev Society, Sapphire Society) Solomon with Michael Zimmerman ( JNFuture Root Society) and JNF Central NJ Senior Campaign Executive Anna Richlin at JNF’s 2017 National Conference.

Andy (Century Council, Negev Society) and Vicki (Century Council, Negev Society, Sapphire Society) Solomon at Mitzpe Ramon on JNF’s President’s Society Mission in Israel.

(L-R) Judy Josephson (President’s Society), Western Galilee Now CEO Michal Shiloach Galnoor, and Miles Josephson (President’s Society) during a wine tasting at the Josephson's home in Randolph.

(L-R) Marvin (World Chairman’s Council, Negev Society) and Eva (World Chairman’s Council, Negev Society, Sapphire Society) Schlanger with Betsy Fischer (Century Council, Negev Society, Sapphire Society), and Shelly (Century Council, Negev Society, Sapphire Society) and Jerry (Century Council, Negev Society) Abramson at JNF’s Southern NJ Breakfast for Israel in Voorhees Township.

(L-R) Scott (Herzl Society), Andi (Herzl Society, Sapphire Society), and Tama Lee Barsky at JNF’s Eastern PA Board Installation in Gladwyn.

(L-R) Roberta (Herzl Society), Robert (Herzl Society), and Rachel Kitchenoff at JNF’s Eastern PA Board Installation in Gladwyn.

LOS ANGELES

(L-R) David Wiener (Century Council, Negev Society), David Frank (Century Council, President’s Society), and Stanley Black (Century Council, President’s Society) at the Los Angeles Tree of Life™ Award Dinner.

(L-R) Western Galilee Now CEO Michael Shiloah Galnoor with Dr. Ann Stehney (Century Council, President’s Society, Sapphire Society) at a parlor meeting in Linwood.

MIDWEST

(L-R) Adam Belfer (Herzl Society), President of the Israel Association of Baseball Peter Kurz, David Rosenthal (Herzl Society), and Steve Bram (Herzl Society) at the CRESLA Project: Baseball Donor Appreciation event in Los Angeles.

(L-R) Paul and Leno Sislin (World Chairman’s Council) with JNF Greater Los Angeles Executive Director Lou Rosenberg at the Los Angeles Tree of Life™ Award Dinner.

Layne and Daniel Zagorin (President’s (L-R) Sandra (President’s Society) and Society) at JNFuture’s Windy City Shabbat Jacob (President’s Society) Kiferbaum, Rob in Chicago. Rubin (Century Council, Negev Society), and Steve Lavin (President’s Society) at the Chicago Tree of Life™ Award Dinner at the Hyatt Regency Hotel.

(L-R) Ian (Century Council, President’s Society), Hannah, and Aimee (Century Council, President’s Society, Sapphire Society) Guttman at JNF’s Ohio Valley Tree of Life™ Award Dinner at the Cincinnati Hilton.

(L-R) Rob Rubin (Century Council, Negev Society), Honoree Ted Koenig (Herzl Society), IDF Major General (Res.) Doron Almog, and Scott Gendell (Century Council, Negev Society) at the Chicago Tree of Life™ Award Dinner at the Hyatt Regency Hotel.

(L-R) Karen Berger (President’s Society), Dr. Leora Bar-Levav, Rabbi Joseph Telushkin, Florine Mark (Sapphire Society), and Carolyn Tisdale at a Women for Israel (WFI) luncheon in Detroit. (L-R) Eli (Herzl Society) and Linda (Sapphire Society) Frank with JNF Chief Development Officer Rick Krosnick at a Guardian of Israel Award Dinner in Milwaukee.

(L-R) Norman and Sylvia Elias with Honorees Greta and Art Rooney (President’s Society) at the Eastern Pennsylvania Tree of Life™ Award Dinner in Pittsburgh.

(L-R) Nina Paul (Century Council, Negev Society, Sapphire Society), Rhonda Sheakley (Century Council, Sapphire Society), and Alana Gerson ( JNFuture Root Society) at JNF’s Ohio Valley Tree of Life™ Award Dinner at the Cincinnati Hilton. (L-R) Debbie Resnick (Century Council) with Avi Baran Munro at the Eastern Pennsylvania Tree of Life™ Award Dinner in Pittsburgh.

Honorees Art and Greta Rooney (President’s Society) at the Eastern Pennsylvania Tree of Life™ Award Dinner in Pittsburgh.

(L-R) Enid Bootzin Berkovits, Jessica Abo, Hilary Miller, and Rusty Hansher Moffic (President’s Council, Sapphire Society) at a Guardian of Israel Award Dinner in Milwaukee.

(L-R) Rabbi Joseph Telushkin, Dr. Jeffrey Chaitoff, and Northern Ohio Board President Margo Vinney (Sapphire Society) at a Major Donor Thank You event in Cleveland.

(L-R) Barry Feldman (Century Council, Negev Society), Marcy Robbins, Rabbi Joseph Telushkin, Andrew Soclof at JNF’s Northern Ohio Breakfast for Israel in Cleveland.

JNF’s Major Donors

B'Yachad

27


NEW ENGLAND

(L-R) Arn Bortz, Eddie Paul (Century Council, Negev Society), and Neil Bortz at JNF’s Ohio Valley Tree of Life™ Award Dinner in Cincinnati.

Noreen Koppelman-Goldstein (Century Council, Negev Society, Sapphire Society) and Barry Goloboff enjoy a Major Donor Thank You event in Cleveland.

Dorothy and Dr. Hershel Sandberg (President’s Society) at a community reception in Detroit.

(L-R) Mary Woolf (Century Council, President’s Society, Sapphire Society), Special in Uniform Director Lt. Col. (Res.) Tiran Attia, and Boston President Emeritus Jeffrey Woolf (Century Council, President’s Society) in Israel on JNF’s President’s Society Mission.

(L-R) Women for Israel (WFI) Chair Risa Aronson (Century Council, President’s Society, Sapphire Society), JNF New England and Capital Region Executive Director Sara Hefez, and Women’s Alliance Chair Judi Elovitz Greenberg (Century Council, Sapphire Society) at JNF’s “Spinning Through Israel” event for Sapphire and Chai members.

(L-R) Boston VP of Campaign Todd Patkin (World Chairman’s Council, Negev Society), Boston President Emeritus Robert Cohan (President’s Society), Sapphire Society President Emeritus Amy Parsons (Century Council, President’s Society, Sapphire Society), Judith Sydney (Sapphire Society), and Boston President Steven London (Herzl Society) at a Board Meeting in Boston.

(L-R) Sara Hefez, Boston President Emeritus Robert Cohan (President’s Society), New England Chairman of the Board Lawrence (Century Council, President’s Society) and Suzanne (Century Council, President’s Society, Sapphire Society) Cohen, and Boston President Steven (Herzl Society) and Paula (Herzl Society) London at JNF’s 2017 National Conference. (L-R) JNF Chief Development Officer Rick Krosnick and Board of Trustee Member Jeffrey Glassman (Herzl Society) in Boston.

New England Chairman of the Board Lawrence (Century Council, President’s Society) and Suzanne (Century Council, President’s Society, Sapphire Society) Cohen at JNF’s 2017 National Conference.

(L-R) JNFuture Member Amie Segel ( JNFuture Root Society) with Nancie Segel (World Chairman’s Council, King Solomon Society, Sapphire Society) at JNF’s 2017 National Conference.

(L-R) JNF National Campaign Director Sharon Freedman, New England Chairman of the Board Lawrence Cohen (Century Council, President’s Society), Sapphire Society President Emeritus Amy Parsons (Century Council, President’s Society, Sapphire Society), Sharon Davidovich (President’s Society), and Sara Hefez at an event in Chestnut Hill.

(L-R) Boston VP of Campaign Todd (World Chairman’s Council, Negev Society) and Yadira (World Chairman’s Council, Negev Society, Sapphire Society) Patkin, Sapphire Society President Emeritus Amy Parsons (Century Council, President’s Society, Sapphire Society), Ora Rates (Presidents Society), and IDF Col (Res.) Sharon Davidovich (President’s Society) at an event in Chestnut Hill.

(L-R) Sapphire Society President Emeritus (L-R) JNF CEO Russell F. Robinson with Amy Parsons (Century Council, President’s Steven London (Herzl Society) at JNF’s Society, Sapphire Society) with Sapphire 2017 National Conference. Society President Rhonda Forman (Sapphire Society) at an event honoring Amy in Chestnut Hill.

(L-R) Gregory A. Davis Leadership Award Honoree Jonathan Gertman (Herzl Society, JNFuture Root Society) and Tree of Life™ Award Honoree Pam Liebman (President’s Society) with JNF CEO Russell F. Robinson at the New York City Real Estate Leonard Litwin Tree of Life™ Award Dinner.

(L-R) Northern NJ Board President Bruce (Century Council, Negev Society) and Ruth (Century Council, Negev Society, Sapphire Society) Pomerantz with Susan Chadick (Century Council, Negev Society, Sapphire Society) and NY Board Member Bob Weiss (Century Council, Negev Society) at the New York City Real Estate Leonard Litwin Tree of Life™ Award Dinner.

Dorothy (President’s Society, Sapphire Society) and Capital Region Board President Robert (President’s Society) Ganz at an event in Albany.

GREATER NEW YORK

(L-R) Event Co-Chairs Kim Dickstein (Sapphire Society), Shari Yardeni (Negev Society), and Nina Levene at the Women for Israel (WFI) “Zionism and Feminism in Today’s Political Climate” panel event at the Ronald S. Lauder JNF House in NYC.

28

B'Yachad

JNF’s Major Donors

(L-R) Honoree Gary Jacob (Century Council, Negev Society), JNF Chairman of the Board Jeffrey E. Levine (Word Chairman’s Council, Negev Society), Pam Liebman (President’s Society), NY Board Members David Greenbaum (World Chairman’s Council, President’s Society) and Michael T. Cohen (Century Council, President’s Society), and Ofer Yardeni (Negev Society) at the New York City Real Estate Leonard Litwin Tree of Life™ Award Dinner.

(L-R) Executive Vice-Chairman of the Society for Preservation of Israel Heritage Sites Noa Geffen with Amy Miller (Century Council, King Solomon Society) and JNF New York Executive Vice President Maidelle Goodman Benamy at a WFI event at the Jewish Museum in NYC.


(L-R) JNF CEO Russell F. Robinson with JNFuture NYC Chair Laruen Roberts (President’s Society, Sapphire Society, JNFuture Root Society) and Mike Breskin ( JNFuture Root Society) at the New York City Real Estate Leonard Litwin Tree of Life™ Award Dinner.

(L-R) Carrie Chalup (Sapphire Society) is presented with a Sapphire Society pin by New York WFI Chair Sheryl Buchholtz (Century Council, President’s Society, Sapphire Society) at the WFI Cooking Demo & Dinner in Roslyn.

Northern NJ Board Member and Major Gifts Chairman Ben Gutmann (World Chairman’s Council, Negev Society) with Leslie Nessman (Century Council, Herzl Society) at JNF’s Northern NJ Major Donor Reception in Alpine.

(L-R back row) Mayor of Mitzpe Ramon Roni Marom and JNF New York Executive Director Michael Feinman. (L-R front row) Bonnie (Century Council, King Solomon Society, Sapphire Society) and Dr. Norman (Century Council, King Solomon Society) Weiss with Carolyn (President’s Society, Sapphire Society) and Richard (President’s Society) Ziegler on the Mitzpe Ramon Task Force Mission in Israel.

(L-R) Susan (World Chairman’s Council, Negev Society, Sapphire Society) and Ben (World Chairman’s Council, Negev Society) Gutmann with Bonnie (Century Council, King Solomon Society, Sapphire Society) and Dr. Norman (Century Council, King Solomon Society) Weiss, and Vivian Grossman (World Chairman’s Council, King Solomon Society, Sapphire Society) at JNF’s 2017 National Conference.

(L-R) Northern NJ Board President Bruce (Century Council, Negev Society) and Ruth (Century Council, Negev Society, Sapphire Society) Pomerantz with JNF Northern NJ Director Jocelyn Inglis and Alon BenGurion at a Northern NJ Major Donor Reception in Alpine.

Ronen Bojmel (Herzl Society) on a family trip to Israel.

WESTERN

(L-R) Eric Elkins (Herzl Society), Ron Werner (Century Council, King Solomon Society), Aaron Taylor (Root Society), and Jack Roldan ( JNFuture Root Society) at the JNFuture Summer Social in Denver.

(L-R) Doreen Feldberg (Century Council, Negev Society, Sapphire Society), JNF CEO Russell F. Robinson, and Harley Feldberg (Century Council, Negev Society) on a JNF VIP Mission to Israel.

Susan Farber (President’s Society, Beth and Mike Kasser (King Solomon Sapphire Society) and Dr. Dan Lucas Society) on a JNF VIP Mission to Israel. (Century Council, Negev Society) at JNF’s 2017 National Conference.

(L-R) Janis (World Chairman’s Council, King Solomon Society, Sapphire Society) and Harold (World Chairman Council, King Solomon Society) Lilie with Jonathan Medved at a Major Donor Appreciation event in Las Vegas.

(L-R) JNF CEO Russell F. Robinson, Ed Devore (President’s Society), and Bernice Friedman (Century Council, Sapphire Society, Negev Society) at JNF’s Annual Campaign Summit in New York City.

(L-R) JNF CEO Russell F. Robinson with Evi (Negev Society, Sapphire Society) and Evan (Negev Society) Makovsky at a Major Donor event in Denver.

(L-R) JNF National Campaign Director Sharon Freedman with Dayna Titus (Century Council, President’s Society, Sapphire Society) at a Northern California Board Meeting in San Francisco.

(L-R) Amy Ovadia with Helen Loewenstein (President’s Society, Sapphire Society) at a President’s Executive Council Meeting in San Francisco.

(L-R) Deby (Century Council, President’s Society, Sapphire Society) and Jeff Goodman (Century Council, President’s Society), and JNF Israel Operations Development Officer Ariel Kotler at JNF’s 2017 National Conference.

(L-R) Bob (Century Council, King Solomon Society) and Shelley (Century Council, King Solomon Society, Sapphire Society) Dubin, Sara Schuman (Century Council, Sapphire Society), and Rabbi Yocheved Mintz (President’s Society, Sapphire Society) at JNF’s 2017 National Conference.

(L-R) Natalie Goldman (Century Council, Negev Society, Sapphire Society) and Barbara K. Burry (Sapphire Society) at a Board of Directors Retreat in Denver.

(L-R) Alan Fisher (World Chairman’s Council, King Solomon Society) with JNF Northern California and Pacific Northwest Executive Director Don Schlesinger at JNF’s 2017 National Conference.

JNF’s Major Donors

B'Yachad

29


(L-R) JNF President Dr. Sol Lizerbram (World Chairman’s Council, King Solomon Society) and Joseph Hess (Century Council) at JNF’s Orange County Breakfast for Israel in Newport Beach.

(L-R) Lauren Lizerbram (World Chairman’s Council, King Solomon Society, Sapphire Society) and Geri Kate Pearce (Century Council, President’s Society) at JNF’s Orange County Breakfast for Israel in Newport Beach.

SOUTHERN

(L-R) Lt. Col. (Res.) Tiran Attia, JNF Palm Springs Director Donna Raider, and Seymour Kreshek (Century Council, Negev Society) at a Major Donor Luncheon in Palm Springs.

Karen (Sapphire Society) and Dr. Robert (King Solomon Society, Century Council) Zeiger at the San Diego reception honoring Dr. Sol Lizerbram as JNF President.

(L-R) JNF CEO Russell F. Robinson, Dr. Barbara Hoffer (Sapphire Society), and Leonard Hirsch (Century Council, Negev Society) at the San Diego reception honoring Dr. Sol Lizerbram as JNF President.

(L-R) Honorable Lynn Schenk (Century Council, Negev Society, Sapphire Society), Honorable John Garamendi, and Patricia Garamendi at JNF’s 2017 National Conference.

(L-R) Honorees Michael Jacobson (President’s Society) and David Birnbrey at the 10th Annual Sam P. Alterman Golf Tournament in Johns Creek.

Atlanta Board Co-President Howard Wexler (Herzl Society) addressing a record audience at the 10th Annual Sam P. Alterman Golf Tournament in Johns Creek.

(L-R) JNF Chairman of the Board Emeritus Ronald S. Lauder (World Chairman’s Council) with JNF President-Elect and VP of Campaign Bruce Gould (World Chairman’s Council, King Solomon Society) at JNF’s 2017 National Conference.

(L-R) JNF-Green Horizons Liaison Ido Eisikovitz with Ed (Herzl Society) and Bobbi (Herzl Society) Schlussel at JNF’s 2017 National Conference.

SOUTHEAST

(L-R) Co-Chairs Adam Loewy (President’s Society) and Evan Gremont (President’s Society) at JNF’s Austin Breakfast for Israel.

(L-R) Marshall Sack, Jack Solka, Sandra Freed (President’s Society), Miriam Raviv, and Sandy Sack at JNF’s Austin Breakfast for Israel.

Lowell (President’s Society) and Peggy Gloria Adelson (Sapphire Society) and (President’s Society) Grizzle at a luncheon Sy Baron at a JNF event at Synagogue in their home in Kingsport, TN. Emanu-El in Charleston.

(L-R) JNF Southwest Executive Director Reagan Weil, with JNF Campaign Director Chuck Caughey, Fredell Shulkin, Jerusalem Post columnist Gil Hoffman, Fonda Arbetter (Sapphire Society), and JNF Chief Development Officer Rick Krosnick at a VIP reception in Dallas.

FLORIDA

(L-R) Garry Marx, Alan Lubel (Herzl Society), and Paul Heller (Herzl Society) at the 10th Annual Sam P. Alterman Golf Tournament in Johns Creek. (L-R) Dr. Alan Sunshine and Stan Sunshine (Herzl Society) at the 10th Annual Sam P. Alterman Golf Tournament in Johns Creek.

30

B'Yachad

JNF’s Major Donors

Debbie Meitin (Century Council, President's Gila Bronner and Dr. Craig Delegdish Society, Sapphire Society) and Jim Pugh, (President’s Society) at JNF’s 2017 Jr. (Century Council, President's Society) at National Conference. JNF’s 2017 National Conference.

Gale and Ed Milgrim (Herzl Society) at the Major Donor’s Reception during JNF’s 2017 National Conference.

(L-R) Executive Director of the Friends of the Arava Institute Miriam May, Maureen Lerner (Herzl Society), Executive Director of the Arava Institute David Lehrer, and Arnold Lerner (Herzl Society) at a parlor meeting in Naples.


(L-R) Harry and Sarasota Board President Marsha (Sapphire Society) Eisenberg with AMHSI-JNF Co-Executive Director Leor Sinai at a parlor meeting in Longboat Key.

(L-R) Sarasota Board Members David (Century Council, President’s Society) and Edie (Century Council, President’s Society) Chaifetz with VP of the Israel Relations Committee Kenneth Segel (World Chairman’s Council, King Solomon Society) at a breakfast in Sarasota.

(L-R) Ilana Lukoff and Tampa Bay Board Member Tina Gordon (Century Council, Sapphire Society) at JNF’s 2017 National Conference.

(L-R) Sarasota Board Member Edie Chaifetz (Century Council, President’s Society) and Toby Siegel (Century Council, Negev Society) at the Siegel’s home in Sarasota.

(L-R) Sarasota Board President Marsha Eisenberg (Sapphire Society) with Director of JNF’s Task Force on Disabilities Yossi Kahana and Sarasota Board Member Roslyn Mazur (Sapphire Society) at Temple Beth Israel in Longboat Key.

(L-R) Miami Board President Ron Kriss (Century Council, Negev Society), Comedian Rabbi Bob Alper, Broward Board President Rabbi Sheldon Harr (President’s Society), and VP of the Israel Relations Committee Kenneth Segel (World Chairman’s Council, King Solomon Society) at the 2018 Broward Campaign Kick-Off event in Fort Lauderdale. (L-R) JNF-Green Horizons Liaison Ido Eisikovits with Eliah Levin, JNF-Halutza Liaison Yeddiya Harush, and Howard Kestenberg (Century Council, Negev Society) at JNF’s 2017 National Conference.

(L-R) Hila Tzachi, Jim Riola (World Cynthia Hertz (Century Council, Chairman’s Council), Arad Mayor Nisan Ben Sapphire Society) and Allen Dubbrin at Hamo, Sy and Mark Israel (Century Council, JNF’s 2017 National Conference. Negev Society), and JNF Israel Development Officer Ariel Kotler in Orlando.

Sandra Best (Sapphire Society) and Murray Simpson (Century Council, Herzl Society) at the 2018 Broward Campaign Kick-Off event in Fort Lauderdale.

(L-R) Karen Whalen and Stella Luftig (Century Council, Negev Society) at the 2018 Broward Campaign Kick-Off event in Fort Lauderdale.

(L-R) Marty and Jane Weiss (Sapphire Society) with Cantor Elaine Shapiro (Century Council, President’s Society, Sapphire Society) and Michael Zimmerman (Century Council, President’s Society) at JNF’s 2017 National Conference.

(L-R) Dr. Robert Colton (Century Council, Negev Society) and Dr. Avram Cooperman (President’s Society) at the South Palm Beach Major Donor Reception in Boca Raton.

Miami-Dade President-Elect Maia Aron ( JNFuture Root Society) and Alex Bokor ( JNFuture Root Society) at the JNFuture Party at JNF’s 2017 National Conference.

Janet Kass (Negev Society) and Alexander Muss High School in Israel (AMHSI-JNF) Co-Executive Director Leor Sinai at Selby Gardens in Sarasota.

(L-R) Chairman of JNF’s Lawyers for Israel (LFI) and Tampa Bay Board Member Dr. Robert Norman (Century Council, Negev Society,) and Naples Board Member Dr. Max Robins (Century Council, Negev Society) at JNF’s 2017 National Conference Gala.

(L-R) Paul Konigsberg (Herzl Society), Bill Hait (Herzl Society), Jim Anchin (Herzl Society), Harvey Berkman, and Burt Tansky (President's Society) at Frenchman’s Creek Campaign Team Meeting in Palm Beach.

(L-R) Naples Board Member Stuart Price (Century Council, Negev Society) with ALEH Negev-Nahalat Eran CEO Avi Wortzman, Maj. Gen. (Res.) Doron and Didi Almog, and Naples Board Member Estelle Price (Century Council, Negev Society, Sapphire Society) at JNF’s 2017 National Conference.

Miami Board President Ron Kriss (Century Council, Negev Society) with Doris Suttin (President's Society, Sapphire Society) at a Special in Uniform parlor meeting in Bal Harbour.

(L-R) Miami Doctors for Israel (DFI) CoChairs Dr. Marisa Potter ( JNFuture Root Society) and Dr. Lila Chertman ( JNFuture Root Society) at the Miami DFI Kick-Off event in Aventura.

(L-R) JNF-Halutza Liaison Yedidya Harush with Stan Grubman (President’s Society), Josh Grubman, Grace Seo, and Judie Grubman (President’s Society) at Halutza in Israel.

JNF’s Major Donors

B'Yachad

31


A LASTING IMPRESSION 1,200 attendees, including 250 college and university students from over 100 campuses, and more than 100 JNFuture leaders, the largest crowd ever participated in Jewish National Fund’s 2017 National Conference in South Florida to hear incredible speakers, engage in in-depth meetings, and network with old and new friends. We reached over 250,000 people on social media throughout the weekend, with 25,000 joining us to view our plenaries on Facebook Live. Dozens of panels, discussions, and plenary sessions were held throughout the weekend-long event, and included inspiring speeches by Israeli Ambassador to the U.S. Ron Dermer; Israeli Minister of Housing Yoav Galant; JNF Chairman of the Board, Emeritus Ronald S. Lauder; New York Times Bestselling Author Daniel Silva; CNN Special Correspondent Jamie Gangel; Be’er Sheva Mayor Ruvik Danilovich; Miss Israel 2013 Titi Aynaw; Mayor of Bal Harbor, FL Gabriel Groisman; and Mayor of Hollywood, FL Josh Levy. A special thanks to National Conference Co-Chairs Vivian Grossman and Benjamin Gutmann, who dedicated tremendous time and effort to making National Conference a success—one that’s left a lasting impression. WITH MORE THAN

Registration for Jewish National Fund’s 2018 National Conference in Phoenix is open now! Register at jnf.org/nc for special savings.


THANK YOU TO OUR SP ONSOR S

October 26  – 29, 2018 The Arizona Biltmore · Phoenix, AZ

Eva and Marvin Schlanger Suttin Family Foundation Jayne & Andy Klein

The Beth and Andrew Fromkin Family Foundation Dr. & Mrs. Murray Rosenthal

Schwartzwald Urology Lee & Claire Hager Sydelle and Michael Lazar

National Conference 2017

B'Yachad

33


The Hero in Each of Us Winners from Jewish National Fund’s Social Media “Heroes” Contest LAST SUMMER,

wrote about her uncle, Ezra Tobias, who served in World War II and was a POW for several years. After his release, Tobias immediately left for Palestine, where he fought for Israel’s independence and lived for many years. (Bottom row, right, with the helmet on.) ADRIENNE ALEXANDER

following B’Yachad’s “Celebrating Israel’s Everyday Heroes” issue, we ran a contest on our social media pages asking for stories about your everyday heroes—regular guys or gals making waves in their community, the Jewish world, or for the land and people of Israel. The response was overwhelming, humbling, and faith-restoring. Congratulations to our winners below, and check out all the other nominees on JNF’s Facebook page at http://bit.ly/2ijajOW. PATRICIA REISS nominated Rabbi Micah Caplan, a member of JNF’s Rabbis for Israel, “because of his gifts to inspire others to see and spread goodness within themselves and those around them, his sharing of his love of Israel with the world, and his growing of the local Jewish community.”

MARLA SLOTT SILVERMAN

described Alon Tal, founder of Adam Teva V’Din and of Jewish National Fund partner Arava Institute for Environmental Studies, as a person who “has dedicated his career to environmental issues in Israel and the Middle East. He continues to educate students in the field and has

YOUR TRIP YOUR CHOICE CLASSIC COLLEGE

CLASSIC GRAD / PROFESSIONAL

7 - DAY EXPERIENCES

CAMPUS EXPERIENCES

INNOVATION NATION

AMPLIFIED ADVENTURE

TASTE OF ISRAEL THROUGH THE LENS

LGBTQ+ ISRAELI PRIDE EXPERIENCE

EXPLORATION

& MORE

Explore Israel with Israelis on one of our unique trip options! REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN FOR SUMMER TRIPS

ISRAELWITHISRAELIS.COM/GO Birthright Israel is for 18-26 year olds with at least one Jewish parent who fit the Birthright Israel eligibility requirements outlined at israelwithisraelis.com/eligibility.

CONTACT SHORASHIM : (312) 267-0677 • REGISTRATION@SHORASHIM.ORG • ISRAELWITHISRAELIS.COM

THIS TRIP IS A GIFT FROM BIRTHRIGHT ISRAEL

34

B'Yachad

Jewish National Fund

written numerous books on the subject.” As the theme of this issue of B’Yachad concerns the environment, we couldn’t agree more! HELEN RICHARD nominated a brave firefighter, Ms. Marti Stein, writing: “Ms. Marti has served the Houston, TX community for over 32 years. Because of her knowledge and dedication, she has helped many other countries with their fire programs, including Israel. She opens her home regularly to Israeli firefighters during their trainings, for Israeli Consulate gatherings, and for local school events. She volunteers her time to oversee drills at the local synagogue and day school, teaching children about fire safety. All is done from her heart, generosity, and warm kindness.” We want to hear more. Continue telling us about your heroes on Jewish National Fund’s social media platforms! Follow us on Facebook (Jewish National Fund-JNF), Twitter (@jnfusa), and Instagram (@jnfusa).


TRANSFORM YOUR HIGH SCHOOL EXPERIENCE. BOOST YOUR COLLEGE APPLICATION. Spend six weeks, eight weeks, or a full semester in Israel on a high school study abroad academic adventure! 800.327.5980 ∙ info@amhsi.org

amhsi.org


Photo by Noam Chen

2 018 T R AV EL & T OUR S

There’s Something for Everyone to Explore. Experience Israel with JNF Travel & Tours. Ride for Yerucham

VIP Tech Tour

MARCH 18 – 22, 2018

MAY 27 – JUNE 3, 2018

Discover 3,000 years of the Negev’s history on an inspirational five-day biking

Join Jewish National Fund for its inaugural Tech Tour and see firsthand the

excursion. This trip is open to riders of all skill levels.

groundbreaking technological innovations emanating from the “Start-Up Nation.”

Israel@70 Tour

Young Professionals Tour (for singles ages 30 – 45)

APRIL 2018 | 4 EXPERIENCES AVAILABLE | OPTIONAL EXTENSION: APRIL 19 – 22

JULY 8 – JULY 15, 2018

Celebrate Israel’s 70 birthday in style on this momentous and unforgettable trip.

Join other young singles for an invigorating experience in Israel. Gain access to

Immerse yourself in rich, cultural festivities marking 70 years of Israel’s

exclusive sights, leaders, and unique opportunities while becoming a part of Israel’s

independence on one of four unique experiences:

extraordinary history and future.

th

Spirit of Israel – April 12 – 19, 2018 Positively Israel: Interfaith – April 12 – 19, 2018

Sunshine Tour (for active adults 55+)

President’s Society – April 15 – 19, 2018 (Optional pre-mission: April 12   –  15)

AUGUST 26 – SEPTEMBER 4, 2018

Young Leadership – April 12 – 19, 2018

Enhance your Jewish identity with a life-changing, 10-day excursion exploring the country from north to south.

Culinary, Wine, and Music Tour Queen of Sheba: Women For Israel Tour

MAY 4 – 12, 2018 Taste and cook your way through Israel with world-renowned Israeli chefs

NOVEMBER 8 – 14, 2018

and sommeliers as you savor the country’s remarkable food, wine, and music.

A women’s-only trip for an unforgettable experience of Israel through women’s eyes.

R EGIST E R TODAY

CALL

877.563.8687  ·

 VISIT

jnf.org/travel  ·

 EMAIL

travel@jnf.org

Profile for Jewish National Fund

B'yachad Winter 2018  

B'yachad Winter 2018  

Advertisement