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BLAIR STATION

(RE)ENVISIONED A Transit Oriented Development study for Ottawa’s Blair Station


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This report is the culmination of the Land Use Planning project course at the School of Urban and Regional Planning at Queen’s University. This course gives students a simulated professional experience with a professional partner, the Policy Development and Urban Design Branch of the Planning and Growth Management Department at the City of Ottawa. The team presented Blair (Re)Envisioned to the City of Ottawa on December 13, 2012. Blair (Re)Envisioned team: Morgan Alger, Hossein Danesh, Mike Dror, Kaitlyn Graham, Jennifer Grove, Jeremy Johnston, Jonathan Pradinuk, Will Robinson-Mushkat. Acknowledgements The project team would like to thank: • Charles Lanktree for his continual guidance, support and feedback. • Dr. David Gordon, for giving us so much of his time. The representatives of various stakeholders, who helped guide the project by meeting with us throughout the term, attending our mid-term design charrette, or providing valuable feedback at our final presentation: • Chris Brouwer, Mike Bureau, Dennis Gratton, Matthew Ippersiel & Alain Miguelez, City of Ottawa • Councillor Rainer Bloess & Councillor Timothy Tierney, City of Ottawa City Council • Martin Barakengera, Sandra Candow, Stanley Leinwand & Miriam MacNeil, National Capital Commission • Colleen Connelly, OC Transpo • JP Thornton, Stantec Architecture • Pamela Sweet, FoTenn Consultants • The stakeholders we interviewed, for donating their time and ideas. Our design charrette participants, who provided their knowledge and expertise: • Cheryl Brouillard, Randolph Wang, City of Ottawa • Darren Ramsay & Ian Semple, City of Kingston • Carl Bray, Ajay Agarwal & Preston Schiller, Queen’s University Angie Balesdent and Jo-Anne Rudachuk for their administrative and logistical support. Our classmates, for their valuable feedback and encouragement throughout the semester.


Executive Summary WHY STUDY THE BLAIR STATION AREA? The City of Ottawa is converting the existing This extensive study helped the project team identify Transitway Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) system from the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and challenges Tunney’s Pasture to Blair Station to Light Rail (SWOC) of the BSA: Transit (LRT). This is expected to stimulate land use intensification and transit-oriented development (TOD) around future LRT stations. This study OPPORTUNITIES STRENGTHS outlines a proposed plan for intensification of 1. Existing transit 1. Underutilized and vacant the Blair Station Area (BSA) in order to assure infrastructure land it develops into an integrated, complete 2. Multi-use pathway system 2. Policy framework 3. Growing employment community that meets the City’s TOD density 3. Proximity to established neighbourhoods and 4. Future LRT target of 400 people and jobs per gross hectare.

WHO AND WHAT INFORM THIS STUDY? Four sources of information informed the design concepts presented in this study. First, the team visited the site, analysed policy documents, identified stakeholder relationships, compiled site history and looked at market trends across the region. Second, stakeholders were interviewed and provided valuable local knowledge. Third, the project team organized a design charrette that was attended by various experts in the fields of transportation, urban design and planning. Finally, an extensive study of 81 cases was undertaken to identify the most appropriate best practices from all over the world.

amenities 4. Established employment area 5. Minimal environmental constraints

5. Large Rights of Way 6. Supportive stakeholders

WEAKNESSES

CHALLENGES

1. Poor internal pedestrian + cycling network 2. Unpleasant built environment 3. Segregation of land uses 4. Superblock development 5. Air & noise pollution 6. No central public spaces

1. Fragmented ownership 2. Little publically-owned land 3. Arterials at capacity 4. Disruptive hydro infrastructure 5. Competition from other TOD stations

These inputs and the SWOC informed nine principles for design and a vision for the BSA.

BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED

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PRINCIPLES Mobility Hub

Density

HOW WILL THE DESIGN ACHIEVE THIS VISION?

Place Making

Circula tion Land Use Complete

Street Network

Parking

TARGET CONCEPT

Safety

The recommended design achieves the minimum gross density target of 400 by siting tall buildings appropriately.

To transform the Blair Station Area (BSA) into a diverse, connected, compact and transit-oriented destination that enhances the quality of life for existing and future residents and transit users.

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BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED

KEY DESIGN ELEMENTS

VISION

• Approximately 420 people + jobs per gross ha • Towers sited to take advantage of Greenbelt views and minimize shadow impact • Medium rise and appropriately placed tall buildings • An urban street network connecting to neighbourhoods and amenities • Podium-and-tower style of development to ensure comfortable streets • Primarily perimeter block built form to maximize human-scale density • Highest density around transit station • Reconfigured on- and off- ramps to create new land for development • Re-connected multi-use trail network allows safe, efficient active mobility • An upgraded pedestrian bridge and new cycling bridge • Weather-protected, seamless connection from station to shopping centres • Minimize surface parking using underground and structures


PHASING The plan is expected to be phased over 25-40 years in order to minimize risk, ensure market absorption of new developments, and create an orderly, appropriate and logical site.

PHASE 1: Station • Integrate station with Gloucester Centre • Improve pedestrian and cycling circulation • Replace Shoppers City East with residential infill

PHASE 2: Placemaking • • • •

Create new public plazas Continue infill around plazas Construct new community centre Make streets pedestrian-friendly

PHASE 3: Infill • Infill mixed use and residential on existing underutilized parking lots • Replace some existing buildings where appropriate

PHASE 4: (Re)Envisioned • Realign interchange • Infill on CSIS lands • Extend grid street network to the north

HOW WILL THE DESIGN BE IMPLEMENTED? TOD plans often go unrealized because not enough attention is paid to practical solutions. This plan incorporates a comprehensive implementation plan with innovative solutions to critical barriers. Ten strategies are recommended to ensure that the plan is implemented according to good TOD principles: 1. Lead rather than regulate development by acquiring land and entering into publicprivate partnerships (P3s) 2. Create policies and incentives, that facilitate the right kind of development 3. Invest heavily in infrastructure and align improvements with phasing strategy 4. Develop a comprehensive parking strategy 5. Improve the development approvals and review process 6. Develop performance indicators to evaluate and monitor progress 7. Create a Business Improvement Area (BIA) for Blair Station Area 8. Make Official Plan (OP) and Zoning By-law amendments 9. Employ Transportation Demand Management (TDM) strategies 10. Prioritize effective public consultation

BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED

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DOES THIS PLAN ACHIEVE ITS OBJECTIVES?

Carpet Existing sufficient density

criteria developed from Ottawa’s TOD guidelines and the precedent

complete community

studies. While the Carpet Concept meets most of the objectives, the

mix of land uses

gross density, creates landmarks, and achieves a greater mix of building

provide high quality public realm create landmarks

Existing

Carpet

Target

Gross Density

91

360

420

Gross FSI

0.3

1.25

1.55

Net FSI

0.6

2.14

2.65

Dwelling Units

797

8,565

12,533

DU/ha

5.8

62

91

mix of building types

2,015

15,222

21,598

minimize surface parking

15

110

158

10,517

34,409

36,231

Jobs/ha

76

250

262

Jobs/Residents

5.2

2.27

1.66

Residents/ha Jobs

Parking Spaces

8 (32m) 8 (32m) 9,195

8,475

28 (88.5 m) 9,813

*People and jobs per hectare

BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED

max. parking standards parking management promote seamless integration of trans. modes proximity to transit infrastructure for cyclists complete streets amenities at station street grid internal connectivity connection to station connection to surrounding neighbourhoods

Layout

1. The BSA presents a great opportunity for TOD. 2. Stakeholders should be continuously consulted. 3. The Target Concept design is recommended in order to achieve the vision for the BSA. 4. Development must be phased, employing the ten recommended strategies in order to ensure implementation. 5. A Community Development Plan (CDP) should be prepared to guide implementation and engage the community in the planning process.

parking at back or underground

Transit, Pedestrians + Cyclists

WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS?

integration with existing neighbourhoods

Vehicles + Parking

Max Storeys

prioritize pedestrians Streetscape + Environment

Residents

open space/ green space

Built Form

types.

Land Use

The existing site and design concepts have been evaluated against

Target Concept is preferred because it reaches a sufficient minimum

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Target


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Table of Contents PAGE Title SECTION 1 INTRODUCTION 1 1.1 Intent 1 1.2 Project Mandate 2 1.3 Location and Significance

SECTION 2 SITE ANALYSIS

3 2.1 History of Surrounding Area 5 2.2 Regional Context 7 2.3 Community Profile 9 2.4 Market Conditions 11 2.5 Built Environment 17 2.6 Natural Environment 18 2.7 Infrastructure 19 2.8 Connectivity SECTION 3 POLICY ANALYSIS 25 3.1Federal Policies 26 3.2 Provincial Policies 26 3.3 Multi-Jurisdictional Policies 28 3.4 Municipal Policies 37 3.5 Overall Implications for BSA SECTION 4 STAKEHOLDER ANALYSIS 38 4.1 Stakeholders 38 4.2 Stakeholder Interviews 40 4.3 Implications SECTION 5 DESIGN CHARRETTE 42 5.1 Charrette Description 43 5.2 Implications

SECTION 6 PRECEDENTS 44 6.1 Transit-Oriented Development 45 6.2 Mobility Hubs 47 6.3 Greyfield Redevelopment 49 6.4 Office Parks 50 6.5 Overall Summary SECTION 7 SWOC ANALYSIS 53 7.1 Strengths 53 7.2 Weaknesses 53 7.3 Opportunities 53 7.4 Challenges 53 7.5 Implications SECTION 8 PRINCIPLES & VISION 54 8.1 Principles and Vision 54 8.2 Principles 54 8.3 A Vision for the BSA SECTION 9 DESIGN CONCEPTS 57 9.1 Target Concept Design 67 9.2 Phasing SECTION 10 EVALUATION 69 10.1 Evaluating Design Concepts 72 10.2 Meeting Stakeholder Interests SECTION 11 IMPLEMENTATION 74 11.1 Strategies 81 11.2 Stakeholder Roles SECTION 12 RECOMMENDATIONS 83 12.1 Project Summary 83 12.2 Presentation Feedback

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BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED

APPENDICES 87 Map A - Parcel Information 88 Map B - Existing Servicing 89 Appendix 1 - Existing Tenant Schedule 90 Appendix 2 - Existing Building Schedule 93 Appendix 3 - Strategic Plan Objectives 96 Appendix 4 - Current Zoning Provisions 100 Appendix 5 - Parking Requirements 101 Appendix 6 - Existing Development Parking Requirements 102 Appendix 7 - Precedent Case Studies 104 Appendix 7.1 - TOD Precedents 108 Appendix 7.2 - Mobility Hub Precedents 112 Appendix 7.3 - Greyfield Redevelopment Precedents 116 Appendix 7.4 - Office Park Precedents 120 Appendix 8 - Stakeholder Interview Script 121 Appendix 9 - Urban Design Guidelines 121 Appendix 9.1 - Mode of Transportation 125 Appendix 9.2 - Built Form 128 Appendix 9.3 - Public Elements 130 Appendix 9.4 - Blair Station Area 131 Appendix 10 - Building Precedents 138 Appendix 11 - Design Charrette 142 Appendix 12 - Carpet Concept Building Schedule 147 Appendix 13 - Target Concept Building Schedule 153 Appendix 14 - Stable Low Density Residential Areas Excluded from Design Consideration 154 Appendix 15 - Shadow Analysis 155 Appendix 16 - Current Zoning Limits 156 Appendix 17 - Additional Proposed Street Cross Section 159 References


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List of Figures PAGE Figure 5 Figure 2-1Rural-to-urban transect 5 Figure 2-2 TOD Plan areas 6 Figure 2-3 Comparing suburban stations 8 Figure 2-4 Comparison of transportation modes for journeys to work 9 Figure 2-5 Housing starts in Ottawa 10 Figure 2-6 Vacancy rates in Ottawa and Suburban East 12 Figure 2-7 Housing type mix 16 Figure 2-8 Comparison of the BSA with three TOD precedents 27 Figure 3-1 BSA growth projections 36 Figure 3-2 Current site conditions evaluated using TOD guidelines 52 Figure 7-1 SWOC summary 55 Figure 9-1 Conceptual districts 55 Figure 9-2 Breaking barriers 55 Figure 9-3 Public spaces 55 Figure 9-4 Urbanized streets 59 Figure 9-5 Before and after diagrams of the Queensway interchange 63 Figure 9-6 Proposed street cross section 66 Figure 9-7 Proposed street cross section with parking

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List of Maps PAGE Map 2 Map 1-1 The BSA in Context 7 Map 2-1 Surrounding neighbourhoods 11 Map 2-2 Land ownership 12 Map 2-3 Existing land uses 15 Map 2-4 Existing building heights 15 Map 2-5 Area figure ground 15 Map 2-6 BSA figure ground 18 Map 2-7 Existing road network 19 Map 2-8 Existing connectivity 20 Map 2-9 Existing pedestrian shed 22 Map 2-10 Existing bus routes 25 Map 3-1 National Interest Land Mass 30 Map 3-2 Official plan designations in the BSA 34 Map 3-3 Zoning designations on site 56 Map 9-1 Target Concept plan view 58 Map 9-2 Proposed pedestrian circulation 58 Map 9-3 Proposed cycling circulation 58 Map 9-4 Proposed bus circulation 58 Map 9-5 Proposed driving circulation 64 Map 9-6 Open space provided in proposed designs 65 Map 9-7 Existing building footprints 65 Map 9-8 Proposed building footprints 65 Map 9-9 Proposed building heights in Target Concept 66 Map 9-10 Proposed parking provisions 67 Map 9-11 Phase 1 67 Map 9-12 Phase 2 68 Map 9-13 Phase 3 68 Map 9-14 Phase 4 76 Map 11-1 Proposed movement of hydro energy facilities 79 Map 11-2 Proposed zoning amendments 87 Map A Parcel Information 88 Map B Existing servicing

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ix


List of Acronyms AT BIA BRT BSA CDP CFB CIP CMA CPTED CSIS DPS DU FAR FSI GFA ha km/h LEED LRT LUP m m2 MUP NCC NCR NILM OP PPS PPUDO PWGSC RMOC ROW sq. ft. SURP SWOC TAD

x

Active Transportation Business Improvement Area Bus Rapid Transit Blair Station Area Community Development Plan Canadian Forces Base Community Improvement Plan Census Metropolitan Area Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design Canadian Security Intelligence Service Development Permit System Dwelling Unit Floor Area Ratio Floor Space Index Gross Floor Area Hectare Kilometres per hour Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Light Rail Transit Land Use Planning Metre Metres squared Multi Use Pathway National Capital Commission National Capital Region National Interest Land Mass Official Plan Provincial Policy Statement Passenger Pick-Up and Drop-Off Public Works and Government Services Canada Regional-Municipality of Ottawa-Carleton Right-of-Way Square feet School of Urban and Regional Planning Strengths - Weaknesses - Opportunities - Challenges Transit-Adjacent Development

BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED

TDM TIF TMP TOD UPH WWII

Transportation Demand Management Tax Increment Financing Transportation Master Plan Transit-Oriented Development Units per hectare World War II


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BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED


1|Introduction 1.1 INTENT The City of Ottawa is planning to convert the existing Transitway Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) to a Light Rail Tranist (LRT) from Tunney’s Pasture Station in the west to Blair Station in the east. Completion of the 12.5 kilometre Confederation Line is anticipated by 2018 and is expected to stimulate land use intensification and transitoriented development (TOD) around future LRT stations. This study provides a plan for the proposed redevelopment and intensification of the area surrounding Blair Station, the interim eastern terminus of the LRT.

1.2 PROJECT MANDATE Each year, teams of second-year graduate students at Queen’s University’s School of Urban and Regional Planning (SURP) undertake major project courses where they act as a consultant group for clients in the public sector. In fall 2012, a team of eight graduate students partnered with the City of Ottawa to create a vision for the BSA in Ottawa. The objective of this project is to provide the students with experience in preparing a plan under conditions that simulate professional practice, while addressing the immediate needs of a real client.

Image 1-1 Future Confederation Line (Source www.ottawalightrail.ca)

SECTION 1 INTRODUCTION

1


1.3 LOCATION & SIGNIFICANCE Gatineau

CFB Rockcliffe

Ottawa River

ntre

al Road

ir Bla

Mo

Roa d

a Avi

aur en t

Vanie

Pa r

4 17

kw

Greenbelt

ar d le v

ay

Ottaw

r Parkw

B ou

ay

Og

ilv

Ro

ie

ad

Tra

y

wa

it ns

a

7

41 Highway

VIA Rail Station

17

y4

wa

h Hig

t The 138 hectare study area is designated primarily ee Str as a Mixed-Use Centre in Ottawa’s Official Plan (OP), au e Rid with the expectation that future development will Parliament enhance the pedestrian environment and address !! Blair Station Hill the distinct character and unique opportunities Open Green Space Ri ve r of the area. In order to ensure that this future Plaza Downtown Transitw a y Private Green Space development occurs in a sustainable way, Blair (Re) Ottawa Greenbelt Envisioned provides a model for TOD in the City of Multi-Use Path Ottawa. TOD is an inherently sustainable urban form Road 7 41 ay ! w because it strives to provide the land uses, densities Building h Hig and urban form to support transit. It promotes Study Area MacdonaldMetres development that is walkable, complete, compact, Cartier Airport 0 75 150 300 (11.5 km Southwest) mixed-use. Some of the benefits ascribed to TODs Metres include: 0 500 1,000 2,000

ay

hw

g Hi

t ion

L St.

Blair Station is located roughly nine kilometres east of the downtown core of Ottawa and Canada’s parliament. The study area approximates an 800 metre walking distance around the transit station and is bounded by federal lands and low-rise residential areas to the north, community amenities and the Greenbelt to the east, residential areas to the south and a mix of residential and commercial areas to the west (Map 1-1). It is split intro quadrants by the Queensway (Highway 174), as well as Blair Road and Ogilvie Road.

Data Source: City of Ottawa (2012)

I

• improved quality of life for residents • reduced household transportation expenses • reduced environmental impacts • alternatives to traffic congestion • reduced household transportation costs, resulting in more affordable lifestyles

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BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED

Blair Station

Other LRT Station

Study Area

Map 1-1 The BSA in context

This vision will be used as a starting point for a Community Development Plan (CDP) for the BSA. The site’s unique location at the end of the future LRT line, at the intersection of two major roads and its proximity to the Queensway provide great opportunities for an integrated, complete community with good housing, employment and public spaces.


2|Site Analysis In order to begin planning for the future of the Blair Station Area (BSA), it is important to gain a thorough understanding of the site today. This Section provides an overview of the site’s history and phases of development that have seen it transform from a rural setting to its present suburban conditions. The BSA is situated along the rural-to-urban transect as it relates to the rest of Ottawa and the other LRT stations in particular. An in-depth analysis of the BSA’s existing natural and physical elements, as well as an overview of the surrounding community profile and market conditions that will affect future development is provided. This chapter utilizes archived data, existing documents, and site visits. Identifying what conditions exist in the BSA today is a crucial step towards moving to transitoriented (TOD), rather than transit-adjacent development (TAD).

2.1 HISTORY OF SURROUNDING AREA The Township of Gloucester was traditionally much larger in size than the neighbourhood we are familiar with today. Its borders stretched from the east banks of the Rideau River and from the south banks of the Ottawa River to Manitock. The roots of the first permanent colonial-English settlement in Gloucester can be traced to 1813, when Braddish Billings navigated the river to a newly constructed log cabin. Colonel John By’s map of the region indicates that by 1828 land had been granted to other men but many lots, though deeded, remained unoccupied. Despite the early settlement to the region it was not until 1832, when basic regulations outlining the keeping of stock were instituted as well as granting “free commoners” rights to access certain land, such as roadways. Five years later the first public money was used for roadway construction. Gloucester was a thriving agricultural community by the mid1800s; recognizing that Bytown was the epicentre for trade and commerce in the region, Billings and other prominent farmers in Gloucester helped finance the first series of bridges to cross the river. Many of the prominent streets in Gloucester were named after notable residents who were from the area. William Ogilvie, for whom Ogilvie Road is named, was born in the area. He served

Blair Station Area

Image 2-1 Gloucester Area circa 1879 (Source Illustrated Historical Atlas of The County of Carleton.)

as a surveyor, working in Gloucester during the early years of his career before venturing west where he was instrumental in the survey of the border between the Yukon and Alaska (Walker, 1968). Blair Road was named for one of the first families to farm in the Gloucester Township; during the 1890s, James Blair built a working bicycle in order to travel to Ottawa to sell goods (Kemp, 1991). Census records from 1861 indicate that the population of Gloucester at that time was 4,522 persons (Walker, 1968). As a result of the steady trade of goods heading to Ottawa and the farming tradition in Gloucester, many agricultural industries were established in Gloucester which stayed in operation well into the twentieth century. For example, dairy was pasteurized and bottled in Gloucester, and produce was sold at Ottawa’s famed Byward Market (Kemp, 1991). However, the late nineteenth and early

SECTION 2 SITE ANALYSIS

3


twentieth century brought change. New Edinburgh was annexed in 1887, followed by the establishment of Rideau Park in 1892, and the incorporation of Rockcliffe Park in 1908. This was followed by purchases of land in Gloucester and other neighbourhoods outside of the central core of Ottawa by the Federal government, such as in 1917 when the National Research Council first acquired land adjacent to Montreal Road (Clark, 2012). It was the formation of the National Capital Commission and the Plan conceptualized by Jacques Gréber that spurred the annexation of much of Gloucester by the City of Ottawa in 1949 and 1950. The majority of the population of Gloucester was lost to Ottawa, as was a significant portion of the township’s land. This included land that fronted the Rideau River, where the majority of Gloucester’s residents were clustered (Walker, 1968). When examined in the context of the growth of Ottawa, this is not surprising as the city’s pre-WWII population of 145,000 blossomed during and after the War (McKeown, 2006). The Gréber plan was also instrumental in the creation of the Greenbelt, established in the early 1950s, that surrounds the capital (National Capital Commission, 2012). In 1951, the Cardinal Heights subdivision broke ground and in 1954, Ogilvie Road was officially named. Suburban developments began to spread eastward from Ottawa towards the Greenbelt during the 1950s and 1960s. Construction on the Queensway began in 1960, but it was not until 1970 that it reached the BSA. As suburban expansion occurred in the City of Ottawa and the surrounding municipalities in the region, a need arose for greater coordination. In 1969 the Regional-Municipality of OttawaCarleton was created. This “upper-tier” of municipal government was comprised of the City of Ottawa and a number of surrounding townships, including Gloucester. Municipal services required on a wider scale than could be efficiently delivered by each individual municipality fell under the domain of the Regional-Municipality of Ottawa-Carleton. This included public transit, with the RMOC taking responsibility for OC Transpo, extending bus service outside the Ottawa City limits. The RMOC also built the Transitway to serve the new suburbs. Initially the regional government was comprised of councillors from the city of Ottawa and the surrounding townships, these councillors then elected a mayor. However, during the 1990s the mayor and councillors for the Regional-Municipality of Ottawa-

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BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED

Carleton were directly elected. Gloucester development during the post-WWII era was poorly controlled and planned. It became a scattering of a variety of development types, haphazardly implemented over several decades. Gloucester was officially incorporated as a city in 1980, but its growth pattern still lacked coordination. The new municipality approved a ‘city centre’ plan for Blair and Ogilvie Roads in 1984, though this plan did little to encourage sound planning and phasing for the neighbourhood. Beginning in 1983, the BRT was built, eventually providing a direct link from the BSA to the Downtown and west end of Ottawa. In 1988 the Gloucester Centre opened and a new city hall was established in one of the office buildings. The CSIS headquarters was established on its current site in 1995. These developments spurred greater employment in the area, but few additional residences. Gloucester was amalgamated along with 10 other communities in 2001, which saw the creation of the current City of Ottawa, officially bringing Gloucester into the wider municipal region (Clark, 2012).

Image 2-2 Site area 1971. In 1971, the BSA was at the ruralsuburban edge. (Source: Unknown. Flight Line: 719-OQTC (AM), Courtesy Queen’s University Map Library)


2.1.2 Implications for Design The BSA was rural until the late 1950s. Its suburban infrastructure – the Queensway ramps and the rights of way of Blair and Ogilvie Roads – was installed in the late 1960s when the automobile was the only mode of transportation considered. The challenge now is to retrofit this infrastructure and built environment to reflect the urban place that the BSA has become.

to categorize the BSA in relation to other TOD study areas given that the soon-tobe-built LRT line essentially runs from Ottawa’s Urban Core to Blair Station (Figure 2-2).

*1970

*Today

2.2 REGIONAL CONTEXT 2.2.1 Rural-to-Urban Transect Any proposed vision for the BSA requires a comprehensive study that situates the site relative to the entire City of Ottawa and other TOD plan areas. One strategic planning tool for organizing the elements of urbanism in a city is the rural-tourban transect (Talen, 2002). A concept drawn from ecology, the transect is a progression of human habitats sequenced from low (rural) to high (urban) density and complexity (Figure 2-1). Adhering to this model through appropriate zoning codes protects the environment and character of specific areas while providing a variety of lifestyles. At first glance, it is obvious that the transect does not correspond directly to Ottawa’s urban form. Development has sprawled up to and over the Greenbelt leaving little evidence of a rural transition zone near Blair Station and other areas adjacent to the Greenbelt. Though widely considered a suburban part of Ottawa, Gloucester now contains elements of a General Urban zone. These include a mix of housing types and significant commercial and employment areas. However, the arrangement of these elements in many parts of Gloucester, including the BSA, exhibits a low-density, auto-oriented pattern of development that is definitely suburban. The transect concept helps

Figure 2-1 The rural-to-urban transect (Talen, 2010). The BSA was at the junction of the rural and suburban areas in 1970 (T2-T3). Today it is at the edge of the General Urban/Suburban Zone (T3T4). Reconstruction of the area to create a TOD after the LRT arrives will create a T5 urban centre node in the T4-T3 general area. As a result of the existing suburban/rural elements, many of the original infrastrucutre must be modified.

Figure 2-2 The TOD Plan areas around each LRT station organized along the transect.

SECTION 2 SITE ANALYSIS

5


The TOD plan areas most comparable to the BSA in terms of their suburban development patterns are Train, St. Laurent, and Cyrville. The purpose of the TOD plans is to create vibrant, mixeduse centres with a high quality public realm. However, each of these four study areas will need a dramatic transformation and significant investment to reflect a more urban environment. Table 2-1 compares the BSA with the existing and TOD plan densities at Train, St. Laurent and Cyrville. When fully built, it is expected that the Train, St. Laurent, and Cyrville study areas will each hold approximately 40,000 people (City of Ottawa, 2012). TOD Study Area Train St. Laurent Cyrville Blair  

Study Area Size (ha) 100 120 95 138

Existing People 6,100 6,160 5,195 12,531

People/ha Existing 61 51 55 91

People/ha Zoning 365 210 350 125*

People/ha TOD Plan 390 355 410 420*

Table 2-1 Comparison of BSA with three similar TOD Study Areas (City of Ottawa, 2012).*Assumes approximately a 2:1 jobs/residents ratio.

While the City of Ottawa has relatively even development projections for Train, St. Laurent and Cyrville, evidence from recently completed LRT lines in Minneapolis, Colorado, and North Carolina suggests that TOD densities varies considerably between station areas (CTOD, 2011). In this study, the three most significant station area characteristics that indicated where TOD was successful were proximity to downtown, proximity to employment centres, and amount of vacant or underutilized land. Proximity to Downtown Shifting demographics and consumer preferences for pedestrianfriendly places with high amenities has led to a resurgence in many downtown areas. Therefore, a greater market exists for infill development near stations closer to downtown. TOD in more urban environments also requires less public investment and infrastructure improvements than more suburban stations. Proximity to Employment Centres Existing employment centres on transit lines increases ridership and therefore creates a greater opportunity for both commercial and residential development.

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BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED

Vacant or Underutilized Land TOD areas with vacant and underutilized land are easier to develop. Properties owners of land with lower ratio of building value to land value will be more likely to pursue development opportunities that drive up property values. Cheaper land may also provide opportunities for the government to purchase sites near the transit station.

TOD

TRAIN ST. LAURENT CYRVILLE

BLAIR

PROXIMITY TO DOWNTOWN PROXIMITY TO EMPLOYMENT CENTRES VACANT OR UNDERUTILIZED LAND

MORE

Figure 2-3 Comparing suburban stations

LESS

Despite being the furthest from the downtown core, the BSA is already a significant employment area with an estimated 10,500 jobs. The BSA is also the largest of the four sites, and has many vacant or underutilized parcels. Blair Station is only a twenty minute ride from the downtown core on the existing BRT line, and this will decrease once the LRT is operational. Given these advantages it is completely reasonable for the BSA to achieve similar densities with a more balanced mix of residents and jobs. Although this contradicts the rural-urban transect, the BSA may even present a greater development opportunity than the three prior stations.


2.2.2 Implications for Design

2.3 COMMUNITY PROFILE

Analyzing Ottawa with an rural-to-urban transect shows that the BSA was originally built at the interface of the Rural and Suburban zones but it will soon be categorized as a General Urban zone. Though definitely not as urban as the three tunnelled downtown stations (which would be considered T6 Urban Core), the BSA has a mix of housing types as well as significant employment areas. On elements alone, the BSA is most similar to the three stations that precede it: Train, St. Laurent, and Cyrville. However, the pattern or form that these elements take is definitively anti-urban. Uses are segregated, density is low, and the pedestrian and cycling environment is dreadful. Ottawa’s TOD studies plan to transform Train, St. Laurent, and Cyrville into urbanized, dense, mixed-use centres. The BSA is already a significant employment centre that can just as reasonably be urbanized to the same degree.

2.3.1 Surrounding Community There are 2,015 people residing directly within the BSA. In order to obtain information on the people most likely to visit the BSA, data for the Community Profile was gathered from an extended 1.2 km radius around Blair Station (Statistics Canada, 2006). This represents a standard distance that people are willing to bicycle. To gain a better understanding of the community characteristics of different geographic areas around the BSA, demographic information was also gathered from the six closest neighbourhoods (Map 2-1).

2.3.2 Demographics Approximately 9,000 residents currently live within a 1.2 km radius of Blair Station. The average age of these residents is 39 years old, very near to the Ottawa CMA average. The percentage of youth (0-19), 23%, and seniors (65+), 12%, is also comparable to the city average. Facilities for youth and services will need to be taken into consideration for future development, especially as aging babyboomers begin to retire. Cultural and educational services will also need to be considered given the area’s high ethnic, cultural and linguistic diversity. Twenty-five percent of the families in private households are single parents, signaling a need for daycare services.

Map 2-1 Surrounding neighbourhoods

SECTION 2 SITE ANALYSIS

7


Educational services

306  

Administrative and support, waste management and

315  

Professional, scientific and technical services

2.3.3 Income

502  

Retail trade

The mean individual and household annual income within the 1.2 km radius is $36,829 and $74,854 respectively. There is significant variation in income levels between the neighbourhoods surrounding Blair Station. Beacon Hill is a stable neighbourhood with middle to high incomes and high levels of home ownership. Carson Grove is relatively high-income but up to a quarter of residents struggle with unaffordable housing. Housing affordability is also a concern in the lower-income neighbourhoods of Pineview and Cummings, where 24% of residents are considered low-income. The arrival of the LRT should improve the existing area around Blair Station’s affordability through better location efficiency (CTOD, 2012). Opportunities for new mixed-income housing should be explored to take advantage of this.

Neighbourhood Carson Grove CFB Rockliffe Cummings Beacon Hill South/Cardinal Heights Pineview Rothwell Heights/Beacon Hill North Combined Neighbourhoods Ottawa CSD CV

445  

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Avg Ind Avg HH Population Households Income Income 8,031 3,224 $41,078 $81,157 5,391 3,025 $36,332 $56,111 8,649 3,308 $29,120 $57,108 6,903 2,919 $37,260 $71,920 5,566 1,939 $28,090 $76,575 10,311 3,737 $54,992 $94,131 44,851 18,152 $37,812 $72,834 812,129 340,732 $34,844 $87,843

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transit ridership is higher, pedestrian and cycling commuting mode Unemployment (Study The Area):prospects 5.10% Unemployment (Ottawa CMA): 5.90% shares are lower. for future employment in the area are promising due to projected spinoffs associated with the expansion of the CSIS building. Comparison of Primary Transportation Modes for Journeys to Work 70% 60% 50% 40% Ottawa CMA

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Figure 2-4 Comparison of transportation modes for journeys to work (Source: Stats Canada, 2005)

 

Table 2-3. Surrounding Neighbourhooods (Source: Ottawa Neighbourhood Study, 2009)

2.3.4 Employment

2.3.5 Implications for Design

Labour force participation for individuals over 15 years old within the 1.2 km radius is 69.7%, slightly higher than the Ottawa average. There is a higher participation rate among men (72.3% to 67.2%), though the unemployment rate among women is lower (4.5% to 5.1%). The top three employment industries are Public Administration (21%), Retail Trade (12%), and Health Care/Social Assistance (10%). Of those residents travelling to work, 55% drove a private vehicle, 27% took public transit, 6% walked, and 1% cycled. Compared to all of Ottawa (Figure 2-4), there are slightly more drivers but significantly more public transit riders among people living within 1.2 km of Blair Station (City of Ottawa, 2008). Interestingly, though

The community surrounding the BSA is culturally diverse and of mixed socio-economic status. Generally, the northern neighbourhoods have higher average incomes than those residents living below the BSA. Housing affordability is a significant issue that can potentially be addressed with a variety of type and tenured residential developments. There is strong employment in the area that will be bolstered once construction to the CSIS headquarters is complete. However, employment in the BSA would benefit from diversification opportunities.

8

BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED


2.4 MARKET CONDITIONS The BSA falls within the Gloucester region of Ottawa and is made up of commercial and office buildings, as well as a small number of residential dwellings, mostly occupant-owned. This subsections aims to analyze the existing market condition of each real estate class present in the study area.

Ottawa’s housing market has been performing extremely well due to improved employment rate and immigration. New housing construction is also on the rise, with high-density dwellings such as apartments and row houses leading the way (Figure 2-5). This is mainly due to improvements in youth employment rate and a rise in single person households.

2.4.1 Residential Residential dwellings represent the smallest of all real estate classes in the study area. 2006 census data shows that there are currently only 167 dwellings within 600 metres of the Blair Station. Eighty-seven percent of all the dwellings are owned and the average selling price is $239,000, significantly lower than the Ottawa average of $364,000. The average gross rent for residential dwellings in the area is about $460 per month. This number is however not a good representation of the rental situation in the area as most rental units in the study area are likely basement apartments. There are currently no proposals for further residential development in the study area.

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Image 2-5 The Gloucester Centre is the largest commercial building in the area. (Image source: Bing Maps)

Most new apartments are being constructed in the downtown core and in older neighbourhoods such as Westboro. Apartments currently represent only nine percent of housing in the study area, very low for an area so close to a major transit station. However, the arrival of the LRT will improve the location efficiency of the BSA, making it ideal for the higher density housing units typically associated with TOD.

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Figure 2-5 Housing starts in Ottawa have been rising with apartments and row houses leading the way; Apartment starts in 2012 are projected to outnumber single-detached starts for the first time in Ottawa. (Source: CMHC, 2012)

With an area of over 345,000 square feet and an additional 30,000 square feet planned, the Gloucester Centre, built in 1988 and designated as a Community Mall, is the largest commercial building in the study area (Image 2-5). Community Malls have been performing quite well in Ottawa with their vacancy currently standing at 2.4 percent, a one percent decrease from last year. The Gloucester Centre currently enjoys a vacancy rate of 0.8 percent. There are also three building designated as neighbourhood mall in the study area (see Appendix 1) containing nearly 200,000 square feet of retail space. Currently, the vacancy rate of neighbourhood malls in Gloucester is 8.4 percent, 4.1 percent higher than the Ottawa average. The average asking rent is $11.32 per square

SECTION 2 SITE ANALYSIS

9


As the study area transforms from a low-density suburban neighbourhood to a high-density TOD, more residents and better public transit access to the area will push the demand for retail space higher. This will create opportunities for:

1. Transformations of Gloucester Centre to a mixed-use centre containing a substantial amount of retail space 2. Development of new mixed use buildings containing retail space at grade

2.4.3 Office TD Bank and Telesat Canada own independent office buildings in the southwest quadrant of the study area and Murdoch investments’ building (also in the southwest) is leased entirely by the Children’s Aid Society. Meanwwhile, Blair Business Park and Commerce Park provide office space to smaller tenants. Together, they consist of a total of five Class A office buildings totalling over 500,000 square feet of office space. The average vacancy rate for office buildings in the study area is 9.5 percent and the average asking rent is $17 per square foot, while the vacancy and average net rent of Class A office buildings in Gloucester is 3.4 percent and $17.05 per square foot respectively (DTZ Barnicke, Q2 2012). Gloucester’s office market is relatively small with a total inventory of just 1.4 million square feet (compared to Ottawa East at 3.6 million, Kanata at 5.2 million, and Nepean at 3.3 million square feet). As a result, any small changes lead to big fluctuations in vacancy rate in this region. Gloucester and Ottawa East together form the Suburban East office market, which has traditionally enjoyed a significantly lower vacancy rate than the rest of Ottawa (Figure 2-6). It is also notable that the average asking rent for Class A office space in Gloucester ($17.05 per square foot) is seven percent higher than the average Ottawa suburban market ($15.9 per square foot), and 20 percent higher than the average asking

10 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED

rent for similar office space in the neighbouring Ottawa East region ($14.27 per square foot), which currently enjoys a vacancy rate of 2.2 percent for its class A office buildings. Vacancy Rate In Ottawa and the Suburban East Office Markets 9.00%   8.00%   7.00%  

Vacancy Rate

foot, 27 cents higher than the Ottawa average (Cushman & Wakefield, Q2 2012). Despite its poor performance in the past year, this category of commercial space has a great potential for growth. There remains a need for additional retail to service the population growth that has been occurring in the suburbs.

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Figure 2-6 Ottawa’s Suburban East office market enjoys a lower vacancy rate than the rest of Ottawa. (DTZ Barnicke, Q2 2012)

There are no office buildings currently under construction in Gloucester. However, there is one new office building being constructed in Ottawa East at 395 Terminal Avenue with 275,125 square feet of space, fully pre-leased to Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC) (DTZ Barnicke, Q3 2011). As the economy recovers from recession, Ottawa’s office market seems to be improving. Ottawa’s office market experienced positive net absorption in the second quarter of 2012 and vacancy rates are projected to remain stable over the next few years. Gloucester’s small office market has an opportunity for expansion as Blair Station brings more people and better public transit to the region.


2.4.4 Fragmented Land Ownership There are a variety of land-owners in the BSA. In the southern quadrant, each building has a different owner, and some roads are prviately owned. In the northwest quadrant, the Gloucester Centre, CSIS, two big box centres and an office building are all owned by different land owners. The case is similar in the northeast quadrant, where Shoppers City East, the Canadian Tire and the office park are all separately-owned. Map 2-2 outlines the existing buildings and parcels, and shows how fragmented the land ownership is in the BSA.

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low, which is a reflection of the high quality of the buildings (Class ‘A’), the small supply, and Ottawa’s steady overall office market. Ottawa’s residential market remains strong with a trend for higher density housing types such as rowhouses and apartments. The arrival of the LRT line will improve the BSA’s desirability, making it a good location for additional housing. Yet, the volume of development proposed for the site may take decades to be absorbed. Also, fragmented land ownership will make implementation difficult as assembling land for development will require a concerted effort from the City.

2.5 BUILT ENVIRONMENT There is approximately 3.2 million sq. feet, or 300,000 sq. metres, of development within the BSA (See Appendix 2 for a complete breakdown of existing development). This total jumps to approximately 405,000 sq. metres when the nearby CSIS building is included. The most prevalent land use within the BSA is retail, followed closely by office, both of which contain expansive surface parking. There are currently 9,195 parking spaces on site and only one small two-storey parking garage. Residential development within the BSA is limited to three small sections of residential neighbourhoods that are not to be developed. All uses within the BSA are segregated and poorly connected to one another. The site in its existing conditions looks nothing like TOD.

Metres Metres 300 300

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Map 2-2 Land ownership in the BSA is very fragmented.

2.4.5 Implications for Design The aging Gloucester Centre has been resilient in the face of growing competition from nearby malls. Its new tenant, Walmart, will anchor the mall for years to come. Despite the presence of vacant commercial buildings, residential and employment intensification should provide plenty of opportunities to increase the amount and variety of retail services in the BSA. The office vacancy rates on site are quite

Image 2-6 Commercial is the most prevalent land use on site

Image 2-7 Underutilized parking lot on site

SECTION 2 SITE ANALYSIS

11


Blair Station Figure 2-7 Housing type mix in 2.1 km radius

Apartment 24%

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Map 2-3 Existing land uses

2.5.1 Residential The residential area north of Ogilvie and east of Blair is part of Cardinal Heights and Beacon-Hill South and features mostly onestorey single-detached homes. The majority were built between 1960 and 1980, though there is minimal new construction occurring on Ogilvie Road. One stretch of poorly situated homes fronting Ogilvie Road have driveways that open directly onto the busy arterial. The two remaining residential areas within the BSA consist primarily of rowhouses, but were built in different eras. While the area to the South in Pineview was mostly built in the 1960s, the area to the West in Cummings is relatively new construction from the past two decades. Although there are some low-rise apartment buildings, the dominant housing typology within a 1.2 km radius around Blair Station is medium density rowhouses (See Figure 2-7). Introducing higher density housing forms will be necessary to reach the target densities for TOD around Blair Station.

Image 2-8 Single family detached homes front onto Ogilvie Road, an arterial road.

Image 2-9 Row houses in the study area.

12 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED


2.5.2 Commercial

2.5.3 Office

The most central and largest building in the BSA is the Gloucester Centre. Built in 1988, the two-storey mall is anchored by Loblaws and Walmart, and also contains a number of small outlets and service offices. ‘Big Box’ retailers, chain restaurants, and a large Silver City theatre surround the mall in the area east of Blair and north of the Queensway. To the east, Blair Place separates Canadian Tire from Shoppers City East, a collection of discount retailers, liquor stores, most of which are now vacant. A small strip of neighbourhood commercial services Gloucester High School. There is also sporadic strip mall development just outside the study area heading east down Ogilvie Road.

Most of the BSA south of the Queensway is devoted to the Blair Business Park, a sprawling collection of parking lots, greenspace, and four office buildings ranging from five to nine storeys high. The newest of the four buildings on the southern edge of the site is an attractive glass structure with a child day care centre and outdoor playground. Most of the remaining office use on site is located in Commerce Park just east of Blair Road: a group of four, seven-storey glass buildings, with an attached two-storey parking garage. There is one other significant office building on site, an isolated five-storey structure wedged between City Park Drive and the BRT. Just north of the BSA, CSIS is undergoing a massive expansion that will see its number of employees doubled. The arrival of such considerable employment gains presents a tremendous opportunity for further intensification.

Image 2-10 Former commercial uses are now vacant in much of the area in the eastern portion of the site.

Image 2-11 Neighbourhood commercial near Gloucester High School.

Image 2-12 The Children’s Aid Society building provides outdoor playground space for children.

Image 2-13 The CSIS expansion building has unique design and will double the number of CSIS employees in the area.

SECTION 2 SITE ANALYSIS

13


2.5.4 Community Services and Amenities There are few community amenities directly within the BSA. The two nearest elementary schools are John Paul II to the south and Carson Grove to the north. There are some medical offices within the Gloucester Centre as well as Shoppers City East, though its leases are all expiring. The only place of worship on site is an Evangelist centre is also currently located in Shoppers City East. The closest cluster of community services is located just outside the eastern boundaries of the BSA near Gloucester High School. Located in the Trillium Complex is the North Gloucester public library, a seniors’ centre, Earl Armstrong arena and Splash wavepool. Trillium Fields Park offers a number of outdoor recreational opportunities including sports fields, a skate park and a BMX track. Both Queensway Park and City Centre Park also contain sports fields as well as outdoor children’s play areas.

2.5.5 Greenspace Despite the abundance of surface parking, there is some greenspace on site in addition to the above-mentioned parks on its boundary. Most greenspace located within the BSA is around the two large office parks. CSIS is currently building on some of the large wooded marshland next to CSIS. Though there is still some wooded area remaining that is federally-protected. There is also significant green space along the Queensway and within its interchange at Blair Road. However, this space is not very accessible due to the area’s poor connectivity. There is also a lack of programmable green space near Blair Station.

Image 2-14 Green space adjacent to office developments on site.

14 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED

Image 2-15 Place of worship on eastern portion of site.

2.5.6 Figure-Ground Analysis A figure-ground analysis uses building footprint data to give an indication of urban form. Maps 2-4 and 2-5 displays a figureground drawing of the BSA and different scales. The pattern of figures outside the BSA clearly exhibits a low-density suburban form typical of post-war suburban sprawl. The irregular and fragmented pattern of large figures within the BSA’s white background gives a good indication of the amount of open land on site. Much of this open land can easily be redeveloped. It is clear that the street network is poorly defined. Strip mall development is also visible along Ogilvie west of the BSA. Figure 2-8 displays a zoomed in figure ground analysis of Blair Station and compares it with those of three compact, sustainable developments: ii. Addison Circle, Addison, Texas; iii. Legacy Park, Tustin, California; iv. Playa Vista, Los Angeles, California.


A weakness of the figure-ground analysis is that it does not indicate building heights. Map 2-4 displays the buildings heights for the BSA and immediate surroundings. With the exception of the office park buildings, there are very few multi-storey buildings on site. Both the building footprints and building heights were utilized to calculate the Floor Space Index (FSI) for each parcel within the BSA (See Appendix 2). The average Net FSI for all non-residential parcels was calculated at 1.08. This is very low for Transit-Oriented Development and is a good indication of the inefficient use of land in the BSA. Increasing the site coverage and raising building heights will raise the Net FSI and move towards increasing density, which currently rests at 85 people/jobs per hectare, much lower than the 300 to 400 in other TOD plans.

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Map 2-4 Existing building heights in the BSA.

Map 2-6 BSA Figure ground map

SECTION 2 SITE ANALYSIS

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2.5.7 Implications for Design Disconnected commercial and office buildings surrounded by expansive surface parking is characteristic of the built environment of the BSA. With the exception of the two-storey Gloucester Centre, most commercial buildings are of the single-storey, big-box variety. The taller office park buildings on site range from five to eight storeys high. Vertical integration and development over the surplus surface parking provide plenty of opportunities for converting the BSA into a compact and walkable TOD. Buildings should be placed in a pattern that improves their relationship to the street and to one another. The area desperately needs a new street network and a central public space where people can socialize. Also, given Ottawaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cold weather climate, considerations of winter city design principles should be made. Figure 2-8 Comparison of the BSA (left) with three sustainable TOD precedents (Cherry and Nagle, 2009). The TOD neighbourhoods show a finer grained street network, much higher building coverage, and some urban squares as open space.

16 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED

Image 2-16 Market square in Kingston, Ontario provides flexible space for users.


2.6 NATURAL ENVIRONMENT Development, redevelopment, and intensification of the BSA will benefit from few environmental constraints. It is relatively flat, on high ground away from floodplains, and does not include any significant protected waterways (surface or underground), forest, or view corridors. This section provides a brief overview of some constraints and considerations for the BSA.

2.6.1 Topography The area is relatively flat with an elevation peak of roughly 80 metres near Ogilvie and Blair Roads that gently slopes downwards towards Green’s Creek, located southeast of the site within the Greenbelt. These slopes are not considered significant enough to present a constraint to development in any way. However, there are some artificial embankments lining the Queensway.

2.6.2 Geology The bedrock in the area is primarily shale and is approximately 2-3 metres in depth. The surficial geology is part of a large region of till in the Ottawa area and may be sensitive to compression and disturbance, and may undergo settlement as a result of prolonged groundwater lowering. This will have to be tested on a site-by-site basis but is not expected to present a constraint to development.

2.6.3 Contamination There is no known contamination on the site. However, several areas on the site have been flagged for possible contamination with rankings ranging from Medium to High on the Historical Land Use Inventory (Ottawa Light Rail, 2011b). This is a result of former commercial uses and requires testing or assessment prior to development. These areas are clustered around the Commerce Park office park off of Blair Place.

Image 2-17 The Greenbelt adjacent to the BSA, looking southeast.

2.6.4 Forest There are still some remaining wooded areas north of the CSIS property that is currently undergoing a significant expansion. Although the area was once used as farmland, it is now designated as Urban Natural Areas and ranked as Moderate for their contribution to urban area biodiversity (Ottawa Light Rail, 2011b). This area is out of the study area and does not constitute a significant constraint, but should be noted. There is forest cover at the west edge of the site, as well as a small amount in the southern portion and along the edge of the Greenbelt.

2.6.5 Greenbelt The Greenbelt is a significant environmental asset that contributes greatly to the area’s biodiversity. Envisioned as part of the Gréber plan, expropriation of land began in 1956. The Greenbelt is an area administered by the Crown-owned NCC. There are three roles outlined for the Greenbelt: Continuous Natural Environment, including a core natural area, natural buffer, and a natural area link; Vibrant Rural Communities, including a designation for cultivated and rural landscape; and Compatible Built Facilities, including buildable site area and infrastructure corridor. The designation most applicable to our study is the Compatible Built Facilities because the edge of the Greenbelt that abuts BSA is designated as buildable site area. The Greenbelt, and specific policies relating to it, will be discussed further in Section 3.

SECTION 2 SITE ANALYSIS

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2.6.6 Noise, Air Quality, and Drainage The site is subject to ‘Severe’ traffic noise due to the fast-moving traffic on the Queensway, Blair Road and Ogilvie Road. Air quality on site is also “Severely” affected from traffic volumes. Both noise pollution and air quality are not expected to affect development since these are constant along the highway and major roads. Stormwater draining from the area is directed to the Cyrville Drain.

2.7 INFRASTRUCTURE 2.7.1 Services The area surrounding the Gloucester Centre and the Office Park to the west of Blair is well-serviced by water and sanitary pipe systems (see Map B in Appendices). The area surrounding Shoppers City East however is not currently well-serviced. Therefore the servicing capacity will need to be upgraded if this site is to be intensified. Any new development will need to be wary of the hydro corridors running north-south and east-west through the site. As well, there is a hydro yard on the south side of the Queensway east of the pedestrian bridge entrance which need to be moved. Storm water currently drains into a system of pipes or runs into the vegetated areas along the Queensway and into the Greenbelt. Stormwater management may need to be improved as heavy rainfall clearly flooded the existing system during the heavy rainfall that greeted our site visit.

Ogilvie means there is sufficient room to dramatically urbanize the streetscape with improved bike facilities and a better pedestrian environment. Excluding the residential streets on site, the remaining roads are primarily discontinuous and only lead to parking lots for shopping centres and office buildings (Map 2-7).

2.7.3. Implications for Design The reach and capacity of the site’s water and sanitary pipe systems will need to be increased in order for intensification to occur. Above ground, development will need to work around the north-south hydro corridor. Without any through streets, all traffic is absorbed by the two intersecting arterials, Blair and Ogilvie Roads. The lanes in each direction on both roads need to be retained to maintain current capacity levels. However, there is plenty of excess ROW that can be utilized to improve the streetscape for the use of pedestrians and cyclists as well. Intersecting these large roads with additional through streets will likely limit the speed of vehicles.

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2.7.2 Roads With a capacity of 4,000 vehicles per hour, the Queensway is a major city freeway that leads travellers towards downtown via the Queensway and the Vanier Parkway. The Queensway and Blair interchange comprise a very large footprint within the site that acts as a constraint towards future development. Both Blair and Ogilvie are arterial roads with two or three lanes of traffic heading in each direction. The 44.5 metres of right-of-way (ROW) on

18 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED

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It is clear from the existing pedestrian and cycling infrastructure provided that active transportation was an afterthought when most of the area was first planned. Despite some efforts to accommodate all modes of transportation, connectivity in the BSA suffers from a lack of consideration for pedestrians and cyclists. The site is designed predominantly for quick and convenient access for private automobiles. However, even the integration of private vehicles with public transit at Blair Station is poorly planned. The level of connectivity for each transportation mode was analyzed and is listed in the order each mode will be prioritized for future sustainable development.

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The multi-use pathways south and west of the study area provide pleasant pedestrian access to the study area. The pathway to the south is well-used by a variety of people, many of whom use it to access the pedestrian bridge and cross the Queensway. This comfortable pedestrian experience diminishes once inside the study area. Crossing Telesat Court in the southern office park en route to the pedestrian bridge is indirect and involves crossing three lanes of traffic or parking lot access roads. Crossing the pedestrian bridge is straight forward, but may be unsafe, particularly at night (Image 2-19). Security measures including security cameras and emergency call boxes are visible on and just off the bridge. It is not uncommon for security guards to walk employees to the station after hours. !

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Image 2-19 The pedestrian bridge is Image 2-18 The Blair Road bridge curb is approximately 0.7 metres wide. reportedly unsafe.

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Image 2-20 A multi-use pathway provides convenient access to the site.

SECTION 2 SITE ANALYSIS

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North of the Queensway, the interior of the study area is poor for pedestrian circulation. Navigating the study area can cuurently be done in two undesirable ways. The first option is to follow circuitous routes with sidewalks and finish by crossing a variable amount of parking lot. The second is walking across parking lots, generally on poorly landscaped and narrow dividers. There are a few pedestrian shortcuts â&#x20AC;&#x201C; for instance a pathway connects the movie theatre to an adjacent residential neighbourhood to its west â&#x20AC;&#x201C; which provide convenient access to amenities; however, these are a minority and are often incomplete. There is little street furniture such as benches or garbage cans along the routes connecting the station and the surrounding area. There is an approximately four-metre buffer along the south side of Ogilvie Road leading to the study area which separates pedestrians from four lanes of fast moving traffic, which could be used to provide better pedestrian infrastrucutre.

Image 2-21 A lack of pedestrian amenities (such as sidewalks) forces pedestrians onto the road just outside of Blair Station.

2.8.2 Cycle

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Bicycle infrastructure surrounding the BSA is inconsistent and lacks connectivity. There are some bicycle lanes on Ogilvie and Blair Roads, but these vary in width (from nearly 2 metres to less than 1 metre in some sections) and tend to take cyclists through potholes and poor pavement conditions. Cycling on these roads, with large volumes and traffic speeds exceeding 60 km/h, is an uncomfortable experience. There are no interior bike pathways, but on the southern and western edges of the study area there is access to the MUP network. These features make it easy to get to the area by bike, but once on-site, cycling conditions deteriorate dramatically as cyclists have to navigate parking lots and undefined internal roads with little infrastructure to assist them. Bicycle parking is available in front of some buildings with varying degrees of convenience.

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20 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED

Map 2-9 Existing pedestrian shed. Shows actual walking distances.


Crossing the pedestrian bridge with your bicycle, while not the primary intent of the bridge, involves either taking a bike onto a small elevator or carrying it up and down two flights of stairs. The alternative for crossing the Queensway is the bike lane on Blair Road, east of the pedestrian bridge. However with high traffic speeds, at-capacity traffic volume, and multiple wide turning movements, this route would only be considered accessible for expert cyclists.

Image 2-22 Semi-covered bicycle parking outside the Gloucester Centre.

Image 2-24 A cyclist breaking the rules on the pedestrian bridge.

Image 2-23 Bike lanes of varying width and quality are provided on Blair and Ogilvie Roads.

Image 2-25 Pedestrians preparing to cross City Park Drive.

SECTION 2 SITE ANALYSIS

21


2.8.3 Transit Blair Station is the fifth most eastern stop on the OC Transpo Route 95, Ottawaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s busiest bus rapid transit route. Once the planned LRT system is introduced, Blair Station will become the eastern-most stop on the line. Blair Station will be transformed by the LRT into a transit hub whereby all transit service in the area will be routed through Blair Station to maximize the effectiveness of the LRT. An east-west transit corridor, the Transitway, runs through the study area adjacent to the Queensway. Existing local transit routes access the study area via roads shared with automobiles, while the BRT runs

on the separate transit corridor. The design of the busway at the station will change with the integration of the LRT. Currently two levels (an upper and lower level) accommodate 158 buses during peak hour. With the integration of the LRT, the lower level alone will need to accommodate a projected 142 buses (increasingly double-decker) during peak hour as the upper level transforms into the LRT line. This is a significant increase from the current rates and accommodations in design may be required.

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22 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED

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Peak Route

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Image 2-27 Loading for local bus routes.

Transitway Station

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Regular Route

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Blair Station

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Image 2-26 Blair Station.

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0

250

500

Metres 1,000

Data Source: City of Ottawa (2012)


2.8.4 Drive Driving to the Blair Station study area is accommodated with four or six lane roads. Blair Road runs north-south and Ogilvie Road runs east-west. All vehicular traffic eventually ends up on these roads, creating capacity problems. Blair Road is currently operating at or near capacity in peak periods, while Ogilvie Road is slightly below capacity (Ottawa Light Rail, 2011b). There is also a major east-west highway, the Queensway, connecting to the rest of Ottawa to the west, and Orleans to the east. The station is connected to the surrounding area by access roads that intersect with the adjacent arterial roads. Ogilvie Road is a four lane major arterial, which runs east west across the northern edge of the study area. It provides multiple access points to the station north of the Queensway. City Park Drive is an interior ring road that runs through the central western portion of the study area, which gives access to different amenities including the transit station, the Gloucester Centre, and SilverCity movie theatre.

Image 2-28 Blair Road looking south from Ogilvie. This stretch of road mainly acts as a highspeed extension of the Queensway ramps. It is a difficult and dangerous place for pedestrians and cyclists.

Apart from City Park Drive, the interior roadways function as private parking lot access lanes. The only access to the portion of the study area south of the Queensway is via Meadowbrook Road off of Blair Road. There is an internal road, Telesat Court, which provides access to office entrances and parking lots. All internal roads function as driveways rather than streets, clearly intended and used only for local traffic and do not provide through routes. There is ample parking in the area, as well as drop-off locations for the Gloucester Centre and transit station. There are two park-and-ride lots, one adjacent to the transit station and one south of the Queensway adjacent to an office building.

2.8.5 Barriers The two arterial roads, Ogilvie and Blair, are significant pedestrian barriers to the study area. Crossing these roads can only be done safely at signalized intersections, and still involves crossing turn lanes where pedestrians have to watch for traffic. Crossing Blair Road from the office park to the east towards the station or vice versa involves a long, uncomfortable crossing that ends on a narrow sidewalk between a Tim Hortonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s drive-through and an access road. There is an alternate route, an underpass, which follows the transit

Image 2-29 This internal street functions as access to Blair Station and parking. Pedestrian and cycling access to the station is difficult and dangerous.

SECTION 2 SITE ANALYSIS

23


corridor. This is, however, very indirect and presents safety issues. The Queensway is another significant barrier, which can only be crossed using the pedestrian bridge; a long, unpleasant, and reportedly unsafe crossing.

Image 2-30 Crossing Blair Road as a pedestrian is difficult and dangerous.

2.8.6 Implications for Design The lack of internal roads severely hinders connectivity throughout the BSA and wastes the capacity of arterial roads on local trips. There are plenty of access points to commercial and employment areas, however they lead merely to parking lots and do not break up the large ‘superblock’ pattern in any significant way. These access points do provide opportunities to lay down new interior streets that integrate the site better with its surrounding neighbourhoods. Creating new streets will also serve to improve cycling and pedestrian connectivity. The Queensway is by far the most substantial barrier to improving connectivity for cyclists and pedestrians. Solutions to this barrier will need to improve Blair Road, and the existing pedestrian bridge. As the last stop on the LRT line, Blair Station’s capacity for accommodating buses will need to increase as it transforms into a major-mobility hub and transfer point.

Image 2-31 Call boxes inside the pedestrian bridge are one of the safety measures used.

Image 2-32 Shabby infrastructure in the south portion of the site.

24 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED


3|Policy Analysis The BSA is affected by policies at the federal, provincial, multijurisdictional and municipal level. This section outlines these policies and summarizes the implications for redevelopment around the BSA. Through a detailed policy analysis, a clearer picture emerges of the supportive policies for development and redevelopment in and around the BSA. However, it also highlights where policies may have fallen behind the actual conditions at the site, and may need to be enhanced in order to best support future developments at Blair.

3.1 FEDERAL POLICIES 3.1.1 The NCC The NCC is a federally mandated organization that administers the land-use of the National Capital Region (NCR), a 4,660 square kilometre area located within the provinces of Ontario and Quebec. Created in 1959, the NCC administers all federallyowned buildings in the region as well as Crown land within the region. The NCC utilizes both capital planning principles, those that address the special and unique character and symbolism of Canadaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s capital, and regional planning principles, those that reflect the importance of environmental stewardship, efficiency, and cooperation with other parties and stakeholders in successful planning. The NCR is planned through the implementation of The Capital Plan, a regional plan that administers, promotes, and preserves federally owned built form and natural settings within the boundaries. A well-defined hierarchy of Master, Sectorial, and Area plans enables the implementation of The Capital Plan. The implementation of the plan is closely monitored and the entire plan undergoes a comprehensive review at five year intervals in order to ensure the plans objectives and priorities are still in sync with the current and future land-use conditions in the NCR.

natural and rural designations, however the Greenbelt Plan does allow for designations of buildable site areas and infrastructure corridors. A small portion of the Greenbelt is located within a 600m radius of the BSA. This area is, in fact, designated as a Buildable Site Area, sometimes referred to as Greenbelt Employment. This designation is intended to provide land-use for organizations that are deemed of Capital importance and to help generate revenue for the maintenance of the Greenbelt; this is why the golf course that abuts the site is a permissible use on Greenbelt land. A small portion of land near the study area (see Map 3-1) is designated National Interest Land Mass. This designation means the land is relevant to the mandate of the NCC and therefore will continue to be owned by the NCC and cannot be sold. This

The aspect of the NCC that is most relevant for the Blair Study Area is the Greenbelt. The Greenbelt is an area within the NCR specifically designated with a variety of uses, principally those of Map 3-1 National Interest Land Mass designation as shown in green. (Source NCC Non-Urban Lands 2006)

SECTION 3 POLICY ANALYSIS

25


includes a small piece of land outside of the Greenbelt as well as the land within the Greenbelt as mentioned above.

3.2 PROVINCIAL POLICIES

3.3 MULTI-JURISDICTIONAL POLICIES

3.2.1 Provincial Policy Statement

3.3.1 Choosing Our Future

The Provincial Policy Statement (PPS) provides direction on issues of land-use development for the Province of Ontario. The PPS focuses growth in settled areas, while avoiding areas that contain significant or sensitive resources, as well as areas that pose a threat to public health and safety. Wise management of development involves directing, promoting, and sustaining growth; maximizing the efficiency of land-use patterns is key. Sufficient land must be made available for intensification, redevelopment and, if necessary, designate growth areas to accommodate various land-uses over a 20 year timeframe. It is the objective of the PPS to have planning authorities promote areas for intensification and redevelopment as well as establish and implement minimum targets for intensification and redevelopment in already built areas. Development in areas of designated growth should occur adjacent to already developed areas, with a compact form, a mix of uses, and densities to maximize efficient use of land, infrastructure, and public service facilities. Authorities should also provide for an appropriate range of housing types and densities required to meet long-term demand in the regional market area.

Choosing our Future is an initiative of the City of Ottawa, partnered with the Ville de Gatineau and the National Capital Commission to guide the NCR toward economic, social, and cultural prosperity in the future. The initiative has produced three plans to ensure this broad goal is achieved: the Sustainability and Resilience Plan, the Energy and Emissions Plan, and the Risk Prevention and Mitigation Plan.

The creation of healthy communities should be encouraged through measures that promote the implementation of streets, open spaces, and facilities that are safe and meet the needs of non-motorized movement. Plans for public infrastructure should also be integrated with plans for growth and intensification; existing facilities should be optimized for the most efficient use. Transportation infrastructure should provide for a safe, energy efficient, and facilitate the movement of people and goods; coordination amongst various transportation systems should be encouraged, even when crossing jurisdictional boundaries. The maximization of efficient uses of existing developed areas serves to promote long-term economic prosperity and the vitality and viability of downtowns and main streets. Ultimately, the PPS provides a standardized set of principles for planners across Ontario to follow when undertaking development and redevelopment.

26 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED

3.3.2 Sustainability and Resilience Plan This is an overarching plan, which forms long-term goals and key strategic directions for the NCR to be sustainable, resilient, and liveable in the future. Ten strategies are outlined to achieve more sustainable land use in the future. 1. Manage Growth and Development 2. Encourage Sustainable Mobility 3. Encourage High Performance Buildings and Renewable Energy 4. Protect and Restore Green and Natural Systems 5. Protect Water and Manage Infrastructure 6. Nurture Culture and Identity 7. Support Social Development 8. Build a Sustainable Economy 9. Manage Materials and Solid Waste 10. Support Local Food and Agriculture


The future LRT line, of which the Blair Station is a part, is expected to be a catalyst for redevelopment and mixed-use areas at stations across the Region. It will provide the opportunity to connect regional pedestrian and cycling networks, and lead in the creation of innovative renewable energy and waste management programs. The Plan includes two growth scenarios for the Region by 2060; a historical trend scenario, and a sustainable scenario based on best practices. In both scenarios, the community around Blair Station is expected to grow significantly. In the desired Sustainable Approach projection, the area is projected to grow with a large high-density core with a ring of medium density around it. Figure 3-1 below show these growth scenarios.

3.3.3 Energy and Emissions Plan This plan was created to address the expected global increase in energy costs, issues of energy security, and climate change over the next 50 years. It considers five community sectors over which municipalities have the greatest degree of influence: land use, transportation, buildings, energy supply, and solid waste. The Plan emphasizes a reductive approach over accommodation, meaning in all sectors the priority should be to lower the amount of energy used or waste created, rather than increase supply. For instance prioritizing pedestrians, cyclists, and transit over the private automobile reduces the need to accommodate motorists by adding lanes and reduces carbon emissions. More sustainable development types, market demand for energy efficient housing products and local and regional renewable energy sources can all contribute to reduced energy demand and lowered emissions in the future. The implications of this plan are to aim for more energy conservative designs, which prioritize more sustainable transportation modes.

Figure 3-1 BSA growth projections from two scenarios. Traditional trends on the left and best practices on the right. Darker brown depicts higher density. (Source: Sustainability and Resilience Plan, 2012, City of Ottawa)

SECTION 3 POLICY ANALYSIS

27


3.3.4 Risk Prevention and Mitigation Plan The Risk Prevention and Mitigation Plan outlines strategies to protect the NCR against a variety of vulnerabilities. Pertaining to Blair Station, these include the increase in urban heat island effect as a result of intensification. In this case, a strategy to mitigate this vulnerability is by the incorporation of ‘cool roofs’. The Plan supports intensification because of the associated reduction in run-off by accommodating the same amount of growth while using less land/ asphalt. Also, intensified areas are more cost effective to service than sprawling growth. The BSA provides opportunities to reduce runoff while intensifying land, both of which are consistent with mitigation strategies presented in this plan.

3.3.5 Federal, Provincial & Multi-Jurisdictional Implications Policies at the Federal, Provincial, and Multi-Jurisdictional levels of government are highly supportive of intensification in already urbanized areas, such as the BSA. This is a positive for the BSA as it has an opportunity over the next generation to become an even greater hub of activity and focal point in Ottawa. In particular, the provincial policy statement provides general guidelines to encourage well-planned and highly sustainable growth and intensification in areas like the BSA. Supportive policies are one tool that can be looked to as a means of promoting well-thought out urban plans. Although Federal and Provincial policies are high level and broad, they reflect a general direction for municipal governments to work with in order to create well-suited plans possible for their communities.

3.4 MUNICIPAL POLICIES 3.4.1 City of Ottawa Strategic Plan The strategic plan of the City of Ottawa operates in a 4 stage cycle over the course of three years. The purpose of the 4 stage cycle is to ensure accurate and timely review, reflect, and reassess the planning objectives and priorities of the City of Ottawa.

28 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED

Strategic Priorities include: • Economic Prosperity • Transportation and Mobility • Environmental Stewardship • Healthy and Caring Communities • Service Excellence • Governance, Planning, and Decision Making • Employee Engagement • Financial Responsibility Of these, the most relevant to the BSA is the strategic priority concerning Transportation and Mobility given that BSA is already a significant transit hub for the current BRT line, and will be a significant transit hub for the LRT line by the year 2017 (see Appendix 3 for further description). Within the transportation and mobility section of the strategic plan are four strategic objectives to be reached by the year 2014; the concluding year of the strategic plan. All four are supportive of TOD at Blair Station STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE: TM1 – ENSURE SUSTAINABLE TRANSIT SERVICES FOR THE CITY OF OTTAWA This objective is to offer reliable travel options at the lowest possible cost and in a manner that is both financial and operationally sustainable. Specifically the strategic objective calls for an increase in total ridership, per revenue service hour by 14%; this objective is to be attained by the end of the year 2014. STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE: TM2 – MAXIMIZE DENSITY IN AND AROUND TRANSIT STATIONS This objective calls for the planning of well-designed, compact neighbourhoods where residents can live, work, shop and take part in recreational activities close by, complete daily undertakings, and support local businesses. This is achievable through access to viable public and active transit means. Specific targets are outlined in the strategic plan in order to facilitate these goals. The strategic plan calls for 38% of the Transit-Oriented development studies to be completed by the end of 2012; 75% by the end of 2013, and 100% by the end of the year 2014.


STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE: TM3 – PROVIDE INFRASTRUCTURE TO SUPPORT MOBILITY CHOICES The goal of this objective is to improve the mobility choices of individuals by supporting a variety of initiatives related to routes, rapid transit, walking and cycling; discouraging the use of privately owned vehicles for transportation within the municipality and the wider region. Specifically, the objective sets standards of increasing the annual growth in the number of trips made by transit, cycling and walking over the 2011 baseline. STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE: TM4 – PROMOTE ALTERNATIVE MOBILITY CHOICES The goal of this objective is to encourage alternative mobility choices by emphasizing transit, cycling and walking as preferred ways of getting around the city. This objective is accomplished through better education for the public, promotion of services, and incentivizing alternative modes of transportation other than driving privately owned vehicles, and providing information that encourages responsible travel. Specifically, the strategic plan calls for an increase in the percentage of population reached by the City’s Transportation Demand Management website (TravelWise) and the Cycling in the City e-newsletter by 10% (on a year-overyear basis). All four of the strategic goals for transportation and mobility outlined in the City of Ottawa’s Strategic Plan have implications for the BSA. As a significant stop on the current BRT line, and as the end of the LRT line (to be completed by 2017) the BSA is a critical point for potential transit users to embark and disembark from public transit, and utilize non-motorized means of transportation. Furthermore, increasing density in the BSA will promote and advance the objective of making the lands immediately surrounding transit areas those that can provide total services and amenities to the residents, thereby reducing the volume of trips by automobile.

3.4.2 City of Ottawa Official Plan The City of Ottawa Official Plan (OP) was consolidated in October of 2011, and is intended to guide the growth and development of the city to the year 2031. The OP establishes a policy framework in order to manage growth and development within Ottawa to ensure that the qualities of the city that are most valued by residents

are protected and reinforced. The Ottawa 20/20 initiative, a series of plans to manage growth in the city, of which the Official Plan is one component, provides sets of principles that enable effective growth and development management, promote sustainability, the creation and maintenance of Mixed-Use Centres, and Mainstreets designations. These facets of urban planning, and how they relate to our site, are discussed in greater detail in the following sections. Growth and intensification are to be directed and encouraged in the already existing urban area where it is easily accommodated in a compact and efficient manner that promotes mixed-use development. These areas are served by quality public transit as well as provisions to include forms of active transportation. Intensification and a greater diversity of uses within the study area will encourage and increase transit ridership, in addition to increasing the services and amenities available to residents and employees within the study area.

MIXED-USE CENTRES Areas with the mixed-use designation are intended to be community and regional focal points. They are generally along the rapid-transit network or arterial roads for superior accessibility. These areas are strategically positioned to incorporate significant growth in the form of high-density, compact, and mixed-use development. The ultimate vision for these areas is to be ‘good places’ that complete and contribute to the vitality of their communities. A large portion of the BSA is designated as Mixed-Use Centre, as shown in Map 3-2. This is consistent with higher-level policies encouraging sustainable growth, particularly around transit stations. The specific density for the Blair area listed in Section 2.2.1. Policy 7 is 200 people and jobs per gross hectare by 2031. This policy was developed with the BRT system in mind. With the introduction of the LRT system, target densities will change (see Ottawa TOD Studies section below). The BSA, specifically around the station itself, is intended to be a community focal point, with excellent design, high-density, compact development forms that support the use of the transit system made accessible by pedestrian, bicycle, local transit, and the private automobile.

SECTION 3 POLICY ANALYSIS

29


GENERAL URBAN AREA

DESIGN PRIORITY AREAS Mixed Use Centres in the OP are also designated by Section 2.5.1 as Design Priority Areas. In these areas, all developments are reviewed for their treatment of pedestrian environments, existing character, and unique opportunities in their respective communities. Enhance pedestrian realms including wider sidewalks, street trees, decorative lighting and public art and other features will be used to encourage pedestrian use and social interaction.

The intent for this designation is to allow a broad mix of uses contributing to sustainable and complete communities. Impact on surrounding neighbourhoods is of great concern and the provision of amenities to these neighbourhoods is important in the General Urban Areas. The BSA has several areas designated as General Urban Area, most of which are at the fringes of the site and cover existing residential areas. One portion of the General Urban Area includes some open parking lot and commercial uses, and this designation here implies a desire to see better design contributing to more appealing and accessible community amenities.

Map 3-2 Official Plan designations in the BSA.

EMPLOYMENT AREA This designation applies solely to the Federal property north of Ogilvie Road where the CSIS headquarters are located. The designation implies intent to maintain this employment function well into the future principally for the provision of employment. The implications of such are that these lands must be used primarily for employment and this is not expected to change.

GREENBELT EMPLOYMENT Mixed Use Centres Employment Area Greenbelt Employment General Urban Area

A small piece of land in the southeast portion of the site is designated Greenbelt Employment area. This designation allows for development on Greenbelt land provided that it pays respect to, and benefits from the Greenbeltâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rural character. This implies that any development that may occur here in the future has a direct connection to the Greenbelt land further east, which is currently being used primarily as a municipal golf course.

3.4.3 Former City of Gloucester Official Plan Site specific policies originating from the Official Plan of the former City of Gloucester are appendices in the Official Plan of the City of Ottawa. Core Commercial Areas are designated within the boundaries of the former City of Gloucester. These areas are located at stops along the transit way, such as Blair station. Core Commercial Areas are major focal points within the community and are intended to be high-density as well as mixed-use and provide a wide range of services to residents of the community. The

30 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED


objectives of these areas are intended to primarily service those who live and work within the area; however the establishment of government facilities, commercial institutions, cultural landmarks and entertainment destinations are also encouraged. This is accomplished through a number of specific policies that encourage high-density of both residential and commercial (office and retail) uses, connectivity for both public and active transit, access to arterial and/or provincial highways, and the creation of at least one urban park within the territory designated as a Core Commercial Area.

3.4.5 Former RMOC Plan The plan for the former Regional-Municipality of Ottawa-Carleton designated BSA as a suburban centre, not a town centre. This short-sighted designation had specific implications for the manner in which the BSA subsequently developed during the 1980s and 1990s. By receiving this designation, those with interests in the BSA were not as strongly beholden to suitable planning practices. Few stringent guidelines for planning the area, both in terms of residential and commercial uses, contributed to the poorly thought out and haphazardly implemented urban design of the area and abundance of sprawl that was achieved.

3.4.7 City of Ottawa Pedestrian Plan The City of Ottawa Pedestrian Plan outlines strategies for intervention where necessary and integration of improved pedestrian networks in the form of sidewalks and pathways. The Beacon Hill area, of which the BSA is a part, ranked 6th in the region for walking mode share at 22% of all trips per 24 hours. The area is listed as High for Short Term Priority for a Community Pedestrian Improvement Process. Improving the pedestrian connections around and through the site, particularly connecting the areas separated by the Queensway is a priority in this plan and is a priority in the recommended BSA concept design.

3.4.6 City of Ottawa Cycling Plan The City of Ottawa Cycling Plan was created to develop an integrated network of cycling routes throughout the City. This is consistent with the strategic direction set out in the OP, Choosing

our Future, and the Transportation Master Plan (3.4.7). The BSA has a city owned pathway running on two sides of the Queensway and thus provides a significant opportunity to integrate into a larger cycling network. The Network Concept Plan includes a Community Cycling Route connecting the existing City Owned Pathways to two City-wide Cycling Routes. It also includes a Cycling Route on NCC-owned property. Together, these two network additions would transform the BSA into a very well connected and accessible area for cyclists. All upgrades mentioned are included in the Short Term (complete by 2018) section of Implementation. These future intentions demonstrate the need to incorporate cycling pathways into future street networks on the site and also focus on connecting existing networks such as the city owned pathway.

3.4.8 Transportation Master Plan The Transportation Master Plan (TMP) outlines the vision for the City of Ottawaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s road, transit, and pathway networks for 2031. It contains several important sections for the Blair Station area. Blair and Ogilvie Roads are designated as arterial roads. City Park Drive, which loops through the largest quadrant of the site, is identified as a Collector. County Road 174, a City Freeway, cuts through the centre of the site and is slated for widening to 6 lanes on both sides of Blair Road. There are no recommendations for widening for any other roads in the area, however according to the Environmental Project Report, described below, Blair Road is near traffic capacity. The Plan includes the goal of increasing environmentally-conscious transportation modes including walking and cycling.

3.4.9 Environmental Project Report The Environmental Project Report was a significant document prepared by the City of Ottawa for the Downtown Ottawa Transit Tunnel. The report study area includes the entire proposed LRT corridor as well as surrounding areas. It details facets of the entire LRT project including the Transit Environmental Assessment process, related Provincial and Federal Acts, stakeholder analysis and consultation, transportation network analyses, environmental constraints, as well as station design concepts, and much more. While not a governing policy document, this report describes a variety of features of the BSA that have been included in Section 2.

SECTION 3 POLICY ANALYSIS

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3.4.10 Ottawa Residential Housing Strategy The City of Ottawa’s Residential Housing Strategy is a complex document that outlines the projected needs of housing growth in the city for the current 25 year period. The aim of this document is for municipal planning authorities to create housing conditions that are in sync with the PPS, as well as municipal infrastructure guidelines, while being adaptable to shifting market demands. 2006

2011

2021

2031

Population

871,000

923,000

1,031,000

1,136,000

Households

351,000

382,000

444,000

497,000

Jobs

530,000

580,000

648,000

703,000

 

Single

Semi

Row

Apartment

TOTAL

%

40%

5%

27%

28%

100%

Table 3-1Projected population of City of Ottawa, households and jobs to 2031.

From the projection, the City needs to provide opportunities for Units 59, 101 7, 257 39, 447 728 146,000 additional households and 173,00041,more jobs147, by532 2031. A detailed methodological approach was taken in the Ottawa   Residential Housing Strategy to estimate projected housing demands to 2031. This enables the forecasting of housing demands   based on age brackets. The total number of required dwellings is Dwelling Type Urban – Units (%) Rural – Units (%) Total – Units (%) obtained by adding to the total projected household demand a Single detached 46, 619 (35%) 12, (94%) 59, 101 (40%) vacancy factor and accounting for481demolition replacements. The population that resides in institutions (e.g. nursing homes, group Semi-detached 7, 124 (5%) 133 (1%) 7, 257 (5%) homes or prisons) is factored out of the “market” housing demand; Townhouse 38, 915 (29%) 531 (4%) 39, 447 (27%) however, provision must be made to accommodate a growing institutionalized population. Apartment 41, 595 (31%) 133 (1%) 41, 728 (28%) 2006 2011 2021 2031   Population

871,000

 2006-2011

10%

2011-2016

Single 7%

Semi

Units 2016-2021

59, 101 5%

% 2021-2026

40% 5%

923,000

1,031,000

1,136,000

The Ottawa Residential Housing Strategy presents a number of Households 351,000 382,000 497,000   scenarios regarding housing demand444,000 and growth until 2031 and beyond, depending on market Jobs 530,000 580,000 648,000 703,000 Single Semi conditions Row and municipal Apartmentplanning conditions. 8%

26%

56%

Row

20%Apartment

TOTAL 70%

7, 257 3%

39, 447

17%41, 728

147, 532 75%

5%

27%

17%28%

100% 75%

3%

3%

 2026-2031 4% 3% 16% Table 3-2 New dwelling units by type, 2006 - 2031.    

32 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED Dwelling Type Urban – Units (%) Rural – Units (%)  

78%

Total – Units (%)

This particular scenario is foreseen in the residential housing strategy as the most plausible. It entails an expansion of the urban boundary and the achievement of a 40% intensification target. It maintains ground-oriented dwellings as the largest component 2006 2011 2021 the next2031 of Ottawa’s new housing construction over 20 years, but anticipates a shift toward apartments. An important assumption Population 871,000 923,000 1,031,000 1,136,000 of this Residential Land Strategy is that over the course of the next 351,000 382,000 444,000 497,000 20 Households years, people preferred choice of dwelling will shift away from single-detached towards row and multi-unit dwellings. Much of this Jobs 530,000 580,000 648,000 703,000 shift will be due to demographic-based market demand stemming   from smaller households, an aging population, the emergence of Singlefor urban Semilifestyles Row Apartment TOTAL prices, a viable market along with rising energy and the desirability types of locations where Units 59, 101 of the 7, 257 39, 447 41, 728 new apartments 147, 532 are projected to be constructed, such as main streets and areas % 40% 5% 27% 28% 100% of mixed-use activity. This projection is conducive to the goal of creating a viable destination for both residence and employment   in the BSA.   Dwelling Type

Urban – Units (%)

Rural – Units (%)

Total – Units (%)

Single detached

46, 619 (35%)

12, 481 (94%)

59, 101 (40%)

Semi-detached

7, 124 (5%)

133 (1%)

7, 257 (5%)

Townhouse

38, 915 (29%)

531 (4%)

39, 447 (27%)

Apartment

41, 595 (31%)

133 (1%)

41, 728 (28%)

 

Table 3-3 Residential intensification targets for the City of Ottawa by 2031.  

Semi Rowtime it willApartment To account forSingle this examination and the take to make appropriate adjustments, the intensification target 2006-2011 10% 8% 26% 56%is proposed within the residential housing strategy is to be phased in gradually 2011-2016 7% 3% 20% 70% as follows: 2016-2021 5% 3% 17% 75% • 2006-2011: 36% • 2012-2021: 40% 2021-2026 5% 3% 17% 75% • 2022-2031: 44% 3% 16% It is2026-2031 anticipated4%that the majority of intensification will78% be in the form of   multi-unit dwellings such as apartments and condominiums, as seen by the activity monitored between mid-2001 and mid-2006.   It is projected that a diminishing number of opportunities for lower-

 


Dwelling Type

Urban – Units (%)

Rural – Units (%)

Total – Units (%)

Single detached

46, 619 (35%)

12, 481 (94%)

59, 101 (40%)

density housing is anticipated as the amount of vacant land within Semi-detached 7, 124 (5%) 133 (1%) 7, 257 (5%) the built-up area available for intensification decreases, and more ofTownhouse the potential for38,intensification is found through39, redevelopment. 915 (29%) 531 (4%) 447 (27%) Furthermore, it is expected with an aging population, as well Apartment 41, 595 (31%) 133 (1%) 41, 728 (28%) as rising levels of immigration, demands for types of housing will   gradually change.  

Single

Semi

Row

Apartment

2006-2011

10%

8%

26%

56%

2011-2016

7%

3%

20%

70%

2016-2021

5%

3%

17%

75%

2021-2026

5%

3%

17%

75%

2026-2031

4%

3%

16%

78%

  Table 3-4 Projected evolution of residential intensification, 2006-2031. Totals may not add up to 100% due to rounding.    

The OP directs residential intensification to the following designations: Central Area; Mainstreets; Mixed-Use Centres; Town Centres; Enterprise Areas. It also directs intensification to within 600 metres of rapid transit stations. During the period mid-2001 to mid2006 those target areas accounted for 20% of the new dwellings in the urban area of Ottawa, or 56% of the total intensification activity. The BSA and adjacent areas fall into two of these categories specifically, that of mainstreets, and mixed-use centres. The Blair-174 Mixed-Use Centre, of which the BSA is a significant part, is essentially suburban in form and comprised almost exclusively of office and retail uses. It is, however, designated as a Key Transfer Station (it will receive the eastern transfer station between the eastwest LRT line and the BRT line to Orléans). Residential development opportunities are feasible in the short-and mid-term, once the rail transit system is in place. The development of a condominium community at the nearby Cyrville Station, which will also be part of the LRT network, is presently underway, at a location with comparable suburban attributes. For Blair-Highway 174 to achieve and exceed the proposed density target to sustain rail rapid transit the City of Ottawa will have to act as a proponent of development

and coordinate stakeholders around the station lands to kick-start the process. Density Range*

Transit Potential

Under 20

Low

Density Range* 20 to 40 Under 20 Density Range*

Transit Potential Modest Low Transit Potential

20 Under 20 40 to 40 80 Density Range*

Modest Low Good Transit Potential

Type of Service No public transit. Requires taxis, jitneys, etc. Type of Service Marginal public transit. No public transit. Requires Buses every ½ hour, express taxis, buses at rushetc. hour. Type of jitneys, Service

public transit. NoMarginal publicbus transit. Requires Good service. Type of Service taxis, jitneys, etc. Buses every ½ hour, express 80 to 120 Very Good Excellent bus hour. service. attransit. rush Under 20 Low Nobuses public Requires 20 to 40 Modest Marginal public transit. taxis, jitneys, etc. 120toto80 200 BRT/LRT Highevery order transit Buses hour, express 40 Good Good bus½service. buses at rush hour. 20 to 40 Modest Marginal public transit. Over 200 Subway High orderbus transit 80 to 120 Very Good Excellent service. Buses every ½ hour, express 40 to 80 Good Good bus service. buses at rush hour.   120 to 200 BRT/LRT High order transit Table 3-5 Transit service potential based on urban density. is expressed 80 to 120 Very Good ExcellentDensity bus service. 40 to 80 Good Good bus service. Site Area(Ha) Jobs The recent Population Density asOver people per gross hectare. TODHigh studies a 200 and jobs Subway orderrecommend transit 120 to 200 BRT/LRT High order transit density range of 200-400 for LRT. 80 to 120 Very Good Excellent bus service. 60.5 6,411 0 106  Blair-Hwy 174 Over 200 Subway High order transit 120 to 200 BRT/LRT High order transit   Site Area(Ha) Jobs Population Density

 

Over 200 Subway Area New Jobs 6,411 Total Jobs Blair-Hwy 174New 60.5 Site Area(Ha) Jobs Dwellings  

 

High order transit Total 2031 106 Target 0 Population Density Population Density

Blair-Hwy 6,411 0 mixed-use 106 (2006). Table Employment and dwelling densities at centres Blair –3-6 174 1,25060.5 3,650 10,061 2,025 200 200 Site Area(Ha) Jobs Area New New Jobs Total Jobs Hwy. 174   Blair-Hwy 174 Dwellings 60.5 6,411

  Area  Blair –

Hwy. 174 Area Blair –   Hwy. 174

Population Total 0 Population

Density 2031 Target 106 Density

New New Jobs Total Jobs Total 2031 1,250 3,650 10,061 2,025 200 Dwellings Population Density Short-term MediumTarget Long-term New New Jobs Total Jobs Total 2031 (2006-2021) (post-2031) 1,250 3,650term (202110,061 projection 2,025 200 Dwellings Population Density 2031) period

Blair – 1,250 3,650 Medium10,061 Short-term 500 750  Blair – Hwy.

2,025 Target 1,250

200 Long-term 1,350

Target 200 Total Target 200 200 Total 2,600

Hwy. Table 3-7 The target densityterm for Blair – Hwy. 174 in 2031 (post-2031) is currently 200 people (2006-2021) (2021projection 174 174 per gross hectare for the BRT station. Target Short-term MediumLong-term Total 2031) period

   

Blair – Hwy. 174 Blair – Hwy.   174

Blair – Hwy.   174

(2006-2021) 500 Short-term (2006-2021) 500

term (2021750 2031) Medium-

projection 1,250 period Target

term (2021750 2031)

projection 1,250 period

500

750

1,250

(post-2031) 1,350 Long-term (post-2031) 1,350

2,600 Total

1,350

2,600

2,600

 

Table 3-8 Targets for mixed-use centres for dwelling units:

SECTION 3 POLICY ANALYSIS

33


It is essential that in order for the City of Ottawa to grow and intensify over the next generation in accordance with the Provincial Policy Statement and the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own stated goals and objectives, it is critical that planning authorities take a leading role to foster conditions that are conducive to this particular type and pattern of growth. This is particularly true in the identified areas, including the BSA.

3.4.11 Zoning Bylaw 2008-250 The Ottawa City Council adopted Zoning By-law 2008250, which controls all permitted land uses throughout the municipality in 2008. The area is currently zoned consistent with the OP intentions for the area. This is a significant advantage as the development of the site moves forward. The following section discusses the most relevant zoning codes in more detail. For a complete account of zoning designations within the study area, see Appendix 4. Zoning in the study area is displayed in Map 3-3 on the following page. Appendix 16 shows calculations for the limits of development within current zoning provisions.

GENERAL MIXED USE Two areas on the northwest part of the site are zoned General Mixed Use. This zone provides further opportunity for combining uses in large buildings. It attempts to limit commercial uses to single use buildings or in groups to ensure the development of mixed-use areas along arterial roads.

RESIDENTIAL FIRST, SECOND, THIRD, FOURTH, AND FIFTH DENSITY The maximum allowances for residential on the site range from single detached/ duplex (first density zone) to mid-high rise (fifth density zone) in the northwest corner with a maximum building height of 22 metres. These zones are on the fringes of the site and all abut or include existing residential areas. There is no significant room for development in any of the residential zones.

MIXED USE CENTRE The areas immediately adjacent to the existing transit station are zoned Mixed Use Centre. This allows for a significant variety of uses, which emphasizes the creation of a community or town centre. There are specific height and Floor Space Index (FSI) provisions for these areas, which exceed the general zoning provisions (see Appendix 3) emphasizing the desire to intensify and increase density in this area. The provisions for this zone are designed to be transit supportive as they are consistent with higher-level policies encouraging transit supportive uses and form.

Mixed Use Centre General Mixed Local Commercial Residential Light Industrial Institutional Open Space

Map 3-3 Zoning designations on site

34 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED


PARKS AND OPEN SPACE There is a significant corridor of O1P-zoned area, which is designated as a Hydro Corridor Subzone. The intent of this zone is to protect and make use of this land as open space, parkland, educational or accessory use to an abutting parcel.

PARKING Parking requirements outlined in the Official Plan of the City of Ottawa which are most relevant for the Blair Study Area are shown in Appendix 5. In general, the parking requirements are supportive (lower) of rapid transit. These lower requirements allow for more effective use of land and provide an incentive to developers by giving them the opportunity to maximize GLA in the Blair Study Area and surrounding neighbourhoods. There are also parking maximums, which further support TOD developments. However, using the minimum requirements, there are over 11000 parking spaces required in the BSA (See Appendix 6 for detailed calculation). Using minimum requirements from Downtown and the Tunneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pasture Mixed Use Centre, the current minimum requirement drops to about 2500 spaces. In order to accommodate significant intensification without devoting large amounts of large to parking structures, lower minimums may be required.

3.4.12 Implications of Zoning

3.4.13 Urban Design Objectives The Urban Design Objectives of the City of Ottawa include 6 general objectives to achieve the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vision for its future. The objectives are: 1. Create Unique Communities 2. Promote Quality Development 3. Enhance Safety and Accessibility 4. Respect Established Character 5. Integrate Adaptability and Diversity 6. Protect Natural Systems The objectives are consistent with principles of good urban design and to the client, and as such will be considered in every aspect of the Blair Area concept design. The document contains examples of a variety of strategies to achieve the objectives mentioned. The Blair Area zoning currently allows buildings up to 48 metres in some areas, and over 10 metres in almost all areas. The City of Ottawa Urban Design Guidelines for High Rise Housing includes strategies for elegantly integrating high rise buildings into existing urban fabric and as such are a useful tool when considering the placement, orientation, and surrounding uses of high rise buildings in the BSA.

A density of approximately 165 people and jobs per hectare can be achieved on site under the current zoning (See Appendix 16 for full calculation). With a target density of 400, it is clear that some zoning adjustments are required.

SECTION 3 POLICY ANALYSIS

35


LAND USE BUILT FORM

sufficient density

EXISTING

complete community mix of land uses provide high quality public realm create landmarks open space/ green space

STREETSCAPE & ENVIRONMENT

prioritize pedestrians

TRANSIT, VEHICLES & PEDESTRIANS & PARKING CYCLISTS

Ottawa’s TOD Guidelines are divided into six general categories. They are: 1. Land Use – The aim is to locate land uses close to TODs in order to generate and maximize ridership on the transit system. This can be accomplished by establishing land uses, or a combination of land uses, that allow transit users to utilize the area at both daytime and nighttime and provide for a variety of services that maximize the efficient use of adjacent space surrounding the TOD. Additional functional efficiencies can be utilized if the land use surrounding the TOD is built to medium and high densities. 2. Layout – Land use patterns and the layout of site development should be planned in order to reduce travel times and distances, and encourage use of transit systems over private automobile use. Locating denser development closer to the TOD maximizes the benefit for both the user and provider of the transit system. 3. Built Form – The belief is that TOD can become their own destination outright through the implementation of ‘place-making’ principles. Making a transit stop a ‘good place’ (well designed, pleasing architecture, open space, park land, community facilities, etc.) will increase ridership and use of the TOD. 4. Pedestrians & Cyclists (Active Transportation) – We are all pedestrians at some point on every trip. The purpose of this guideline is to make active transportation (AT) convenient and positive, encouraging the use of AT when getting to, or from, the TOD. 5. Vehicles & Parking – Surface level parking often occupies a significant portion of an area and is often overwhelming and in conflict with pedestrian movement. The aim is to maximize the efficient use of parking spaces, thereby reducing the amount of parking overall through a variety of means (reduced vehicle ownership, shared spaces, etc.) It is also used to help encourage transit ridership and minimize conflicts between vehicles and users of AT. 6. Streetscape & Environment – A high quality design and efficiently planned sidewalk and internal walkways can greatly enhance a TOD. They are an integral part of the overall layout of a TOD and care should be taken to enhance these elements of a TOD.

integration with existing neighbourhoods mix of building types minimize surface parking parking at back or underground max. parking standards other means of parking mgmt promote seamless integration of trans. modes proximity to transit infrastructure for cyclists complete streets amenities at station street grid internal connectivity

LAYOUT

3.4.14 Ottawa Transit Oriented Development Guidelines

connection to station connection to surrounding neighbourhoods

Figure 3-2 Current site conditions evaluated using TOD Guidelines

36 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED


3.4.15 Recent Ottawa TOD Studies

3.5 OVERALL IMPLICATIONS FOR BSA

The City of Ottawa has begun to undertake TOD Studies for stations on the future LRT line in order to best take advantage of the new system. For the three stations west of Blair: Train, St. Laurent, and Cyrville, new ‘TOD zones’ are proposed. There are three new zones in total.

At all levels of government, policies are generally supportive of TOD measures for areas such as the BSA. This is critical because it provides the weight of all levels of government to support change for BSA. This is an area that for a variety of reasons including, location, attitudes towards automobile orientation, previous designations, oversight and poor planning principles, led to sprawl and transit-adjacent development. With the completion of the LRT line in 2018, the need for change at the BSA is clear. This includes intensification, higher density, and the use of sustainable planning practices. By having supportive governmental policies, planners will be able to better implement appropriate design concepts and implementation strategies to foster the creation of successful transit oriented destinations.

TOD Sub-Zone

Minimum # of Units per Net hectare (Residential)

Minimum Floor Space Index (nonresidential

Maximum Building Height

Range of People per net hectare

H (high)

350

1.5

30 storeys

550 +

(close to station)

M (medium)

(90 metres) 250

1.0

20 storeys

400 – 1000

(60 metres) L (low)

150

0.5

6 storeys

250 - 500

(20 metres)  

Table 3-9 Proposed TOD zones from Ottawa TOD Studies

These zones and accompanying plans are necessary to achieve the desired targets for people and jobs per gross hectare to support the LRT system.

3.4.16 Municipal Policy Implications By comparing all options for people per net hectare to the current target of 200 people and jobs per net hectare at Blair station, it is clear that this number is significantly lower than what is desired for stations with LRT. Current zoning at Blair has maximum FSIs between 0.6 and 2.0, so these may as well be low considering the minimums presented here. Maximum building heights at Blair range from 20 – 48 metres, which may have been context sensitive when the zoning by-law was written, but are certainly significantly lower than those presented in the recent TOD studies and are appropriate for TODs.

SECTION 3 POLICY ANALYSIS

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4|Stakeholder Analysis 4.1 STAKEHOLDERS

4.2 STAKEHOLDER INTERVIEWS

The section contributes to the overall understanding of the complex relationships that influence the BSA today. This analysis influences the design concept of the BSA in Section 9 and was used to informs the implementation strategies that are presented in Section 11. A stakeholder analysis is useful as a tool than can help identify potential misunderstandings or areas of conflict, predict outcomes and show potential avenues for cooperation amongst the various stakeholders.

A series of interviews and meetings held with various stakeholders over the course of the Vision for Blair Station project. The project team conducted short interviews with key stakeholders in order to discover interests and identify issues. Stakeholders interviewed included planners with the NCC, the City of Ottawa, and OC Transpo, as well as city councillors, a retail property owner, an office property owner, an office tenant, and a member of a community association. The semi-structured interviews allowed stakeholders to share their knowledge and opinions with the project team. In addition to seven general questions that were asked of all stakeholders, a series of pre-determined stakeholder-specific questions were asked.

This chapter takes an expansive view of stakeholders: stakeholders are the people, organizations or institutions who are either impacted by the project or who will impact the project (Newcombe, 2003). Main actors are those stakeholders most likely to participate in the implementation of the project (Table 4-1). The City of Ottawa, OC Transpo, developers, commercial property owners and the community association will play a central role in the process of change. While main actors are essential components of the process, it is important to note that there are other groups that also have a stake in the project (Newcombe, 2003). These actors are the secondary actors, and they also will affect and be affected by development in the BSA (Table 4-1). Main Actors

Secondary Actors

• • • • • • • • • • • •

The City of Ottawa OC Transpo Developers Community Association Commercial Property Owners City Councillors General public Lenders National Capital Commission Office tenants Retail tenants Transit users

  4-1 Main and secondary stakeholders in the BSA Table

38 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED

Stakeholders contacted for interviews were identified in a brainstorming session by the project team. Some stakeholders interviewed identified other stakeholders who were then contacted for interviews by the project team. Interview scripts and questions can be found in Appendix 8. The stakeholder input was helpful for providing local knowledge and new perspectives to the project team. The compiled input was used to develop the design for the new vision for Blair Station. Table 4-1 summarises the input received by the project team.


City of Ottawa Commercial Property Owners

Interests are what motivate stakeholders; they are the advantages or disadvantages that the project may bring (Christensen, 1993: 207). Resources are what allow stakeholders to affect the process of implementation. Examples of resources could be power, knowledge or money. Action channels are the formal or informal means by which stakeholders can leverage their resources to act on their interests, such as political processes, advocacy or budget cycles.

Community Associations

Tables 4-2 and 4-3 were developed from the work of Christensen (1993) to better understand and predict how the stakeholders will act. At first glance these interests may seem competing but if properly managed they can be complimentary to one another.

Interests

Resources

Action Channels

- Implement Official Plan and infrastructure master plan policies

- Planning expertise

- Set policies

- Creator of municipal plans and documents

- Budget process

- Achieve Strategic Plan objectives - Maximize tax revenues

- Land ownership

- Maximize return on investment

- Significant land ownership

- Build infrastructure

- Maintain low vacancy rates and attract new tenants

Developers

- Development applications

- Raise rental and property values - Protect or enhance existing amenities and open spaces

- Local knowledge

- Votes - Advocacy

- Protect or enhance quality of life of residents

- Media

- Increase mobility choices and access to transit

- Public Hearings

- Minimize traffic impact - Maintain or increase value of land - Maximize return on investment

OC Transpo

- Public hearings

- Finance development

- Development applications

- Minimize risk - Land ownership - Maximize long-term value - Short term financial feasibility - Increase transit ridership

- Planning expertise

- Budget process

- Make mobility efficient

- Funding of transit projects

- Build infrastructure

- Keep costs and fares low - Maximize monetary return on land

- Ownership of land at station

Table 4-2 Main actors

Image 4-1 Commercial property owners were included in the stakeholder analysis.

SECTION 4 STAKEHOLDER ANALYSIS

39


Professional Consultants

City Councillors

Table 4-3 Secondary actors Interests

Resources

Action Channels

Protecting or enhancing the quality of life of residents

Votes at council and committee meetings

Ensuring development is done in an appropriate way.

Budget process

Private employers

Votes

Public Hearings

Votes

Public Hearings

Financial knowledge and expertise

Terms of loans

Planning and development expertise

Tripartite committee

LUP approvals on federal land

Negotiate leases

Negotiate leases

• •

Minimize risk and generate revenues

Ensure capital worthy of Canada

National Capital Commission Office Tenants Retail Tenants Transit Users

Planning, architecture, landscape architecture, and engineering expertise

Ensure development does not adversely affect the city or region Economic growth for the city and region

Contributes to the public good

Lenders

General Public

Ensure appropriate development for the BSA

Political power

Retain talent and attract new talent

Maintain accessibility for employees

Minimize disruptions

Retain customers and attract new customers

Increase walk through traffic

Minimize disruptions

Keep transit accessible, convenient and safe

Keep parking at station

Keep fares low

40 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED

Some land ownership in study area

Votes

Public Hearings

4.3 Implications By identifying stakeholders and outlining their interests, resources and action channels, we can better understand the forces acting on the BSA and predict the relationship dynamics that will inevitably influence change. The stakeholder analysis reveals that there are a large number of organizations or groups affected by the development of the BSA, both main actors and secondary actors, and they have varying quantities and qualities of resources available to them. Main actors are important because of the central role they will play in initiating and coordinating development throughout the process. Successful implementation of TOD at the BSA is dependent on engagement and coordination between actors. Some secondary actors in the BSA, like retail and office tenants, and some city-wide stakeholders, like transit users and the general public, will be affected by the project, yet have little or no resources or action channels for action. It is important that these stakeholders are recognized and that their voices are heard. There are two main conclusions to draw from this analysis. First, in order to be successful, the implementation of TOD requires the participation of all of the identified stakeholders. Second, the analysis also points to the need for specific and defined roles and strategies for all stakeholders. These conclusions are revisited in Section 11 where implementation strategies for stakeholders are explored. Interviews with stakeholders were useful for providing local knowledge about the site and identifying community needs. Input collected from key stakeholders and experts was integral to informing the design, but an effort should be made to engage the public in the planning process.


Topic

Summary of Input

Issues + Concerns

• • • •

Ideas + Suggestions

• • • • • • •

Thoughts on TOD

• In general, stakeholders agree that TOD is a good thing for the Blair Area. Transit is really important to the Blair area and there is already strong ridership. Transit can be positive for businesses, employees and residents alike. • Stakeholders emphasised different benefits of TOD. One focused on the importance of creating pedestrian-friendly environments for transit users. Others thought that bringing mixed use and density would be good for Blair Station. • One stakeholder was concerned about residential uses close to the Queensway. The stakeholder mentioned that residential might be better along Ogilvie Road.

Suggestions for Public Engagement

• Its important to inform the community of change and development. • Reaching out to transit users as well as residents is important. • Reaching out to stakeholders as well as the general public is important. • Displays in the Gloucester Centre with computers where people could see the proposals, talk to City representatives, and make comments would be useful. • Getting people to put input on maps works well. • Large forums, theatre-settings and too much detailed information are ineffective.

Better circulation infrastructure around station Lack of city-owned land Existing park and ride facilities are insufficient Need Passenger Pick-up and Drop-off (PPUDO) on both sides of the Queensway • Safety concerns related to the pedestrian bridge • Insufficient lighting at night Create a mobility hub Safety for pedestrians and cyclists Intensify and mix land uses Create public space Create a great place Shelter from the weather The area should be accessible for all

Table 4-4 Summary of stakeholder inputs.

SECTION 4 STAKEHOLDER ANALYSIS

41


5| Design Charrette 5.1 CHARRETTE DESCRIPTION After finalizing a draft of the background study, the project team held a design charrette in Kingston, ON which had 17 participants. These participants represented professional planners from the City of Ottawa, the City of Kingston, and Bray Heritage, as well as faculty and graduate students from Queen’s University’s School of Urban and Regional Planning. The goal of the charrette was to have the participants consider the site analysis and then create multiple design options to help inform the final vision for the BSA. Therefore, the charrette provided participants with sufficient information to inform their designs options and to build consensus on what the BSA should look like in the future.

The workshops were an opportunity to present the research completed to date. Participants asked questions and provided valuable feedback while identifying areas that required further research. Participants were able to supplement the material with some of their own specialized knowledge about Ottawa and TOD in general. The discussion period was very active and provided a great lead up to the design exercise.

The project team gave a presentation on the arrival of the Ottawa LRT system and the rationale for intensification around Blair Station. Participants learned about the site’s location, existing conditions, and its strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and challenges (SWOC). The purpose of this presentation was to provide background information to the participants, some of whom were not familiar with Ottawa. The next exercise in the charrette was a series of technical workshops. Participants were divided into four small groups and rotated between four workshop stations. Each station displayed poster boards with photos and data analyzing one aspect of the background analysis. Two project team members were present at each station to discuss the analysis with the participants. The themes of the four stations were: • Site Analysis I: Built environment, real estate analysis, and community profile. • Site Analysis II: Natural environment, infrastructure, transportation, and connectivity. • Policy Framework: Review of policies and the regulatory framework. • Precedents: Analysis of relevant TOD, greyfield, office park and mobility hub precedents.

42 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED

Image 5-1 A SURP student presents his group’s design to charrette participants.


Workshop Station Site Analysis I

Site Analysis II

Policy Framework

Precedents

Key Discussion Points Growing trend towards apartments in Ottawa housing starts Mix of housing tenure surrounding the BSA Specialized housing for seniors and/or students Need a mix of types and unit sizes (1-3 bedrooms) Planning history in Gloucester, or lack thereof Existing transit ridership levels Overcoming the Queensway to improve connectivity Unsafe pedestrian and cycling environment Environmental opportunities (view corridors, extension of parks system, etc.) How many buses will need to be accommodated ? How traffic will more around and through the site ? Parking minimum and maximums Who will be responsible for upgrading infrastructure ? Incentives to provide underground parking Density targets in relation to other LRT station Where does Blair lie on the rural-urban transect ? Best practices for pedestrian bridges Appropriate size of pedestrian shed

• Creating a main street should be explored • Build at or close to the street line • Building heights should descend from possible high rises near the station down to more human scaled buildings near established residential areas • Parking should be replaced with underground or multilevel structures but at a lower ratio • Public spaces and greenspace need to be considered Following a wrap-up discussion, participants were asked to complete a short survey. Results from the voluntary survey indicated that the charrette was a success, though some respondents mentioned they were pressed for time in the design exercise. Despite the limited time constraints, the charrette produced very coherent results and the project team left with invaluable feedback and innovative design ideas that informed the remainder of the site analysis and final vision for Blair Station.

Most relevant precedents to Blair Station Deciding on a site orientation of the site (inwards vs. outwards)

Table 5-1 Summary of key discussion points at each workshop station.

5.2 IMPLICATIONS The charrette provided the project team with valuable insights about regional directions and new design ideas for the BSA. After gaining an understanding of the BSA, the same groups were divided into design breakout rooms and given just over an hour to create design options of the entire BSA and of a smaller portion of the site in greater detail (Image 5-2). All the groups developed sophisticated and unique designs (images of the designs can be found in Appendix 11), which they presented to the entire group in the main room (Image 5-2). Although the designs differed in many respects, some common elements or themes appeared: • • • •

Transit station integration Mix of uses with sizes (e.g. small and large-scale retail and office) Superblock pattern should be broken up with through streets Streetscape improvements are required on Ogilvie Road and Blair Road

Image 5-2 Students, professional planners, and professors working together on design for the BSA.

SECTION 5 PARTICIPATION

43


6| Precedents A total of 81 precedents from 8 countries were examined (See Appendix 7 for full list). From this list, 16 precedents were selected for detailed review. Projects were categorized into four (4) categories relevant to the BSA: • Transit Oriented Development • Mobility Hub • Greyfield Redevelopment • Office Parks This section introduces each of these categories, lists case studies considered, and summarizes best practices and lessons learned for the BSA. The 16 in-depth case studies can be found in Appendix 7.

6.1.2 Relevance to the BSA The BSA is well situated for TOD. The BSA is already a significant employment area and the location of many transit-supportive land uses, such as retail and entertainment, residential, and some recreational and cultural facilities, a school, and a library. However, the site is automobile-oriented and vast areas of land are occupied by parking lots. The BSA has tremendous potential to become a vibrant, safe and attractive TOD destination in the City of Ottawa.

6.1 TRANSIT ORIENTED DEVELOPMENT 6.1.1 Introduction Transit Oriented Developments (TODs) are mixed-use, walkable, urban developments built around a new or existing rail or bus-rapid transit station. TODs strive to provide the land uses, densities and urban form to support transit. TODs are being implemented in many places around North America and the world. Many planners and decision-makers are touting TODs as solutions to the problems associated with sprawl, and TODs are being recognized for their potential to infill autooriented environments. TODs provide locational-efficiency where car-oriented land uses create waste. As Peter Calthorpe, one of the first proponents of TOD, notes that, “the first-ring suburbs, with their oft-vacant industrial zones and moribund retail corridors, are perhaps the ripest areas for the positive impacts of transit” (Dittmar and Ohland, 2004: xiii).

Image 6-1 (Above) The BSA already has some aspects of transit oriented development, such as some mix of land uses including office and residential. The design challenge is to move from transit-adjacent development (TAD) to transit-oriented development (TOD). Image location is in the southern portion of the site.

Image 6-2 Brentwood Station in Calgary is an example of a good TOD.

44 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED


6.1.3 List of Case Studies

6.1.4 Lessons for TOD

For the purpose of this study over 20 TOD case studies were examined. Of these case studies, four examples of TOD were chosen for in-depth study. Because each TOD presents unique opportunities and challenges, precedent cases for this project were chosen based on their relevance to the BSA. In-depth case studies exhibit the following criteria wherever possible: • Suburban location • Similar mix of land uses as the BSA • Similar transit type • Canadian examples • Award-winning projects These detailed case studies may be found in Appendix 7.1.

• Parking should be managed in order to promote other modes of transportation, including walking, cycling and transit. • Ensure connectivity: transit must be convenient. The station must be safely and directly accessible from residential, commercial and office areas. • Build complete communities: balance residential and retail use with open space, recreational facilities, cultural centres and other amenities. • Successful TODs are destinations that extend activity hours into the evening and weekend. • A coordinating agency may be needed to lead development by acting as the developer and taking the site through the development process. • It can take a long time to implement a TOD, unless it is a single site redeveloped by a single owner; 15 to 30 years is not unusual.

1. Collingwood Village, Vancouver, BC 2. Metropole, Ottawa, ON 3. Pleasant Hill-Contra Costa Centre, Walnut Creek, California 4. Brentwood Station, Calgary, AB 5. The Equinox, Toronto, ON 6. Rosslyn-Ballston Corridor, Arlington, Virginia 7. Ohlone-Chynoweth Station, San Jose, California 8. Orenco Station, Portland, Oregon 9. The Bridges, Calgary, AB 10. Portland Hills, Dartmouth, NS 11. Time, North Vancouver, BC 12. Mockingbird Station, Dallas, Texas 13. Port Credit Village, Mississauga, ON 14. Ashmont Station, Boston, Massachusetts 15. Centre Commons Community, Portland, Oregon 16. Bethesda Row, Maryland 17. Orestad, Copenhagen 18. Allemohe, Hamburg, Germany 19. Les Chocheres de la Gare, Sainte-Thérèse, QB 20. Fruitvale, Oakland, California

6.2 MOBILITY HUBS 6.2.1 Introduction Mobility hubs are the centres of circulation for cities. They are interchanges between various modes of transportation including cycling, walking, buses, subway, light rail and even heavy rail. The goal of a mobility hub is to create a seamless transfer between modes and the focus is on creating a convenient and comfortable transit experience (Metrolinx, 2011). Placemaking and functionality are the two key components of mobility hubs. Compact design and the use of information technology are used in such transportation hubs to facilitate the travel experience. Mobility hubs are enhanced by being surrounded by a mix of land uses, including housing, employment, cultural amenities, public facilities and regional attractions (Metrolinx, 2011).

SECTION 6 PRECEDENTS

45


MOBILITY HUB CHARACTERISTICS

MOBILITY HUB STATION DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS 


Conventional Low-density Single uses Separated uses Low population Low employment Wide arterial roads Large parking lots Little weather protection Mall-oriented shopping Not accommodating people with disabilities Discourages walking Discourages cycling No adjacent services/institutions No information Single mode 


Best Practice Medium- and high-density Mixed use Integrated uses High population High employment Network of streets Strategic parking structures Weather moderation Street-oriented shopping Accessible Pedestrian-friendly Bike-friendly Adjacent shops and services Real-time information Multi-modal

Table 6-1 Mobility Hub characteristics (Source Metrolinx, 2007: 7) 
 
 


At the Station Clear, easy, convenient access to stations for all Good signage Good lighting Weather-protected, heated waiting rooms Washrooms/change rooms Bicycle stations Real-time service information Service kiosks with refreshments, papers, etc. Local destination map/information Internet connectivity Travellers’ aid/telephones Virtual workplace Safe environmental design Car-share program

Around the station Transit plaza Transit links to nearby destinations Convenience shopping Daycare Pleasant open space Cultural, educational, entertainment, institutional uses Convenient connections between modes Cafes/restaurants Grocery store Personal services High Occupancy Vehicle preferred parking Plug-ins for electric vehicles Facilities for delivery of goods


 Table 6-2 Mobility Hub station design considerations (Source Metrolinx, 2007: 32)

6.2.2 Relevance to the BSA Blair Station is slated to become the final stop on the east end of Ottawa’s LRT, making the BSA a major transfer centre between buses and LRT. Passengers will need to move efficiently and safely between local and express buses and the future light rail centre. The need for the BSA to balance transfers between LRT, bus, bike and walking will only increase looking towards the future.

Image 6-3 Rosa Parks Transit Centre is a precedent for a mobility hub (Source http://www.archdaily.com/30880/rosa-parks-transit-center-ftl-designengineering-studio/)

46 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED


6.2.3 List of Case Studies

6.2.4 Lessons for Mobility Hubs

Many examples of TOD and greyfield redevelopment are also examples of mobility hubs (see Pleasant Hill-Contra Costa Centre, California; Brentwood Station, Calgary; and CityCenter Plaza, Colorado in Appendix 7.2). However, the precedent cases in this section focus on the function of the transit interchange. These are examples of best practice in mobility hub design; the projects selected demonstrate how modes of transportation can be integrated in innovative ways.

• Make transit hubs a destination: mobility hubs should also be Transit Oriented Developments and should be surrounded by transit-supportive land uses. • Design for accessibility, which helps make easy to use and comfortable spaces that everyone can use. • Focus on place-making: landmarks, unique architecture and design make transit attractive. • Provide a mix of uses, not just around the station, but also within the station. Cafes and retail within hubs are convenient and contribute to the feeling of safety. • Prioritize convenience: shopping for everyday needs should be located near mobility hubs. • Implementation can be complex and difficult to manage, and typically takes decades.

In-depth case studies exhibit the following criteria wherever possible: • Similar modes of transportation to the BSA • Transit stations in winter cities or harsh climates • Transit in suburban locations • Balance of commuter and local transit users These detailed case studies may be found in Appendix 7.2 1. Rosa Parks Transit Station, Detroit, Michigan 2. Transit Hub, Tempe, Arizona 3. Bloor and Dundas Study, Toronto, ON 4. Metrotown, Burnaby, BC 5. Surrey Central, Surrey, BC 6. Transmilenio Portal del Sur, Bogotá, Colombia 7. Shudehill Station, Manchester, UK 8. Warwick Station District, City of Warwick, Rhode Island 9. Stratford Station, London, UK 10. Dundas West-Bloor Mobility Study, Toronto, Ontario 11. Transit Mall, Portland, Oregon 12. Atocha Intercambiadore, Madrid, Spain 13. Broadway Station, Vancouver, BC 14. Milwaukee Intermodal Station, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 15. Southern Cross Station, Melbourne, Australia 16. Gare de l’Ouest, Brussels, Belgium 17. Croydon Station, Croydon, UK 18. Hastings Station, Hastings, UK 19. Montmorency Station, Laval, QB 20. Nagoya Station, Nagoya, Japan

6.3 GREYFIELD REDEVELOPMENT 6.3.1 Introduction Struggling malls and neighbourhood shopping centres are creating immediate problems for today’s cities (Jones, 2011). These large sites pose great threats to their surroundings by precipitating decay and perpetuating unlivable, unfriendly and inhumane places. In 2001, the Congress for the New Urbanism termed these sites ‘greyfields’, defining a greyfield as, “a dying regional mall that has become both economically and architecturally obsolete”(Michael, 2012). In spite of all of the challenges posed by these developments, it is important recognize the potential of these sites to allow for the development of large scale infill projects and act as catalysts for community revitalization.

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The success of greyfield redevelopment projects around the world has contributed to the creation of a great deal of greyfield literature, and the identification of five greyfield redevelopment models (Congress for the New Urbanism, 2005):

• Mall Reinvestment • Mall Repositioning • Adaptive Reuse • Single Use Redevelopment • Mixed-Use Redevelopment

In consideration of the redevelopment of the BSA, the mixeduse redevelopment model is the most relevant. This model may require the replacement of some existing buildings with mixeduses, including retail, office, residential, and employment. This model achieves high densities, high lot coverage, and often provides parking alternatives. This model operates on a street grid pattern with large amounts of open and public space. Mixed-use greyfield redevelopments are commonly referred to as ‘town centres’ or ‘lifestyle centres’ for the full range of uses and amenities that they provide (McKay, 2007).

6.3.2 Relevance to the BSA According to the City of Ottawa’s Official Plan, there is strategic direction to “regenerate greyfields and brownfields such as aging shopping centres and outdated industrial facilities” (City of Ottawa, 2011). In the context of the BSA, both Shoppers City East and the Gloucester Centre have been identified as potential greyfield sites. They will play an important role in the redevelopment of the BSA.

6.3.3 List of Case Studies For the purposes of this study, twenty greyfield redevelopment case studies were examined. Of these case studies, four examples of mixed-use greyfield redevelopments were chosen for in-depth study. In-depth case studies exhibit the following criteria wherever possible:

• Suburban location • Canadian designs • Award winning designs

These detailed case studies may be found in Appendix 7.3. 1. Bay Ridges Plaza, Pickering, ON 2. Shops at Don Mills, Toronto, ON 3. City Centre, Englewood, Colorado 4. Mizner Park, Boca Raton, Florida 5. Trafalgar Village Mall, Oakville, ON 6. 1600 Bath Road, Kingston, ON 7. Aldershot Plaza, Burlington, ON 8. Olde Thornhill Village, Markham, ON 9. 50th Street East Urban Centre, Calgary AB 10. Garrison Woods, Calgary, Alberta 11. Manchester Parkade, Massachusetts, Connecticut 12. Paseo Colorado, Pasadena, California 13. City Place, Long Beach, California 14. Belmar, Lakewood, Colorado 15. Downtown Park Forest, Park Forest, Illinois 16. Winter Park Village, Winter Park, Florida 17. The Renaissance, Calgary, AB 18. Lynn Valley, Vancouver, BC 19. Morningside Mall, Toronto, ON 20. Mashpee Commons, Cape Cod, Massachusetts

Image 6-4 The Shops at Don Mills is a precedent for greyfield redevelopment (Source yorkvillia.com)

48 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED


6.3.4 Lessons for Greyfield Redevelopment • Prioritize pedestrians: place retail uses at grade, use transparent facades, and create permeable and connective street grids with continuous street edges. • Incorporate and integrate a mix of uses, including: office, retail, industrial, and cultural. • Construct diversity through built form: include not only a mix of uses, but also a mix of building types for a variety of incomes. • Ensure quality design: prepare a master plan, site specific guidelines, and tailored zoning. • Focus on public space and place-making: include amenities such as open space, park connections, and provisions for lighting and safety. • Perfect the planning process: make use of public-private partnerships when available and ensure public consultation and participation is included from the very beginning of the project. • Create a dedicated redevelopment agency to catalyze redevelopment: partner with developers, and use tax-increment funding to acquire land and recover the costs.

6.4 OFFICE PARKS 6.4.1 Introduction Office parks, also known as business parks, are districts that are organized or planned to “facilitate compatibility between the industrial operations therein, and the existing activities and character of the community in which the park is located” (Hartshorn, 1973). These parks are defined by their combination of a strategic location and the knowledge clusters of like businesses within them. Many of North America’s existing office parks were built in the 1950s and 1960s. These office parks were developed in the suburbs or in locations outside of major city centres. Their locations are often isolated and poorly connected to transit and surrounding areas. Buildings are often single-use, underutilitzed, overscaled and separated by large parking lots (Tachieva, 2010).

office parks (Mozingo, 2011).Through processes of intensification and revitalization, office parks are being rebuilt following both smart growth and New Urbanist principles. In many cases, office parks are evolving through the rehabilitation and adaptive reuse of existing buildings. The successes of these developments are measured by increases in densities, mixed-uses, better placemaking, pedestrian priority, transit-orientation, and quality amenities and design (Ontario Ministry of Infrastructure, 2012).

6.4.2 Relevance to the BSA Blair Station is located between two suburban office park developments, one located directly to the south and one located east of the BRT station. These existing office parks are traditional in nature with poor connectivity, single use buildings, and widely dispersed development placed among large parking lots. Fortunately, the office park located to the South of Blair is connected to the existing BRT by a pedestrian bridge. The office park to the northeast has access to the station by way of a pedestrian tunnel underneath Blair Road. Both of these office parks will play an important role in the redevelopment of the BSA.

6.4.3 List of Case Studies For the purposes of this study, twenty office park case studies were examined. The lessons learned from these projects provide important considerations for the future of the BSA. Of these case studies, four examples of mixed-use office park redevelopments were chosen for in-depth study. In-depth case studies exhibit the following criteria wherever possible:

• Similar sized cities to Ottawa • Type of employment use • Suburban location • Award winning or recognition as best practices

Recently, planners have turned to rethinking sprawl, starting with

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These detailed case studies may be found in Appendix 7.4. 1. University Town Center, Prince George’s County, Maryland 2. Technology Square, Cambridge, Massachusetts 3. Technopôle Angus, Montréal, QB 4. Schlitz Park, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 5.Chiswick Park, London, UK 6. University of Waterloo Research and Technology Park, Waterloo, ON 7. Savoie-Technolac, Le Bourget du Lac Cedex, France 8. Biogen Idec Campus, San Diego, California 9. SouthWest 1 Enterprise Park, Berrinba, Australia 10. Discover Place, Burnaby, BC 11. Commerce Valley Business Park, Markham, ON 12. Lancaster Corporate Centre, Kitchener, ON 13. Harbourside Business Park, Auckland, New Zealand 14. Takapuna, Auckland, New Zealand 15. Metro Office Park, Guaynabo, Puerto Rico 16. Stockley Park, London, UK 17. Harbor Bay Business Park, Alameda, California 18. The Branches, Reston, Virginia 19. Naiman Tech Centre, San Diego, California 20. Urban Outfitters Corporate Campus, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 21. Conjunctive Points, Los Angeles and Culver City, California

6.4.4 Lessons for Office Parks • Focus on transit-orientation: ensure accessibility via multiple modes of transit, create connections between bus and light rail lines, relocate parking to the rear of buildings, and invest in walking, cycling, and transit infrastructure. • Incorporate and integrate a mix of uses, including: office, retail, industrial and cultural. • Ensure quality design: create compact developments that allow for flexible and adaptable work areas, prepare a master plan, set site specific guidelines, and tailor zoning. • Create branding and place-making: Provide ample open space, park connections, unique amenities, and provide sufficient safety and lighting. • Commit to sustainability: retrofit existing buildings to conform

50 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED

to modern uses, increase site densities, and pursue LEED certification. • Perfect the planning process: make use of public-private partnerships when available and ensure public consultation and participation is included from the very beginning of the project. • Redevelopment can take a long time without a catalyst to spur design.

Image 6-5 Technology Square, Massachusetts is a great for office park. (Source: Ontario Ministry of Infrastructure, www.placestogrow.ca)

6.5 OVERALL SUMMARY 6.5.1 Land Use • Ensure sufficient densities to support-transit usage: these case studies point to the need for a gross FSI range between 1.0 and 4.0. At present, the BSA fails to use a sufficient density, falling well below this range with a gross FSI of 0.3. • Incorporate and integrate a mix of land uses including office, retail, industrial, residential and cultural. At this time, the BSA, though successfully including a mix of uses, fails to integrate different land uses with one another. • Build complete communities: amenities should include a grocery store, a community centre, library, municipal courts, recreational facilities, cafes and restaurants, daycare, convenience shopping, and police services. The BSA does currently provide a variety of amenities, including many of those listed here.


6.5.2 Streetscapes and Environment • Focus on the public realm: each case study demonstrates high quality public plazas, squares, open spaces, parks or streets. At present, the BSA suffers from a lack of: quality public and open spaces, parks, and community assets. • Emphasize place-making: create vibrant places where people enjoy spending their time. Elegantly designed public facilities and unique buildings create landmarks and street furniture contribute to sense of place. At present, the BSA has little focus on place-making and fails to create vibrant places. • Design for winter cities: wherever possible, public outdoor areas should cover pedestrians and protect them from the elements. At present, the only provisions for winter design in the BSA include the covered pedestrian bridge. Aside from this element, the BSA fails to consider weather-specific design.

6.5.3 Built Form • Prioritize pedestrians: place retail uses at grade, use transparent facades, and create a permeable and connective street grid with continuous street edges. At this time, the BSA strongly lacks connectivity and pedestrian orientation. Rather, the BSA is auto-centric. • Building heights should be highest around transit stations and scaled down appropriately for existing communities. At this time the BSA has very few tall buildings, most of which are located farthest from Blair station.

6.5.4 Parking & Vehicles • Minimize surface parking. At present, the BSA provides an overabundance of parking, with requirements for a minimum of roughly 9,195 spaces according to the BSA’s current uses. • Balance needs of commuter transit users and local transit users. At present, the BSA is primarily used as a commuter transit service, failing to focus on the needs of all local transit users. • Metrolinx recommends maximum parking standards for suburban transit nodes of 1.5-3.0 stalls per 100 m2 GFA of office, 1 stall per unit of single unit residential, 0.75-1.5 per multi-unit residential and 3.0 – 5.0 units per 100 m2 GFA of

retail (Metrolinx, 2009: 83). At present the BSA does not have maximum parking standards, but rather, has strict provisions for minimum parking standards. • Maximize parking use by sharing stalls between uses with different peak hours. Shared parking can be located up to 300m away if connected by a safe and convenient walking route. At this time, the BSA does not have any provisions for shared parking. • Car share programs are transit-supportive and should be located near stations. At this time, the BSA does not have any car share programs.

6.5.5 Transit, Pedestrians & Cylists • Promote inter-modal transit hub guidelines and ensure convenient and comfortable access for residents, employees, shoppers and visitors. Currently the BSA does not have intermodal transit hub guidelines. • Create Bike and Ride stations that promote biking as a way to get to transit. Bike and Ride stations provide appropriate facilities for bicycles, including sheltered and safe storage. Other facilities might include bike repair stations, washrooms and water fountains. At present, the BSA fails to promote biking as a means of transit because it lacks sufficient cycling infrastructure, including complete bike lanes and bike and ride stations. • Build complete streets that balance needs of cars, transit, bicycles and pedestrians. Utilize streetscaping details to make streets safer for pedestrians. At present, the BSA fails to realize complete streets because of its auto-centric focus. The BSA lacks connective and complete pedestrian and cyclist networks and fails to utilize streetscaping details to make streets safer for pedestrians.

6.5.6 Site Design • Reinsert a street grid into areas of parking lots and campus grid development. At this time, the BSA does not utilize a street grid. • Prioritize connectivity. Ensure convenient and comfortable access to transit stations. Presently the BSA fails to prioritize connectivity.

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51


7|SWOC Analysis A Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Challenges (SWOC) analysis consolidates the findings from the Study Area Analysis with the input gathered from stakeholders, experts and precedents.

The following table summarizes the key strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and challenges for the BSA. These are the most prominent features that will inform the vision for the BSA and its TOD plan.

WEAKNESSES

STRENGTHS

1. Segregation of land uses 2. Unpleasant built environment 3. Poor internal pedestrian & cycling network 4. Superblock development 5. Air & noise pollution 6. No central public spaces

1. Existing transit infrastructure 2. Multi-use pathway system 3. Near established neighbourhoods and amenities 4. Existing employment area 5. Few environmental constraints

CHALLENGES

OPPORTUNITIES

1. Underutilized and vacant land 2. Policy framework 3. Growing employment 4. Future LRT 5. Large Rights of Way 6. Supportive stakeholders

52 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED

Figure 7-1 SWOC summary

1. Fragmented ownership 2. Little publically-owned land 3. Arterials at capacity 4. Disruptive hydro infrastructure 5. Competition from other TOD areas


7.1 STRENGTHS

7.4 CHALLENGES

Several features of the BSA make it a desirable location for TOD development. It is only an approximate 20 minute bus ride to the downtown core and the existing transit infrastructure provides good access to the site by bus or by private automobile. The multiuse pathway also provides access for pedestrians and cyclists. The BSA is already a major employment area and is surrounded by diverse established neighbourhoods that contain some recreational and cultural amenities. Development will also face minimal environmental constraints

Although the BSA has great potential, transformation from TAD to TOD faces many challenges. Fragmented ownership and lack of publically owned land near the station is a major barrier to TOD that will need to be addressed. The Queensway acts as a major barrier that presents a significant connectivity challenge for creating a unified site. Moreover, limiting any traffic increases will be vital to future development considering Blair and Ogilvie Road are currently at capacity. The line of hydro towers cutting directly through the site is another physical challenge. Other infrastructure and placemaking improvements will require considerable investment. Finally, competition from the neighbouring St. Laurent mall may pose a challenge for adding additional commercial space.

7.2 WEAKNESSES The most notable weakness of the study area is the segregation of land uses. There are no existing mixed used buildings or areas in the BSA. Poor quality, suburban buildings that are poorly related to one another characterize the built environment. The lack of through streets and poor internal circulation completely favour the automobile, making for a very unwelcoming environment for pedestrians and cyclists. The site lacks any definable character and is without any central gathering space. The high speed and volume of traffic on the Queensway and the two arterial roads causes significant noise and air pollution. The BSA can currently be summarized as TAD.

7.5 IMPLICATIONS Any future plans for the Blair Station study area should capitalize on the identified strengths of the site in order to take advantage of the opportunities available. Conversely, any proposed redevelopment plan should try to negate weaknesses and overcome challenges by using appropriate design and recommending strong policies.

7.3 OPPORTUNITIES

Although there are clearly many weaknesses with the existing state of the BSA, some of these poor conditions actually present great opportunities for TOD. For example, there are large areas of vacant land as well as vast underutilized surface parking lots that make for great infill sites, prime for significant intensification. The large ROWs also leave plenty of space for dramatic streetscape improvements with appropriate facilities for cyclists and pedestrians. Growing employment in the area will generate more opportunities for commercial and residential growth. The greatest opportunity is the arrival of the LRT, which will significantly improve location efficiency and potentially increase property values, which together makes TOD feasible. The BSA also benefits from a supportive and keen group of stakeholders and a policy framework that supports TOD.

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53


8| Principles and Vision 8.1 PRINCIPLES & VISION:

8.3 A VISION FOR THE BSA

Nine principles were assembled from the study area analysis, and the inputs gathered through interviews with stakeholders, the design charrette involving experts, and a comprehensive case study analysis. The principles evolved out of implications of the analysis, and lessons learned from the inputs, and inform Blair (Re) Envisioned.

Transform the Blair Station Area into a diverse, connected, compact and transit-oriented destination that enhances the quality of life for existing and future residents and transit users.

8.2 PRINCIPLES

Mobility Mobility Hub Mobility Hub Hub

Make transit seamless, comfortable, and convenient for all users

Foster sustainable development by building a dense urban form

Create circulation network that prioritizes pedestrians and cyclists

Integrate a mix of land uses to create a vibrant and complete community

Build inclusive, complete streets and communities

Improve and rationalize a street network for efficient and safe movement

Efficiently minimize and manage parking

Provide safe spaces for transit users, visitors, employees and residents

Mobility Place Mobility Place Mobility Place Place Mobility Hub Density Making Density Hub Making Density Mobility Place Mobility Place Hub Making Making Density Density Hub Density Hub Making Density Density Hub Making Density

Place Place Making Place Making Making

Create public social spaces that people can be proud of

Circula Circula Circula Circula Circula Circula Complete tion Complete Land Use Complete tion tion Land Use Land Use Circula Circula Circula Complete Complete tion tion Land Use Land Use Complete tion Land Use tion Complete Land Use Complete Complete tion Land Use tion Land Use Street Street Network Street Network Network

Street Street Parking Network Street Network Parking Parking Network

54 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED

Street Street Network Safety Parking Street Safety Parking Network Network Safety Parking

Parking Safety Safety Parking Parking Safety

Safety Safety Safety


9| Design Concepts The design for the BSA evolved from the vision and principles established in the previous section. The City of Ottawaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s TOD studies expect to reach minimum densities of 400 people and jobs per gross hectare at Train, St. Laurent, and Cyrville. The analysis of the BSA shows that it is reasonable to target similar densities at Blair Station. To achieve the vision for the BSA, the site was first conceptualized as three distinct districts separated by barriers (Figure 9-1). New districts were visualized over the barriers in order to better connect the districts (Figure 9-2). Three public spaces were then drawn, one in each of the districts, that are well-connected to each other and to the surrounding public realm (Figure 9-3). Next, an urban street grid was laid down to facilitate this connection (Figure 9-4).

CARPET DESIGN

These design elements led to the creation of a carpet concept, an urban design tool that is used to get the basics right, creating a decisively more urban environment with mixed-uses, improved connectivity, and high-quality public space. It has a density Image 9-1 Proposed Carpet Design looking south.

TARGET DESIGN

Figure 9-1 Conceptual disctricts

Figure 9-2 Breaking barriers

Figure 9-3 Public spaces

Figure 9-4 Urbanized streets

Image 9-2 Proposed Target Design, looking south east towards Greens Creek.

SECTION 9 DESIGN CONCEPTS

55


of approximately 340 people and jobs per gross hectare. Although the Carpet Concept avoids the use of high-rise buildings, towers may become necessary, both in the short term, as a bonusing tool, and in the long term, in absorbing population growth. Appropriate locations for taller buildings were the basis for the second design presented in this study, the Target Concept, which achieves the target density of 400 people and jobs per gross hectare. The Target Concept identifies and utilizes the most context-sensitive locations for placing high-rise towers. Conditions for placement of high rise towers include appropriate places for increased density, minimizing shadow impacts, and taking advantage of significant views. Map 9-1 is a plan view of the Target Design, which will be discussed for the rest of the section. Table 9-1 compares a variety of metrics between the existing site and both design concepts. Appendices 12 and 13 provides a detailed comparison of the Carpet and Target Concepts.

Image 9-3 A birds-eye rendering of the Target Concept.

56 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED

Map 9-1 Target Concept plan view


9.1 TARGET CONCEPT DESIGN Existing

Carpet

Target

Gross Density

91

360

420

Gross F.S.I.

0.3

1.25

1.55

Net F.S.I.

0.6

2.14

2.65

Dwelling Units

797

8,565

12,533

DU/ha

5.8

62

91

2015

15,222

21,598

15

110

158

10,517

34,409

36,231

Jobs/ha

76

250

262

Jobs/Residents

5.2

2.27

1.66

Residents Residents/ha Jobs

Max Storeys Parking Spaces

8 (32m) 8 (32m) 9,195

8,475

28 (88.5 m) 9,813

Table 9-1 Comparison of Carpet and Target Concepts with existing conditions. Assumptions: 1.62 People Per Apartment Unit; 2.06 People Per Stacked Townhouse Unit; 80 m2 Gross Area Per Residential Unit; 27.9 m2 Per Office Employee; 37.2 m2 Per Retail Employee; 3m Floor Height For Residential; 3.5 Floor Height For Commercial; Parking requirements based on the Downtown and Tunneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pasture ratios.

9.1.1 Connectivity STREET NETWORK A grid-like road network was chosen for the design to maximize options for all modes of transportation in the BSA and minimize travel distances. Maps 9-2 through 9-5 illustrate the proposed street network, and its implications for the driver, the bus transit user, the pedestrian, and the cyclist.

particularly to the transit station. New connections also alleviate congestion on Ogilvie and Blair Roads by dispersing traffic around the site, and create linkages to exterior existing neighbourhoods in the BSA. For bus transit users, the gridded street network contributes to the accessibility of Blair station through the use of a variety of street types. Map 9-4, which outlines existing and proposed bus routes, identifies major streets as having bus service, which are lined with proposed and existing bus stops. Such roads include Ogilvie and Blair, as well as City Park Drive, which has been re-aligned and narrowed to 23.6 metres in the design. Major streets are serviced by bus routes to encourage activity to contribute to a successful public realm. By comparison, laneways, which may be as narrow as 12 metres, exist at the opposite end of the hierarchy for the purposes of servicing and relocating parking to the rear of buildings. Existing and proposed bus routes are important in contributing to the creation of a hierarchy of streets in the BSA. In terms of pedestrian and cyclist connectivity, the gridded road network provides options in route choice by expanding both the sidewalk network and bike lane network throughout the site. Maps 9-2 and 9-3 outline pedestrian and cyclist routes, emphasizing provisions for a separate pedestrian bridge and separate cycling bridge for crossing the Queensway. Additional improvements made to the Queensway crossing across Blair Road further connectivity between the southern and the northern portions of the site by reducing travel distances to Blair Station.

Map 9-5 presents driving circulation conditions through the identification of existing controlled crosswalks and controlled intersections, proposed controlled intersections, and removed controlled intersections in the design. The gridded road network focuses on increasing the number of connections along Ogilvie and Blair Roads to provide better automotive access to the site, and

SECTION 9 DESIGN CONCEPTS

57


!

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Building Study Area

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Building

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!

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!

!

Study Area 100

Road

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Sidewalk

0

Existing Bus Route

!

!

Cycling Bridge

!

Proposed Bus Stop Existing Bus Stop

!

Pedestrian Bridge

!!!

Blair Station

! !

!

0

Metres 400

200

75

Metres 300

150

Data Source: City of Ottawa (2012)

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Data Source: City of Ottawa (2012)

I

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Map 9-2 Proposed pedestrian circulation

! Map 9-4 Proposed bus circulation

Map 9-3 Proposed cycling circulation

Map 9-5 Proposed driving circulation ! ( ! ( ! (

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Blair Station Bike Lane

! (

Multi-Use Path

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Cyclist Bridge

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Study Area 150

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Building

75

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Proposed Controlled Intersection Removed Controlled Intersection Existing Controlled Crosswalk

Major Road

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Local Road

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Laneway

Data Source: City of Ottawa (2012)

Transit

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! (

Study Area 0

! (

100

200

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Data Source: City of Ottawa (2012)

! (

58 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED

Existing Controlled Intersection

Highway

! Metres 300

Blair Station

! (

I


TRANSITWAY

TRANSITWAY

QUEENSWAY

LRT

TRANSITWAY

QUEENSWAY

BEFORE

QUEENSWAY BLAIR ROAD

BLAIR ROAD

QUEENSWAY

AFTER

Figure 9-5 Before and after diagrams of the Queensway interchange.

INTERCHANGE Figure 9-5 shows the proposed realignment of Queensway interchange ramps. The Controlled Intersection proposed off-ramp heading west ascends to help slow cars to a complete stop at the Blair Road bridge. The on-ramp descends Street to the Queensway, allowing cars easier acceleration to merge with highway traffic. This realignment allows for lands formerly Direction of Traffic dedicated to the cloverleaf to be repurposed as developable land. Precedents from the Blair Station Catherine Streeet interchange in Ottawa, and the Decarie in Montreal demonstrate the viability of this idea. Transitway/LRT

LEGEND

Image 9-4 The Catherine Street interchange in Ottawa is much more urban in nature by allowing traffic to enter and exit Highway 417 without cloverleaf ramps. (Image source: Google Maps, 2012)

SECTION 9 DESIGN CONCEPTS

59


TRAIL NETWORK The multi-use pathway system has been extended into the site and provides pedestrians and cyclists with direct connections to the transit station. This achieves a variety of objectives including multi-modal integration and the promotion of healthy and active lifestyles. The pathway is approximately 6 metres wide to allow for two directions of bicycle traffic and space for pedestrians. Providing separated connections to the station (identified in maps 9-2 and 9-3) as well as the significant existing multi-use pathway system puts pedestrians and cyclists first. Formerly one of the biggest detriments to pedestrian and cyclist mobility, crossing the Queensway, is now possible via three separate travel routes. BRIDGING THE GAP The existing pedestrian bridge is unpleasant and unsafe. By straightening, widening, and shortening it, design can improve user experience. The proposed bridge has been shortened by almost 60 metres and widened to 6 metres (from approximately 2.5 metres). A width of 6 metres provides opportunity for vendors or kiosks on the bridge and higher volumes of transit users, which will be necessary with the future development of the southern portion of the site. The bridge now terminates indoors at both ends (the new station design is described below), providing the transit user with a more pleasant experience, and further prioritizing pedestrians instead of planning only for cars.

Image 9-6 A cycling bridge spanning a highway. (Image source: aroundsarasota.com)

Image 9-7 Proposed cycling bridge and expanded pedestrian bridge

Image 9-5 An ascending loop cycling bridge in Vancouver. (Image source: fraseropolis.com)

60 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED


The existing bridge fails to accommodate the cyclist transit user. In order to provide cyclists with a seamless experience of access to and from the transit station, the design proposes a second bridge primarily for cyclists. This bridge reaches appropriate elevation using an ascending loop, similar to the Golden Pears Bridge in Vancouver, BC, allowing cyclists to cross the Queensway without getting off of their bikes. The bridge is also connected to the multi-use pathway system, providing the most direct access to the transit station from outside of the BSA. On the north side of the Queensway the bridge is integrated into the new Blair Station building, so that cyclists can exit and secure their bikes in indoor storage, with provisions for showers and repairs.

9.1.2 Built Environment BLAIR STATION One of the biggest missed opportunities on the site is the disconnection between the existing transit station and other BSA amenities. To overcome this obstacle, the design integrates the station platform into the Gloucester Centre by extending the mall structure to the south, over the station. This integration offers transit users a comfortable indoor environment in which to wait for trains. Nearby retail amenities provide the transit user the greatest convenience on their trips to and from home or work. A Passenger Pick-Up and Drop-Off (PPUDO) area is provided at grade below the redesigned station building.

Image 9-8 The Gloucester Centre has been expanded to integrate with Blair Station

Image 9-9 Metrotown is an example of an LRT station integrated into a shopping mall. This example also has tower style residential development on top of the mall. (Image source: Google Maps, 2012)

The goal of placemaking was seen as most important around the station, where most activity would be concentrated, throughout the day. Two large plazas, one adjacent to the Gloucester Centre, and one south of the Queensway, are located directly outside of the stations. The plazas provide flexible space, contributing to the identity of the Gloucester community. Buildings frame the plazas to give users a sense of enclosure without overwhelming the space. A proposed community centre is situated adjacent to the northern plaza, which is intended to be the focal point of the entire BSA.

Image 9-10 Rendering of plaza adjacent to Gloucester Centre entrance.

SECTION 9 DESIGN CONCEPTS

61


RESIDENTIAL

A total of 14,900 residential units have been added to the site. Table 9-1 describes the breakdown of residential types and units. Residences have been concentrated in a few specific areas for their provision of views, quiet environments, and convenience to the transit station. Highest residential density is located closest to the transit station with buildings as tall as 30 storeys in order to provide convenient access to the LRT system for the greatest number of residents. Shadow analysis was preformed to ensure shadow impacts are minimized on residences and public spaces. See Appendix 15 for a detailed shadow analysis. Tower 1 is sited on a currently vacant parcel of land between the transitway and an access road to the Gloucester Centre (Image 9-11). This parcel provides views of the Greenbelt, convenient access to the station, and minimizes shadow impact on surrounding uses. Pedestrian access to the station should be provided underground. Tower 2 provides significant views of the Greenbelt, minimizes shadow impact on surrounding uses, and is close to the pedestrian bridge for access to the station (Image 9-13). Image 9-11 Tower 1 is convenient to the transit station and provides great views of the Greenbelt.

Taller residential buildings that are further from the station, for instance on the eastern fringe, have been sited because of their potential for beautiful views of the Greenbelt.

Image 9-13 Tower 2 has great views of the Greenbelt, no negative shadow impacts, and is convenient to Blair Road, the pedestrian bridge, and the Queensway.

Image 9-12 Bay Ridges Plaza demonstrates a mix of high and medium rise development.

Image 9-14 High rise buildings in Collingwood Village, Vancouver, use podiums to mitigate the impact of tall buildings on the streets below. Podiums are proposed for all tall buildings in the Target Concept.

62 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED


Image 9-15 Townhouse style developments adjacent to existing residential neighbourhoods mitigate impacts on surrounding neighbourhoods.

Image 9-16 Gramercy Place townhouses in Ottawa, Ontario are precedent buildings for the designs. (Image source: Google Maps, 2012)

OPEN SPACE A lack of open space and green space was identified as a significant weakness of the BSA in the SWOC analysis presented in Section 7. One of the aims of the design is to provide for more open space and green space on the site to meet the open space requirements of two hectares per 1000 people, as outlined by the City of Ottawaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Greenspace Master Plan. As such, provisions for open space and green space in the design should total 50 hectares (for a population of 25,000). At present, open space in the design totals 11 hectares, calculated using both open spaces and leisure land, which includes public parks, sports fields, pathways, and other open spaces. To make up the additional 39 hectares required by the Greenspace Master Plan, the design relies on other significant open spaces located just outside of the site, including the Greenbelt to the south, and the two park lands to the east and west of the site.

Townhouse style developments at the fringes of the site keep a consistent scale with, minimize impact on adjacent residential neighbourhoods, and help transition to the more dense built form in the centre of the BSA. COMMERCIAL & OFFICE As an existing retail hub in the neighbourhood, the Gloucester Centre was preserved as the commercial focal point for the BSA. About 290,000 square metres of retail space have been added to the site. By spreading commercial uses at grade around the site, the design creates a distinct mixed-use centre. Existing office buildings have mainly been maintained for their value as dense employment hubs. About 511,000 square metres of office space have been added. The most significant proposed office buildings are located close to the transit station to provide convenient and at times direct indoor access to the station.

Sidewalk

Buffer

Traffic Lane

2.0 m

2.0 m

3.5 m

Traffic Lane 3.5 m

Buffer 2.0 m

Multi Use Pathway

Bike Lane 2.5 m

4.0 m 0.5 m

20.0 m

Figure 9-6 Proposed street cross section includes the multi-use pathway, providing direct access to green spaces outside of the BSA.

SECTION 9 DESIGN CONCEPTS

63


Map 9-6 illustrates provisions for various types of open space and green space, distinguishing public spaces from private spaces. Public open green space is provided throughout the BSA, in an attempt to create a park system, connected by the multi-use pathway which runs throughout the site. All open green spaces in the BSA are for public use, and include a range of park infrastructure, such as benches, garbage bins, lighting, playgrounds, and in larger areas, sports fields. The multi-use pathway connecting the park system is also public, and provides for a range of users, including both pedestrians and cyclists. The greenbelt additionally serves as a public green space, though it is heavily treed. Despite its inaccessibility, the greenbelt contributes to the BSA by providing beautiful natural views and maintaining a buffer for local residents. The golf course located within the greenbelt provides an additional recreation amenity to the area. Private green spaces are located in courtyards in the center of perimeter blocks. Private green spaces provide patio areas for cafes as well as outdoor spaces for residents of mixed-use buildings. Design provisions for open space and green space are crucial to contributing to a successful outdoor public realm.

!!

Blair Station Open Green Space Plaza Private Green Space Greenbelt Multi-Use Path Road

!

Building Study Area 0

75

150

Metres 300

Data Source: City of Ottawa (2012)

I

Map 9-6 Open space provided in proposed designs

Image 9-13 Community amenities east of the BSA (Image source: Bing Maps, 2012)

64 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED

OVERALL SITE DESIGN Overall, the design emphasizes the transition of the BSA from a suburban to more urban area, as illustrated in Maps 9-7 and 9-8. Map 9-9 displays proposed heights for the design, identified as areas of low-rise, mid-rise, and high-rise development. High rise buildings are focused nearest the transit station to provide transit access to the greatest number of residents, and bordering the Queensway to buffer the BSA from highway traffic. A comparison of the pre-design and post-design figure grounds best illustrate the transformation of the BSA, displaying the change to an urban gridded street network with smaller block sizes in place of suburban super blocks. Infill buildings in the post-design figure ground are located closer together, with smaller setbacks to the road. Additionally, development is concentrated around Blair Station.


!

Blair Station Building Study Area

0

75

Metres 300

150

Data Source: City of Ottawa (2012)

I

!

Map 9-7 Existing building footprints

Map 9-9 Proposed building heights in Target Concept

9.1.3 Parking !

Blair Station Building Study Area

0

75

Metres 300

150

Data Source: City of Ottawa (2012)

!

I

Good transit-oriented design reduces the supply of parking to encourage transit use and other more sustainable modes of transportation. With this in mind, parking is still necessary. Significant infill on existing parking lots is required to achieve the desired density for the area. Displacing this parking creates the need for alternative parking provisions, including parking structures, surface lots, and on-street parking, in addition to the adoption of a variety of progressive parking policies, such as shared parking (See Section 11 for implementation strategies).

Map 9-8 Proposed building footprints

SECTION 9 DESIGN CONCEPTS

65


Map 9-10 illustrates the strategic positioning of parking throughout the BSA in the form of parking structures, surface parking, and on-street parking. Parking structures are notably set back from the street by lined buildings and are located in close proximity to the transit station to improve accessibility for commuters, and to major employment areas. Surface parking is minimal, and is hidden in central areas of perimeter blocks or located to the rear of buildings, far from the transit station. Street parking is provided on most interior streets in lanes of 2.5 metres (See Figure 9-7) to facilitate an active public realm by providing a barrier between pedestrians and cars, and serving as a traffic calming measure to slow traffic in these areas. On-street parking provides 2,050 parking spaces to accommodate the needs of transit users and local residents. Map 9-10 demonstrates the significance of quality design and strategic planning in creating successful and efficient parking solutions for a high traffic area.

Sidewalk 2.0 m

Buffer 2.0 m

Parking Lane 2.5 m

Traffic Lane

Traffic Lane

Parking Lane

3.5 m

2.5 m

3.5 m

Buffer 2.0 m

Sidewalk 2.0 m

20.0 m

Figure 9-7 Proposed street cross section includes two lanes of on-street parking 2.5 metres wide

!!

Blair Station Parking Structure Surface Parking (Private) On-Street Parking Road

P

Building

!

Study Area 0

75

150

Metres 300

Data Source: City of Ottawa (2012)

I

P

Image 9-14 Parking behind other uses keeps active street frontages. Map 9-10 Proposed parking provisions

66 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED


9.2 PHASING The phasing of the Target Concept provides realistic incremental development targets that maintain the functionality of the site and transit station during construction while improving the financial feasibility for the public and private sectors over the short and long term. It is expected this would occur over 25-40 years, allowing approximately 6 to 10 years per phase.

1

Phase 1: Station Improving the station area is a priority and is suggested to be the first thing completed. This includes expanding the Gloucester Centre into the station building, improving the pedestrian bridge, adding the cycling bridge, and creating the south receiving station building. Taller buildings on the Gloucester Centre and in the new building south of the Queensway are included as incentives for this important development. Parking structures are included in the first phase to allow infill development on surfaces lots in later phases. Features of this phase include: • Reorganizing the station area • Two significant parking garages to allow infill • Realigning City Park Drive to allow more direct access to station • Starting the grid street network in the eastern portion • Infill adjacent to Gloucester Centre • Developing vacant land to the east and redevelop Shopper’s City retail outlet • Developing Tower 2

2

Phase 2: Placemaking Following improved facilities for transit users, Phase 2 includes the beginning of placemaking to transform the BSA into a better community focal point. This includes largely infill on surface lots, as well as the redevelopment of the Canadian Tire site. Features in this phase include: • Creation of central and south plazas • Extend the grid network throughout site • Adjustments to pedestrian bridge • Create cycling bridge • Develop area at terminus of pedestrian bridge • Creation of parking structure in the south for future infill of surface parking • Redevelop Canadian Tire property into residential mixed use developments

SECTION 9 DESIGN CONCEPTS

67


Phase 3: Infill This phase includes the redevelopment of existing buildings including SilverCity, other big box stores, and Blair Plaza in the south. Infill around existing office buildings is completed, and Tower 1 is developed. Redeveloping existing buildings is saved largely for this phase to allow existing buildings to persist as long as possible to minimize transition time between old and new. Features of this phase include: • Completing the infill of southern portion of the area • Replacing the movie theatre with townhouse development, easing transition to more dense areas of the site • Completing the internal grid network • Replacing the existing office at the western edge of site with residential development

Phase 4: (Re)Envisioned This final phase includes significant changes to the Queensway interchanges, as well as infill development on the CSIS property north of Ogilvie Road. These changes are reserved for the last phase because they are the most likely to face significant opposition. Features of this phase include: • Realigning the interchanges • Increased transit use by this phase may also reduce the impact of these changes on traffic flow • Developing land formerly used for ramps • Creating pathways to transitway directly from new development along Blair Road • Creating the street network and infill development north of Ogilvie road

68 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED

3

4


10| Evaluation

mix of land uses provide high quality public realm create landmarks open space/ green space prioritize pedestrians integration with existing neighbourhoods mix of building types minimize surface parking parking at back or underground max. parking standards parking management promote seamless integration of trans. modes

Vehicles + Parking

proximity to transit infrastructure for cyclists complete streets amenities at station

Transit, Pedestrians + Cyclists

STREETSCAPE AND ENVIRONMENT Wide sidewalks and multi-use pathways prioritize pedestrians and cyclists throughout the site. Existing neighbourhoods have been connected to the site through the creation of new internal streets that connect with neighbourhood streets. Parking structures are lined with buildings to prevent negative impacts on adjacent street. High quality streetscaping complements the urbanized built form to create a more pleasant pedestrian experience.

complete community

Streetscape + Environment

BUILT FORM Achieving the targeted density means a significant amount of infill development and intensification must occur. All surface parking lots have been consolidated into strategically placed parking structures. Density concentrated around the transit station is transit supportive and because of the location of the station, the impact on surrounding neighbourhoods is minimized. Buildings are designed to front onto and frame streets to create a more urban, pedestrian friendly environment. The expanded station building will be a landmark building with unique design

sufficient density

Built Form

LAND USE The recommended design achieves a target density of about 420 people and jobs per gross hectare. This target comes from the recently completed City of Ottawa TOD Studies. Along with density, the design achieves a mix of uses. Residences, offices, retail space, and community space are all help transform the site from a single use, single typology into a mixed-use complete community. Existing community amenities, such as the Loblaws grocery store, are being preserved for their value to the community. Open space is provided and the multi-use trail allows connection to more significant open spaces.

Carpet Existing Land Use

10.1 EVALUATING DESIGN CONCEPTS

Target

street grid

connection to station

Table 10-1 Evaluating design options based on Ottawaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s TOD Guidelines

Layout

internal connectivity

connection to surrounding neighbourhoods

SECTION 10 EVALUATION

69


VEHICLES & PARKING The addition of a cycling bridge, the improved pedestrian bridge, and the new station building are efforts to help create a more seamless transit user experience. Shared use parking spaces better manage parking supply to minimize wasted space. New parking standards consistent with downtown Ottawa and Tunneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pasture, the terminal station at the other end of the LRT line, allow for prioritization of pedestrian and cycling modes. TRANSIT, PEDESTRIANS & CYCLISTS The realigned City Park Drive and existing transit infrastructure will be the primary routes for local bus traffic. Sidewalks are included on all roads to ensure pedestrian connections are convenient and frequent. Bike lanes on major roads and the creation of the cycling bridge provide cyclists with more comfortable and convenient access to all amenities on the site. The extended MUP system provides pedestrians and cyclists with the highest possible level of convenience and safety for travelling in, out and within the area. LAYOUT The internal grid system maximizes the number of connections throughout the site and minimizes the distance between connections to all amenities. Widest ROWs lead directly to the station, and the grid provides many alternative routes for all types of transit users. The new station building is accessible from multiple points including the entrance fronting on the new plaza, the PPUDO area below the station building, and the improved pedestrian and cycling bridges. Connections to surrounding neighbourhoods are made with the grid street network and improved MUP system.

70 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED


TYPE OF PROJECT, DEVELOPER, AND BUILD OUT Both designs will transform the BSA from development that is adjacent to transit to development that is designed to have a synergistic relationship with transit facilities. They achieve this by integrating facilities into buildings, creating more density around the transit station, and providing better access to the station using the road network and improved bridges. The BSA’s land ownership is highly fragmented. The recommended block layout largely respects this ownership pattern, and individual land ownership will persist with the new design so that multiple developers can complete the project.

Target

Transit TOD Oriented Development

Multiple 2012-

138 ha

Townhomes & Mid to High Rise Apartments

138 ha

1.2

Parking

Transect

Dwelling Units

Office Space (m2)

285,856 445,293 11,198 6425 T4 (structured)

Townhomes and Mid Rise Apartments

Gross FAR FSI

338

Gross Site Area (hectares)

Carpet TOD Multiple 2012Transit Oriented Development

Building Typology

110,910 245,694 389

Year Built

78

Developer

Existing TAD Multiple 1980Transit Single 135.2 0.22 present Detached, ha Adjacent Development Townhomes, Office (Low – Mid Rise)

Type of Project

Retail Space (m2)

BUILDING TYPOLOGY, DENSITY FIGURES, AND PARKING The building types in the Carpet Design achieve density through mid-rise development, while the Target Design utilizes appropriatelyplaced high-rise buildings to achieve the target density. This results in significant differences in the amount of office and residential space provided by the Carpet and Target Designs. In both designs parking is reduced even as density increases. This is achieved through reduction in parking minimums and expected increases in transit ridership in correspondence with proper transit-oriented design. Gross Density (People & Jobs / Gross Ha)

There is a significant amount of vacant land and land devoted to surface parking which can easily be redeveloped in the short term

(20 years), in Phases 1 and 2. The longer term phases, Phases 3 and 4, involve demolition of some existing buildings and the interchange realignment.

9,195 (surface)

T3 Suburban /T2 Rural

2050 (onstreet)

  Table 10-2 Evaluating designs based on key figures from precedents.

1.5

400

293,731 510,922 14,907 7763 T4 T5 (structured) 2050 (onstreet)

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71


10.2 STAKEHOLDER INTERESTS In order to evaluate the Blair (Re)Envisioned plan, the stakeholder analysis needs to be revisited to better understand how development will affect the actors involved in the BSA. Table 11-3 presents the interests of the stakeholders identified in Section 4. and

talks about how the recommended design and implementation strategies address stakeholder interests of main and secondary actors. This evaluation predicts that, in general, the interests of all stakeholders will be met by the proposed plan.

Table 10-3 Evaluating stakeholder interests.

How the Plan Address Stakeholder Interests

• Provides new development opportunities • Phasing plan ensures market absorption to keep vacancy low • Development will likely raise rental and property values in the BSA

• Protect or enhance existing amenities and open spaces • Protect or enhance quality of life of residents • Increase mobility choices and access to transit • Minimize traffic impact • Maintain or increase value of land

• • • • • • •

• Maximize return on investment • Minimize risk • Short term financial feasibility

• Provides new development opportunities • Phasing strategy keeps vacancy low • Proposes postponed development charges on developers

• Increase transit ridership • Make mobility efficient • Keep costs and fares low

• Creates a destination at the BSA and generate bi-directional flows to maintain efficiency while increasing ridership • Proposes selling development rights with pre-conditions to developers

Community Associations

Commercial Property Owners

• Maximize return on investment • Maintain low vacancy rates and attract new tenants • Raise rental and property values

Developers

• Implement Official Plan and Infrastructure Master • Meets minimum density targets consistent with municipal policy Plan policies • Meets OP policy objectives and is a public good • Achieve Strategic Plan objectives • Increases development charge revenues • Increases property tax revenues from increased intensity of land use • Maximize tax revenues and higher land values

OC Transpo

City of Ottawa

Interests

72 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED

Provides civic amenities such as new plazas and community centre New infrastructure serves residents Improves accessibility to LRT, bus Improves cycling and pedestrian infrastructure Rationalizes traffic circulation Improves road network Development will likely raise property values in the BSA


City Councillors

• Protecting or enhancing the quality of life of residents • Ensuring development is done in an appropriate way

• Provides new infrastructure and amenities for residents • Proposes staged phasing and implementation strategies

Professional Consultants

• Ensure appropriate development for the BSA • Contributes to the public good

• Meets policy objectives of the OP • Is a public good

• Ensure development does not adversely affect the city or region • Economic growth for the city and region

• Generates new construction in the city • Absorbs regional population and job growth • Generates municipal revenues and sales taxes

• Minimize risk and generate revenues

• Phasing strategy ensures market absorption and makes development a safe and profitable investment

• Create a capital worthy of Canada

• Improves the quality of the built environment in Canada’s Capital

• Retain talent and attract new talent • Maintain accessibility for employees • Minimize disruptions

• Creates an attractive, safe and accessible office space where people want to work • Phasing strategy ensures a logical development order to minimize interruptions

• Retain customers and attract new customers • Increase walk through traffic • Create attractive, safe and accessible retail spaces where people want to shop • Minimize disruptions

• Brings more people through retail spaces by making Blair a destination • Phasing strategy ensures logical development order to minimize interruptions

• Keep transit accessible, convenient and safe • Keep parking at station • Keep fares low

• Brings transit-supportive uses to the station itself to serve the needs of transit users • Provides parking at station to serve neighbouring communities • Increases ridership to keep fares low

Transit Users

Retail Tenants

Office Tenants

General Public

How the Plan Address Stakeholder Interests

NCC Lenders

Interests

SECTION 10 EVALUATION

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11| Implementation 11.1 STRATEGIES The wide-ranging social, economic, and environmental benefits of higher-density, walkable development near transit stations are firmly established. The design for Blair Station is intended to maximize these benefits in a manner that is sensitive to the context of the surrounding area and Ottawa as a whole. Yet, despite strong support, TOD often remains an elusive concept. The Precedents section examined a wide range of successful TOD projects and plans that are most relevant to Blair Station. However, many examples exist where TOD plans are never realized and station areas remain inefficiently underdeveloped. When TOD plans fail to live up to their potential, blame is typically attributed to a limited number of barriers including: local neighbourhood opposition, risk-averse developers and lenders, a weak market, difficulties with financing and an unsupportive regulatory framework (Belzer & Autler, 2002). These barriers can be increasingly challenging in suburban settings because the development that is advocated differs from what is usually on the ground and in the marketplace. Too often the focus remains on these barriers and not enough on practical solutions for making TOD work. The realization of Blair (Re)Envisioned requires a comprehensive long-term implementation plan with innovative solutions to these barriers. Below is a list of strategies to facilitate the right kind of development in the BSA. Since successful implementation of TOD plans requires devoted effort on the part of all stakeholders, roles for each stakeholder group are defined with a specific focus on potential areas for collaboration.

74 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED

1. CREATE A TOD DEVELOPMENT AGENCY TO INITIATE THE PROCESS OF DEVELOPMENT AND ENCOURAGE GROWTH. The scale of the transformation that must occur in order to create a viable and successful TOD requires a mechanism to spark the process of development. Many recently developed TODs have benefited greatly from the incorporation of a development agency. The principal objective of the development agency is to facilitate initial public development and encourage private investment in the site. To create a development agency, City Council must approve a new organization, or modify an existing one. The agency will provide the necessary start-up funding in order to assemble lands, build initial parking structures and begin making the necessary infrastructure and placemaking improvements in the BSA. Several successful precedents studied used this strategy to guide development. For example, the City of Boca Raton, FL, established a community redevelopment agency responsible for leading the development of Mizner Park, a mixed-use development with a wide array of greenspace and cultural facilities. The agency purchased the land and entered into partnerships with cultural organizations and developers with expertise in mixed-use projects. 2. LEAD RATHER THAN REGULATE DEVELOPMENT BY ACQUIRING LAND, DEVELOPING INFRASTRUCTURE AND ENTERING INTO PUBLICPRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS Ownership in underdeveloped sites is often fragmented, and developers are unaware of the potential long-term benefits of intensification. To resolve this issue, many successful redevelopment efforts have focused on acquiring and assembling land near transit stations. Public-private partnerships have also proven effective to facilitate development.


Land can often be purchased at relatively low-cost if done proactively before the new transit infrastructure is in place. One key step is the identification of undervalued and underutilized sites such as vacant properties or surface parking lots. This land can either be developed or reparceled and sold back to developers with conditions for projects that align with TOD principles. In the BSA, these sites may include: • Shoppers City East: where existing buildings are of low- value and the units are nearly all vacant. • Vacant land on City Park Drive just north of the Queensway: close proximity to the station as well as existing residences and City Centre Park. • Existing park-and-ride lots: can be held as land bank deposits for later development or even as construction yards for nearby development. One effective approach is to sell or lease a portion of a park-and-ride lot and to replace the remaining surface stalls with a multi-storey parking structure.

3. CREATE POLICIES AND INCENTIVES THAT FACILITATE THE RIGHT KIND OF DEVELOPMENT

In addition to acquiring the identified properties, the City of Ottawa needs to take an active role in the subdivision of parcels to conform to the desired street layout. The City might consider expropriating the ROWs, which would effectively create smaller block-sized parcels. These smaller parcels should then be rezoned to reflect the desired form of development and zoned with a Holding (‘H’) designation until adequate infrastructure upgrades were completed. In this scenario, property owners that are unwilling to build projects that meet the desired outcomes would be more likely to sell the property to a developer with experience in TOD. In the interim, these parcels would continue functioning as surface parking.

• Tax-increment financing (TIF): The designation of the BSA as a TIF district would mean that all property taxes would go to infrastructure and placemaking improvements in the area. They can also provide gap financing to developers in the short term. • TOD tax exemptions: Tax exemptions can be offered to developers of high density-mixed use transit stations that meet TOD objectives such as providing a minimum number of affordable units. Eligibility for tax exemptions are typically limited to less than ten years - during the first phase of development. • Density bonusing: Section 37 of the Ontario Planning Act permits some forms of height or density bonusing, which allows buildings to exceed limits in the zoning by-law in exchange for community amenities, services, or affordable housing. Density bonusing can improve the feasibility of projects while improving the quality of the public realm that is so crucial for TOD to succeed. Section 37 also permits municipalities to require community benefit charges, which are a proportion of the value uplift when a property is rezoned. Density bonusing and community benefit charges are two valuable tools that can help pay for the dramatic improvements to the public realm, especially the three public plazas recommended in the design concepts.

‘Air rights’ are another innovative tool that the City can negotiate with developers to facilitate development. In Redmond, Washington, a moderate-income rental housing project was built on the air rights above a parking structure near the Overlake Metro Transit station (Dunphy et al. 2004). The utilization of air rights in the BSA should be explored over the Gloucester Centre or any newly constructed parking structures.

Multiple lines of research demonstrate that new transit infrastructure often has positive impacts on land values, rents, and development trends. However, transit is just one of many factors influencing development and every site must still compete with every other site in the region. Therefore, transit alone is not always sufficient to promote redevelopment even with the right zoning and other regulatory tools. For example, a critical component of Blair (Re) Envisioned is the replacement of oversupplied surface parking with parking structures. Yet, developers will typically only build structured or underground parking when land is more expensive than structure (Metro Regional Government, 2004). Innovative financing instruments and incentives such as tax-increment financing (TIF) and density bonusing are required when market forces are simply not strong enough to support TOD.

SECTION 11 IMPLEMENTATION

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4. INVEST IN INFRASTRUCTURE AND ALIGN IMPROVEMENTS WITH PHASING STRATEGY The existing infrastructure for the BSA is currently suited for a suburban, or in some sections, a rural environment. For example, the Blair/Queensway interchange was designed when much of the BSA was still a rural area, with large tracts of land wasted for large cloverleaf on- and off-ramps. Updating the infrastructure to support and meet the capacity requirements of an urban district will require significant long-term investment. In particular, the realization of Blair (Re)Envisioned will require: • The relocation of the hydro energy corridor along the Queensway and along Blair Road (Map 11-1). • Alterations to the Queensway’s westbound off-ramp to TARGET remove a large right turning movement. CONCEPT • Alterations to the Queensway’s eastbound off- and on-ramps 0L[HGXVH2IÀFH Mixed-usea Residential to create single-point interchange. 2IÀFH

• Dramatic streetscape improvements to Ogilvie and Blair Road. • Realignment and addition of new through streets. • Upgrading of water and sanitary pipe systems. Since development at the BSA has to yet to begin, a detailed phasing strategy is important to provide realistic, incremental development targets. All infrastructure improvements need to be aligned with the phasing strategy to ensure coordination between the planning and implementation processes. The unity of phasing and infrastructure will be integral to support short-term development while maintaining the long-term TOD vision and objectives.

5. IMPROVE THE DEVELOPMENT APPROVALS AND REVIEW PROCESS

Residential &LYLF

Road HYDRO Parking CORRIDOR Multi-use Pathway Plaza

Hydro yard

*UHHQVSDFH Hydro LRT Linelines

TARGET CONCEPT 0L[HGXVH2IÀFH Mixed-use Residential 2IÀFH Residential &LYLF Road Parking Multi-use Pathway Plaza *UHHQVSDFH LRT Line

EXISTING Map 11-1 Proposed movement of Hydro energy facilities

76 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED

PROPOSED

Since 2007, the Ontario Planning Act allows municipalities to establish a Development Permit System (DPS). A DPS is a streamlined permit system that combines the zoning, minor variance and site plan control processes into one permit requirement. It offers greater flexibility for staff in approving development applications in designated districts where high quality development is paramount. In a DPS, designated areas can be divided into distinct districts with unique requirements. This format would suit the BSA due to the large size of the site and the differing areas within it. Potential districts include: • Medium Density Residential • Station Area Mixed Use • Office Mixed Use • Community Facilities • Open Space Creating a development checklist for each district that is derived from the Urban Design Guidelines (Appendix 9) to distribute to developers and use during the review process ensures that developments conform to desired standards. Checklists can improve clarity over approval decisions. The City of Ottawa should also ensure that projects within the BSA are subject to a review by the Urban Design Panel. Finally, design competitions


should be considered for public facilities and spaces such as the civic centre and the north and south plazas. 6. DEVELOP PERFORMANCE INDICATORS TO EVALUATE AND MONITOR PROGRESS In Section 10, the plan for the BSA is evaluated according to established design criteria. The City of Ottawa should develop detailed quantitative and qualitative performance indicators in order to monitor development and evaluate whether it meets all objectives in Section 10. Table 11-1 is a sample list of some potential performance indicators.

Table 11-1 Potential performance indicators Performance Indicator Mode share

Description Individualsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; mode of transportation

Vehicle ownership

Average household vehicle ownership Average travel time from home to work Amount of parking spaces provided per unit or GFA Daily and time of day use of parking spaces Daily and time of day transit ridership On-time performance of transit Size and quality of sidewalks and other pedestrian environments Number of accidents and surveyed perception of safety and security People and jobs per hectare

Commute time Parking ratio Parking utilization Transit ridership Transit reliability Pedestrian infrastructure

Safety and security

Density

Image 11-1 Abundant free parking can destroy any TOD plan

Housing-Jobs balance Property values Housing affordability

Housing tenure Greenhouse gas emissions

Number of residents and number of jobs in the BSA Property values of housing and office rents Percent spent on housing relative to household income Mix of rental and owneroccupied housing

Related Principle(s) Transportation Economic Resiliency Environmental Sustainability Transportation Transportation Transportation Economic Resiliency Transportation Economic Resiliency Transportation Land Use Transportation Urban Design The Public Realm Land Use Urban Design Land Use Land Use Urban Design Public Realm Land Use Economic Resiliency Economic Resiliency Land Use

Economic Resiliency Environmental Sustainability

SECTION 11 IMPLEMENTATION

77


7. MAKE OFFICIAL PLAN AND ZONING BY-LAW AMENDMENTS Official Plan It is imperative that an amendment to the City of Ottawa’s OP regarding the zoning of the area is passed in order to designate all area located within the BSA as Mixed-Use Centres, with the exception of open-space. Although the majority of the site is already designated as mixed-use centre, designating the remaining area is critical because it enables the development of a “main-street” aesthetic throughout the BSA by enabling retail and businesses at street level while encouraging residential habitation above. The designation, as opposed to the General Mixed-Use designation, allows for a broader spectrum of commercial enterprises that are permissible under the designation. Amendments to the OP should be brought to the City Council of Ottawa by the Councillor of the BSA. The area in the North-west quadrant of the site currently zoned as General Urban Area is recommended to be re-classified as Mixed Use Centre. In order for proper implementation of new designations to occur under the OP a step-by-step process must be outlined and utilized. • The first step is for the City of Ottawa to expropriate the rightsof-way necessary to establish the local street network. This effectively acts as a means of sub-division, which will enable the municipality and property owners to better manage the newly formed parcels of land that formed though sub-division. • The existing parking lots can continue to be used for parking in the interim. The City should expropriate the land it needs for infrastructure purposes, such as bus facilities, local streets, parking garages and construction yards. • A holding (H) designation will be placed on existing parking lots. In order to have the holding designation removed and the new mixed-use centres designation to take effect, land-owners and developers must meet certain requirements. Examples include provisions for parking garages, access to newly built light-rail transit station, and implementation of urban design guidelines. The new designations provide a number of benefits to the landowners and developers. The designations will help raise property values and enable a greater number of uses on the parcels of land. This will, in turn, make the properties more lucrative from a

78 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED

development standpoint. A Community Improvement Plan (CIP) will then be established as a means of coordination between active stakeholders to further advance the redevelopment at the BSA. The plan will provide a comprehensive outline to repay the initial capital costs. Funding can be achieved through charges for parking provisions as well as levies. Further funding can then be invested in future construction and infrastructure upgrades in the later phases of the development process. Zoning In accordance with the City of Ottawa’s Transit Oriented Development Studies, the area surrounding Blair Station is recommended to be rezoned to three TOD specific zones: high density (TD3), medium density (TD2), and low density (TD1). With minor exceptions, the arrangement of the TD zones places the highest densities near the station. Densities then gradually decrease outwards to the edges of the BSA where compatability concerns exist with surrounding low-density residentials areas. The TD3 zone is located within the immediate vicinity of the transit stop (within 200m), TD2 (200-600m) and TD1 (600-800m). The stated density targets for each zone are as follows: Areas zoned TD3 require 350 units per hectare, when lot sizes are equal to or larger than 0.125 hectares. The minimum floor space index is 1.5 for non-residential buildings and the maximum allowable height is 90 metres. Areas falling under the TD2 zone require 250 units per hectare when lot sizes are equal to or greater than 0.125 hectares. The minimum floor space index is 1.0 for non-residential buildings and the maximum allowable height is 60 metres. Areas zoned TD1 require 150 units per hectare when lots sizes are equal to or greater than 0.125 hectares. The minimum allowable floor space index is 1.0 for non-residential buildings and the maximum allowable height is 20 metres. In all zones, lots than are smaller than 0.125 do not face minimum units per hectare. For mixed-use buildings the building will be classified according to which use, residential or non-residential, occupies the larger portion of the building based on floor space index measurements (City of Ottawa, 2012).


Map 11-2 Proposed zoning amendments

SECTION 11 IMPLEMENTATION

79


8. CREATE A BUSINESS IMPROVEMENT AREA FOR BLAIR STATION AREA.

9. UTILIZE TRANSPORTATION DEMAND MANAGEMENT

Business Improvement Areas (BIAs) are defined areas where businesses contribute to enhancements within the area boundaries. BIA’s provide additional services such as street beautification, branding and marketing, as well as seasonal improvements. Incorporating a BIA into the visioning for the BSA strengthens ties between various enterprises located in the study area and aids in the overall development and aesthetic of the BSA. The City has been supportive of collaboration with the business community, and often assists business groups in formally designating a BIA. The City collects a special zone levy that is used by the BIA for its operations..

One of the BIA’s or redevelopment agency’s responsibilities is implementing Transportation Demand Management (TDM) strategies, which are critical to ensuring the success of TOD at the BSA. TDM is a suite of policies and strategies concerned with managing and reducing the demand for driving, as opposed to increasing the supply of driving infrastructure. TDM attempts to alter drivers’ behaviour in order to achieve several goals: 1. Reduce congestion, 2. Save on infrastructure costs, 3. Save residents and workers money on travel, 4. Offer more transport choice, 5. Improve the safety of roads, 6. Protect our environment, 7. Use land use efficiently, and 8. Improve a community’s liveability. (Litman, 2010)

“The City of Ottawa recognizes the importance of the collaborative approach and its payback to the business community and is committed in its support and encouragement to business groups to examine the formation of a BIA for their area. The City will assist in the formal designation of a BIA and collect a special zone levy, which is returned to the BIA for its administration, annual budget and programming needs” (City of Ottawa, 2012). Steps required to create BIA: Step 1: Establish need (done). Step 2: Establish steering committee (relevant stakeholders and municipal officials – BIA governing body must include at least one councillor from City of Ottawa). Step 3: Set out goals and objectives (area beautification, promotion and marketing of Blair BIA, creating and enforcing effective TDM strategies etc.). Step 4: Craft a preliminary budget proposal (this details the amount needed to be collected from local businesses in levy). Step 5: Determine proposed boundaries (Blair Station Area). Step 6: Communicate with vested parties (stakeholders within proposed Blair BIA) Step 7: Formalize request to the City of Ottawa (through municipal officials, eg. Councillors). Step 8: Provide required notice to property/business owners Step 9: Pass required by-law (imposing levy on businesses within area).

80 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED

Transportation must be managed effectively to promote the use of transit, carpooling, cycling and walking. The TDM agency set up by the City will first create a TDM strategy using a four-step process: Step 1: Gather Information – This step involves research of the current transportation conditions and projections of future conditions in the BSA, including ridership levels, journey patterns and how people arrive at the station. Meetings with stakeholders must be held in order to address their needs. This helps identify potential conflicts and where collaboration can occur. Step 2: Set Direction – A strategic framework is to be created, setting the principle objectives and directions of the TDM strategy. The framework articulates the vision, goals and objectives to be achieved through the implementation of the strategy.


Step 3: Assess Options – The TMA must examine the various possible strategies for implementing the vision of the strategy as outlined in the previous step. This involves measuring the impact of the TDM through pilot studies or best practice case studies. When assessing the TDM options it is critical to gauge the cost of implementation, feasibility of success, potential risks, roles to be played, and the strategic importance and value for money of any and all options. Step 4: Identification of Actions – This step involves the development of a plan with the necessary actions to be taken in order to implement the TDM strategy. This includes prioritizing tasks, crafting individual and group roles and responsibilities, timelines, costs and sources of funding, performance measurements, communications strategies, improvement processes, and desired outcomes as a result of the implementation strategy of the TDM. Oversupplied and free parking can quickly destroy any TOD plan (Talen, 2010). The most integral aspect of the TDM strategy will be to manage the amount of parking. The agency’s role is to build parking garages in the first phase of development (see Section 10), and add parking as needed throughout the plan’s long-term implementation. This is necessary as a catalyst that allows land owners to develop surface lots to better uses without significantly reducing the parking ratio. After some development has occurred, land owners will be more inclined to continue developing at lower parking ratios. Managing parking will assist with the phasing plan, spur development and encourage people to use a variety of other modes of transport in and around the BSA. In addition to the reduced parking ratio recommended in the zoning bylaw amendments, the agency needs to: • Impose a levy on all non-residential parking spaces and keep pricing flexible to reflect and manage demand. • Allow for sharing of parking spaces at different times of the day between different land uses. • Encourage bicycle- and car-sharing parking spots, and provide carpool spots. • Incorporate parking requirements used in Tunney’s Pasture, the western terminus of the planned LRT, in terms of parking minimums and maximums.

10. PRIORITIZE PUBLIC CONSULTATION The introduction of increased densities may create controversy amongst existing property owners and community residents. Therefore, active engagement with all stakeholders should be pursued at every stage of the process to help identify and address any concerns. The City of Ottawa should follow up on the stakeholder analysis outlined in Section 4 by meeting and surveying the actors that play a role in the BSA’s development. Educating all stakeholders on the social, environmental and economic benefits of TOD will also be critical for successful implementation. The City of Ottawa should therefore collaborate with higher levels of government, health organizations, schools and other stakeholders to develop community-based programs that promote transit-supportive planning, design and increasing transit ridership.

11.2 STAKEHOLDER ROLES Cooperation between stakeholders is an absolute necessity for promoting TOD, especially around suburban transit stations. Section 4 identified the interests of both main and secondary stakeholder groups. Roles for the main actors are identified below and these will ultimately affect the implementation strategy. However, all stakeholders groups including secondary actors can and need to play their part in the realization of Blair (Re)Envisioned. City of Ottawa The City of Ottawa has the broadest mandate of any of the actors and will need to take a leadership role in all of the abovementioned implementation strategies. In addition to these strategies, the City of Ottawa should undertake the following actions: • Have discussions with the NCC and the National government about the potential of development on their land. • Develop a comprehensive parking strategy. • Release RFPs for major development projects, aligning with phasing strategy.

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OC Transpo OC Transpo has a mandate to provide efficient and reasonable transit across the City of Ottawa. OC Transpo is a main actor in the BSA of their ownership of the transit station and other parcels in key locations near the primary transit zone. The following actions should be undertaken by the transit agency: • Use innovative partnerships with adjacent commercial property owners to improve connectivity and develop new sources of revenue on OC Transpo land. • Stimulate investment and ensure integration by letting a developer build the transit station. • Be involved with the station planning as well as the wider area land use planning process in order to support accessibility and interconnection. • Plan for TOD at the urban and regional scales and study system-wide needs. Community Associations Three community associations are affected by development at the BSA. These associations are main actors because they represent the residents of the BSA and neighbours of the BSA. The following actions should be taken by the community associations: • Advocate for connected, human-scale, quality public realm and high quality amenities for residents of the area. • Participate in planning by promoting, attending and reporting on public meetings. • Share local knowledge with transit authorities, city planners and councillors. • Use political leverage to maintain momentum and political focus on TOD implementation in the BSA. Property Owners and Developers Property owners and developers have the resources required to build TOD projects. While they are also concerned with creating

82 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED

great places, they have financial requirements that need to be met. Costs, revenues, property values, marketability, and phasing are their primary focus. Property owners and developers should undertake the following actions: • Become educated about the financial structure of TOD and mixed-use projects. • Enter into public-private partnerships with the City of Ottawa. • Engage the public about future projects with workshops and open houses. • Take advantage of the many grants available for mixed income and environmentally sustainable projects. • Phase all construction appropriately to ensure financial feasibility.


12| Conclusion 12.1 PROJECT SUMMARY 1. The BSA presents a great opportunity for TOD. 2. Stakeholders should be continuously consulted. 3. The Target Concept design is recommended in order to achieve the vision for the BSA. 4. Development must be phased, employing the ten recommended strategies in order to ensure implementation. 5. A Community Development Plan (CDP) should be prepared to guide implementation and engage the community in the planning process.

12.2 PRESENTATION FEEDBACK On December 13th, 2012, the project team travelled to the City of Ottawa to give a presentation on the Blair (Re)Envisioned project. The presentation was held at City Hall and was attended by City staff, councillors, professional planners, and some stakeholders. Following the presentation, attendees were invited to ask questions and provide feedback to aid the project team in the completion of their final report. This section summarizes the feedback gathered from this presentation.

12.2.1 Background

One attendee asked for clarity regarding an explanation of the transect theory used to contextualize and analyze the BSA. The transect, which is a model used to define the appropriate zoning in transitioning from rural to urban areas, was used to guide the designs. The team explained that the transect theory was used to analyze the site in two ways. First, the site was contextualized in the City of Ottawa as an existing suburban/general urban area

Image 12-1 The team takes questions after their presentation in Ottawa

that in the future, will transition into an urban center. Second, the site itself was compared along the transect, and was used to show that the designs placed the most urban development such as high rise buildings nearest the station, and lower density buildings such as townhomes furthest from the station on the site’s fringe.

12.2.2 Approach

Questions were also asked regarding the team’s approach that helped inform the designs. Audience members expressed concerns for the capacity of the LRT and its ability to support the density proposed by the designs. The team presented case studies of TOD precedents that were consulted to inform the peak load capacities of both BRT and LRT prior to the design phase. They responded that that the BSA’s population is currently too low to support BRT, let alone LRT, making density increases a necessity. In addition, the team noted that the changes

SECTION 12 RECOMMENDATIONS

83


proposed by the designs will transform the BSA into both a transit destination as well as a transit origin, generating trips both to and from Blair station at both the AM and PM peak.

12.2.3 Application

Several questions were also asked regarding the application section of the presentation. In response to an attendee who asked how the design allowed people to cross Blair Road, the team described the urbanization of the streetscape and showed the introduction of additional controlled intersections that would improve pedestrian orientation, safety, and overall connectivity within the site. Attendees also asked how the mall would be integrated with the station, and questioned the teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s decision to enclose the area that connects Blair station to the mall. The project team first used the sketch-up model to show the integration over the existing bus loop, and then offered the precedent of Metrotown in Burnaby, BC as an example of a fully enclosed, second storey connection between a transit station and a mall. Open 24 hours a day, the Metrotown connection provides a safe, weather-protected and amenity rich environment for transit user convenience. The rationale for enclosing the connection in the designs is to make multimodal transitions for transit users as fluid as possible. Regarding integration, one attendee asked how the designs will help to connect the BSA with the community located beyond the site. The team presented connectivity maps showing the creation of additional controlled intersections, bus routes, a gridded sidewalk network, and a complete multi-use pathway system to provide integrative and supportive multi-modal networks which connect the BSA to surrounding areas. Concerns were also raised regarding the future impact of the extension of the LRT in changing the form and function of the station, particularly in terms of its effects on the success of developments proposed along the southern portion of Blair road where the future BRT is to be extended. The team responded to these concerns by discussing changes in the street network, particularly the additional controlled intersections proposed

84 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED

along Blair road. Although the team admitted that the designs do not narrow Blair road in anticipation of mixed use development, the team emphasized the importance of the creation of the gridded street network in encouraging mixed use development by providing multiple frontages, and also providing options to the transit authority to have buses make use of all streets. Another attendee asked for a more in-depth explanation regarding the decision to create a single-point interchange on the north side of the Queensway as opposed to the south. The team explained that the interchange was realigned so that on- and off- ramps would run parallel to the Queensway on the north portion of the site to essentially create new land for development and to act as a traffic calming measure. The southern portion was not considered for interchange realignment on the basis that this land lies immediately adjacent to the greenbelt, and thus may be more environmentally sensitive and not fit for development. However, the team explained that the eastbound off-rampâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s right turn lane was realigned to allow for development within the existing cloverleaf. Additional questions targeted the decision to increase density on the site, asking where buildings could have been built higher, why certain single family housing areas were retained in the designs, what the net density was in areas considered for redevelopment, and whether the team considered adding additional institutional uses. The team described that places deemed suitable for tall buildings were those closest to the station to provide increased transit accessibility to the highest number of people, along the Queensway to act as a noise buffer, and across from the Greenbelt to take advantage of the views. Single family housing areas were retained in the designs because they are established and are not being considered for redevelopment at this time. In addition, the net density in areas considered for redevelopment in the design is over 700 persons per hectare. In consideration of provisions for institutional uses, the team described the possibility of constructing an elementary school just east of the site on some of the lands occupied by parking lots of Gloucester High School. The Greenbelt and other large open spaces, as well as other existing community amenities located to the east and west of the site were deemed suitable to accommodate the need recreation vis-Ă -vis intensification.


12.2.4 Execution

Concerns were also raised regarding strategies for implementation. Several attendees asked how investment would be encouraged to support the first few phases of the design, and to additionally support the construction of parking structures. The project team discussed strategies for tax increment financing and density bonusing to attract developers during early phases, and the use of borrowing strategies to fund parking structures so that surface lots would become free for development in the short term. Another question was raised as to whether proposed zoning amendments to transition from land use based to TOD zones would allow for a full range of uses in the designs. The team responded that the designs encourage a mix of land uses in all TOD zones, with some limitations in cases of unsuitable uses. The team emphasized that TOD zones are primarily proposed for the purposes of ensuring that density in the area is concentrated nearest to the station to ensure that the maximum number of people benefit from increased access to public transit.

12.2.5 Overall

The project team was asked to reflect on what they considered to be the most difficult challenge of the project, and what came most easily. The team agreed that the hardest decision was determining how to show the target density of 400 persons and jobs per hectare by deciding what was appropriate for the site, and if high rise development would be necessary to reach that goal. Finding a balance between design options that were realistic and those that were more ideal proved to be an additional challenge. Early on it became clear that increasing connectivity and safety through seamless multi modal integration was a priority for the site, evolving into one of the principles that became extremely influential in informing the teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s design.

SECTION 12 RECOMMENDATIONS

85


86 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED


MAP A - PARCEL INFORMATION This image provides call numbers for parcels that are referenced in later appendices.

13

7

11 8 10 12 9

1 6 3

!

2

Building Parcel

!

Study Area

5

4

Blair Station

0

14

15

75

Metres 300

150

Data Source: City of Ottawa

I 16

17

18

APPENDICES

87


MAP B - EXISTING SERVICING

!

Blair Station Combined Pipe Sanitary Pipe Storm Pipe Water Pipe

!

Building Road Study Area

I 0

75

150

Metres 300

Data Source: City of Ottawa (2012)

88 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED


APPENDIX 1 - EXISTING TENANT SCHEDULE Gloucester  Centre Gloucester  Centre ACCESSORIES,  FASHION,  FOOTWEAR ACCESSORIES,  FASHION,   StoreFOOTWEAR Store Bentley Leather Bentley Leather Elgin Sports Elgin Sports Jasmine’s Accessories Jasmine’s Accessories Payless  ShoeSource

Payless  ShoeSource Saba Saba

Suzy  Shier Trendz

Suzy  Shier Trendz

PERSONAL  SERVICES PERSONAL  SERVICESStore Store

Caribbean  Exposure Caribbean  ExposureFashionails Fashionails GQ Barber

Ottawa  Academy

GQ Barber

Ottawa  Academy

STORES  &  SERVICES   STORES  &  SERVICES  Store Store

Cignal Customize  It

Cignal Customize  It Dollar Deal

Dollar Deal LCBO  -­‐  Opening  Soon LCBO  -­‐  Opening  Soon Mr.  Gas Mr.  Gas Pharma  Plus  Drugmart Pharma  Plus  Drugmart Rogers  Wireless Rogers  Wireless The Nutrition Company

SPECIALTY  FOODS  &  GROCERY SPECIALTY  FOODS  &Store  GROCERY

Store

Bulk Barn Loblaws

Bulk Barn Loblaws JEWELLERY

JEWELLERY Store Store Dewpura Jewellers Dewpura Jewellers PROFESSIONAL  SERVICES PROFESSIONAL  SERVICES Store Store

Century 21 Goldleaf Century 21 Goldleaf Desjardins Business Centre Desjardins Business Centre Centre Chiropractic Gloucester Gloucester Centre Chiropractic Gloucester Centre Eye Care Gloucester Centre Eye Care Gloucester Dental Centre

Gloucester DentalMacQuarrie Centre Whyte Killoran MacQuarrie Whyte Killoran Mall Administration Office Mall Administration Office Ministry of Children & Youth Services Ministry of Children & Youth Services Northern Lights Canada Northern Lights Canada The Co-Operators The Co-Operators

DEPARTMENT  STORE DEPARTMENT  STORE Store Store

Wal-Mart

Wal-Mart

BANKS  &  FINANCIAL  SERVICES The Nutrition Company BANKS  &  FINANCIAL   SERVICES The  Source Store The  Source Thomas  Cook  -­‐  Algonquin  Travel  &  CruiseStore CIBC Thomas  Cook  -­‐  Algonquin   ravel   &  Cruise CIBC VezinaT& Vezina Opticians Scotiabank Vezina & Vezina Opticians Scotiabank Wind  Mobile Wind  Mobile RESTAURANTS Store

RESTAURANTS Store

KIOSKS

KIOSKS Store

The  Mongolian  Village The  Mongolian  Village Moxie’s Classic Grill

Store

FOOD  &  BEVERAGE FOOD  &  BEVERAGE Store

MGB Gold Buyers MGB Gold Buyers

Moxie’s Classic Grill

Store

A  &  W

eVape Ottawa

eVape Ottawa Golden Watch

Golden Watch Lottery Kiosk

Lottery Kiosk

Blair Business Park (1900 City Park Drive) Commerce  Park  (1400  Blair  Pl) Gloucester  plaza  (2280  City  Park  Drive) Shoppers  City  East  (2016  Ogilvie  Rd) Blair  plaza  (2061  Meadowbrook  Road) Blair Business ParkGentry (1900 City Park Drive) Commerce  Park  (1400   Blair  Corporation Pl) Gloucester  plaza  (2280   ity  Park  Drive) Shoppers  City  East  (Appletree 2016  Ogilvie  Medical Rd) Road) Capital Amita OldCNavy Centre Blair  plaza  (2061  Meadowbrook   Mac's Gentry Capital Industrial Alliance Insurance and Financial Amita Corporation Appletree Medical Mac's Services Inc Banque LaurentienneOld Navy Aldo Bill Centre Prankard Evangelistic Association BPEA Vitalforce Industrial AllianceMHPM Insurance and Financial Services Inc Banque Laurentienne Aldo Bill Prankard Evangelistic Association Vitalforce Project Leaders The Bentall Corporation Jacob Outlet Dentisterie Familiale BPEA Gloucester Studio Gissoo MHPM Project Leaders The Bentall Corporation Dentisterie Familiale Gloucester Studio Gissoo St. John Ambulance Bentall Kennedy Real Jacob Estate Outlet Services Mexx Fabricland Distributors Farah Lawyers + Associates St. John Ambulance Bentall Real Estate Fabricland Distributors Farah Lawyers + Capital Associates Konica Minolta Business Solutions (Canada) Ltd. Kennedy Bertschi OrthServices Smith LLPMexx Guess Gabriel Restaurant Homes Realty Inc. Konica Minolta Business Ltd. Bertschi Orth Smith LLP Hockey Guess Gabriel Restaurant Capital Homes Realty Inc. Atomic Solutions Energy of(Canada) Canada Limited (AECL) CARHA Sport Mart Giant Tiger Pinevier Plazza Atomic Energy ofAccessible Canada Limited (AECL) CARHA Hockey CaseWare Idea Inc Sport Mart Giant Tiger Insurance Bowring Dr. Kandalaft Sami Office Pinevier Plazza Kiki Lebanese & Greek Accessible Insurance CaseWare Idea Inc Bowring Dr. Kandalaft Sami Office Kiki Lebanese & Greek Gymnastics Canada CGI Let's Celebrate LCBO Royal Oak Restaurant Gymnastics Canada CGI Let's Celebrate Reitmans LCBO Royal Oak Restaurant The Personal Insurance Company Of Canada I Play Hockey.ca Pet Valu The Personal Insurance Company Of Canada I Play Hockey.caMuirfield Homes Inc Reitmans Pet Valu Telus Mobility Corporate Rogers Plus Telus Mobility Corporate Muirfield Homes Inc Rogers Plus BBM Business Systems Orenda Aerospace Corporation Shoppers Drug Mart BBM Business Systems Orenda Aerospace Corporation Shoppers Drug Mart Copier Masters Ltd. Pryor & Associates Staples Copier Masters Ltd. Pryor & Associates Staples Vision Informatik Inc RBC The Beer Store Vision Informatik Eurocom Inc RBC The Beer Store Dollarama Ska Food Inc Eurocom Ska Food Inc Dollarama Government of Ontario Slimband Government of Ontario Slimband Civitas Architecture Inc Dr. Vlahovich Alexander Civitas Architecture Inc Dr. Vlahovich Champlain Local Health Integration Network (CLHIN) Alexander Assessment Strategies Inc Champlain LocalLexmark Health Integration Assessment Strategies Incfiscaux régionaux Ontario Canada Network (CLHIN) Bureaux Lexmark CanadaStilo Bureaux fiscaux régionaux Ontario Encon Group Inc Stilo Encon Group IncDr. Nordin Christopher Getronics Canada Inc. Getronics Canada Dr. Nordin Christopher TheInc. Ottawa Telephony Group Inc. Outdoors Card-Natural Resources The Ottawa Telephony Group Inc.America Eastern Outdoors Card-Natural Resources Runaware North Pennant Canada Limited Runaware North Filemaker America Eastern Pennant Canada Limited De L'Ontario Inc Province Filemaker Inc Province De L'Ontario Thompson Rosemount Group Inc  Relizon Canada Thompson Rosemount GroupSea-doo Inc  Relizon Canada Retail Sales Tax Vendor Permits Bombardier Inc Bombardier Sea-doo Inc Retail Sales Tax Vendor Crupi, Sam Encon Permits Insurance Managers Crupi, Sam Encon InsuranceFord Managers Credit Canada Ltd Ford Credit Canada LtdCorp Manta Manta Corp Bovar Environmental Bovar Environmental Gopin Gopin Ge Capital Canada Financement Ge Capital Canada Financement Bell Mobility Paging Bell Mobility Paging Latro Quest Corp Latro Quest CorpNesbitt Burns Inc Nesbitt Burns Inc Alstom Canada Inc Alstom Canada Inc Mxi  Technologies  Ltd Mxi  Technologies  Ltd Canadian Red Cross Canadian Red Cross

A  &  W

Cheezy Pizza & Pasta Cheezy Pizza & Pasta Edo  Japan Edo  Japan Silly Billy's Silly Billy's Subway

Subway Tim  Horton's

Tim  Horton's

Treats Treats The Tropical Kitchen The Tropical Kitchen

APPENDICES

89


Appendix 2.2: Building Schedule

APPENDIX 2 - EXISTING BUILDING SCHEDULE Street Name

Zoning Code

Land Use

CSIS Expansion Building #1 1459

Ogilvie Road

LI[249]

Office

CSIS Expansion Building #2 1459

Ogilvie Road

LI[249]

Office

Building Name Street #

Parcel # 1 Total Future Shop 1525

Building Footprint

GFA (m2)

Storeys

Floor Space Index (FSI)

18,466

92330

5

0.92

100,869

18%

6,611

13222

2

0.13

100,869

7%

25,077

105552

1.05

100,869

25%

2

(m )

FSI Allowed

Parcel Area Lot Coverage (m2)

City Park Drive

GM

Commercial

2,191

2191

1

62,073

4%

Montana's 1750

Ogilvie Road

GM

Commercial

596

596

1

62,073

1%

Casey's Bar and Grill 1880

Ogilvie Road

GM[1349]

Commercial

475

475

1

62,073

1%

City Park Drive

GM[1349]

Commercial

2,365

2365

1

62,073

4%

East Side Mario's 1820

Ogilvie Road

GM

Commercial

390

390

1

62,073

1%

Silver City Theatre 1880

Ogilvie Road

GM[1349]

Commercial

7,873

7873

1

62,073

13%

13,890

13890

62,073

22%

Chapter's 2401

Parcel #2 Total Gloucester Centre 1980

0.22

0.6

Ogilvie Road

MC[1333]

Commercial

30,822

61643

2

97,837

32%

City Park Drive

MC[1333]

Office

672

672

1

97,837

1%

Oops Express Gas Bar 1970

Ogilvie Road

MC[1333]

Commercial

114

114

1

97,837

<1%

Moxie's Classic Grill 1976

Ogilvie Road

MC[1333]

Commercial

466

466

1

97,837

<1%

Blair Station 1980

Ogilvie Road

MC[1333]

Transportation

464

929

2

97,837

<1%

32,538

63824

97,837

33%

1,839

9195

10,095

18%

1,839

9195

10,095

18%

Scotiabank 2400

Parcel #3 Total Blair Business Park 1900

City Park Drive

MC

Office

Parcel #4 Total

0.65

2

5

0.91

Gloucester Plaza 2280

City Park Drive

MC[1349]

Commercial

7,197

7197

1

28,604

25%

Fuji Sushi 2300

City Park Drive

MC[1349]

Commercial

477

477

1

28,604

2%

7,674

7674

28,604

27%

Parcel #5 Total Tim Horton's 1150

0.27

1.1

Blair Road

MC[1333]

Commercial

321

321

1

10,042

3%

90 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED LCBO 1150 Blair Road

MC[1333]

Commercial

1,470

1470

1

10,042

15%


Parcel #4 Total

1,839 City Park Drive

Fuji Sushi 2300

City Park Drive

MC[1349]

Commercial

Street Name

Zoning Code

Land Use

CSIS ExpansionTim Building #1 1150 1459 Horton's

Ogilvie Road Blair Road

LI[249] MC[1333]

CSIS Expansion Building #2 1150 1459 LCBO

Ogilvie Road Blair Road

LI[249] MC[1333]

APPENDIX 2 - EXISTING BUILDING SCHEDULE

477

10,095

18%

28,604

25%

28,604

2%

477

1

7,674 2

GFA 7674(m2)

Storeys

Floor Space 0.27 Index (FSI)

Office Commercial

18,466 321

92330 321

5 1

0.92

100,869 10,042

18% 3%

Office Commercial

6,611 1,470

13222 1470

2 1

0.13

100,869 10,042

7% 15%

25,077 1,791

105552 1791

1.05 0.18

100,869 10,042

25% 18%

Parcel 1 Total Parcel##6 Future Shop 1525 Canadian Tire 2010

0.91

MC[1349] Commercial 7,197 7197 1 Appendix 2.2: Building Schedule

Gloucester Plaza 2280

Building Name Parcel #5 Total Street #

9195

Building Footprint (m )

FSI 1.1Allowed

Parcel Area Lot Coverage 28,604 27% (m2)

City Park Drive Ogilvie Road

GM MC[74]

Commercial

2,191 7,559

2191 7559

1

62,073 27,166

4% 28%

Montana's 1750 Canadian Tire Gas Bar 2010

Ogilvie Road

GM MC[74]

Commercial

596 221

596 221

1

62,073 27,166

1%

Casey's Bar#7 and Grill 1880 Parcel Total

Ogilvie Road

GM[1349]

Commercial

475 7,780

475 7780

1

62,073 27,166

1% 29%

Chapter's 2401 Commerce Park 300-1400

City Park Blair PlaceDrive

GM[1349] MC

Commercial Parking

2,365 4,905

2365 9810

1 2

62,073 6,630

4% 74%

East Side Parcel #8Mario's Total 1820

Ogilvie Road

GM

Commercial

390 4,905

390 9810

1

62,073 6,630

1% 74%

Ogilvie Road Blair Place

GM[1349] MC

Commercial Office

7,873 1,738

7873 13904

1 8

62,073 3,384

13% 51%

13,890 1,738

13890 13904

62,073 3,384

22% 51%

97,837 3,164

32% 56%

97,837 3,164

1% 56%

97,837 2,901

<1% 48%

97,837 2,901

<1% 48%

97,837 9,617

<1% 19%

Silver City Theatre 1880 Commerce Park 300-1400

#2 Total Parcel #9 Ogilvie Road Blair Place

MC[1333] MC

Commercial Office

30,822 1,764

61643 12350

2 7

ParcelScotiabank #10 Total

City Park Drive

MC[1333]

Office

672 1,764

672 12350

1

Ogilvie Road Blair Place

MC[1333] MC

Commercial Office

114 1,387

114 11097

1 8

OopsCommerce Express GasPark Bar 300-1400 1970 Moxie's Grill 1976 ParcelClassic #11 Total Blair Station 1980 Commerce Park 300-1400

Ogilvie Road

Ogilvie Road Blair Place

MC[1333] Commercial 466 466 1 1,387 11097 Appendix 2.2: Building Schedule MC[1333] MC

Transportation Office

464 1,801

929 14404

2 8

2 32,538 1,801 (m )

GFA (m2) 63824 14404

Storeys

Building Footprint

Street Name

Zoning Code

Land Use

Blair PlaceDrive City Park

MC[74] MC

Commercial Office

352 1,839

352 9195

1 5

Ogilvie Road

MC[74]

Commercial

379 1,839

379 9195

1

Shoppers CityPlaza East 2016 Gloucester 2280

Ogilvie Road City Park Drive

MC[74] MC[1349]

Commercial Commercial

12,669 7,197

12669 7197

Shoppers City East Strip Mall 2016 Fuji Sushi 2300

Ogilvie Road City Park Drive

MC[74] MC[1349]

Commercial Commercial

814 477

Blair Place

MC[74]

Commercial

Ogilvie Road Blair Road

MC[74] MC[1333]

Blair Road

MC[1333]

Building Parcel #3Name Parcel #12 Total Street # Vacant Blair Business Park 1420 1900 Vacant Parcel #4 Total

Mall Parcel Strip #5 Total

2010

1400

Pioneer Gas Bar 2016 Tim Horton's 1150

Parcel #13 LCBO Total 1150

1.48

0.22 4.11

Gloucester Centre 1980 Commerce Park 300-1400

2400

0.29

1.1

1.8

0.6

3.90

3.83

Floor Space 0.65 1.50 (FSI) Index

FSI 2 1.8Allowed

Parcel Area Lot Coverage 97,837 33% 9,617 19% (m2) 78,565 10,095

<1% 18%

78,565 10,095

<1% 18%

1 1

78,565 28,604

16% 25%

814 477

1 1

78,565 28,604

1% 2%

1,502 7,674

1502 7674

1

78,565 28,604

2% 27%

Commercial Commercial

217 321

217 321

1 1

78,565 10,042

<1% 3%

Commercial

15,933 1,470

15933 1470

1

0.91

0.27

0.20

1.1

1.1

78,565 10,042

20% 15% APPENDICES

91


Vacant 2010

Ogilvie Road

Shoppers City East 2016

Ogilvie Road

Shoppers City East Strip Mall 2016

Ogilvie Road

MC[74]

Commercial

814

Blair Place Street Name

MC[74]

Zoning Code

Commercial Land Use

Pioneer Gas Bar 2016 CSIS Expansion Building #1 1459

Ogilvie Road

MC[74] LI[249]

CSIS Expansion #2 1459 ParcelBuilding #13 Total

Ogilvie Road

MC[74]

Commercial

379

379

1

MC[74] Commercial 12,669 12669 1 Appendix 2.2: Building Schedule

APPENDIX 2 - EXISTING BUILDING SCHEDULE

814

1

1,502 2

1502 GFA (m2)

1 Storeys

Floor Space Index (FSI)

Commercial Office

217 18,466

217 92330

1 5

0.92

LI[249]

Office

6,611 15,933

13222 15933

2

0.13 0.20

Telesat Court

MC

Office

2,756 25,077

22048 105552

8

1.05

Telesat Court City Park Drive

MC GM

Accessory Commercial

643 2,191

643 2191

1

1750

Ogilvie Road

GM

Commercial

596 3,398

596 22691

1

Toronto 1450 Casey's BarDominion and Grill 1880

Telesat Court Ogilvie Road

MC GM[1349]

Office Commercial

1,502 475

13519 475

9 1

City Park Drive

GM[1349]

Commercial

2,365 1,502

2365 13519

1

Telesat Accessory 1601 East Side Mario's 1820

Telesat Court Ogilvie Road

MC GM

Office Commercial

200 390

200 390

Telesat 1880 1601 Silver City Theatre

Telesat Court Ogilvie Road

MC GM[1349]

Office Commercial

6,800 7,873

33998 7873

7,000 13,890

34198 13890

Building Name

Strip Mall 1400 Street #

Toronto # Dominion Parcel 1 Total

1600

Toronto DominionFuture Accessory 1600 Shop 1525

Parcel Montana's #14 Total

Chapter's Parcel #15 Total

2401

Parcel Parcel#16 #2 Total Children's Aid Society 1602 Gloucester Centre 1980

ParcelScotiabank #17 Total

2400

Blair Plaza 2067 Oops Express Gas Bar 1970 Moxie's Grill 1976 ParcelClassic #18 Total Blair Station Non-residential Total

1980

1900

(m )

FSI Allowed

<1%

78,565

16%

78,565

1%

Parcel Area 2% Lot Coverage (m2)

78,565

78,565 100,869

<1% 18%

100,869 78,565

7% 20%

35,301 100,869

8% 25%

35,301 62,073

2% 4%

62,073 35,301

1% 10%

15,205 62,073

10% 1%

62,073 15,205

4% 10%

1

40,387 62,073

<1% 1%

5 1

40,387 62,073

17% 13%

40,387 62,073

17% 22%

19,721 97,837

11% 32%

97,837 19,721

1% 11%

7,029 97,837

23% <1%

97,837 7,029

<1% 23%

97,837 558,590

<1% 19%

226,854 97,837

23% 33%

0.64

0.89

0.85 0.22

1.1

2

2

2 0.6

Telesat Court Ogilvie Road

MC MC[1333]

Office Commercial

2,188 30,822

8754 61643

4 2

City Park Drive

MC[1333]

Office

672 2,188

672 8754

1

Meadowbrook Ogilvie Road Road

LC6 MC[1333]

Commercial

1,619 114

1619 114

1

Ogilvie Road

MC[1333]

Commercial

466 1,619

466 1619

1

0.23

Ogilvie Road

MC[1333]

Transportation

464 108,747

929 367985

2

0.66

Residential

51,913 32,538

103826 63824

2

0.46 0.65

Office

1,839 51,913

9195 103826

5

0.46

10,095 226,854

18% 23%

160,660 1,839

471811 9195

0.91 0.60

785,444 10,095

20% 18%

Residential Parcel #3 Total Blair BusinessTotal Park Residential

Building Footprint

78,565

City Park Drive

MC

Totall Parcel Site #4 Tota

0.44

2

0.6

2

Gloucester Plaza 2280

City Park Drive

MC[1349]

Commercial

7,197

7197

1

28,604

25%

Fuji Sushi 2300

City Park Drive

MC[1349]

Commercial

477

477

1

28,604

2%

7,674

7674

28,604

27%

Parcel #5 Total Tim Horton's 1150

0.27

1.1

Blair Road

MC[1333]

Commercial

321

321

1

10,042

3%

92 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED LCBO 1150 Blair Road

MC[1333]

Commercial

1,470

1470

1

10,042

15%


APPENDIX 3 - STRATEGIC PLAN OBJECTIVES Appendix 3.1: City of Ottawa - Strategic Plan Objectives The 2011-2014 Strategic Plan describes Ottawa City Council’s key objectives. Several objectives will have a direct impact on the Blair Station study area and are described below. Strategic Objective: TM1 – Ensure sustainable transit services Offer reliable travel options at the lowest possible cost and in a financially and operationally sustainable way. Transit and Mobility 1-A: Increase total ridership per revenue service hour by 14% by the end of 2014. Strategic Initiatives

Committee Oversight Performance Measures

Budget – Capital (Operating) {‘000}

O-Train Service

Transit Committee

Complete 100% of the key project milestones

$59,000 ($0)

Transit Committee

Increase the proportion of seats available to customers from 79% to 91% by Q2 2013.

$81,000 ($0)

Transit Committee

Increase productivity measure and achieve

$0 ($0)

Expansion Double-decker Purchase Route Optimization Savings

savings target ($19.5M/year).

Strategic Objective: TM2 – Maximize density in and around transit stations Plan well-designed, compact neighbourhoods where residents can live, work, shop and play close by, complete daily activities easily, access viable transit, and support local businesses. Transit and Mobility 2-A: Complete 38% of the Transit-Oriented development studies by the end of 2012, 75% by the end of 2013 and 100% by the end of 2014.O Community Planning

Planning Committee

Complete the projects outlined in the TOD studies on time and budget.

$0 ($2,540)

APPENDICES

93


Strategic Objective: TM3 – Provide infrastructure to support mobility choices Improve individuals’ mobility choices by supporting a variety of initiatives related to routes, rapid transit, walking and cycling. TM3-A: Increase the annual growth in the number of trips made by transit, cycling and walking over the 2011 baseline as follows: cycling: 3.5% per year, transit: 2.2% per year, walking: 1.5% per year. Ottawa Light Rail Transit

Finance and Economic Development

Complete 28% of the Ottawa Light Rail Transit (OLRT) key project milestones by the end of Q1 2012,

Western Light Rail Transit

Transportation Committee

Complete 66% of the Western Light Rail Transit Corridor Environmental Corridor Environmental Assessment study by Q1 2012 and 100% by Q1 2013.

$0 ($0)

Cycling Safety Evaluation

Transportation Committee

Complete 10 cycling safety enhancements/upgrades per year.

$420 ($420)

Ottawa on the Move Transportation Committee/ Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee

Complete a minimum of 85% of each year’s scheduled construction program (2012-2014) related to the integrated road, sewer and water program; road resurfacing; cycling infrastructure; sidewalks; and bridges and structures.

$169,856 ($125)

Public Works Vehicular

Increase the percentage of pedestrian and Pedestrian Safety signalized intersections equipped with audible and mobility signals by 55% in 2012.

$3,150 ($0)

Transportation Committee

94 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED

$2,100,000 ($26,800)

57% by the end of Q2 2012, 71% by the end of Q3 2012, and 100% by the end of Q4 2012


Strategic Objective: TM4 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Promote alternative mobility choices Promote alternative mobility choices by emphasizing transit, cycling and walking as preferred ways of getting around the city. Use education, promotion and incentives to encourage alternatives to driving, and provide information that encourages responsible travel. Performance Measure(s TM4-A: Increase the percentage of population reached by the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Transportation Demand Management website (TravelWise) and the Cycling in the City e-newsletter by 10% (on a year-over-year basis). Downtown Ottawa Mobility Overlay Study

Transportation Committee

Complete 25% of the Downtown Ottawa Mobility Overlay Study Mobility Overlay (DOMO) study by the end of Q1 2012, 50% by the end of Q2 2012, 75% by the end of Q3 2012 and 100% by the end of Q4 2012.

$0 ($0)

Transportation Demand Management Strategy and Implementation

Transportation Committee

A: Web portal operational by end of 2012.

$950 ($0)

OC Transpo Marketing

Transit Committee

B: Increase average monthly Web portal usage by 10% annually in 2013 and 2014. A: Increase customer connections made through social media channels by 10%. Revitalize employee engagement per quarter, on a year-overyear basis.

$0 ($0)

B: Launch a comprehensive Employee Engagement Strategy by Q4 2012.

APPENDICES

95


APPENDIX 4 - CURRENT ZONING PROVISIONS Parcel #

Zone

Zone Name

4, 8-12, 14, 15, 16

MC

Mixed Use Centre

3, 6

MC [1333]

5

13

Permitted Uses

Subzone Provision

Max. Height (m)

FSI or lot coverage

amusement centre, animal care establishment, animal hospital, apartment dwelling; low rise, apartment dwelling; mid-high rise, artist studio, bank, bank machine, bar, broadcasting studio, cinema, community centre, community garden*, community health and resource centre, convenience store, court house, day care, diplomatic mission*, drive-through facility, dwelling units, emergency service, group home*, home-based business*, home-based day care*, hospital, hotel, instructional facility, library, medical facility, multiple attached dwelling*, municipal service
centre, museum, nightclub, office, parking garage, parking lot, personal service business, place of assembly, place of worship, planned unit development*, post office, post-secondary educational institution, production studio, recreational or athletic facility, research and development centre, residential care facility, restaurant, retail food store, retail
store, retirement home, retirement home; converted*, rooming
house, rooming house; converted*, school, service and repair shop, shelter*, small batch brewery*, sports arena, stacked dwelling*, technology industry, theatre, training centre

N/A

Site specific: 22 at fringe, 48 nearest station Default: 11 - 28

Site specific: 1.1 – 2.0

Mixed Use Centre

Additional allowances: car wash, drive-through facility, gas bar

N/A

N/A

N/A

MC [1349]

Mixed Use Centre

Additional allowance: cinema Restriction: retail food store

N/A

N/A

N/A

MC [74]

Mixed Use Centre

Additional allowance: automobile service station, car wash, gas bar

N/A

N/A

N/A

96 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED


APPENDIX 4 - CURRENT ZONING PROVISIONS 2

GM

General Mixed Use

Non-residential:
animal care establishment, animal hospital, artist studio, bank,
bank machine, catering establishment, community centre, community garden*, community health and resource centre, convenience store, day care, diplomatic mission*, drivethrough facility, emergency service, funeral home, home-based business, home-based day care*, instructional
facility, library medical facility, municipal service centre, office, personal service business, place of assembly, place of worship, post
office, recreational and athletic facility, research and development
centre, residential care facility*, restaurant, retail food store, retail
store, service and repair shop, shelter*, small batch brewery* technology industry, training centre

N/A

22

0.6

N/A

22

0.6

N/A

32

2

N/A

18

1.0

Residential:
apartment dwelling; low rise, apartment dwelling; midhigh rise, bed and breakfast*, dwelling unit, group home*, multiple attached dwelling*, planned unit development*, retirement home, retirement home; converted*, rooming house, rooming house; converted*, rooming unit, stacked dwelling* 2

GM [1349]

Additional allowance: cinema Restriction: retail food store

1

IL[249]

Light Industrial

All uses prohibited except for the following:
- office
- research and development centre - technology industry - utility installation

17

I1E

Institutional

community centre, community garden*, day care, emergency service, group home*, library, museum, municipal service centre, one dwelling unit ancillary to a permitted use, park, place of assembly, place of worship and ancillary rooming units, recreational and athletic facility, residential care facility, retirement home, retirement home; converted*, rooming
house, rooming house; converted*, school, shelter*, sports arena, training centre limited to job instruction/ training associated with a school

APPENDICES

97


APPENDIX 4 - CURRENT ZONING PROVISIONS 18

LC6

Local Commer- Non-Residential:
 community gardens*, community health and recial source centre, convenience store, day care, drive through facility, gas bar,
library,
medical facility, municipal service centre, office, personal service business, place of worship, restaurant, retail food store, retail store, school

N/A

12.5

N/A

N/A

11

20% Max. lot coverage

Also permitted: golf course

11

20% Max. lot coverage

Exception and subzone: Height and setback restrictions


11-15 and per dwelling type

Residential: 
apartment dwelling; low rise, bed and breakfast*, dwelling unit, group home*, home-based business*, home-based day care*, multiple attached dwelling*, planned unit development*, retirement home, retirement home; converted, rooming house, rooming house; converted, rooming unit, stacked dwelling

O1P

Parks and Open Space

Also permitted: accessory use to a permitted use on land immediately abutting an O1P subzone*, agricultural use*, community garden, environmental preserve and education area, park, utility installation limited to a hydro transmission and distribution system and facilities

O1A

Parks and Open Space

Community garden*, environmental preserve and education area, park.

R5A [1231]

Residential Fifth Apartment dwelling; low rise, apartment dwelling; mid-high rise, Density bed and breakfast*, community garden*, converted dwelling*, detached
dwelling, diplomatic mission*, duplex dwelling, dwelling unit, group home*, home-based business*, home-based daycare*, linked-detached dwelling*, multiple attached dwelling*, park, planned unit development*, residential care facility, retirement home; converted*, retirement home, rooming house; converted*, rooming house, secondary dwelling unit*, semi-detached dwelling*, shelter*, stacked dwelling*, three-unit dwelling

98 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED

Minimum lot area ranges from 180-1400 m2 depending on dwelling type


APPENDIX 4 - CURRENT ZONING PROVISIONS R4Z

Residential Fourth Density

Apartment dwelling; low rise, bed and breakfast*, community garden*, converted dwelling*, detached dwelling, diplomatic mission*, duplex dwelling*, group home*, home-based business*, home-based daycare*, linked-detached dwelling*, multiple attached dwelling*, park, planned unit development*, retirement home; converted*, retirement home, rooming house; converted*, rooming house, secondary dwelling unit*, semi-detached dwelling*, stacked dwelling*, three-unit dwelling

N/A

15

N/A

R3Y [1074]

Residential Fourth Density

Bed and breakfast*, community garden*, converted dwelling*, detached dwelling, diplomatic mission*, duplex dwelling*, group home*, home-based business*, home-based daycare*, linked-detached dwelling*, multiple attached dwelling*, park, planned unit development*, retirement home; converted*, secondary dwelling unit*, semi-detached dwelling*, three-unit dwelling

Exception and subzone: Height and setback restrictionsâ&#x20AC;¨

11

N/A

N/A

11

N/A

Height and setback restrictions

11

N/A

N/A

11

N/A

Minimum lot area ranges from 150-1400 m2 depending on dwelling type R3Y [708]

Residential Third Additional provision: Minimum lot width 5m Density

R2N

Residential Sec- Bed and breakfast, community garden, detached dwelling, ond Density diplomatic mission, duplex dwelling, group home, __home-based business, home-based daycare, linked-detached dwelling, park, retirement home; converted, secondary dwelling unit, semi-detached dwelling

R1WW [637]

Residential First Density

Bed and breakfast*, community garden*, detached dwelling, diplomatic mission*, group home*, home-based business*, homebased daycare*, park, retirement home; converted* secondary dwelling unit*,

*Specific provisions apply for these uses, see Zoning Bylaw 250-2008 Source: City of Ottawa Zoning Bylaw 250-2008

APPENDICES

99


APPENDIX 5 - PARKING REQUIREMENTS

Parking Minimum Land Use

Apartment Building Mid-High Rise, Low Rise

Parking Maximum (within 600m of rapid transit) Central Area (Downtown Ottawa) and Mixed Use Centre Zone at Tunney’s Pasture

Blair Station Area:

Blair Station Area:

Within 600m of rapid transit

Other cases

West of Rideau Canal: none

Central Area (Downtown Ottawa) and Mixed Use Centre Zone at Tunney’s Pasture

0.5 per DU

1.2 per DU

0.5 per DU

1.0 per DU

0.5 per DU

1.2 per DU

1.5 per dwelling unit (combined total of resident and visitor parking)

Blair Station Area

1.75 per dwelling unit (combined total of resident and visitor parking)

East of Rideau Canal: 0.25 per DU Dwelling Units, in the same building with other uses

West of Rideau Canal: none East of Rideau Canal: 0.5 per DU

Stacked Dwelling (3 units)

West of Rideau Canal: none

No maximum

East of Rideau Canal: 0.25 per DU Residential Care Facility/

0.25 per DU plus 1 per 100m2 of GFA used for medical, health, personal services

No maximum

Retirement Home Hospital

2

2

2

0.75 per 100m GFA

Office

0.75 per 100m GFA

Post Secondary Educational Institution

0.75 per 100m GFA

Research And Development Centre

0.75 per 100m GFA

0.8 per 100m GFA

Retail Store; Retail Food Store

None

3.4 per 100m2 GFA

2

2

Source: Part 4: Parking, Zoning Bylaw 250-2008, City of Ottawa

100 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED

5.0 per 100m GFA 2

2.3 per 100m GFA

2.4 per 100m GFA 2

2

1.0 per 100 m GFA 2

1 per 100m GFA

2

2

2

4 per 100m GFA

2

0.75 per 100m GFA

1.6 per 100m GFA

2

Medical Facility

Shopping Centre

2

Within 600m of rapid transit: 1.2 per 100m of GFA Other cases: 1.4 per 100m of GFA

1.2 per 100m GFA

2

2

3.4 per 100m GLFA

2

2.7 per 100m GFA 2

1.5 per 100m GFA 2

1.0 per 100m GFA 2

1.0 per 100m GFA 2

3.6 per 100m2 100m GLFA

2

1.0 per 100m GLFA

2

4.0 per 100m GFA 2

4.0 per 100m GLFA


APPENDIX 6 - EXISTING DEVELOPMENT PARKING REQUIREMENTS Use

GFA

2

Min. per 100m

2

Max. per 100m

Parcel #1 Parcel #2

Office Retail

105,552 13,890

2 3

3 4

Parcel #3 Parcel #4

Retail Office

63,824 9,195

3 2

4 3

Parcel #5

Retail

7,674

3

4

Parcel #6

Retail

1,791

3

4

Parcel #7 Parcel #8 Parcel #9

Retail Parking Garage Office

7,780 9,810 13,904

3 N/A 2

4 N/A 3

Parcel #10 Parcel #11 Parcel #12 Parcel #13 Parcel #14 Parcel #15 Parcel #16 Parcel #17 Parcel #18

Office Office Office Retail Office Office Office Office Retail

12,350 11,097 14,404 15,933 22,691 13,519 34,198 8,754 1,619

2 2 2 3 2 2 2 2 3

3 3 3 4 3 3 3 3 4

Minimum Maximum Downtown Req. Downtown Minimum 1 792 2,428 2,850 0 0 472 556 1 479 2,170 2,553 1 69 211 248 1 58 261 307 0 0 61 72 0 0 265 311 N/A N/A N/A N/A 1 104 320 375 1 93 284 333 1 83 255 300 1 108 331 389 1 119 542 637 1 170 522 613 1 101 311 365 1 256 787 923 1 66 201 236 0 0 55 65

Total Required Parking Spaces

9,476

11,133

2,498

Total minimum required parking spaces according to Area C (Suburban Area) requirements: 9,476 Total maximum allowable parking spaces according to Area C (Suburban Area) maximums: 11,133 Total minimum required parking spaces using the Downtown Area requirements: 2,498 Note: Does not include residential parcels.

APPENDICES 101


APPENDIX 7 - PRECEDENT CASE STUDIES Transit Oriented Development Precedents 1. Collingwood Village, Vancouver, BC 2. Metropole, Ottawa, ON 3. Pleasant Hill-Contra Costa Centre, Walnut Creek, California 4. Brentwood Station, Calgary, AB 5. The Equinox, Toronto, ON 6. Rosslyn-Ballston Corridor, Arlington, Virginia 7. Ohlone-Chynoweth Station, San Jose, California 8. Orenco Station, Portland, Oregon 9. The Bridges, Calgary, AB 10. Portland Hills, Dartmouth, NS 11. Time, North Vancouver, BC 12. Mockingbird Station, Dallas, Texas 13. Port Credit Village, Mississauga, ON 14. Ashmont Station, Boston, Massachusetts 15. Centre Commons Community, Portland, Oregon 16. Bethesda Row, Maryland 17. Orestad, Copenhagen 18. Allemohe, Hamburg, Germany 19. Les Chocheres de la Gare, Sainte-Thérèse, QB 20. Fruitvale, Oakland, California Mobility Hub Precedents 21. Rosa Parks Transit Station, Detroit, Michigan 22. Transit Hub, Tempe, Arizona 23. Bloor and Dundas Study, Toronto, ON 24. Metrotown, Burnaby, BC 25. Surrey Central, Surrey, BC 26. Transmilenio Portal del Sur, Bogotá, Colombia 27. Shudehill Station, Manchester, UK 28. Warwick Station District, City of Warwick, Rhode Island 29. Stratford Station, London, UK 30. Dundas West-Bloor Mobility Study, Toronto, Ontario 31. Transit Mall, Portland, Oregon 32. Atocha Intercambiadore, Madrid, Spain 33. Broadway Station, Vancouver, BC 34. Milwaukee Intermodal Station, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 35. Southern Cross Station, Melbourne, Australia 36. Gare de l’Ouest, Brussels, Belgium 37. Croydon Station, Croydon, UK 38. Hastings Station, Hastings, UK 39. Montmorency Station, Laval, QB 40. Nagoya Station, Nagoya, Japan

102 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED

Greyfield Redevelopment Precedents 41. Bay Ridges Plaza, Pickering, ON 42. Shops at Don Mills, Toronto, ON 43. City Centre, Englewood, Colorado 44. Mizner Park, Boca Raton, Florida 45. Trafalgar Village Mall, Oakville, ON 46. 1600 Bath Road, Kingston, ON 47. Aldershot Plaza, Burlington, ON 48. Olde Thornhill Village, Markham, ON 49. 50th Street East Urban Centre, Calgary AB 50. Garrison Woods, Calgary, Alberta 51. Manchester Parkade, Massachusetts, Connecticut 52. Paseo Colorado, Pasadena, California 53. City Place, Long Beach, California 54. Belmar, Lakewood, Colorado 55. Downtown Park Forest, Park Forest, Illinois 56. Winter Park Village, Winter Park, Florida 57. The Renaissance, Calgary, AB 58. Lynn Valley, Vancouver, BC 59. Morningside Mall, Toronto, ON 60. Mashpee Commons, Cape Cod, Massachusetts Office Park Precedents 61. University Town Centre, Prince George’s County, Maryland 62. Technology Square, Cambridge, Massachusetts 63. Technopôle Angus, Montréal, QB 64. Schlitz Park, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 65. Chiswick Park, London, UK 66. University of Waterloo Research and Technology Park, Waterloo, ON 67. Savoie-Technolac, Le Bourget du Lac Cedex, France 68. Biogen Idec Campus, San Diego, California 69. SouthWest 1 Enterprise Park, Berrinba, Australia 70. Discover Place, Burnaby, BC 71. Commerce Valley Business Park, Markham, ON 72. Lancaster Corporate Centre, Kitchener, ON 73. Harbourside Business Park, Auckland, New Zealand 74. Takapuna, Auckland, New Zealand 75. Metro Office Park, Guaynabo, Puerto Rico 76. Stockley Park, London, UK 77. Harbor Bay Business Park, Alameda, California 78. The Branches, Reston, Virginia 79. Naiman Tech Centre, San Diego, California 80. 81.

Urban Outfitters Corporate Campus, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Conjunctive Points, Los Angeles and Culver City, California


APPENDIX 7 - PRECEDENT CASE STUDIES Precedents Index Appendix 7.1 – Transit-Oriented Development (TOD) 1. Collingwood Village, Vancouver, BC 2. Metropole, Ottawa, ON 3. Brentwood Station, Calgary, AB 4. Pleasant Hill-Contra Costa Center Station, Walnut Creek, California Appendix 7.2 – Inter-Modal Transit Hubs 1. Rosa Parks Transit Centre, Detroit 2. Tempe Transportation Centre, Tempe, Arizona 3. Dundas Bloor Mobility Hub Study, Toronto, ON 4. Metrotown, Burnaby, BC Appendix 7.3 – Greyfield Redevelopment 1. Bay Ridges Plaza, Pickering, ON 2. Shops at Don Mills, Toronto, ON 3. Mizner Park, Boca Raton, Florida 4. CityCentre, Englewood, Colorado Appendix 7.4 – Office Parks 1. University Town Centre, Prince George’s County, Maryland 2. Technôpole Angus, Montreal, QB 3. Technology Square, Cambridge, Massachusetts 4. Schlitz Park, Milwaukee, Wisconsin

APPENDICES 103


7.1 TOD Precedents Case Study: Collingwood Village - Vancouver, British Columbia Description: Collingwood Village is a complete urban village focussed on the JoyceCollingwood SkyTrain Station in Vancouver, British Columbia. The developer and the City worked closely to develop a vision for coordinating land use planning within a large-scale development. The project has benefitted from extensive site amenities, which were the result of negotiations between the City and the developer for bonus density. A community centre, a school, a health centre, and a neighbourhood policing centre compliment the retail uses, such as the grocery store, drugstore and other small-scale retail.

feeling of an urban village. • Building heights were transitioned down to the existing communities in an appropriate way that was accepted by the community. For Further Reading: http://www.cmhc-schl.gc.ca/en/inpr/su/sucopl/upload/66623-w.pdf Collingwood
Village
 Land Use Developer Previous Land Use Year Built Building Typology

The planning process involved a long and extensive public consultation process over eight years contributed to the ultimate support of the project by the community. There is a significant mix of market and affordable housing.

Gross Site Area Gross FSI Gross Density Retail Space Office Space Residential Units Parking

One of the most significant aspects of this project are the lowered parking standards. In the first phase of development, 1.75 stalls/unit were required, but due to the high rates of transit use, in later phases this dropped to 1.04 stalls/unit. All unit parking is underground in order to keep transit supportive land uses at grade.

Transportation Amenities

Crowley Street, where most commercial uses are located, extends from the transit station into the community and acts as the ‘central spine’ of the site. Short blocks across Crowley Street and numerous mid-block pedestrian pathways enhance connectivity into the surrounding residential communities. The layout of the development was designed to ensure excellent pedestrian connectivity to the SkyTrain. As a result, many people walk to the station, contributing to ‘eyes on the street’ and the feelings of safety in the community.

Implementation Agency 


Mixed use Concert Properties Light industrial 1990-2006 Up to four storey townhouses; Mid- and high-rise apartments 11.3 ha 2.4 (Estimated) 239 UPH N/A N/A 2,700 units 2,173 parking stalls (1.35/unit in Phase 1, 1.04/unit in Phase 2); All parking is underground SkyTrain Community centre, school, health centre, parks, police station Vancouver Land Corporation

Key facts for Collingwood Village

Residential buildings incorporated ground-oriented units on-grade to enhance the pedestrian experience. As well, tall buildings were constructed with a street-oriented base of 4 to 6 storeys to humanize the scale of the towers. Landscaping and building-orientation were used to buffer the project from the SkyTrain system. Lessons for the BSA: • Planners’ flexibility with parking requirements allowed appropriate adjustments when there was evidence that residents were using transit more and automobiles less. • Community amenities, along with the high density, helped create the

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A view of the different building types at Collingwood Village (CMHC, 2009: 5).


Case Study: Metropole - Ottawa, ON 


Description: Metropole is a high-density residential development located adjacent to the Westboro Transit station along Ottawa’s Transitway. The project is a mix of high-rise residential and townhouse development, and is well-integrated with existing single – family homes. Metropole has Ottawa’s tallest building, which was recognized by the Ottawa-Carleton Home Builder’s Association (OCHBA) as the best high-rise residential building in Ottawa in 2004. The Metropole project is consistent with Ottawa’s TOD principles as the project is located 200m from a transit station. The development also takes advantage of its close proximity to a linear park system and the Ottawa River. The site is served by amenities and shopping areas in the surrounding neighbourhoods. However, the project would benefit from at-grade mixed use to activate the area. At this time, no retail or commercial uses or civic amenities exist on-site. Parking requirements are as low as one stall/unit for tower residents because the City of Ottawa only requires one parking space per unit for residences within 400m of public transit (CMHC 2007). Townhouse residents have either a one- or two-car garage. 24 spaces of visitor parking were provided at-grade. Lessons for the BSA: • The developer added a pedestrian path to the station contributing to the connectivity of the site. • The project was consistent with City of Ottawa policy to increase density around transit stations.

Metropole


Transportation

Residential Minto Developments Inc. Vacant land 2003-2004 Apartment tower; Townhouses 2.8 ha 0.94 (Estimated) 239 UPH N/A N/A 221 (total) 1 stall/ unit for the tower; 24 surface spaces for visitors; 1- or 2- car garages in the townhouses Transitway

Amenities

Pedestrian pathway

Land Use Developer Previous Land Use Year Built Building Typology Gross Site Area Gross FSI Gross Density Retail Space Office Space Residential Units Parking

Implementation N/A Agency 
 Key facts for Metropole 
 


For Further Reading: http://www.cmhc-schl.gc.ca/en/inpr/su/sucopl/upload/65516-W.pdf

(Right) The Metropole Tower from the Transitway (City of Ottawa, Retrieved from http://ottawa.ca/en/city_hall/planningprojectsreports/planning/design_plan_ guidelines/completed/transit/guidelines/built_form/index.html)

APPENDICES 105


Case Study Pleasant Hill – Contra Costa Center - Walnut Creek, California Description: Pleasant Hill’s Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) station, which opened in 1973, grew out of a typical post-WWII suburban landscape of single-family dwellings and auto-oriented development. Initially surrounded by parking lots, planners and policy-makers have developed a vibrant, dense and diverse community within the sprawl. The transformation began with the Pleasant Hill BART Station Area Specific Plan in 1983 with the goal to create a new urban centre and to increase the attractiveness of transit. The redevelopment plan of Pleasant Hill’s BART Station follows a close resemblance to that of the BSA. Today, this is area is considered a prime example of a suburban employment and residential centre located on transportation. It has been recognized by the Urban Land Institute as a model of suburban Transit Oriented Development and received the County Supervisors Association of California Partnership Award. Pleasant Hill is strategically located as a regional transportation hub. The site is connected to the Iron Horse regional trail system and located adjacent to a major sub-arterial, as well as being an employment hub. Planners were challenged to serve the needs of the commuter transit users who drive to the station and the needs of the residents around the station. Today, the Pleasant Hill - Contra Costa Centre is area that mixes residential, commercial and office uses. An entertainment complex was developed adjacent to the station. There is also a public outdoor space focussed on the transit station where activity is most intense. The site creates an attractive, lively and pleasant environment for pedestrians through an interconnected network of streets. Pedestrian crossings increase connectivity across the highways and overcome the issues presented by the proximity of highways to the site

• Parking was shared between the Park and Ride and the entertainment complex creating more efficiencies. • The retail-entertainment complex provided the focal point and destination at the transit station. For 
 Further Reading: http://centrepoints.org/home.php Pleasant
Hill
Contra
Costa
Center
 Land Use Developer Previous Land Use Year Built Building Typology Gross Site Area Gross FSI Gross Density

Retail Space Office Space Residential Units Parking Transportation Amenities Implementation Agency 


Mixed Use Oxford Properties, Trammell Crow Greyfield 1983 – 2005 Walk-up apartments; Office 56 ha 0.83 (Estimated) - 72 UPH - 43 UPH - 4-5 UPH 37,000 m2 retail/entertainment/cultural complex and hotel 204,387 m2 2,300 units 3,398 stalls of Park and Ride Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) Public plaza Contra Costa Redevelopment Agency

Key facts for Pleasant Hill Contra Costa Center Brentwood
Station
 Land Use Developer

Mixed Use N/A

The Pleasant Hill station has implemented some innovative parking initiatives. For example, drivers who carpool to the station can park in the parking garage for free. Also, the Park and Ride is shared-use between parking for commuters and parking for the entertainment complex, which is busiest during the evenings and weekends. There is also ample provision of bike racks as well as over one hundred shared use electronic lockers for bikes. Lessons for the BSA: • High intensity office uses and high-density residential apartments were located closest to the station while mid-rise residential was located further out.

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View of the Pleasant Hill transit plaza (Sustainable Cities Collective, retrieved from: One Size does not Fit All: Alternative Approaches to Transit Oriented Development http://sustainablecitiescollective.com/cflower/68226/one-sizedoes-not-fit-all-different-approaches-transit-oriented-development).


Case Study: Brentwood Station – Calgary, Alberta Description: Brentwood Station is located in Northwest Calgary near the University of Calgary and the Foothills Hospital. Currently, Brentwood Station serves as an important transfer point for buses and LRT and has the largest ‘Park and Ride’s in the city. The station is also immediately adjacent to a regional shopping destination, Brentwood Village Shopping Centre, a collection of aging strip development and more recent big-box stores. The area is already a significant employment area due to its proximity to the University and the University Innovation Park. The City of Calgary has recognized the potential for this site to intensify, and in 2009, the Brentwood Station Area Redevelopment Plan (ARP) was passed by City Council. The plan is consistent with the City of Calgary’s need to accommodate the City’s growth in a more sustainable way and use existing infrastructure more efficiently. The Brentwood Station ARP envisions Brentwood Station as the heart of a complete, unified community. Key points of the plan are using a variety of building types, creating a pedestrian-friendly environment, and welldesigned streets and reintroduce open spaces. The plan seeks to remain sensitive to the existing low-density residential communities through appropriate density transitions further away from the station. Density, tallest buildings will be 90 m, will be centred along a commercial main street.

Previous Land Use Year Built Building Typology

Gross Site Area Gross FSI Gross Density Retail Space Office Space Residential Units Parking Transportation Amenities Implementation Agency 


Greyfield 2007-present Townhouses; Live-work units; Apartment towers 36 ha - Minimum FSI 1.0 - Maximum FSI 4.5 N/A 56,711 m2 (maximum build out) 113,440 m2 (maximum build out) 272,248 m2 (maximum build out) N/A LRT Open space City of Calgary

Key facts for Brentwood Station

The plan aims to reintroduce streets and blocks into the existing large commercial parcels. For bicycles, dedicated bike lanes on site and connections into the regional system are planned on certain routes and bicycle lockers should be placed at the station. Larger retail uses are permitted, however, they should adopt an urban format with smaller floor plates and locate in mixed-use buildings. Lessons for the BSA: • The plan reinserts blocks and streets back into large retail development. • The plan calls for a mix of land uses, including open spaces, which serve to create a complete community. • The plan uses FAR measurements to control built form and ensure an appropriate public realm.

Rendering of Phase 1 (University City) of Brentwood Station redevelopment (Centurion Mechanical, http://www.centurionmechanical.ca/projects.html).

For Further Reading: http://www.calgary.ca/PDA/LUPP/Pages/Current-studies-and-ongoingactivities/Transit-oriented-development-tod/Brentwood-Station-AreaRedevelopment-Plan.aspx

APPENDICES 107


7.2 Mobility Hub Precedents

Case Study: : Rosa Parks Transit Station, Detroit, Michigan

Rosa
Parks


Description The Rosa Parks Transit Station is a 4,500 m2 facility located in downtown Detroit. The station was completed in 2009 with a budget of $22.5 million to provide a connection between the DDOT public buses, the SMART suburban light rail system, and Transit Windsor. It is estimated that about 10,000 riders pass through the station daily. In comparison, Blair station currently experiences 20,000 passengers on a daily weekday basis. The design focuses on pedestrian connectivity throughout the site to provide convenient and comfortable transitions throughout the transportation system. The 24-hour facility also features amenities such as a restaurant, a taxi access point and public restrooms. The soaring tensile roof canopies were inexpensive and durable and were designed to be a unique landmark in downtown Detroit. The structure provides comfortable waiting areas that make transit more appealing in cold winters and also harvest rainwater. Lessons for the BSA: • Weather was taken into consideration in station design in order to make transit use more comfortable year-round. • The unique design was an affordable and elegant design solution for a transit station.


 Built Transit Type

Estimated number of daily riders Implementation Agency 


2005-2009 Light rail Bus Taxi 10,000 Detroit Economic Growth Corporation

Key facts for Rosa Parks Transit Station Tempe

 Built Transit Type

Estimated number of daily riders Implementation Agency 


2006- 2008 LRT Bus Bicycle 13,300 City of Tempe

For Further Reading: http://criticaldetroit.org/buildings/rosa-parks-transit-center/

The Rosa Parks Transit Centre in downtown Detroit (Retrieved from: http://www. archdaily.com/30880/rosa-parks-transit-center-ftl-design-engineering-studio/)

108 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED


Case Study: The Tempe Transportation Center, Tempe, Arizona Description: The Tempe Transportation Center is an attempt to show that there are alternatives to the car. The inter-modal transit hub, completed in 2008, was built on an existing surface parking lot in the downtown of the Pheonix suburb of Tempe. Originally supposed to be a bus plaza and a ticket centre, the project evolved after the decision to build LRT. The station connects new light rail system with over 11 bus routes, providing the site with a steady stream of 300 buses a day. There are three facilities on the 2.4 acre site centred around a small plaza. First, the LRT station sits to the north of the plaza. To the south, the curved driveway for buses accommodates room for 13 bus shelters. Finally, leasable office space, the bike station, the security office and the transit store are located in the building on the west side of the plaza. There is also a community meeting space in the sculptural wing off of the main three-storey retail/office building.

Taxi Estimated number of 10,000 daily riders Implementation Detroit Economic Growth Corporation For Further Reading: Agency http://www.sonoraninstitute.org/blogs/index.php/scotie-blog/26-tempe


transportation-center Tempe

 Built Transit Type

Estimated number of daily riders Implementation Agency 


2006- 2008 LRT Bus Bicycle 13,300 City of Tempe

Key facts for Tempe Transportation Center

Tempe is not a winter city, but like Canada, it experiences extreme weather. All facilities had to be designed to provide shade, and landscaping and trees on site were essential, especially for the hot summer months. The bike facilities include bike storage, showers for commuters, a bike repair shop, a drinking fountain, and public washrooms. A car share is also located on-site. In addition to the unique and striking architecture, the buildings incorporated many green building elements, including green roofs, greywater and stormwater management, passive solar design and eco-friendly materials. The buildings were recently awarded with LEED Platinum Certification. LEED platinum, 53% reduction in energy as compared to a conventional building (Metrolinx, 2009). Lessons for the BSA: • This transportation hub considered bike commuters along with other commuters by incorporating “bike and ride” facilities, including repair shops, washrooms, drinking fountains and showers. • A mix of uses were incorporated into the station itself. • The project was designed with high connectivity between light rail and bus. The plaza served to create a comfortable place to transfer between modes.

Tempe Transportation Centre with 13 bus bays (Otak, www.otak.com)

APPENDICES 109


Case Study: Dundas West Bloor Mobility Hub Study – Toronto, ON Description The Dundas West-Bloor Mobility Hub Study began as a way to explore how connections between major modes of transportation. The potential mobility hub would connect the GO commuter train to a subway line on Metrolinx’s Georgetown rail corridor. The mobility hub study area is identified as the 800 m radius around the intersection of Dundas Street West and Bloor Street West. Metrolinx has identified the Dundas-Bloor hub as a gateway, meaning that this is where two or more regional transit lines meet. One of the key recommendations of this study is to provide a weatherprotected connection between these modes of transportation. Also, the study recommends promoting active transportation by providing bicycle facilities at the mobility hub and pedestrian-friendly streetscapes. Intensification should be promoted in the areas directly adjacent to the mobility hub and provide a mix of land uses. Lessons for the BSA: • Mobility hubs should be surrounded by vital neighbourhoods with residential and employment uses. • The plan recognizes the role of cycling and walking as modes of transportation. Facilities should provide amenities for cyclists.

Dundas
West
Bloor

 Built Transit Type

Estimated number of morning peak riders Implementation Agency 


2009-2011 GO commuter rail Subway Bicycle 5,000 Metrolinx

Key facts for Dunhas West Bloor Mobility Hub Metrotown
 Built Transit Type Estimated number of daily riders Implementation Agency 


1985-2005 Skytrain Bus Metrotown is Vancouver’s second busiest station City of Burnaby

For Further Reading: http://www.metrolinx.com/en/

A rendering of the Air Rail Link in the Dundas West-Bloor West Mobility Hub Study (Metrolinx, Retrived from http://www.archdaily.com/30880/rosaparks-transit-center-ftl-design-engineering-studio/)

110 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED


Case Study: Metrotown - Burnaby, BC Description: Metrotown is one of Burnaby’s four town centres. Located in the Greater Vancouver Regional District, Metrotown lies about 10 km from Vancouver, and it is connected to the downtown via Skytrain. Metrotown began as three separate shopping malls, an office tower and a library. Now the area boasts residential high-rise, hotel, and more office. The mixed land uses and high integration of transit services makes Metrotown an example of both TOD and mobility hub concepts. The Skytrain station is connected to a covered concourse which leads directly to the Station Square and Metropolis malls. Metrotown is also a major bus transfer point for connecting buses to Burnaby and Southern Vancouver. Passengers transfer vertically from the raised Skytrain system to the at-grade covered bus stop.

Estimated number of morning peak riders Implementation Agency 


Bicycle 5,000 Metrolinx

Metrotown
 Built Transit Type Estimated number of daily riders Implementation Agency 


1985-2005 Skytrain Bus Metrotown is Vancouver’s second busiest station City of Burnaby

Key facts for Metrotown 


A major threat to the Metrotown station is the abundance free parking at the shopping malls. Also, the surrounding areas show minimal considerations for limiting automobile use, establishing maximum parking ratios or having managed parking. Lessons for the BSA: • Metrotown allowed passengers to integrate commuting with daily shopping needs. • Metrotown created a reverse flow of traffic by creating a destination and an origin of transit traffic. • The station was highly integrated with the malls and different modes of transit to serve the needs of transit passengers. For Further Reading: http://www.translink.ca/~/media/Documents/bpotp/10_year_ plan/Annual_Plans/media10yearplan/Backgrounder%20What%20 have%20we%20done%20for%20you%20lately.ashx

Metrotown Station in 1986. (Translink, http://buzzer.translink.ca/index. php/2010/01/skytrain-flashback-photos/)

APPENDICES 111


7.3 Greyfield Redevelopment Precedents Case Study: Bay Ridges Plaza – Pickering, Ontario

Bay
Ridges
Plaza


Description: Bay Ridges Plaza, located in Pickering, Ontario, is an example of a successful suburban greyfield redevelopment. The project, now known as San Francisco by the Bay, demolished and replaced the declining Bay Ridges plaza with a large mixed-use infill development over the course of four phases.

In large part, the success of the Bay Ridges Plaza redevelopment can be attributed to the role of the public consultation process. Originally, the redevelopment was met with strong opposition from the local community, particularly for its removal of the Price Chopper grocery store. Following the resulting OMB hearing, the City of Pickering placed a Hold on the Square Boy Plaza land until a new food retail use was established within the commercial units of already developed towers on other parts of the site. Although this problem caused a significant delay during the planning process, it did contribute to ensuring a mixed-use product. San Francisco by the Bay is not only mixed-use, but also mixed-income. The project provides a variety of building types and sizes, including a range of condominium units and townhomes. The development is both pedestrian and transit friendly, located just south of Highway 401 and roughly 400 metres from the Pickering Go Station. It is focused on public parkland/open space provided by the Douglas Ravine, which is protected by the Toronto and Region Conservation Authority (TRCA).

Land Use Developers

Year Built Building Typology Gross Site Area Gross FSI Gross Density Retail Space/ Office Space Residential Units Parking

Transportation Implementation Agency 


112 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED

547 70 surface parking stalls for shoppers and visitors; 2 stalls/townhouse; Additional 48 underground stalls for visitor parking South of Highway 401; 400m from Pickering GO Station City of Pickering

Key facts for Bay Rides Plaza

The Bay Ridges Plaza redevelopment has been particularly successful in increasing density on the site through the use of a master plan. The guidelines of the master plan for San Francisco by the Bay enforced strict design and development guidelines to ensure appropriate site planning, and proper development execution. Lessons for the BSA: • Included public consultation from the very beginning of the planning process, allowing the developers to identify and address community concerns throughout the project, including the need to incorporate a range of retail and a grocery store into the development. • Provided a range of housing types to accommodate a variety of incomes and diverse needs. • Utilized a Master Plan to ensure appropriate site planning and development throughout all project phases. For Further Reading: http://www.pickering.ca/en/cityhall/resources/c2-bayridgesredevelopment.pdf

Mixed use S&R Development Group Ltd.; The Rose Corporation; Chestnut Hill Homes 2006-present Townhomes; High-Rise Towers 10.6 ha 0.5 (Estimated) 205.3 UPH 2,322 m2

Bay Rides Plaza


Case Study: Shops at Don Mills – Toronto, Ontario Description: The Shops at Don Mills, located in North York, Toronto, were redeveloped on the former greyfield site known as the Don Mills Centre. This greyfield redevelopment was triggered by the loss of Eaton’s, the mall’s major tenant, due to bankruptcy. The owner and developer Cadillac Fairview redeveloped the failing mall to create a successful outdoor, mixed-use centre. Following the loss of Eaton’s, the Don Mills Centre met inevitable decline. In 2001, Cadillac Fairview submitted applications for site redevelopment. After some difficulty reaching a consensus on a redevelopment vision with both the City and the community, Cadillac Fairview was granted site plan approval from the OMB. In 2006 Cadillac Fairview demolished the Don Mills Centre and partnered with the residential FRAM Building Group to begin reconstruction. The redevelopment of the Don Mills Centre was successful in revitalizing and rejuvenating a declining area. The Shops at Don Mills, which opened in 2009, vastly increased the density and amount of safe public space on the site. The redevelopment incorporated a new private street system, outdoor retail space, an open square, and condominium towers ranging in height from 8 to 20 storeys. This redevelopment was able to replace and add to the existing uses on the site, while radically improving the quality of design and safety of public space. Lessons for the BSA: • Prioritized the pedestrian experience by planning for safe and quality spaces. • Focused on urban design, particularly in residential and outdoor areas. The open air concept of the Shops at Don Mills is one of its most unique and well-received features. • Vastly increased site density by designing compact development and including high-rise (up to 20 storeys) mixed-use towers. • Demonstrated a need for advanced planning for LRT

Shops
at
Don
Mills

 Land Use Developer Year Built Building Typology Gross Site Area Gross FSI Gross Density Retail Space Office Space Residential Units Parking Transportation

Mixed Use Cadillac Fairview Corporation Limited 2003-2009 Mid- and High-Rise (8-20 Storeys) 15.2 ha 1.2 (Estimated) 85.5 UPH 42,000 m2 6,000 m2 1,300 1,059 stalls in parking structure; 1,500 stalls on-street Accessible by bus and car; Site of future LRT station N/A

Implementation Agency 
 facts for Shops at Don Mills Key

Shops at Don Mills plaza (yorkvillia.com).

For Further Reading: http://www.shopsatdonmills.ca/en/centreinfo/Pages/OurHistory. aspx

APPENDICES 113


Case Study: Mizner Park – Boca Raton, Florida

Description: Mizner Park, located in Boca Raton, Florida, was one of the first greyfield redevelopment projects undertaken in North America. The project converted the once failing Boca Raton Mall into a mixeduse, pedestrian-friendly, multi-storey development. Surrounded by low-density residential neighbourhoods of single-detached homes, Mizner Park is a pioneer of greyfield success. The development of Mizner Park was achieved through the acquisition of 11.6 Ha of private lands and the use of a public-private partnership involving the City of Boca Raton, the Community Redevelopment Agency, a developer of mixed-use facilities, and cultural users. The project cost an estimated $56,625,000 U.S. The incorporation of retail, office, residential, and cultural spaces into one development helped to craft an identity for Boca Raton’s once declining downtown. The project focused around a public promenade, organized along two city blocks. Retail uses were placed at grade, while parking garages were relocated to the rear of buildings. The pedestrian scale of the development and extensive attention paid to landscape and design detail contributed a great deal to the sense of community that now flourishes in this Mediterranean style development.

Mizner
Park
 Land Use Developers Year Built Building Typology Gross Site Area Gross FSI Gross Density Retail Space Office Space Residential Units Parking Transportation Implementation Agency

Mixed use Crocker and Company; Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association 1991-1998 Low- and Mid-Rise 11.6 ha 1.5 (Estimated) 23.5 UPH 21,925 m2 24,320 m2 272 2,500+ stalls 2.4 km from Interstate 95 Boca Raton Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA)


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


Key facts for Mizer Park

The success of the Minzer Park project as an upscale lifestyle centre has been recognized by the Urban Land institute, the International Council of Shopping Centres, and the Sierra Club of Florida, among others. This project stressed the need to rezone for higher densities, introduce a mix of uses, and maintain focus on the pedestrian experience. Lessons for the BSA: • Utilized a public-private partnership to ensure the successful completion of the project. Without this partnership, site specific zoning amendments to allow for higher densities and mixed-uses may not have been possible. • Focused on the pedestrian experience by ensuring high quality public and open space such as the main piazza, which runs through the centre of the site. • Relocated parking to the rear of buildings to provide additional space for pedestrians and commercial/retail uses. For Further Reading: http://www.ci.boca-raton.fl.us/dev/pdf/CRA/MiznerParkHandout. pdf

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Street level view of the Mizner Park greyfield redevelopment (Congress for the New Urbanism, 2005)


Case Study: CityCenter – Englewood, Colorado

City
Center
Englewood


Description The redevelopment of CityCenter, located in Englewood, Colorado, was one of the first successful suburban greyfield projects in the United States to replace a regional shopping mall with an outdoor mixeduse city centre. This public-private project integrates a mix of uses into an existing community fabric, while focusing on public space, connectivity, sustainability, and culture.

Cinderella City Mall, which opened in 1968, was once a vibrant and profitable suburban development. In 1974, the mall was responsible for 52 percent of the City of Englewood’s sales tax revenue. By 1994 however, the shifting of retail trends and outward competition reduced the mall’s sales tax revenue to as little as 2.5 percent, leading to the inevitable closure of the mall. In 1997, the City revisited the decaying site, to determine its future highest and best use. The City partnered with a private, non-profit group of local developers, landscape architects, bankers, real estate executives, planners, and attorneys to consult the community and consider the benefits of mixed-used, transit, and pedestrian-oriented development. The success of CityCenter Englewood may be largely attributed to its integration of supportive uses that helped to form a lively, wellconnected downtown. The development includes City office space, a library, municipal courts, and a cultural arts centre, on top of a mix of retail, commercial, and residential uses. The project additionally integrates transit, big-box development, and a parks and greenway system. This project has successfully contributed to the revitalization of the inner suburban Englewood area, and serves as an important precedent for greyfield redevelopment best practices in Colorado, and for all of North America. Lessons for the BSA: • Integrated existing light rail and bus transit into new development using a pedestrian bridge. • Connected the development to its surroundings by expanding the traditional street network into the site and linking the site with an existing park and greenway system. • Modified existing big-box to fit within the development by providing design guidelines and making zoning bylaw amendments.

Land Use Developers

Year Built Building Typology Gross Site Area Gross FSI Gross Density Retail Space Office Space Residential Units Parking Transportation Implementation Agency 


Mixed use Calthorpe Associates, David Owen Tryba Architects, Miller Weingarten Realty, and Trammell Crow Residential 2000-2002 Townhomes; High-Rise Towers 22.2 Ha 0.5 (Estimated) 205.3 Units/Ha 35,300 m2 27,900 m2 440 2,810 Access to light rail and bus. Private Non-Profit Developers

Key facts for CityCenter 


Key facts for CityCentre Englewood CityCenter. (http://www.meekspartners.com/alexan-citycenter).

For Further Reading: http://www.englewoodgov.org/Index.aspx?page=468

APPENDICES 115


7.4 Office Park Precedents University Town Center - Prince George’s County, Maryland Description University Town Centre, an office park redevelopment in Hyattsville, Maryland, has had two lives. This retrofit sits on what was first a farmer’s field in the 1950s and later a typical suburban office park around 10 kilometres from Washington, D.C. In the 1950s, two brothers sought help from architect Edward Durell Stone to develop their land (Jones, 2011). Together they came up with a master plan design for a forward-thinking mixed use, high-density centre. Unfortunately, the plan was never implemented except three office buildings surrounded by surface parking, instead of plazas, retail, apartments and public art. In 1993, the Washington Metro arrived at the office park and the retrofit began. The project managed to keep all existing buildings and tenants, and the tenant even funded a fourth office building on the site. A new main street was developed and sidewalks were added to create a pedestrian-friendly area. The project uses a variety of architectural styles, contributing to an eclectic and authentic feeling. Echoing the original plan for the site, the 2003 plan includes mixed use infilling around the existing office buildings. Existing uses, such as medical offices, government offices, day care and post office, are complimented with new uses, including shops, restaurants, cinema, a hotel, and a supermarket. A sixteen-storey apartment building for students and a 22unit luxury condominium were built.

University
Town
Center
 
 Land Use Developer(s) Year Built Building Typology

Gross Site Area Gross FSI Gross Density Retail Space/ Office Space Residential Units

Parking

Transportation Implementation Agency 


Mixed Use (Office/Retail) Prince George’s Metro Center, Inc. 1963-1971 (office park) 2003-2008 (retrofit) Mid-rise office; Apartment towers; Mid-rise residential Phase 1 - 23 ha Phase 2 - 40 ha 0.3 [Estimated] N/A 22,300 m2 (retail) 121,000 m2 (office) 900 bedrooms (for students); 22 lofts; 112 luxury condos Garage A has 1,455 stalls; Garage B has 1,150 stalls; Metro 3 Surface Lot (for employees); 60 surface lot (for retail customers) Metro line N/A

Key facts for University Town Centre 


Lessons for the BSA: • The project is a reinvention of an existing office park. • In this case, sense of place was derived from its messiness and eccentricity. • Infilling was done both horizontally (adding buildings between buildings) and vertically (staking uses). • Shared parking strategies and adding new parking structures and underground parking freed up new sites to build on. For Further Reading: http://www.universitytowncenter.net/

A view of University Town Center with two of the three original office buildings. The original office buildings are located in the center of the site and indicated by an ‘O’, while all other buildings on site are infill. (Dunham Jones, 2011: Color Plate 51).

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Case Study: Technôpole Angus – Montreal, Quebec Description Technôpole Angus is a brownfield turned office park, located in the Rosemont district of east Montreal. The project is currently in mid-development of its second of two phases, with a projected completion date of 2018. The site is part of a long-term redevelopment project of former Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) Angus Shop lands. Due to rising unemployment in the Rosemont district in the mid 1990’s, the Rosemont-la PetitePatrie borough Community Economic Development Corporation (CDEC) proposed a job creation strategy in conjunction with the second phase of the Angus Shop lands redevelopment. Supported by both the City and the community, CDEC established a non-profit development corporation, Société de développement Angus (SDA) in 1995, to carry out the plans. The SDA purchased land from CPR, and held responsibility for developing the office park Technôpole Angus. Additionally, CPR teamed with the Société des terrains Angus (SOTAN) to develop residential uses adjacent to the office park. The redevelopment of the Technôpole Angus site aims to fully integrate the urban office park with the surrounding community, a primarily residential area of two and three storey apartment buildings, duplexes, and triplexes. Thus far, Technôpole Angus has been successful, creating jobs, increasing density, and maintaining low-rise building heights while maintaining a pedestrian and transitoriented focus. Located just five minutes from the subway and local bus routes, this project has placed significant emphasis on the importance of sustainability. The project markets itself as a modern business park, and an active participant in the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design for Neighbourhood Development (LEED) pilot program. In addition to the implementation of a Sustainable Transport Plan (2006), Technôpole Angus provides ample open space, a permeable and connective street network, and an integration and mix of uses.

• Maintained the heights of adjacent buildings to create connectivity between the office park and its surrounding neighbourhoods. • Modified existing big-box to fit within the development by providing design guidelines and making zoning bylaw amendments. For Further Reading: Technopole
Angus

 https://www.placestogrow.ca/images/pdfs/ufcs-Technopole_Angus.pdf Land Use Developer Year Built Building Typology Gross Site Area Gross FAR Gross Density Retail Space/ Office Space Residential Units Parking Transportation Implementation Agency

Mixed Use (Office/Retail) Société de développement Angus 1995-Ongoing (2018) Low-Rise Office Buildings (1-4 Storeys) 20 ha 1.2 (Estimated) 125 Jobs/ha 237,609 m2 N/A 399 stalls of surface parking; 60 stalls of underground parking 5 min. walk to subway & bus routes Société de développement Angus


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


Key facts for Technôpole Angus 
 
 
 
 
 


Lessons for the BSA: • Enhanced the pedestrian experience by designing a permeable and connective street network, ensuring continuous street edges, using transparent facades, and providing abundant open space (4.1 ha of connected park system). • Incorporated transit options and accessibility into the development, and relocated parking to the rear of buildings.

Aerial view of the Technopôle Angus office park development (Ontario Ministry of Infrastructure, www.placestogrow.ca)

APPENDICES 117


Case Study: Technology Square – Cambridge, Massachusetts Schiltz
Park


Description Technology Square, located in Cambridge, Massachusetts, is a recent example of successful office park intensification. The project’s redevelopment included both the renovation of existing, fifty year old office buildings as well as large infill developments. Technology Square is now a large transit and pedestrian-oriented office and mixed-use employment area. Following the closure of the Lux Flakes soap factory in the 1950’s, a partnership evolved between the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), the City of Cambridge’s Redevelopment Authority, and the real estate developer Cabot Cabot & Forbes to restore the decayed site. The project was one of the first to partner an American business park with a university, let alone to unify civic and academic interests in the redevelopment of an industrial area. The project was built between 2001 and 2002, and later, in 2006, it was sold to Alexandria Real Estate Equities Inc.


 Land Use Developer(s) Year Built Building Typology Gross Site Area Gross FAR Gross Density Retail Space Office Space Residential Units Parking Transportation Implementation Agency 


Mixed use The Brewery Works, Inc. 1984-1991 Mid- and High-Rise (5-10 Storeys) 16.2 ha 0.7 (Estimated) 259.25 Jobs/ha 836 m2 102,249 m2 + 16,208 m2 (Industrial) N/A 3,092 Accessible by bus N/A

Key facts for Technology Square

The project’s success may be largely attributed to its attention to both transit and pedestrian-friendly development. Technology Square is well served by the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority, with access to the subway, eight local bus routes, and a private rush hour shuttle. In addition, dedicated bike lanes, the grid pattern of buildings and streets, and the incorporation of retail uses at grade contribute to a successful public realm. The stepped six- to four-storey parking structure located on the northwest corner of the site is essential to the compactness of this development. structures to provide parking relief and enhance the pedestrian realm. Lessons for the BSA: • Stepped buildings to match the heights of those in surrounding areas to create connectivity. • Encouraged windows and retail uses placed at grade in mixed-use buildings. • Incorporated transit into site accessibility and used large parking For Further Reading: http://www.ontla.on.ca/library/repository/mon/23012/297307.pdf

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Technology Square site plan (Ontario Ministry of Infrastructure, www.placestogrow.ca)


Case Study: Schlitz Park – Milwaukee, Wisconsin Technology
Square


Description Schlitz Park is a successful rehabilitation and adaptive reuse redevelopment project located in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, a city of over half a million people. Marketed as an ideal location for blending both work and lifestyle, this mixed-use office park project promises to ‘offer the best of all worlds’. The redevelopment of Schlitz Park was led by a public-private partnership that incorporated the families that first purchased the brewery property in 1983 as part of The Brewery Works, Inc.. Redevelopment of the brewery started in 1984 and was completed in 1991. Incurring some demolition, the majority of buildings on the site were rehabilitated and converted to office use, with some retail and warehouse uses. Infrastructure upgrades and new builds have cost an estimated $60,000,000.00 U.S.. The successes of Schlitz Park ultimately lies in its diverse built form, provisions for amenities, and focus on branding. Buildings in the Park are mixed-use, and incorporate natural lighting, exposed ceilings, and open, flexible space. A multitude of amenities, including parks, recreational programs, a variety of retail services, access to the nearby Riverwalk, and 24/7 security are attractive features. In addition, the project places an emphasis on sustainability by rehabilitating existing buildings, pursuing LEED certification for completed renovations, and ensuring accessibility by walking, cycling, driving, and public transit.


 Land Use Developer(s) Year Built Building Typology Gross Site Area Gross FAR Gross Density Retail Space Office Space Residential Units Parking Transportation Implementation Agency

Mixed use Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Cabot Cabot & Forbes 1998-2002 Mid-Rise Office Buildings (5-10 Storeys) 4.05 ha 2.6 (Estimated) 1,114 Jobs/ha 3,437 m2 102,069 m2 N/A 1,593 stalls in parking structure 5-10 min. walk to subway & bus routes City of Cambridge’s Redevelopment Authority

Key facts for Schlitz Park

Lessons for the BSA: • Renovated and rehabilitated existing historic buildings for the adaptive reuse of mixed-use office and retail space. • Focused on provisions for amenities, including 24/7 safety, access to public and open spaces, and additional on-site services. • Emphasized sustainability in design, operation, and access. • Upgrades and new builds have cost an estimated $60,000,000.00 U.S.. For Further Reading: http://www.schlitzpark.com/

Street level view of the rehabilitation and adaptive reuse of the former Schlitz Brewery into Schlitz Park (Former Brewery Buildings, http://www. galenfrysinger.com/milwaukee_brew_buildings.htm)

APPENDICES 119


APPENDIX 8 - STAKEHOLDER INTERVIEW SCRIPT “First of all, thank you for agreeing to participate in this interview. I really appreciate you taking the time out of your schedule to speak with me. Our project is a partnership between Queen’s University and the City of Ottawa. We are creating a vision for the Blair Station area. The final product of this is a presentation and a report that will be given to the City of Ottawa and stakeholders. You will be invited to this event and we hope that you will be able to attend. We are looking at the area around the Blair Station within approximately 600m radius, which is approximately a five minute walk around the station. The area includes the Gloucester centre, as far north as CSIS, the Canadian Tire and Giant Tiger plazas, the office towers to the east of Blair and south of the 417 as well as some surrounding residential areas.” Q 1 Do you have any issues or concerns that related to Blair Station overall? Q 2 Do you have any ideas or suggestions related to Blair Station that you would like to share at this time? Q 3 Are you aware of any local or specific community, business or institutional initiatives that would need to be considered in more detail through the course of this study? Q 4 What are your thoughts on Transit Oriented Development? Q 5 Do you have any suggestions you would like to offer in regards to the public engagement process? What has worked in previous processes? What hasn’t? Q 6 Do you know of any other area stakeholders that I could contact for an interview? Q 7 Do you have any other comments, ideas or suggestions that you would like to share?

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APPENDIX 9 - URBAN DESIGN GUIDELINES

9.1 Mode of Transportation

Urban design guidelines play an important role in shaping cities, towns, and villages through the management of built form. Design guidelines provide direction for particular aspects of the built environment to ensure appropriate and suitable development. These guidelines can be used to promote active and safe spaces to contribute to the creation of a successful public realm. It is important that design guidelines are encouraged throughout entire sites, with specific focus placed on areas of particular importance.

9.1.1 ROAD NETWORK • Transform the road network from suburban style cul-desacs and haphazard streets to a more urban layout that incorporates a grid street pattern with shorter blocks and more frequent connections. • Transform private driveways into public streets that are accessible to everyone. • Convert highway entrances and exits from large cloverleafs to a single-point interchange where possible, with entrance ramps and exit ramps that run directly adjacent to the highway, to provide additional space where development can occur (See Section 9 for illustration). • Provide a hierarchy of road types, including laneways, local streets, collectors and arterials, throughout the site to accommodate varying user needs, modes of transportation and traffic levels. Right-of-way (ROW) sizes for these street types will range from 12 m to 31.6 m (Refer to cross-sections in Appendix 17). • Apply the principles for street design outlined in these guidelines to all roads throughout the site, including provisions for street trees, street furniture, lighting, bike lanes, pedestrian paths and laneways. • Ensure that both sides of every street incorporate development and are given equal design treatment.

The following urban design guidelines have been created with the intention of achieving the vision for this study: to transform the BSA from a sprawling suburb into a well-integrated urban center. In order to achieve this transition, core principles have been adopted to direct growth change in the BSA from T3 suburban to a more appropriate T4 (general urban) or T5 (urban center) form. With reference to several existing urban design guidelines, including the SmartCode, the following twelve categories have been selected to aid in accomplishing this purpose: 9.1 Mode of Transportation: 9.1.1 Road Network 9.1.2 Cycling Network 9.1.3 Pedestrian Network 9.1.4 Blair Station 9.1.5 Parking 9.2 Built Form: 9.2.1 High-Rise Development 9.2.2 Mid-Rise Development 9.2.3 Office Development 9.2.4 Townhouses 9.3 Public Elements: 9.3.1 Public Parks and Open Spaces 9.3.2 Streetscapes 9.4 Blair Station Area: 9.4.1 Overall Site Design

APPENDICES 121


9.1.2 CYCLING NETWORK • Provide cycling lanes along all major roads throughout the site and as part of a connected multi-use pathway. • Provide bike lanes that are a minimum of 1.8 m wide and a multi-use pathway (MUP) that is a minimum of six metres wide to allow for separated two-way bike lanes and a pedestrian path. • Provide bike lanes that run directly adjacent to sidewalks and that are separated from sidewalks and pedestrian paths by a landscaped buffer. On busier roads, segregate bike lanes from vehicle traffic with a row of on-street parking. • Provide bicycle facilities and infrastructure such as bike racks and shower stalls to encourage cycling throughout the site. Offer facilities in active areas such as main streets, along the MUP, in front of public buildings, and within public parks and plazas. • Provide cyclist connections over highway barriers that are a minimum of six metres wide to allow cycling in both directions. Connections should be composed of transparent material, should be straight to promote clear sight lines from one end to the other, and should incorporate Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) principles such as frequent and consistently spaced lighting, formal surveillance such as security cameras and mirrors, call boxes, and access to the bridge through easily identifiable entrances. Link these connections to other cycling paths throughout the site.

Roads in Vancouver, British Columbia, incorporate principles for ‘complete streets’, including provisions for streetscaping, bike lanes, street furniture, street trees, and laneways (Source: http://raisethehammer.org/article/1665/complete _streets_would_help_code_red_areas)

(Right) Cross section demonstrating designs for ‘complete streets’, accommodating multiple modes of transit including motorists, cyclists, and pedestrians through provisions for wide sidewalks, bike lanes, streetscaping, street trees, and street furniture.

122 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED

Sidewalk 2.0 m

Buffer 2.0 m

Bike Lane Parking Lane 1.8 m

2.5 m

Traffic Lane

Traffic Lane

3.5 m

3.5 m

23.6 m

Parking Lane Bike Lane 1.8 m 2.5 m

Buffer 2.0 m

Sidewalk 2.0 m


9.1.3 PEDESTRIAN NETWORK • Provide a continuous and connected pedestrian network throughout the site that consists of sidewalks, walkways, trails and safe pedestrian crossings. • Provide pedestrian pathways that are a minimum of two metres wide to facilitate walking in both directions. • Include landscaping and street trees, lighting and other street furniture such as benches and garbage bins along all pedestrian paths to create a more comfortable walking environment. • Integrate pedestrian crosswalks into street intersections and other crossing points that are immediately distinguishable through the use of alternative paving materials and colours, painted patterns, and raised surfaces. Incorporate curb bump outs into intersections to minimize crossing distances. • Provide pedestrian connections over highway barriers that are a minimum of six metres wide to accommodate increased pedestrian traffic and to provide room for other activities, including buskers, vendors, and kiosks. Connections should be composed of transparent material, should be straight to promote clear sight lines from one end to the other, and should incorporate CPTED principles such as frequent and consistently spaced lighting, formal surveillance such as security cameras and mirrors, call boxes, and access to the bridge through easily identifiable entrances.

9.1.4 BLAIR STATION • Within and directly adjacent to Blair Station, include a mix of uses that cater to both local residents and transit users, such as office, retail and residential. • Connect the station to forms of active transportation, including bike paths, walkways and multi-use trails. Provide bike facilities such as showers, repairs, and secured parking at and around the station. • Directly connect the station to the Gloucester Centre to facilitate easy and weather protected access between the two. • Within Blair Station, provide weather protection measures for waiting areas and for connections to the Gloucester Centre, including covered waiting areas, indoor pathways, building projections and awnings. • Incorporate CPTED strategies such as adequate lighting, access through easily identifiable entrances, visibility through clear sight lines, formal surveillance measures and call boxes to create a safer environment throughout all times of the day. • Design Blair Station to be universally accessible through provisions for barrier-free access, such as ramps and elevators, signage, flat surfaces, auditory and visual displays, clear sight lines and automatic doors

The pedestrian bridge in Pickering, Ontario is an example of a wide, straight, transparent and fully enclosed connection that straddles a major highway to link transit users to the Pickering GO station. (Source: http://urbantoronto.ca/forum/s howthread.php/10103-Pickering-Office-Tower-(LEED-Silver-8s-3-)-PedestrianBridge/page7)

Rosa Parks Station provides covered waiting areas and clear sightlines throughout the station. Retail is located within the station to support transit users. (Source: http://www.archdaily.com/30880/rosa-parks-transit-center-ftl-designengineering-studio/)

APPENDICES 123


9.1.5 PARKING • To minimize surface parking, locate a majority of site parking within parking structures that are a maximum of four storeys. Improve the appearance of parking garages through the use of a variety of materials, textures and architectural detailing, and by lining garages with buildings. • Locate any surface parking at the rear of buildings or within perimeter blocks so that it is not visible from the street. • Provide multiple entrances and exits to both surface parking lots and parking structures. Locate entrances off of side streets and laneways. • Draw attention to any sidewalks that cross parking entrances, for example, with decorative paving or raised surfaces, to enhance pedestrian safety by increasing driver awareness of pedestrian routes. • Where possible, screen parking lots with landscaping. Distribute landscaping throughout surface parking lots to soften their visual impact, reinforce circulation routes and maximize shade. Landscape pedestrian routes through parking lots to provide a buffer from cars and to provide more pleasant connections to buildings and the street. • Ensure all parking lots are well-lit through overhead lighting and pedestrian-scaled lighting such as bollards, a short vertical post. • Incorporate other CPTED strategies into parking design, including the creation of clear sightlines and provision of formal surveillance measures to enhance the safety of both parking lots and parking structures.

Example of a four storey parking structure in Portland, Oregon with retail at grade. (Source: Google Maps, 2012).

This parking structure in the Byward Market in Ottawa maintains an active street frontage with retail while providing parking on the second storey and the roof. (Source: Google Maps, 2012).

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9.2 Built Form • Locate all buildings within 400 metres walking distance of a park or open space. • Transition in scale between mid- and high- buildings and surrounding lower-rise development by stepping buildings down in height. • Design building bases to be proportional in height to the width of road right-of-ways to provide a sense of enclosure along the street. Bases should not exceed a height-to-width ratio of 1:1. Step buildings back a minimum of 2.5 metres above this height. • Design building bases that are similar in setback and proportion to neighbouring structures to create a coherent streetwall. • Provide active uses at grade to contribute to a human-scale, vibrant street level environment. • Orient buildings toward the street and provide entrances that are clearly visible and directly accessible from the sidewalk to promote use. Incorporate large windows along ground floors of buildings for views of both building interiors and the street. • Articulate building facades and roof lines through measures such as material changes, reflectivity, projecting and recessed surfaces, and architectural detailing to maximize visual interest and to break down building mass. Incorporate high quality materials such as glass, stone, steel and brick. • Breakup long facades with vertical breaks and mid-block walkways to provide an increased number of connections, to minimize walking and cycling distance, and to reduce apparent building mass. • Design all buildings to maximize sustainability for example, by pursuing LEED certification for all new developments on site, incorporating green roofs and green walls and using passive heating and cooling measures. • Where possible, rehabilitate or retrofit existing buildings to accommodate new uses.

The podium creates a continuous streetwall while the tower increases density near a train station in Collingwood Village, Vancouver. (Source: concertpropoerties.com)

(Right) Jarvis Street Toronto is an example of mixed-use development along with commercial at grade and several storeys of apartment units on top. Top units are stepped back to minimize impacts at street level. (Source: http:// www.remaxcondosplus.com/toronto-condo-buildings/saintjames.html)

APPENDICES 125


9.2.1 HIGH RISE DEVELOPMENT (9+ STOREYS) • Locate high-rise development around Blair Station to provide increased density in this area and to provide transit access to a significant number of people. • Separate high-rise buildings from buildings of similar height by 20-23 metres in order to minimize shadow and wind tunnel effects at street level, and to maintain privacy and access to natural light for uses of adjacent buildings. • Design high-rise buildings with maximum floor plate sizes of 750 square metres for residential buildings and 2,000 square metres for office and commercial buildings to limit their visual impact. • Design high-rise buildings as towers-on-podiums to mitigate the impacts of height and bulk by breaking up buildings into clearly defined sections. • Include a mix of uses within high-rise development such as office, retail and residential.

9.2.2 MID-RISE DEVELOPMENT (4-9 STOREYS) • Locate mid-rise development throughout the site to provide increased density to achieve density targets. • Incorporate mid-rise development as a variety of building types, including perimeter blocks and walk-up apartments. • Include a mix of uses within mid-rise development such as office, retail and residential. • Incorporate design elements such as horizontal bands, building indentations and material and colour changes to distinguish between different uses on different floors.

The Rise in Vancouver is a mid-rise development with residential units on top of large format retail. Parking is underground. (Source: http://www.therisevancouver. com)

Development in Regent Park, located in Toronto, Ontario, illustrates the use of podiums, and the placement of active uses at grade, to humanize tall buildings at the pedestrian scale. (Source: http://www.blogto.com/city/2010/03/phase_ one_of_regent_par k_revitalization_nears_completion/)

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9.2.3 OFFICE DEVELOPMENT • Incorporate office use within mid- and high-rise development. • Design office buildings with unique character and distinct signage to generate a more identifiable image for a business. • Provide courtyards, plazas and other amenity spaces adjacent to office buildings for the enjoyment of office workers. • Incorporate CPTED strategies into office design such as access control, adequate lighting, identifiable entrances, and formal surveillance measures to create a safer environment throughout all times of the day.

600 Technology Square, located in Cambridge, Massachusetts, is a good example of office development in that it is oriented toward the street, has facades constructed out of a mix of materials, and is welcoming at street level. (Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/marc72/5409354636/)

9.2.4 TOWNHOUSES • Provide a mixture of row, semi-detached or stacked townhouses which range in height between two and four storeys. • Place a maximum of 14 attached townhouses in a single row. • Provide windows that look out onto the street and front yard amenities such as porches for informal surveillance. • Setback front yards a maximum of six metres to provide space for landscaping and amenity space, including porches, verandas and gardens. • Position decks and balconies to minimize overlook onto neighbouring properties and private amenity space. Where overlook occurs, screen views with landscaping or fencing. • Provide laneways for access and servicing.

Gramercy Place stacked townhouses on Gloucester Street, Ottawa boast facades that incorporate a mix of materials, architectural details, depths, and roof lines that are appropriate for the land area and add interest to the streetscape. Similar townhouses were built in Beacon Hill North (Source: Google Maps, 2012).

APPENDICES 127


9.3 Public Elements 9.3.1 PUBLIC PARKS AND OPEN SPACES • Provide a variety of open spaces throughout the site, including courtyards, plazas, parkettes and neighbourhood parks. • Locate all places of residence on the site within a 400 metre walking distance of a park or open space to provide convenient access for all residents. • Create public plazas as focal points in central areas and areas of high activity, such as near Blair Station, in order to enhance the public realm and to provide spaces for gathering, socializing and relaxing. • Front development surrounding a park or open space onto that space to create natural surveillance. Provide active uses at grade to encourage street level activity around an open space. • Provide multiple access points to parks and open spaces that are clearly visible and easily identifiable in order to encourage public use and increase natural surveillance. • Design parks and open spaces to incorporate CPTED strategies such as adequate lighting and visibility through clear sight lines to create a safer environment throughout all times of the day. • Provide amenities within parks and open spaces such as benches, garbage bins, bike racks, and playground equipment to promote public use. • Include a combination of trees and landscaping, decorative paving, water features and public art to enhance the appearance and identity of parks and open spaces.

128 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED

Technology Square Park, located in Cambridge, Massachusetts, illustrates the importance of framing and fronting onto park space with surrounding development to create an active public space. (Source: http://forum.dallasmetropolis.com/showthread.php/8271-TechnologySquare-Park-in-Cambridge-MA).

9.3.2 STREETSCAPES • Scale street lighting to both the pedestrian and road traffic. Provide continuous lighting along all streets, walkways and trails to prevent the creation of light and dark pockets and for aesthetic effect. Use accent lighting where appropriate to highlight special architectural and landscape features, signage and key landmarks. Where possible, integrate energy efficient lighting features, such as timers, dimmers, sensors and lighting powered by alternative energy sources. • Plant street trees on all roads throughout the site with the exception of laneways. Space trees between 7 and 12 metres apart, depending on the road type, to create a continuous tree canopy and a more intimate streetscape. Trees should have a minimum branching height of 2.4 metres to allow for pedestrian movement underneath. Locate street trees


between the road and sidewalk to buffer pedestrians from vehicular traffic. Place them at least one metre from the curb to allow for snow removal, large vehicle movements, and to minimize salt damage. Plant a variety of species to add colour and texture to the streetscape. Species should be native to the area. Incorporate green infrastructure such as street trees, permeable pavement, and other landscape features into streetscapes for the purposes of stormwater management, reducing the heat island effect, and increasing the level of biodiversity in the area. Design sidewalks and walkways that are at least 4 metres wide to provide a planting bed or allee for landscaping and street trees. Plant landscaping such as shrubbery and flower beds to complement street trees. Focus landscaping on key pedestrian areas, such as community entrances, storefronts, and highly used streets and pathways. Use a variety of species to add visual interest to the streetscape. Species should be native to the area. Provide street furniture such as benches, bike racks, garbage bins, tree guards and newspaper boxes throughout the site. Concentrate street furniture in areas of high pedestrian activity, such as frequently used pathways, parks and plazas, and building entrances. Provide transparent bus shelters throughout the site which offer seating and bus schedules, and are accompanied by other street furniture such as garbage bins and newspaper boxes for user convenience. Use decorative paving, such as cobblestone, brick, and patterned concrete to denote active pedestrian areas and amenity zones.

Sidewalk 2.0 m

Buffer 2.0 m

Parking Lane 2.5 m

Traffic Lane

Traffic Lane

Parking Lane

3.5 m

2.5 m

3.5 m

Buffer 2.0 m

Sidewalk 2.0 m

20.0 m

(Above) Cross section illustrating well-designed streetscapes, including street trees, lighting, wide sidewalks, and street furniture.

(Right) The Shops at Don Mills, in Toronto, Ontario, illustrates the use of streetscape beautification strategies to provide a comfortable and appealing outdoor space through the use of street trees, lighting, a mix of decorative pavement types and patterns, wide sidewalks, and proper signage. (Source: http://www.flairecondostoronto. com/flaire-condos-the-shops-on-don-mills/).

APPENDICES 129


9.4 Blair Station Area

9.4.1 OVERALL SITE DESIGN • Lay out the site in a fine-grained grid pattern consisting of short blocks in order to provide multiple connections and points of access, and to offer route choice to drivers, pedestrians and cyclists. • Create several additional openings onto the existing arterial roads, particularly Ogilvie Road and Blair Road, to increase the number of connections to the site and to relieve traffic congestion. • Locate all laneways and servicing lanes at the rear of buildings. Place loading bays behind buildings and on side streets so as to be hidden from public view. • Concentrate the highest densities and tallest buildings around Blair Station to provide access to and from the site for many users. • Transition in scale between high- and mid-rise development around Blair Station by stepping buildings down towards adjacent lower-rise development.

130 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED

Collingwood Village, located in Vancouver, British Columbia illustrates the importance of placing buildings of the highest densities closest to transit to create a hub of activity, as well as to buffer surrounding neighbourhoods from noise pollution created by the Skytrain. (Source: http://waatp.nl/people/joyce-on/)


APPENDIX 10 - BUILDING PRECEDENTS

List of contents 1. Byward Market - Parking Lot 2. Mount Pleasant - Civic Centre 3. Sqaure Benny - Walk-up Condos 4. The Olive - Mid-Rise Live-Work 5. The Highlands - Residential Tower 6. Galleria 1 & 2 - Mid-Rise Condo 7. The Vento - Mixed Use Infill 8. The Remington at Collingwood Village - Tower and Podium 9. Gramercy Place - Stacked Townhouses 10. Walnut Creek - Office Towers

APPENDICES 131


(Source: www.perkinswill.com

(Source: Google, 2012)

Mount Pleasant Civic Centre Community Centre

Byward Market Parking Lot

Address: 1 Kingsway, Vancouver, BC

Address: York Street, Ottawa, ON Description: Parking garage with two levels of parking and at-grade retaill. Size: Approx. 450 stalls GFA: 12,000 sqm Height: 2 storeys

20 m

20 m

Footprint: 70 m x 55 m

Description: Civic centre with recreational uses, multi-purpose rooms and outdoor space. Also houses a public library, the Child Development Centre, a cafe and market value housing. 20 m

Size: 29,000 sqm community centre, 1100 sqm library, 630 sqm child care facility, and 98 residential units GFA: 5,500 sqm Height: 6 - 7 storeys

132 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED

20 m

Footprint: 110 m x 80 m


(Source: http://www.claudecormier.com/project/benny-farm)

The Olive Mid Rise Live-Work Units

Square Benny Walk up apartment-style condos

Address: Calgary, AB

Address: 1400 Rue Benny, Montreal, QB

Description: Over half the units of The Olive are live work units. Some current commercial uses include dental, medical, office and fitness uses. Some units are built over the Footprint: 65 m x 33 m lane and there is a landscaped interior courtyard.

Description: Newly developed units in Benny Farm for condo ownership. The buildings are designed using environmentallyconscious technologies.

20 m

Size: 27 units

Size: 42 units (Phase 1) and 76 units (Phase 2)

GFA: 5,500 sqm

GFA: 6,500 sqm Height: 3-4 storeys

(Source: http://www.aviurban.com/past/18/olive/)

Height: 3 storeys 20 m

Footprint: 35 m x 50 m x 20 m (maximum depth)

Source: www.calgary.ca

APPENDICES 133


(Source: www.richcraft.com/galleria2)

(Source: Google, 2012)

The Highlands Residential Tower

Address: 200 and 238 Besserer Ottawa, ON

Address: 505-515 St. Laurent Boulevard, Ottawa, ON

Description: Luxury condo development. Galleria 2 features retail on ground level and ground oriented units

Description: Residential tower with podium and underground parking near Montreal Road. Units are for condo ownership. Size: 374 units 20 m

GFA: 30,000 sqm Height: 20 storeys with 5 storey podium

134 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED

Galleria 1 & 2 Mid Rise Condo with Retail

Size: Galleria 1 - unknown Galleria 2 - 460 sqm of retail, 197 condo units

Footprint: 25 m x 25 m (tower)

GFA:

Galleria 1 - 16,000 sqm Galleria 2 - 20,000 sqm

152 m x 25 m (podium)

Height:

Galleria 1 - 12 storeys Galleria 2 - 14 storeys

20 m

Galleria 1

20 m

Footprint: 54 m x 25 m


(Source: http://www.archicentral.com/)

The Vento Mixed Use Infill

The Remington at Collingwood Vaillage Podium and Tower

Address: 108 8 St NE, Calgary, AB Description: A mixed use retail residential development in Calgaryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s The Bridges. Residential units are townhouse style with courtyard Footprint: access. Parking is underground and commericial stalls are located 75 m x 25 m at the rear and accessed through a laneway. LEED platinum for multifamily residential.

Address: 3528 Vanness Boulevard, Vancouver, BC 20 m

Size: 20 residential units, 1,300 sqm of retail space and 2 affordable dwelling units GFA: 3,600 sqm Height: 3 storeys

(Source: www.concertproperties.com)

(Source: http://www.sustainabilitysolutions.ca/)

Description: Residential tower on podium development with one and two bedroom apartments for rent. The L-shaped building frames an Footprint: interior courtyard. 20 m x 30 m (tower) 60 m long x 20 m wide x Size: 257 units 30 m (podium) 20 m x 40 m (courtyard) GFA: 18,000 sqm 20 m

Height: 20 storey tower with 6 storey podium APPENDICES 135


(Ontario Ministry of Infrastructure, www.placestogrow.ca)

(Source: www.therisevancouver.com)

Technology Square Mixed Use Office

The Rise Mixed Use Address: 485 W 8th Avenue, Vancouver, BC

Address: 600 Technology Square, Cambridge, Massachusetts

Description: Mixed use development with big box retail (Home Depot), a grocery store (Save on Foods), and residential garden homes on upper storeys. The building features Footprint: 110 m x 80 m live-work units, rooftop garden and underground parking.

Description: Class A office space with ground floor retail including convenience store, banking services, FedEx, food and fitness centre.

Size: 90 condos and townhouses, 20,000 sqm of retail space

GFA: 9,000 sqm

20 m

GFA: 26,400 sqm Height: 6 - 7 storeys 136 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED

Size: 12,000 sqm

Height: 5 storeys

20 m

Footprint: 45 m x 80 m


(Source: www.onlc.com)

(Source: Google, 2012)

(Source: Google, 2012)

Walnut Creek Office Towers

Gramery Place Stacked Townhouses Address: 300 Gloucester Street, Ottawa, ON

Address: 1277 Treat Boulevard, Walnut Creek, California

Description: Stacked townhouses developed by Minto Development. Units face the street and parking is located in interior. Similar units in Beacon Hill North

Description: Twin office towers adjacent to the Pleasant Hill - Contra Costa Centre BART station. A landscaped plaza is located between the buildings and an attached 4 storey parking garage is behind.

Size: 54 units

20 m

Footprint: Total site area 72 m x 77m

GFA: 7,800 sqm

GFA: 17,000 sqm (each)

Density: 138 units/net hectare

Height: 10 storeys

20 m

Footprint: 55 m x 35 m (each tower)

Height: 4 storeys

APPENDICES 137


APPENDIX 11 - DESIGN CHARRETTE After finalizing a draft of the background study, the project team held a design charrette in Kingston, ON which was attended by 17 participants. These participants represented professional planners from the City of Ottawa, the City of Kingston, and Bray Heritage, as well as faculty and graduate students from Queen’s University’s School of Urban and Regional Planning. The goal of the charrette was to have the participants create multiple design options to inform the final vision(s) for the Blair Station Area (BSA). Therefore, the charrette needed to also provide participants with sufficient information to inform their designs options and to build consensus on what the BSA should look like in the future. The project team gave a presentation on the arrival of the Ottawa LRT system and the rationale for intensification around Blair Station. Participants learned about the site’s location, existing conditions, and its strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and challenges (S.W.O.C.). The purpose of this presentation was to provide background information to the participants, some of whom were not familiar with Ottawa. The next exercise in the charrette was a series of technical workshops. Participants were divided into four small groups and rotated between four workshop stations. Each station displayed poster boards with photos and data analyzing one aspect of the background analysis. Two project team members were present at each station to discuss the analysis with the participants. The themes of the four stations were: • Site Analysis I: Built environment, real estate analysis, and community profile. • Site Analysis II: natural environment, infrastructure, transportation, and connectivity • Policy Framework: review of policies and the regulatory framework. • Precedents: analysis of relevant transit-oriented development, greyfield, office park and mobility hub precedents. The workshops were an opportunity to present the research completed to date. Participants asked questions and provided

138 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED

valuable feedback while identifying areas that required further research. Participants were able to supplement the material with some of their own specialized knowledge about Ottawa and TOD in general. The discussions period was very active and provided a great lead up to design exercise. Workshop Station Site Analysis I

Site Analysis II

Policy Framework

Precedents

Key Discussion Points Growing trend towards apartments in Ottawa housing starts Mix of housing tenure surrounding the BSA Specialized housing for seniors and/or students Need a mix of types and unit sizes (1-3 bedrooms) Planning history in Gloucester, or lack thereof Existing transit ridership levels Overcoming the Queensway to improve connectivity Unsafe pedestrian and cycling environment Environmental opportunities (view corridors, extension of parks system, etc.) How many buses will need to be accommodated How traffic will more around and through the site Parking minimum and maximums Who will be responsible for upgrading infrastructure Incentives to provide underground parking Density targets in relation to other LRT station Where does Blair lie on the rural-urban transect Best practices for pedestrian bridges Appropriate size of pedestrian shed Most relevant precedents to Blair Station Deciding on a site orientation of the site (inwards vs. outwards)

After gaining an understanding of the BSA, the same groups were divided into design breakout rooms and given just over an hour to create design options of the entire BSA and of a smaller portion of the site in greater detail (FIG 1). All the groups developed sophisticated and unique designs, which they presented to the entire group in the main room (FIG 2). Although the designs differed in many respects, some common elements or themes appeared: • Transit station integration • Mix of uses with varying sizes (e.g. small and large-scale retail and office)


• Super block pattern should be broken up into a grid with through streets • Streetscape improvements are required on Ogilvie Road and Blair Road • Creating a main street should be explored • Build at or close to the street line • Building heights should descend from possible high rises near the station down to more human scaled buildings near established residential areas. • Parking should be replaced with underground or multilevel structures but at a lower ratio • Public spaces and greenspace need to be considered

BLUE GROUP Main Points: • Create grid street network and integrate with surroundings • Build to plane whenever possible • Parking garage along Queensway provides noise buffer and can be extended as development is phased in • Towers placed in strategic areas for max density around station and views of greenbelt

Following a wrap-up discussion, participants were asked to complete a short survey. Results from the voluntary survey indicated that the charrette was a success, though some respondents mentioned they were pressed for time in the design exercise. Despite the limited time constraints, the charrette produced very coherent results and the project team left with invaluable feedback and innovative design ideas that informed the remainder of the site analysis and final vision for Blair Station.

Blue Group Concept Plan

APPENDICES 139


RED GROUP

PURPLE GROUP

Main Points: • Raised greenway over Queensway provides open space and improves connectivity • Smaller blocks create modified grid • Primarily mixed use • Small area plan (east): • Interior main street created with tree lined boulevard • Office buildings maintained but with greater access to the street • Mix of building forms

Main Points: • Pedestrian bridge fully integrated with Gloucester centre • Condos and office towers located around the mall • Small area plan (south): • Connected pathway • Intensification of office park with mixed uses • Residential development along Blair Road Purple Group concept plan

Red Group concept plan

Purple Group small area plan

Red Group small area plan

140 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED


GREEN GROUP

COMMENTS

Main points: • Focus on what is realistically achievable • Generally the same block function but with introduction of mixed uses • Most buildings retained with introduction of new infill buildings (green) • Creation of new interior streets (blue)

• Developers can be educated to produce different products. Need to show them good precedents that are successful and profitable. Don’t just accept developers for the way they are. • Need to think regionally and compare site to other places in Ottawa. Should do similar SWOC analysis for other areas of the city including downtown, other stations, older neighbourhoods etc… • Don’t feel the need to retain as many buildings as possible. Most are easily replaceable.

Red Group concept plan

Red Group small area plan

APPENDICES 141


APPENDIX 12 - CARPET CONCEPT BUILDING SCHEDULE

5 1 6 3 6 6 6 7 7 7 7 4 4 4 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 6 2 6 7 3 6 7 7 5 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 5 3 8 8 8 4 4 4 4

88,308.71 6,611.28 23,414.77 23,846.76 42,719.31 40,724.84 37,077.53 59,732.82 21,597.81 16,593.99 17,839.36 6,653.68 4,816.92 4,929.96 5,687.19 15,512.20 7,393.00 12,379.56 13,153.24 13,318.00 8,071.48 13,462.08 14,423.20 29,850.84 8,984.88 19,263.90 64,374.36 32,146.80 136,260.39 63,324.68 50,675.88 14,872.50 38,177.38 38,527.40 38,818.44 32,855.91 50,617.59 46,314.61 28,382.90 22,415.52 3,555.63 10,663.84 10,674.88 10,670.88 9,908.48 7,059.20 6,877.76 5,238.76

Gross Floor Area by Type of Use

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26! 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47

18,530 6,611 4,067 7,949 7,286 6,948 6,329 8,698 3,195 2,456 2,638 1,663 1,204 1,232 1,896 3,878 1,848 3,095 3,288 3,330 2,018 3,366 3,606 7,208 4,492 3,211 8,640 10,716 42,514 12,330 9,512 3,256 5,540 6,437 6,485 5,474 8,402 7,731 4,174 5,415 1,185 1,333 1,334 1,334 2,477 1,765 1,719 1,310

142 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED

18,403 14,138 15,201 6,654 4,817 4,930 5,687 15,512 7,393 12,380 13,153 13,318 8,071 13,462 14,423 35,753 33,813 33,630 32,638 32,090 32,334 27,382 42,215 38,583 24,209 9,908 7,059 6,878 5,239

4,067 7,286 6,948 6,329 8,698 3,195 2,456 2,638 2,742 8,985 3,211 8,640 21,431 127,543 5,777 5,746 5,540 6,437 6,485 5,474 8,402 7,731 4,174 3,085 1,185 -

88,309 6,611 19,348 35,433 33,777 30,748 51,035 13,710 16,053 19,981 10,716 8,717 9,248 12,341 2,370 10,664 10,675 10,671 -

Dwelling Units

Residents

Jobs

Residents & Jobs

Parking Required

Parking Provided

Parking (m2)

Building Gross Area (m2)

Office Area (m2)

Storeys

Retail Area (m2)

Floor Plate (m2)

Residential Area (m2)

Building #

23,847 13,399 23,734 11,300 5,625 6,990 -

230 177 190 83 60 62 71 194 92 155 164 166 101 168 180 447 423 420 408 401 404 342 528 482 303 124 88 86 65

373 286 308 171 124 127 146 399 190 319 339 270 163 273 292 724 685 681 661 650 655 554 855 781 490 201 143 177 135

3,165 237 803 1,466 1,397 1,272 2,063 86 66 71 565 242 662 948 960 3,741 155 154 331 149 173 174 147 226 208 112 525 117 382 383 382 -

3,165 237 803 1,466 1,397 1,272 2,063 459 352 379 171 124 127 146 399 190 319 339 270 163 273 292 565 242 662 1,672 960 3,741 840 835 331 810 823 829 702 1,081 989 602 525 117 382 383 382 201 143 177 135

662 50 145 0 266 253 231 383 46 35 38 17 12 12 14 39 18 31 33 33 20 34 36 103 0 120 239 80 1022 85 84 69 82 80 81 68 106 96 61 93 18 80 80 80 25 18 17 13

795 447 791 377 188 233 -

 


APPENDIX 12 - CARPET CONCEPT BUILDING SCHEDULE Storeys

Building Gross Area (m2)

5 8 8 7 4 4 2 2 2 2 4 5 4 6 3 8 6 6 8 6 7 6 6 6 6 4 4 4 4 6 6 4 4 4 6

13,991.30 7,140.24 6,800.96 9,376.08 6,490.36 7,181.76 3,445.98 1,530.72 3,493.32 1,515.20 6,934.44 20,103.28 39,393.40 30,162.40 37,803.44 20,359.36 10,013.28 10,048.23 10,674.02 12,949.45 14,151.67 13,918.38 14,315.10 7,384.95 9,742.59 4,782.20 8,752.72 17,218.56 21,260.16 11,052.52 22,308.76 5,185.76 5,358.24 9,918.80 52,418.71

6,490 7,182 3,446 1,531 3,493 1,515 6,934 15,236 9,066 8,616 17,221 4,019 7,439 -

893 850 3,432 3,222 2,428 2,435 2,490 2,623 3,608 3,740 1,375 2,372 1,196 2,436.36 5,088 1,296 1,340 2,480 -

13,991 6,248 5,951 9,376 11,812 8,757 20,359 7,585 7,613 10,674 10,459 11,529 10,310 10,575 6,010 7,371 3,587 8,753 21,260 3,889 37,720

8,291 27,205 11,705 37,803 8,152 14,699

81 90 43 19 44 19 87 190 113 108 215 50 93 -

167 185 89 39 90 39 179 309 184 174 349 81 151 -

501 248 236 336 423 406 87 730 337 338 383 442 484 467 480 252 328 161 314 762 65 137 174 36 67 1,352

501 248 236 336 167 185 89 39 90 39 179 423 406 395 730 337 338 383 442 484 467 480 252 328 161 314 184 762 240 485 174 117 217 1,352

1,755,957

621,462

317,508

624,237

192,750

7,768

13,207

30,909

44,117

Total (Study Area)

Total (Exclusion Area)!

Total (Development Area)!

48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82

2,798 893 850 1,339 1,623 1,795 1,723 765 1,747 758 1,734 4,435 11,987 7,294 11,393 2,545 2,428 2,435 1,441 3,403 2,623 3,608 3,740 1,375 2,372 1,196 2,188 4,305 5,315 2,436 5,088 1,296 1,340 2,480 8,390

Dwelling Units

Residents

Jobs

Residents & Jobs

Parking Required

Parking Provided

Parking (m2)

Office Area (m2)

Gross Floor Area by Type of Use Retail Area (m2)

Floor Plate (m2)

Residential Area (m2)

Building #

797

8,565

2015

15,222

3500

34,409

105 47 45 70 16 18 9 4 9 4 17 89 66 38 0 153 57 57 80 78 86 77 79 45 55 27 66 23 159 22 43 29 10 19 283

7,192

276 907 390 1,260 272 490

6,425

5515

49,632

Assumptions 1.62 People Per Apartment Unit; 2.06 People Per Stacked Townhouse Unit; 80 m2 Gross Area Per Residential Unit; 27.9 m2 Per Office Employee; 37.2 m2 Per Retail Employee; 30 m2 Per Parking Spot; 3m Floor Height For Residential; 3.5m Floor Height For Commercial; Parking requirements based on the Downtown and Tunney’s Pasture ratios. GFA includes underground parking and garage space but not surface parking.   ✜ This is a mixed use centre containing a civic centre and affordable housing. The civic centre is assumed to have a mixture of office and retail space. ✪ Areas within the boundaries of the BSA that are considered for development (see exclusion areas map)

APPENDICES 143


APPENDIX 12 - CARPET CONCEPT BUILDING SCHEDULE

0 7

1

3

6

5

4 2 10

9

8

15

14

27

44

13

12 11

26

40

39

43

17

56

59

18 31

19

21

22

23

20

60

82 61

62 67 63 64

65

66 70 69

73

68

77

72 71

74

81

76

75 78

80 79

144 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED

53 54

51

50

28

25

47

52

49

48

45

46

42

41

30

24

16

34

33

32

29

38

37

36

35

55 57

58


APPENDIX 12 - CARPET CONCEPT BUILDING SCHEDULE Block Area (m2) GFA (m2) Net FSI A 13,071 47,262 B 12,138 42,719 C 11,163 40,725 D 9,845 37,078 E 15,243 59,733 F 9,552 28,252 G 2,791 7,583 H 7,373 21,411 I 7,983 22,769 J 11,084 22,905 K 5,707 8,985 L 5,358 12,380 M 6,122 13,153 N 8,813 19,264 O 5,582 13,318 P 2,646 8,071

Q

5,333

13,462

R

6,404

14,423

8,954 13,929 48,658 12,102 10,850 10,988 4,019 3,584 30,292 8,150 14,900 12,626 5,125 10,606 9,061 8,017 5,882 6,400 6,870 10,149 6,792 3,692 6,121 5,320

25,385 64,374 136,260 32,147 50,532 50,676 13,466 115,522 32,856 50,618 46,315 28,383 36,636 21,346 16,786 12,298 21,131 16,177 13,429 10,228 6,934 18,031 -

S T U V W X Y Z A1 B1 C1 D1 E1 F1 G1 H1 I1 J1 K1 L1 M1 N1 O1 P1

Block Q1 R1 S1 T1 U1 V1 W1 X1 Y1 Z1 A2 B2 C2 D2 E2 F2 TOTAL (Net Development 2.52 Area) Total (Net Exclusion 2.25 Area) Total (Net 2.84 Study Area)! 4.62 2.80 2.66 4.66 4.61 0.00 3.76 3.81 4.03 3.40 3.67 5.54 3.45 2.36 2.09 2.09 3.30 2.35 1.32 1.51 1.88 2.95 0.00 3.62 3.52 3.65 3.77 3.92 2.96 2.72 2.90 2.85 2.07 1.57 2.31 2.15 2.19 2.39 3.05

Area (m2) GFA (m2) Net FSI 2,758 24,375 49,876 12,972 38,880 8,007 30,675 13,601 44,029 3,648 10,013 6,626 20,722 6,314 12,949 3,356 14,152 5,388 13,918 6,583 14,315 10,840 16,138 11,085 24,923 17,291 37,095 10,368 22,309 27,814 20,463

0.00 2.05 3.00 3.83 3.24 2.74 3.13 2.05 4.22 2.58 2.17 1.49 2.25 2.15 2.15 0.74

580,323

1,623,480

2.80

226,854

103,826

0.46

807,177

1,727,306

2.14

★ Net area does not include roadways and open spaces (see blocks map)

Gross Area (m2) GFA (m2) Gross FSI ''''''''''''''''!"#$%"&&& '''''!"$($"#&) !*(+

 

Net FSI= GFA/ Area Gross FSI= GFA/ Gross Area

 

APPENDICES 145


APPENDIX 12 - CARPET CONCEPT BUILDING SCHEDULE

146 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED

 


Building Gross Area (m2)

Gross Floor Area by Type of Use

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27! 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44

18,530 6,611 4,067 7,949 7,286 6,948 6,329 8,698 3,195 2,456 2,638 1,663 1,204 1,232 891 885 3,878 1,848 3,095 3,288 3,747 2,018 4,483 3,606 4,492 3,211 7,208 8,640 10,716 42,514 1,248 1,253 1,025 1,025 12,330 636 9,512 1,575 3,322 5,540 6,437 6,485 5,474 8,402 7,731

5 1 6 3 6 6 6 7 7 7 7 4 4 4 3 4 4 4 4 4 12 4 8 4 2 6 18 7 3 6 15 15 14 14 7 12 7 92 10 7 7 7 7 7 7

88,309 6,611 23,415 23,847 42,719 40,725 37,078 59,733 21,598 16,594 17,839 6,654 4,817 4,930 2,672 3,541 15,512 7,393 12,380 13,153 34,326 8,071 24,847 14,423 8,985 19,264 62,605 64,374 32,147 136,260 18,723 18,442 13,725 13,725 63,325 7,180 50,676 25,702 20,886 38,177 38,527 38,818 32,856 50,618 46,315

11,214 18,403 14,138 15,201 6,654 4,817 4,930 2,672 3,541 15,512 7,393 12,380 13,153 28,926 8,071 24,847 14,423 46,565 35,753 18,723 18,442 13,725 13,725 33,813 7,180 33,630 19,401 32,638 32,090 32,334 27,382 42,215 38,583

4,067 7,286 6,948 6,329 8,698 3,195 2,456 2,638 8,985 3,211 4,145 8,640 21,431 127,543 5,777 5,746 1,575 5,540 6,437 6,485 5,474 8,402 7,731

88,309 6,611 8,134 35,433 33,777 30,748 51,035 16,053 19,981 10,716 8,717 15,662 -

Dwelling Units

Residents Jobs

Residents & Jobs

Parking Required

Parking Provided

Parking (m2)

Storeys

Office Area (m2)

Floor Plate (m2)

Residential Area (m2)

Building #

13 - TARGET CONCEPT BUILDING SCHEDULE Retail Area (m2)

 APPENDIX

23,847 5,400 11,895 23,734 11,300 4,726 5,224 -

0 0 140 0 0 0 0 0 230 177 190 83 60 62 33 44 194 92 155 164 362 101 311 180 0 0 582 447 0 0 234 231 172 172 423 90 420 243 0 408 401 404 342 528 482

227 373 286 308 171 124 127 69 91 399 190 319 339 586 163 503 292 943 724 379 373 278 278 685 145 681 393 661 650 655 554 855 781

3,165 237 401 1,466 1,397 1,272 2,063 86 66 71 242 662 111 948 960 3,741 155 154 42 561 149 173 174 147 226 208

3,165 237 628 1,466 1,397 1,272 2,063 459 352 379 171 124 127 69 91 399 190 319 339 586 163 503 292 242 662 1,054 1,672 960 3,741 379 373 278 278 840 145 835 435 561 810 823 829 702 1,081 989

662 50 89 0 266 253 231 383 46 35 38 17 12 12 7 9 39 18 31 33 72 20 62 36 0 120 116 239 80 1022 47 46 34 34 85 18 84 49 117 82 80 81 68 106 96

795 180 397 791 377 158 174 -

   

APPENDICES 147


APPENDIX 13 - TARGET CONCEPT BUILDING SCHEDULE Gross Floor Area by Type of Use

45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91

4,174 5,415 1,185 1,333 1,334 1,334 2,477 1,765 1,719 1,310 2,798 893 850 1,339 1,623 1,795 1,379 1,265 1,734 4,708 2,490 1,250 12,788 1,025 1,025 7,294 626 11,393 2,545 2,428 2,435 1,441 3,403 2,623 3,608 3,740 1,375 2,372 1,196 2,188 4,305 5,315 2,436 5,088 1,296 1,340 2,480

7 5 3 8 8 8 4 4 4 4 5 8 8 7 4 4 12 12 4 16 17 12 4 15 15 6 23 3 8 6 6 8 8 7 6 19 6 6 4 4 4 4 6 6 4 4 4

148 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED

       

28,383 22,416 3,556 10,664 10,675 10,671 9,908 7,059 6,878 5,239 13,991 7,140 6,801 9,376 6,490 7,182 20,316 18,615 6,934 65,807 35,742 18,400 41,284 15,375 14,750 38,308 14,407 37,803 20,359 2,428 10,048 10,674 14,775 14,152 13,918 27,755 7,385 9,743 4,782 8,753 17,219 21,260 11,053 22,309 5,186 5,358 9,919

24,209 9,908 7,059 6,878 5,239 6,490 7,182 16,180 14,821 6,934 14,650 15,375 14,750 15,236 14,407 18,181 9,066 8,616 17,221 4,019 7,439

4,174 3,085 1,185 893 850 9,511 3,222 2,428 2,435 2,490 2,623 3,608 2,558 1,375 2,372 1,196 2,436 5,088 1,296 1,340 2,480

12,341 2,370 10,664 10,675 10,671 13,991 6,248 5,951 9,376 51,685 28,273 7,674 20,359 7,585 7,613 10,674 12,285 11,529 10,310 5,116 6,010 7,371 3,587 8,753 21,260 3,889 -

Dwelling Units

Residents Jobs

Residents & Jobs

Parking Required

Parking Provided

Parking (m2)

Building Gross Area (m2)

Office Area (m2)

Storeys

Retail Area (m2)

Floor Plate (m2)

Residential Area (m2)

Building #

6,990 4,136 3,794 14,123 7,469 3,750 24,098 19,851 37,803 1,901 8,152 -

303 0 0 0 0 0 124 88 86 65 0 0 0 0 81 90 202 185 87 0 0 183 0 192 184 190 180 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 227 0 0 0 0 113 0 108 215 0 50 93

490 201 143 177 135 167 185 328 300 179 297 311 299 309 292 368 184 174 349 81 151

112 525 117 382 383 382 501 248 236 336 1,853 1,013 531 87 730 337 338 383 507 484 467 252 252 328 161 314 762 65 137 174 36 67

602 525 117 382 383 382 201 143 177 135 501 248 236 336 167 185 328 300 179 1,853 1,013 297 531 311 299 395 292 730 337 338 383 507 484 467 620 252 328 161 314 184 762 240 485 174 117 217

61 93 18 80 80 80 25 18 17 13 105 47 45 70 16 18 40 37 17 388 212 37 58 38 37 38 36 0 153 57 57 80 92 86 77 84 45 55 27 66 23 159 22 43 29 10 19

233 138 126 471 249 125 803 662 1,260 63 272 -

                           


APPENDIX 13 - TARGET CONCEPT BUILDING SCHEDULE

Gross Floor Area by Type of Use

8,390 2,503

Total Total (Study (Exclusion Area) Area)!

Total (Development Area)!

92 93

6 17

52,419 42,546

42,546

2,158,726

938,879

-

325,383

Dwelling Units

Residents Jobs

Residents & Jobs

Parking Required

Parking Provided

Parking (m2)

Building Gross Area (m2)

Office Area (m2)

Storeys

Retail Area (m2)

Floor Plate (m2)

Residential Area (m2)

Building #

37,720 -

14,699 -

669,157

232,892

0 532

11,736

797

12,533

862

1,352 -

1,352 862

19,583

32,731

52,314

2015

21,598

3500

36,231

283 106

8,323

490 -

7,763

5515

57,829

Assumptions 1.62 People Per Apartment Unit; 2.06 People Per Stacked Townhouse Unit; 80 m2 Gross Area Per Residential Unit; 27.9 m2 Per Office Employee; 37.2 m2 Per Retail Employee; 30 m2 Per Parking Spot; 3m Floor Height For Residential; 3.5m Floor Height For Commercial; Parking requirements based on the Downtown and Tunney’s Pasture ratios. GFA includes underground parking and garage space but not surface parking.

 

✜ This is a mixed use centre containing a civic centre and affordable housing. The civic centre is assumed to have a mixture of office and retail space. ✪ Areas within the boundaries of the BSA that are considered for development (see exclusion areas map) ★ Areas not considered for development (See exclusion areas map) + future CSIS employment. CSIS is projected to add 3,500 jobs.

 

APPENDICES 149


APPENDIX 13 - TARGET CONCEPT BUILDING SCHEDULE

0 7

1

3

6

5

4

35

2

39

41

40

45

44

43

42

34 10

9

8

12 11 14

27

28

15 17

16

46 24

50

58

57

61

37 29

25 19

63

60

59

56

55

54

53

49

48

36

30

18

52

51 47

13

62

66 65

33

64

32

31

38

20

21

22

23

26

69

93

68

67

70

92 71

72 77 73 74

75

76 80 79

83

78

87

82 81

84

91

86

85 88

90 89

v

150 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED

 


APPENDIX 13 - TARGET CONCEPT BUILDING SCHEDULE Block A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q

R

S T U V W X Y Z A1 B1 C1 D1 E1 F1 G1 H1 I1 J1 K1 L1 M1 N1 O1 P1

Area (m2) GFA (m2) Net FSI 13,071 47,262 3.62 12,138 42,719 3.52 11,163 40,725 3.65 9,845 37,078 3.77 15,243 59,733 3.92 9,552 28,252 2.96 2,791 7,103 2.54 7,373 21,411 2.90 7,983 22,769 2.85 11,084 22,905 2.07 5,707 8,985 1.57 5,358 12,380 2.31 6,122 13,153 2.15 8,813 19,264 2.19 5,582 34,326 6.15 2,646 8,071 3.05

Block Q1 R1 S1 T1 U1 V1 W1 X1 Y1 Z1 A2 B2 C2 D2 E2 F2

Area (m2) GFA (m2) Net FSI 2,757 18,400 6.67 24,375 49,876 2.05 12,972 71,409 5.50 8,007 45,082 5.63 13,601 86,575 6.37 3,648 10,013 2.74 6,626 20,722 3.13 6,314 14,776 2.34 3,356 14,152 4.22 5,388 13,918 2.58 6,583 27,755 4.22 10,840 16,138 1.49 11,085 24,923 2.25 17,291 37,095 2.15 10,368 22,309 2.15 27,814 20,463 0.74

24,847

Total (Net Development 4.66 Area)

580,323

2,033,143

3.50

6,404

14,423

Total (Net Exclusion 2.25 Area)

226,854

103,826

0.46

8,954 13,929 48,658 12,102 10,850 10,988 4,019 3,584 30,292 8,150 14,900 12,626 5,125 10,606 9,061 8,017 5,882 6,400 6,870 10,149 6,792 3,692 6,121 5,320

62,605 64,374 200,875 32,147 57,712 50,676 25,702 20,886 115,522 32,856 50,618 46,315 28,383 36,636 21,346 16,786 12,298 21,131 16,177 26,806 25,797 6,934 65,807 35,742

807,177

2,136,969

2.65

5,333

Total (Net 6.99 Study Area)! 4.62 4.13 2.66 5.32 4.61 6.39 5.83 3.81 4.03 3.40 3.67 5.54 3.45 2.36 2.09 2.09 3.30 2.35 2.64 3.80 1.88 10.75 6.72

★ Net area does not include roadways and open spaces (see blocks map)

Gross Area (m2) GFA (m2) Gross FSI

''''''''''''''!"#$%"&&& '''("!#)"*)*

!+,,

 

Net FSI= GFA/ Area Gross FSI= GFA/ Gross Area

APPENDICES 151


APPENDIX 13   - TARGET CONCEPT BUILDING SCHEDULE

  152 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED

 


APPENDIX 14 - STABLE LOW DENSITY RESIDENTIAL AREAS EXCLUDED FROM DESIGN CONSIDERATION

!

!

Blair Station Exclusion Area Roadway

0

75

150

Metres 300

Data Source: City of Ottawa (2012)

I

Building Footprints Study Area

APPENDICES 153


APPENDIX 15 - SHADOW ANALYSIS

June 21, 9 AM

June 21, 12 PM

June 21, 4 PM

December 21, 10 AM

December 21, 1 PM

December 21, 7 PM

154 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED


APPENDIX 16 - CURRENT ZONING LIMITS Parcel # 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 Total (Development Area)"

Parcel Area(m2)! 1,343 62,073 97,837 10,095 28,604 10,042 27,166 6,630 3,384 3,164 2,901 9,617 78,565 35,301 15,205 40,387 19,721 7,029 10,817 4,690 6,975 5,464 11,431 1,201 12,253 4,482 968 1,109 1,574

520,028

FAR Allowed 0.6 0.6 2 2 1.1 2 1.1 1.8 1.8 1.8 1.8 1.8 1.1 2 2 2 2 2 2 0 2 0 0 0 2 2 2 2 2

1.50

Max Floor Area (m2) 806 37,244 195,674 20,190 31,464 20,084 29,883 11,934 6,091 5,695 5,222 17,311 86,422 70,602 30,410 80,774 39,442 14,058 21,634 13,950 24,506 8,964 1,936 2,218 3,148

Type of Space Residential Retail Office Parking" Total

Space (m2) 406,246 105,715 183,882 83,818 779,661

Dwelling Units

Residents & Jobs 4,514 4,514

7,764 2,842 6,591 17,196 +

Current Residents! Future CSIS workers Total Residents & Jobs Total Gross Study Area (ha) Density Allowed Under Current Zoning#

2,015 3,500 22,711 137.8

165

779,661

 

Assumptions 1.72 People Per Dwelling Units (slightly higher than the standard used for apartments as some units will be townhomes); 80 m2 Gross Area Per Residential Unit; 27.9 m2 Per Office Employee; 37.2 m2 Per Retail Employee; Max Floor Area includes underground parking and garage space but not surface parking.

★ Does not include roadways and open spaces (see map A) v Areas within the boundaries of the BSA considered for development (see exclusion areas map) ✪ Includes only underground and garage parking space ¢ Residents who live in areas within the boundaries of the BSA that are not considered for redevelopment (see exclusion areas map) ✜ People and jobs per hectare

APPENDICES 155


APPENDIX 17 - ADDITIONAL PROPOSED STREET CROSS SECTIONS

Sidewalk

Traffic Lane

2.5 m

3.5 m

Traffic Lane 3.5 m

Sidewalk 2.5 m

12.0 m

156 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED

Sidewalk 2.0 m

Buffer 2.0 m

Bike Lane Parking Lane 1.8 m

2.5 m

Traffic Lane

Traffic Lane

3.5 m

3.5 m

23.6 m

Parking Lane Bike Lane 1.8 m 2.5 m

Buffer 2.0 m

Sidewalk 2.0 m


APPENDIX 17 - ADDITIONAL PROPOSED STREET CROSS SECTIONS

Amenity Space 4.0 m

Sidewalk 2.0 m

Buffer 2.0 m

Bike Lane Parking Lane 1.8 m

2.5 m

Traffic Lane

Traffic Lane

Parking Lane

Bike Lane

Buffer

3.5 m

3.5 m

2.5 m

1.8 m

2.0 m

Sidewalk 2.0 m

Amenity Space 4.0 m

31.6 m

APPENDICES 157


APPENDIX 17 - ADDITIONAL PROPOSED STREET CROSS SECTIONS

Sidewalk

Buffer

Bike Lane

Traffic Lane

Traffic Lane

Traffic Lane

Traffic Lane

4.0 m

2.0 m

2.0 m

3.5 m

3.5 m

3.5 m

3.5 m

37.0 m

158 BLAIR STATION (RE)ENVISIONED

Traffic Lane 3.5 m

Traffic Lane

Bike Lane

3.5 m

2.0 m

Buffer 2.0 m

Sidewalk 4.0 m


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Blair Station (Re)Envisioned