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HIRAM FARM L i v i n g

a n d

L e a r n i n g

C o m m u n i t y

An agricultural community for adults with autism.

2014 - 2016 Strategic Plan


Contents Executive Summary!

4

Part One!

5

History

5

Organizational Growth

6

Table 1: Farmer Wages!

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Table 2: Hiram Farm Indicators!

6

Part Two!

7

Components of a Logic Model

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Table 3: Component Definition!

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Figure 1: Reading the Logic Model!

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Resources Table 4: Resources! Activities

8 8 9

Table 5: Marketing & Communications Activities!

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Table 6: Volunteer Engagement Activities!

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Table 7: Organization & Farm Infrastructure (2014 to 2016)!

11

Table 8: Fundraising Source Mix (2014 to 2016)!

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Table 9: Hiram Farm Board of Directors!

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Table 10: Individuals (2014 to 2016)!

12

Table 11: Businesses & Organizations (2014 to 2016)!

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Table 12: Foundations (2014 to 2016)!

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Table 13: Special Events & Direct Mail Campaigns!

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Table 14: Donor Cycle Terms!

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Figure 2: The Donor Cycle!

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Table 15: Fund Development Strategy Activities!

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Table 16: Residential Services Activities! Outputs Table 17: Outputs by Component! Outcomes Table 18: Outcomes! Impact

16 16 16 18 18 19

Table 19: Impact!

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Figure 3: Hiram Farm Logic Model!

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Action Plans

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Table 20: Marketing, Communications & Volunteer Engagement Action Plan!

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Table 21: Volunteer Engagement Action Plan!

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Table 22: Time, Talent & Treasure (T3) Board Challenge Action Plan!

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Table 23: Individual Giving Action Plan!

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Table 24: Business, Organizations & Foundations Action Plan!

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Table 24: Special Events Action Plan!

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Table 25: Organization & Farm Infrastructure Action Plan!

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Table 26: Collaboration Infrastructure Action Plan!

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Table 27: Residential Services Action Plan!

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Gantt Chart

Part Three!

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25

Vision

25

Strengths

27

Weaknesses

28

Threats

28

Opportunities

29

Stakeholders

30

Steps

30

Mission

31

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Part Four!

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Chambers of Commerce

32

Fundraising & Foundation Resources

32

Approaching Foundations

33

Living Arrangements - Adults with ASD

34

Research on Residential Living for Autistic Adults

36

Volunteer Web Resources

36

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Executive Summary ! This strategic growth planning was completed over several months in 2013. Beginning with a visioning exercise and situational (SWOT) analysis facilitated during a retreat in February 2013, the Board of Directors put into motion the strategic direction for the organization. Several essential strategic paths were identified for development that led to a prioritized clustering in three areas around marketing, communications, volunteer engagement, funding, and partnerships. These three cluster areas build upon and reinforce each other so that critical outcomes are realized. More specifically, the cluster areas and outcomes include: 1. Marketing, Communications & Volunteer Engagement. Improving marketing, communications and volunteer engagement for increasing supporters, volunteers, and donors 2. Fund Development Strategy for Organization Infrastructure & Farm Infrastructure. Establishing a fund development strategy to raise funds for increasing organization infrastructure (i.e., board and staff development, administrative office expansion), farm infrastructure, and exploring residential services 3. Collaboration Infrastructure. Building collaborative partnerships (collaboration infrastructure) for increasing community partners and expanding presence The final area identified as important for Hiram Farm is developing a plan for owning and operating a residential facility. While not a cluster, this critical work is scheduled to begin in 2016 with research and data collection to inform a strategy and fund development plan. ! This report outlines the strategic growth plan for Hiram Farm in four parts. Part One of this report is a brief history of the organization including a snapshot of key indicators that demonstrate organizational growth from 2009 through 2012 (i.e., farmer wage increases, revenue, persons served, direct support professionals mix). Logic modeling informed the Hiram Farm strategic plan. Part Two of this report presents the Logic Model (for explanation, evaluation and course correction) and Action Plans (for implementation). Notes from the board visioning process and SWOT analysis are summarized in Part Three. Finally, data sources and additional useful organizational information are presented in Part Four.

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Part One Hiram Farm Living and Learning Community History In 2007 a dedicated group of parents and professionals came together to fulfill a dream. This group is working to make this dream a reality for many families in Portage County and the surrounding area that need this service. After 18 months of planning and fundraising, the Hiram Farm program opened in June of 2009 on a 120-acre organic farm under lease from the Alfred W. Couch Farm Company Trustees. Six adult workers with autism were served by the program at that time. In the first year, a one-acre organic garden was planted, twelve small garden plots were made available to gardeners living in the Hiram community, the livestock program began and a small greenhouse was constructed. 2010 saw the program grow to serving 16 workers, a second, larger, greenhouse was built and construction began on our barn. The livestock program grew to include chickens and pigs in addition to the sheep and goats that were raised the previous year. By our second anniversary, June of 2011, the program expanded to include 22 adults with autism. Construction work on the barn is nearly complete and the organization was fortunate to be able to purchase a house adjacent to the Farm property which will serve as office and program space. Meanwhile, our therapeutic farm community project has more than doubled in size and the Hiram Farm farmers and staff have developed a number of craft projects and grown seedling plants to sell to the public. 2012 brought many changes to the farm. The new barn was completed, the Farmhouse received it’s occupancy permits and we increased our farm animals by adding 2 therapy cows along with our pigs, chickens, sheep and goats. The farmhouse houses our art therapy program, our weaving program and we recently added a ceramics program. This space also houses the administrative offices and the gallery where the farmer’s crafts and furniture items are sold.

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By our fourth anniversary, June 2013, we moved our old hoop house and had it rebuilt, purchased a new greenhouse to have a year round growing program to sell our produce to local restaurants and have added a new pavilion for permanent shade. We have expanded our program to 29 farmers with 12 full time and 8 part-time staff members (as of November 1, 2013). This period of rapid growth has been challenging and rewarding. Hiram Farm Living and Learning Community hopes to be able to provide the employment opportunities and therapeutic activities that people with autism so desperately need for many years to come. Organizational Growth The achievements of Hiram Farm Living and Learning Community (Hiram Farm) are also reflected through increasing performance. Table 1 outlines the farmer wage increases from 2010 to 2012. Table 2 presents additional key indicators of the Hiram Farm growth from 2009 to 2012 demonstrating increases in revenue, persons served, and the direct support professionals mix illustrating increases in regular staff and substitute staff. Table 1: Farmer Wages Year

Earnings per paycheck

Percent increase

2010

$22.65

--

2011

$33.40

47.46%

2012

$49.65

48.65%

2013

$70.54

42.07%

Table 2: Hiram Farm Indicators 1 REVENUES

PERSONS SERVED

DIRECT SUPPORT PROFESSIONAL

Year

Amount

Percent Increase

Number

Percent Increase

Regular Staff

Substitute Total Staff* Staff

2009

$160,000

--

6

--

6

0

6

2010

$397,000

148.13%

15

150%

9

3

12

2011

$560,000

41.06%

20

33%

10

2

12

2012

$606,975

8.39%

25

25%

11

5

16

2013**

$688,836

13.49%

29

16%

11

7

18

1 * Executive Director and Office Manager not included

**Estimated for November and December 2013 based upon August, September, and October 2013 average gross revenue Hiram Farm • Strategic Plan (2014 - 2016)

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Part Two The Logic Model Components of a Logic Model According to the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, a logic model is a systematic way to present the relationships among resources, planned activities, and intended results. The logic model describes the sequence of activities thought to bring about change and how these activities are linked to the results. The components of the logic model are defined in Table 3. Table 3: Component Definition

Component Resources

Definition Resources include the human, financial, organizational, and community resources a program has available to direct toward doing the work.

Activities

Program Activities are what the program does with the resources. Activities are the processes, tools, events, technology, and actions that are an intentional part of the program implementation. These interventions are used to bring about the intended program changes or results.

Outputs

Outputs are the direct products of program activities and may include types, levels and targets of services to be delivered by the program.

Outcomes

Outcomes are the specific changes in program farmers’ behavior, knowledge, skills, status and level of functioning.

Impact

Impact is the fundamental intended or unintended change occurring in organizations, communities or systems as a result of program activities.

When “read” from left to right, the logic model provides a description over time from planning to results. Reading a logic model means following the chain of reasoning or “If...then..” statements which connect the parts. Figure 1 shows how the logic model is read.

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Figure 1: Reading the Logic Model

If you accomplish your planned activities to the extent you intended, then your participants will benefit in certain ways

If these benefits to participants are achieved, then certain changes in organizations, communities, or systems might be expected to occur

Resources/ Inputs

Activities

Outputs

Outcomes

Impact

1

2

3

4

5

Certain resources are needed to operate your program

actors ng the trip: members’ school rk schedules idays weather t Flier availability

Activities: g/checking family es ng holiday flight information airport rtation ng Iowa relatives

If you have access to them, then you can use them to accomplish your planned activities

If you accomplish your planned activities, then you will hopefully deliver the amount of product and/or service that you intended

Your Planned Work

Your Intended Results

Figure 2. How to Read a Logic Model.

A logic model was developed to guide the Hiram Farm Strategic Plan. The components are

The WHY: Logic Model discussed in the following section. Purpose and Practical Application The purpose of a logic model is to provide stakeholders with a road map describing the sequence of related events connecting the need for the planned program with the proResources gram’s desired results. Mapping a proposed program helps you visualize and understand how human and financial investments can contribute to achieving your intended program The resources (see Table 4) that will be harnessed to implement the Hiram Farm strategic plan goals and can lead to program improvements. include the board of directors, staff, Hiram Farm, the Hiram community, Friends of the Farm, A logic model brings program concepts and dreams to life. It lets stakeholders try an idea on Hiram College, volunteers, donors, supporters, and consultants. for size and apply theories to a model or picture of how the program would function. The following example shows how the logic model approach works. (If you are familiar with logic 4: Resources models, you may wish to skip ahead toTable the section entitled “Why Use A Logic Model?”) An Example:

Resources

We are proposing an inexpensive family trip from Charleston, South Carolina, to Des Moines, Iowa, of Directors to visit relatives during December school Board holidays. The seasonal trip we dream of taking from Charleston to Des Moines is the “program.” Basic assumptions about our trip “program” are: Staff • We want to visit relatives between 12/10/00 andFarm 1/5/01 while the children are out of school. Hiram • We will fly from South Carolina to Iowa because it takes less time than driving and because Hiram Community frequent flier (FF) miles are available. Friends of the Farm • Using frequent flier miles will reduce travel costs.

Hiram College We have to determine the factors influencing our trip, including necessary resources, such as, the number of family members, scheduled vacation time, the number of frequent flier miles we have, Volunteers round trip air reservations for each family member, and transportation to and from our home to Donors & Supporters the airport. The activities necessary to make this happen are the creation of our own family holiday Consultants schedule, securing our Iowa relative’s schedule, garnering air line information and reservations and planning for transportation to and from the airport. Hiram Farm • Strategic Plan (2014 - 2016)

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Logic Model Development Guide

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Activities For the Marketing, Communications & Volunteer Engagement cluster, marking and communications activities are revolve around strengthening social networking (e.g., email blasts and social media), and enhancing the organization website. Marketing and communications activities are outlined in Table 5. Table 5: Marketing & Communications Activities

Activities (2014 - 2016) Further develop website with eye towards fundraising Develop hard copy and electronic solicitations Develop DVD slide show for events Develop Speaker’s Bureau Student Resource Council Engage Hiram, Kent and NEOMED students as volunteers Establish a Student Resource Council and recruit members from Hiram, Kent & NEOMED

Efforts for volunteer engagement include the redevelopment of the Friends of the Farm volunteer program including monthly email newsletter featuring volunteer projects, volunteer honor role, revamping of the volunteer orientation process, ongoing communication, and the development of a volunteer recognition program. Further, Hiram Farm will also develop a Student Resource Council recruiting students from Hiram College, Kent State University, and Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED). Activities around volunteer engagement are outlined in Table 6. Table 6: Volunteer Engagement Activities

Activities (2014 - 2016) Student Resource Council Engage Hiram, Kent and NEOMED students as volunteers Establish a Student Resource Council Recruit Student Resource Council members from Hiram, Kent and NEOMED

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Activities (2014 - 2016) Friends of the Farm Program Improve marketing and communications: More efficient registration processes Promote “Hot Projects� Monthly e-mail newsletter featuring Friends of the Farm projects Friends of the Farm honor role listing names of exceptional volunteers Revamp Friends of the Farm orientation process: Personalized e-mails More inspiring content highlighting potential impact of Friends of the Farm Increased staff support Ongoing and personalized communication with every Friends of the Farm: Public recognition Rewards for Friends of the Farm service Redesigned orientation included several new components: Immediate confirmation e-mail that would ignite excitement about volunteering. Comprehensive and contextual overview of most pressing needs and Hiram Farm issues Show the important role that Friends of the Farm play in addressing issues Clear statement of overarching goals Improve follow-up with all orientation attendees Friends of the Farm Recognition Program: Friends of the Farm are personally called and thanked Friends of the Farm asked about their experience, asked for feedback, ideas, or any thoughts Friends of the Farm receive an e-mail thanking them for their commitment

Activities for the Fund Development Strategy cluster was developed building upon a fundraising campaign of $172,500. Organization and Farm Infrastructure targeted for funding for 2014 to 2016 identified as needing funding are outlined in Table 7.

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Table 7: Organization & Farm Infrastructure (2014 to 2016) Item

Amount

Organization Infrastructure: Administrative Building

$25,000

Staffing (e.g., Fundraising, Marketing, Volunteer Coordination)

$30,000

Board & Staff Training

$15,000

Farm Infrastructure: Restroom & Shower Building

$85,000

Additional Farm Infrastructure

$17,500

TOTAL

$172,500

In determining a strategy for raising the $172,500, the 2012 fundraising totals were examined to inform the source mix. In 2012, Hiram Farm raised $35,216. Sources of funding included individuals (26%), businesses and organizations (29%), foundations (14%), direct mail (8%), and special events (22%). In applying these percentages to the $172,500 targeted amount, the source mix was developed and presented to the Public Relations & Fund Development Committee. The Public Relations & Fund Development Committee reviewed the numbers and made adjustments to the fundraising source mix. The Committee also determined additional efforts were required to leverage the opportunities available via individual giving and mitigate the risks given the local trend in cash contributions from businesses and organizations. This information including the final decisions regarding targeted amounts are outlined in Table 8. Further, these final targeted amounts were more in alignment with the Giving USA national averages of giving by source. Giving USA 2013 reports total charitable giving by source as individuals (72%), foundations (15%), bequests (7%), and corporations 6%). Table 8: Fundraising Source Mix (2014 to 2016) Source

2012

Percentage

Percentage projections

FINAL Targets

Board of Directors Challenge Fund

--

--

--

$22,500

Individuals

$9,232

26%

$39,321

$50,000

$10,252

29%

$43,666

$15,000

Foundations

$5,000

14%

$21,297

$25,000

Direct Mail

$2,860

8%

$12,182

$30,000

Special Events

$7,873

22%

$33,534

$30,000

$35,216

100%

$150,000

$172,500

Businesses & Organizations

TOTAL Hiram Farm • Strategic Plan (2014 - 2016)

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A detailed projection of gift ranges and targeted prospects were also developed to inform the fund development strategy. Information for the Hiram Farm Board of Directors in Table 9, Individuals is presented in Table 10, Businesses and Organizations are presented in Table 11, Foundations in Table 12, and Special Events and Direct Mail are outlined in Table 13. Table 9: Hiram Farm Board of Directors Year

Minimum Annual Gift

2014

$500

15

15

$7,500

$7,500

2015

$500

15

30

$7,500

$15,000

2016

$500

15

45

$7,500

$22,500

TOTAL

# of Gifts

Cumulative # Amount per of Gifts Range

45

Cumulative Total

$22,500

Table 10: Individuals (2014 to 2016) Gift Range

# of Gifts

Cumulative # of Prospects Cumulative # Amount # of Gifts (3:1) of Prospects per Range

Cumulative Total

$5,000

4

4

12

12

$20,000

$20,000

$2,500

1

5

3

15

$2,500

$22,500

$1,000

5

10

15

30

$5,000

$27,500

$500

6

16

18

48

$3,000

$30,500

$250

12

28

36

84

$3,000

$33,500

$100

50

78

150

234

$5,000

$38,500

$50

100

178

300

534

$5,000

$43,500

$25

100

278

300

834

$2,500

$46,000

$10

250

528

750

1584

$2,500

$48,500

$5

300

828

900

2484

$1,500

$50,000

TOTAL

828

2484

$50,000

Table 11: Businesses & Organizations (2014 to 2016) Gift Range

# of Cumulative # of Prospects Cumulative # Amount Gifts # of Gifts (4:1) of Prospects per Range

Cumulative Total

$5,000

1

1

4

4

$5,000

$5,000

$2,500

2

3

8

12

$5,000

$10,000

$1,000

3

6

12

24

$3,000

$13,000

$500

2

8

8

32

$1,000

$14,000

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Gift Range

# of Cumulative # of Prospects Cumulative # Amount Gifts # of Gifts (4:1) of Prospects per Range

$250

4

TOTAL

12

16

12

48

48

Cumulative Total

$1,000

$15,000

$15,000

Table 12: Foundations (2014 to 2016) Gift Range

# of Gifts

Cumulative # of Prospects Cumulative # Amount Cumulative # of Gifts (5:1) of Prospects per Range Total

$10,000

1

1

5

5

$10,000

$10,000

$5,000

2

3

10

15

$10,000

$20,000

$2,500

2

5

10

25

$5,000

$25,000

TOTAL

5

25

$25,000

Table 13: Special Events & Direct Mail Campaigns Event

Dates

Targeted Amount

2014 Spring Gala

April

2014 Annual Farm Days

August, September & October

$3,000

2014 Direct Mail

November

$5,000

2015 Spring Gala

April

2015 Annual Farm Days

August, September & October

$4,500

2015 Direct Mail

November

$5,000

2016 Spring Gala

April

2016 Annual Farm Days

August, September & October

$6,000

2016 Direct Mail

November

$5,000

TOTAL

$10,000

$10,500

$11,000

$60,000

The push by the Public Relations & Fund Development Committee for increased individual giving is appropriate. A donor study found of the donors who claimed they were not open to new causes, 42% of donors who had given over $10,000 the previous year would be willing to give to a new organization if someone they know approached them. Essentially, when a friend or acquaintance asks for support, they will give because they trust the solicitor (www.gailperry.com). The activities of the board brings the needed momentum to identify prospects from their network, to create opportunities for interaction in order to expand familiarity with Hiram Farm, and to build the donor base. The work of the board and Executive Director will involved a significant increase in individual solicitations. To support this work,

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definitions of the donor cycle are provided in Table 14 and a graphical representation of the cycle is presented in Figure 2. Table 14: Donor Cycle Terms

Term

Definition

Identification

Identify individuals with assets to make a gift; foundations and corporations whose philanthropic principles match Hiram Farm needs, and qualification of prospects. Prospects can also be identified by board, staff, other donors, or volunteers.

Discovery

The process where a meeting or interaction, usually face-to-face, determines and verifies a prospect’s ability to make a gift, philanthropic intent, and interest in supporting Hiram Farm.

Cultivation

Engage the prospect, encourage prospect to attend events and visit the farm, introduce prospect to board, clients, get the prospect involved and interested in people, projects, and programs, determine best fit for philanthropy.

Solicitation

Performed at the highest possible leadership level, a request for support is presented to the prospect.

Stewardship

Demonstrate recognition and appreciation of the gift, as well as the use of funds. Good stewardship is the best way to ensure multiple gifts from the same donor. Find several ways to thank you donors and they’ll stick with you.

After Stewardship, the process starts over with Cultivation for the next gift. Figure 2: The Donor Cycle

Identification

Discovery

Cultivation

Stewardship

Solicitation

These efforts inform the activities in the Public Relations & Fund Development Strategy. The Public Relations & Fund Development Strategy has several components that raise funds for Organization and Farm Infrastructure and Programming. The components include individual giving, special events, businesses, organizations and foundations, and direct mail. The specific Hiram Farm • Strategic Plan (2014 - 2016)

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activities for the components of the Fund Development Strategy and the Organization, Farm & Collaboration Infrastructure are outlined in Table 15. Table 15: Fund Development Strategy Activities

Component

Activities (2014 - 2016) Annual Time, Talent & Treasure (T3) Board Challenge Request Time, Talent & Treasure (T3) commitment from Board of Directors Request time and talent commitment in addition to board meetings Launch Board Challenge for a minimum $500 donation from each member

Individual Giving Develop Donor Cards Board members to identify potential donors at various financial levels Board members agree to work on fundraising events, make calls Fund Development Strategy

Secure mailing lists (e.g., DOC Church) Annual Direct mail campaigns

Businesses, Organizations & Foundations Identify and list businesses/organizations at various financial levels Identify potential grant opportunities Grant writing

Special Events Annual Spring Gala Annual Fall Farm Days in August, September & October

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Component

Activities (2014 - 2016) Organization Infrastructure Administrative Building Additional staffing (e.g., fundraising, marketing, volunteer coordinator) Board and Staff Training

Infrastructure

Farm Infrastructure Restroom & Shower Building Additional Farm Infrastructure (e.g., garage, livestock shelter) Collaboration Infrastructure Build Board Committee to explore and evaluate collaborations Research, determine needs, and build networks in other counties

Activities for the third cluster around Residential Services are outlined in Table 16. Table 16: Residential Services Activities

Activities (2016) Research and data collection to inform strategy and fund development plan for the development of residential services

Outputs The activities outlined above will facilitate specific outcomes for Hiram Farm. The outcomes for each component are outlined in Table 17. Table 17: Outputs by Component

Outputs (2014 - 2016) Marketing & Communications Enhanced Website Marketing materials developed Recruit and train 6 board members/parents for Speakers Bureau for 25 events annually

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Outputs (2014 - 2016) Volunteer Engagement Student Resource Council that meets quarterly Create 2 service learning projects and/or internships around volunteering, fundraising and developing a social media strategy Retool and reignite Friends of the Farm & Engage 100 Friends of the Farm Annual recognition event Fund Development Strategy $172,500 targeted fundraising goal $22,500 from board challenge $50,000 from individual giving $15,000 from business and organizations $30,000 from direct mail campaign $30,000 from special events Time, Talent, Treasure (T3) Board Challenge Raise $7,500 annually from Board Secure time and talent commitment in addition to board meetings Board to complete self assessment Individual Giving Donor cards for every fundraising event Develop, acquire appropriate mailing lists Sort by giving the 917 records in database Grow the current 192 person email list Businesses, Organizations & Foundations Identify 48 businesses/organizations and 25 foundations and solicit for support Special Events Spring Gala in April for 2014 - 2016 Farm days in Aug, Sept & Oct. 2014 - 2016 Direct Mail campaign in Nov 2014 - 2016 Hiram Farm • Strategic Plan (2014 - 2016)

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Outputs (2014 - 2016) Organization Infrastructure Identify administrative space Secure additional staff support Complete annual training for board and staff Farm Infrastructure Restroom and Shower Building completed Complete additional needed infrastructure Collaboration Infrastructure Collaboration Board Committee established Explore and evaluate collaboration opportunities in another county annually Build collaboration network in another county annually Residential Services Begin developing the plan for owning and operating a residential facility

Outcomes The detailed outcomes that result from the outputs are outlined in Table 18. Table 18: Outcomes

Outcomes (2014 - 2016) Increased awareness about Hiram Farm Increased structured engagement with college/university around service learning and/or internships Increased outreach and engagement Increase number of volunteers Improved volunteer experience with Friends of the Farm Program Improved follow up with previous donors and supporters of Hiram Farm Increased connections with Hiram Farm Coordinated fundraising strategy developed

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Outcomes (2014 - 2016) Increased board membership and donors contributing time, talent and treasure to Hiram Farm Increased research and cultivation of larger donors Increased funding for infrastructure to better meet needs and actualize mission Increased fundraising activities to expand geography and commitment Improved knowledge on businesses, organizations, and foundations that support the mission of Hiram Farm Improved process for direct-mail campaign including email strategy Increased awareness about the funding needed and expansion opportunities available to Hiram Farm Increased presence in Geauga and Summit counties Increased collaborative partners Increased impact in multiple counties Expanded support for Hiram Farm Increased knowledge about real estate development opportunities and corresponding strategy for a residential services Increased knowledge on residential services strategy including need and cost benefit analysis

Impact With the proposed outcomes, the impact of this strategic plan is outlined in Table 19. Table 19: Impact

Impact Provide agricultural opportunities for people with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) with living wages Build network of connections and supporters of Hiram Farm Farmers living, working and engaging in community with year-round programming and expanded real estate holdings Residential Services

The above components described in detail above are presented in the logic model in Figure 3. Hiram Farm • Strategic Plan (2014 - 2016)

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Figure 3: Hiram Farm Logic Model

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Action Plans Action plans have been developed for implementation of the Strategic Plan. Detailed action plans with start and end dates are included in Tables 20 through 26 below. Table 20: Marketing, Communications & Volunteer Engagement Action Plan

Marketing & Communications Further develop website with eye towards fundraising and

Timing

Start

End

5 months

Feb 2014

June 2014

Develop DVD slide show for events

1 to 3 months

June 2014

Dec 2014

Develop Speaker’s Bureau (recruit, train, build calendar)

6 months

June 2014

Dec 2014

Start

End

social media (monthly email blasts beginning in June 2014)

Table 21: Volunteer Engagement Action Plan

Volunteer Engagement

Timing

Engage Hiram, Kent and NEOMED students as

Aug 2013

Ongoing

Jan 2015

Ongoing

May 2014

Ongoing

volunteers Establish a Student Resource Council and recruit members from Hiram, Kent & NEOMED Establish service learning projects and/or internships for college students Retool Friends of the Farm program

6 months

Nov 2013

April 2014

Improve marketing and communications to Friends of the

3 months

Jan 2014

April 2014

Revamp Friends of the Farm orientation process

1 to 3 months

Jan 2014

April 2014

Ongoing and personalized communication with Friends

1 month

April 2014

May 2014

Redesign Friends of the Farm Orientation

1 month

April 2014

May 2014

Friends of the Farm Recognition Program

3 months

Jan 2015

April 2015

Farm via enhanced website

of the Farm

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Table 22: Time, Talent & Treasure (T3) Board Challenge Action Plan

T3 Board Challenge Request Time, Talent & Treasure (T3) commitment from

Timing

Start

End

3 months

Jan 2014

Dec 2016

3 months

Jan 2014

Dec 2016

3 months

Jan 2014

Dec 2016

Board of Directors Request time and talent commitment in addition to board meetings Launch Board Challenge for a minimum $500 donation from each member Table 23: Individual Giving Action Plan

Individual Giving

Timing

Start

End

Develop Donor Cards

3 months

Nov 2013

Jan 2014

Board members to identify potential donors at various

3 months

Nov 2013

Jan 2014

Jan 2014

Ongoing

financial levels Board members agree to work on fundraising events, make calls Secure mailing lists (e.g., DOC Church)

3 months

June

Sept

Annual Direct mail campaigns (Nov 2014, Nov 2015, Nov

3 months

Sept

Nov

2016) Table 24: Business, Organizations & Foundations Action Plan

Businesses, Organizations & Foundations Identify and list businesses/organizations at various

Timing 3 to 6 months

Start

End

Jan 2014

June 2014

Identify potential grant opportunities

March 2014

Ongoing

Grant writing

May 2014

Ongoing

Business and Organizations solicitations

April 2014

Ongoing

financial levels

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Table 24: Special Events Action Plan

Special Events Annual Spring Gala (April 2014, April 2015, April 2016)

Timing 1 to 3 months

Annual Fall Farm Days in August, September & October

Start

End

Jan

April

Aug 2014

Oct 2016

Table 25: Organization & Farm Infrastructure Action Plan

Organization Infrastructure Administrative Building

Timing 6 months

Additional staffing (e.g., fundraising, marketing,

Start

End

Jan 2014

June 2015

June 2015

Ongoing

Jan 2014

Ongoing

Jan 2016

April 2016

As needed

Ongoing

volunteer coordinator) Board and Staff Training Restroom & Shower Building

1 to 3 months

Additional Farm Infrastructure (e.g., garage, livestock shelter)

Table 26: Collaboration Infrastructure Action Plan

Special Events Build Board Committee to explore and evaluate

Timing 3 months

Start

End

June 2015

Sept 2015

Oct 2015

Ongoing

collaborations Research, determine needs, and build networks in other counties Table 27: Residential Services Action Plan

Special Events Research and data collection to inform a strategy and fund

Timing 12 months

Start Jan 2016

End Dec 2016

development plan for the development of residential services

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Gantt Chart The action plans are presented as a gantt chart to provide a broad overview of the activities.

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Part Three Visioning & Strengths-Weaknesses-Opportunities-Threats (SWOT) Analysis Vision • Participants living, working and engaging in community • Work environment where living wages and above are paid • Physical infrastructure - building, additional program space • Transportation, van • Year-round farming program • State of the art growing strategies • Farm working, community work, build skills of participants and assist participants in finding employment • Satellite farm in Geauga and Summit counties • Farm to fork restaurant • National model - fieldwork for scholars, practitioners, research resource for colleges and universities • National conference • Leaders on national advocacy of adults with autism • Program to serve the most difficult and severe autism needs • Acquisition of additional real estate • Nearby living, central courtyard, apartments • Variety of residential models available, many options • Better integrate into mainstream living • Emergency (and non-emergency) respite program Hiram Farm • Strategic Plan (2014 - 2016)

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• Maximize relationships with local colleges and universities and those farther out • The “go to” nonprofit for support, the nonprofit donors want to support • “Go to” nonprofit for expertise - models, scholarly place, relevant, connection to colleges and universities • Collaboration with non-governmental organizations (NGOs) to develop international connections • Create an endowment • Diversified funding • Expand on electronic media • “Friends” group that is engaged often to update and solicit for support • Cultivate big donors • Collaboration with community, satellite farms, build relationships • Build collaborations to make best use of existing resources, seek opportunities to sublet • Recreation and cultural programming to enrich program and create additional community connections, collaboration • Equine therapy, connect to community • Training for staff and other professionals • Leadership training • Family education - what is gentle teaching vs. consequence based programming • Parent mentor program • Extended school year and summer programming • Meet with middle and high schools to build connections and transitions • Interim space for activities to help transition

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Strengths • We are still here and a credible organization • Staff • Reputation is good with stakeholders • Wow factor and novelty of the farm • Big picture of what is available • Property has low overhead, the farm • Internal knowledge - ability to train, inspire and manage • One stop shop for participants • Participants experience growth and exchange • Location • Accomplishments - connection with schools and churches • Participant satisfaction - happiness, increased outcomes, and reduction of medication taken • Local source for organic food • Church partnership • Board diversity, commitment and connections • Volunteers - core group, strong connections with students • Growing group of participants, diverse geography • Increase awareness of problems associated with autism - need is growing • Some fear mitigated because of high education levels in Hiram

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Weaknesses • Funding - 98% government sourced • Facility - need more program space in the building • Lack of living (residential) space • No residential housing • Lease prohibits residential living (conservation easements) • Lack of management staff • Small staff - limited fill-in, overlap, cross training, no succession plan • Staff training needed - requires specialized trainers • No weekend programming • Waiting list - need to be able to serve participants, or will lose them • Location - transportation to Hiram for students, and attracting staff Threats • Government funding - entitlement program funding cuts may be reduced or eliminated (98% of funding) • Don’t own land • NIMBY - not in my backyard • Awakening of large numbers of persons suffering from autism - inability to serve numbers, cuts in eligibility may result; most difficult to serve may be affected • Economic growth limited - cultivation of big funders needed; uncertain future of higher education (liberal arts colleges go out of business everyday); population loss, fewer kids, schools closing; Ohio population numbers projected different from today • Need to ensure balance of community, businesses, and colleges/education • Competition - Cuyahoga County, other organizations

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Opportunities • Potential • Pedagogy • Grow in advocacy work • Programming - based upon participant need • Weekend programming • Hiram as a residential opportunity - housing options available, retirement community; Kent has a model - high school courses, certificate, recognition of work; first year experience in residence housing • Cleveland Foundation • Living in communities - not live and work in the same place • Partner with Kent State University - grants for sustainability • President’s climate change commitment - wind and solar energy, tie into Hiram Farm initiative • Trumbull County • Build a strategy to overcome fear of autism, what autism is not • Hire a fundraiser, grant writer • Build a national model and national attractor • Find large foundation to support adults with autism • Fund development strategy • Attract corporate sponsors • Research and connect with resources in the county • Community funding support - businesses, individuals - fundraiser • Franchise • Strategy for collaboration with county, training arm/site for county • Collaboration opportunities with other land owners that need programs, e.g. Hiram House Camp Hiram Farm • Strategic Plan (2014 - 2016)

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Stakeholders • Participants • Staff • Parents, family • Funders • Local community • Couch farm trustees (land lease) • Donors • Volunteers • Supporters, customers • School districts, state, county • Referral sources • State department of developmental disabilities, medicaid Steps 1. Increase program space for winter (10) 2. Develop year-round farming program (8) 3. Research and cultivate big donors (8) 4. Renewable energy resources on farm - solar, wind - develop strategy, research funding and best practices (6) 5. Residential housing (5) 6. First annual farm to fork fundraiser (5) 7. Research local real estate opportunities (3) 8. Hire fundraising consultant (3) 9. Develop a membership program - Friends of Hiram Farm (2) 10. Electronic media program (2) 11. Training seminars (1)

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12. Establish an endowment (1) 13. Fund development strategy (1) 14. Research geographic opportunities for growth and expansion (1) 15. Develop community education and outreach program; external programming 16. Build advocacy program - funding, education, protesting, scholarship, siblings 17. Farm to fork restaurant 18. Conversations with collaboration partners (4-H, Autism society of Ohio, AISO, TRC) 19. Tap into student resources for internships - research proposal development, social media 20. Community gardens as a strategy to connect with community 21. Strategy for secure transportation Mission Current. Hiram Farm Living and Learning Community is a nonprofit organization that provides opportunities for people with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) to grow, learn, work, and live in a setting focused on respect and support for individuals and the environment. Working Draft. To provide agricultural opportunities for people with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) to develop independence in communities and respect for the environment. Tagline. An agricultural community for adults with autism.

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Part Four Additional Resources Chambers of Commerce Area

Website

Garrettville/Hiram

http://www.garrettsvillearea.com/

Portage County Chamber of Commerce

http://www.co.portage.oh.us/chambers.htm

Aurora County

http://www.allaboutaurora.com/

Brimfield

http://www.brimfieldchamber.com/

Kent

http://www.kentbiz.com/

Mantua-Shalersville

http://www.mantuashalersvillechamber.com/

Ravenna

http://www.ravennaareachamber.com/

Rootstown

http://www.rootstownchamber.org/

Streetsboro

http://www.streetsborochamber.org/

Fundraising & Foundation Resources Tempel, E., T. Seiler and E. Aldrich (2011). Achieving Excellence in Fundraising. Third Edition. Jossey-Bass. Seltzer, M. (2001). Securing Your Organization’s Future: A Complete Guide to Fundraising Strategies. New York, The Foundation Center. Rosenthal, A. (2001). The Third House: Lobbyists and Lobbying In the States, 2nd Edition. Washington, D.C., Congressional Quarterly Press. Foundation Center Library, Cleveland 1422 Euclid, Avenue, Suite 1600 Cleveland, OH 44115 (216) 861-1993 http://foundationcenter.org/cleveland/ Hiram Farm • Strategic Plan (2014 - 2016)

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Approaching Foundations Foundations

Funding Areas

• Best known, least understood

• General operating

• Established to support charitable efforts

• Program

• May adjust priorities

• Challenge/Matching

• Important part of funding mix

• Program Related Investments (PRIs)

• Capital

Advantages • Mission is to give away money – required to do so

Strategy for Securing Foundation Grant • Get Ready

• Larger gifts

• Frame Needs

• Information is available (990s, website)

• Prepare Strategy

• Foundation Center Library Cleveland • Can serve as leverage for other sources of funding Disadvantages • Competitive • Takes time to apply and receive • Can be a limited investment • Mission drift • Limited use of funds • Reporting requirements Giving • Minimum distribution of 5% (exchange for tax advantages) • Types

• Connection with mission • Build from expertise • Achievable • Relevant • Documentation • Reputation • Rationale • Research prospects / Build knowledge about prospects • Approach

Websites http://foundationcenter.org/ http://www.grants.gov/

• Family • Community • Corporate • Public charities Hiram Farm • Strategic Plan (2014 - 2016)

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Living Arrangements - Adults with ASD The Opening Doors study suggested the increase in prevalence of ASD has resulted in an increase in demand for effective services, supports and housing for adults living with autism. The report continues stating need continues to far exceed the available resources leaving a generation of people with autism and their families in limbo, especially in relation to long-term living and learning options. The Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders article by Sara Mahan and Alison M. Kizlowski discusses the importance of Supported Independent Living (SIL). The authors report the following: • Very little research is reported about the residential opportunities for adults with ASD, much less the advantages and disadvantages of alternative placements. • The preferred option for living arrangements is complete independence (e.g., living in an apartment without assistance). However, based on prognosis, this is not usually a viable option. Only about 10% of individuals with ASD are able to achieve such a residential status in adulthood. • When out-of-home living is required, but an institution is not necessary or preferred, a somewhat less restrictive and more community-based lifestyle exists. Overall, it is estimated that 25% of individuals with ASD may demonstrate improvements in skills required for independent living over time, but still require supervision as adults. • When residential and group home options are deemed too restrictive and independent living and co-residency are not feasible, another more recent choice is Supported Independent Living (SIL). • In SIL the individuals live in their own apartment or house and receive supports (e.g., skills training, transportation) from staff who work with them for specified periods of time. Individuals may have roommates in SIL, but unlike group homes, staff are generally not available throughout the entire day and night.

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National Association of Residential Providers for Adults with Autism (NARPAA) 26 members across 20 states http://www.narpaa.org/ Ardmore, Inc., Akron, Ohio http://ardmoreinc.org/ ESPA (Paul Shattock), Sunderland, England http://www.espa.org.uk/Web/Home/ home.aspx Chapel Haven, Inc., New Haven, Connecticut http://www.chapelhaven.org Autistic Services, Inc., Williamsvillee, New York http://www.autisticservices.org

Developmental Disabilities Institute, Smithtown, NY http://www.ddiny.org Eden Family Services, Princeton, NJ http://www.edenservices.org Farmsteads of New England, Hilsborough, NH http://www.farmsteads-ne.org Grafton School, Inc., Winchester, VA http://www.grafton.org The Homestead, Altoona, IA http://www.thehomestead.org

Avondale House, Houston, TX http://www.avondalehouse.org

Judevine, St. Louis, MO http://www.judevine.org/

Autism Services Center, Huntington, WV http://www.autismservicescenter.org

Linwood Center, Inc., Ellicott City, MD http://www.linwoodcenter.org

Autism Services of Southwest Louisiana, Inc., Lake Charles, LA http://www.autismservicesswla.com

Residential Management Systems, Cincinnati, OH http://www.teamrms.com

Autism Treatment Center, Dallas, TX http://www.atcoftexas.org/

Rusty’s Morningstar Ranch, Cornville, AZ http://www.rmr.org

Benhaven, North Haven, CT http://www.benhaven.org

Safe Haven Farms, Cincinnati, OH http://www.safehavenfarms.org

Bittersweet Farms, Whitehouse, OH http://www.bittersweetfarms.org

The Sean Ashley House, Houston, TX http://www.seanashleyhouse.org

Carolina Autism Supported Living Services, Charleston, SC http://www.casls.org

Southwest Autism Research, Phoenix, AZ http://www.autismcenter.org/

Community Services for Autistic Adults and Children, Rockville, MD http://www.csaac.org Hiram Farm • Strategic Plan (2014 - 2016)

Sunshine Inc, Maumee, OH http://www.sunshineincnwo.org

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Research on Residential Living for Autistic Adults Mahan, S. and A. Kizlowski (2011). Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders in Matson, J. L., & Sturmey, P. (editors). International handbook of autism and pervasive developmental disorders: Springer. Brand, A., Gheerawo, R., & Valfort, M. (2010). Living in the Community: housing design for adults with autism. Helen Hamlyn Centre. Burleson, W., Newman, N., & Brotman, R. (2012). Empowering independent living for people with autism: designing supportive, low-cost, interactive e-health environments Persuasive Technology. Design for Health and Safety (pp. 13-30): Springer. Ride, G. N., & Work, S. S. T. (2011). What’s Inside. Autism Matters, 8(3). Resnik, D. & J. Blackbourn (2009). Opening Doors: A Discussion of Residential Options for Adults Living with Autism and Related Disorders. Southwest Autism Research & Resource Center (SARCC), Urban Land Institute, www.uli.org. Ahrentzen, S. (2009). Advancing Fu$ Spectrum Housing: Designing for Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders. Stardust Center for Affordable Homes and the Family, Arizona State University, http://sala.asu.edu. Volunteer Web Resources Volunteers & Nonprofit Management Business Volunteers Unlimited (http://www.bvuvolunteers.org/) BVU is a national model organization that strengthens nonprofits by involving thousands of volunteers from the community; engaging hundreds of business executives and professionals on nonprofit boards of directors; and providing leadingedge board and management consulting and training services for nonprofits. Volunteer Today (http://www.volunteertoday.com/default.htm) Volunteer Today provides information on the engagement of volunteers including support and promotion of professional development opportunities for those who work with volunteers. VolunteerMatch (http://www.volunteermatch.org)

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VolunteerMatch strengthens communities by making it easier for people to connect with philanthropic and community causes. Offering a variety of online services to support civic engagement, VolunteerMatch hosts millions of visitors a year and has become the preferred internet recruiting tool for more than 65,000 nonprofit organizations. Volunteer Solutions (http://www.volunteersolutions.org) Volunteer Solutions is a volunteer matching application that helps Volunteer Centers connect individuals to volunteer opportunities. Volunteer Solutions helps volunteers, nonprofit agencies, corporations, event organizers, and Volunteer Centers get connected. CharityChannel (http://charitychannel.com/) CharityChannel is a resource that connects visitors to nonprofit colleagues around the world. CharityChannel provides a “channel” on which nonprofit professionals can learn from each other, share information and work together to advance philanthropy. Americorps (http://www.nationalservice.gov/programs/americorps) AmeriCorps engages more than 80,000 Americans in intensive service each year at nonprofits, schools, public agencies, and community and faith-based groups across the country.

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2013 Board of Directors Jason Bricker-Thompson, President Roger McKinney, Vice President Bob Berg, Secretary Amy Sittner, Treasurer Linda Ferlito Ruthanne Freeman Mary Bowers Melody Tankersley Doug Brattebo Barb Moledar Christine Kohls-Hunder Vickie Webster Management Team De Ann Brewer, Executive Director Jennifer Viggiani, Director of Operations/Controller Missy Bookbinder, Habilitation Manager Mike Hague, Farm Manager

Mission Statement To provide opportunities for people with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) to grow, learn, work, and live in a setting focused on respect and support for individuals and the environment.

HIRAM FARM

Living and Learning Community

An agricultural community for adults with autism. P.O. Box 157 11543 Garfield Road Hiram, OH 44234 (330) 569-3441 info@hiramfarm.org

www.HiramFarm.org

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