Page 1

J E F F R E Y YA S U O M A N S F I E L D

SELECTED WORK 2007-2014


J E F F R E Y YA S U O M A N S F I E L D 105 S. Washington St. Rochester, NY 14608 jeffmansfield.mobile@gmail.com

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

Parker Warburton Architecture Dunedin, New Zealand Architectural Graduate Wall Street Retail Development, Facade Development Hoistway Addition, University of Otago The Learning Center for the Deaf Framingham, MA Seasonal Staff, Maintenance Department 818 Central Pool House 848 Central ADA-Accessible Ramp/Retrofit

SOFTWARE Rhinoceros Vectorworks AutoCAD

Cinema 4D 3DS Max Adobe Creative Suite

LANGUAGES English American Sign Language International Sign References available upon request. * denotes refereed publication Edited 02.2014

German (Limited) Danish (Limited)

present 07.14 05.13 present 09.12 05.12 09.11

Denmark International Study Study Abroad, Copenhagen, Denmark, Fall 2006 Urban Design Core

05.11

Deaf Epistemologies of Sound: On Physical Listening* Deaf Studies and Deaf Scholars: Deaf Ontologies in the 21st Century, ed. Annelies Kusters, Dai O’Brien, Oxford University Press, forthcoming in 2015

02.10

HHF Architekten Basel, Switzerland Trainee Tsai Guesthouse SD+DD (HHF + Ai Weiwei) —American Architecture Award 2013 Kunstmuseum Basel Competition (HHF+Ai Weiwei)—4th Prize Basel Harbor Study “Re-Harbour” Geneva La Praille Masterplan Schulhaus Chatelet, Biel Competition Lichtstrasse 11 Facade Development Geschafthaus Furstenriederstrasse, Munich Competition—2nd Prize

Princeton University A.B., Architecture, cum laude, 2008 Frederick Barnard White Thesis Prize Frames, Dom-inoes, and New Realities: The Column, Slab, and the Generation of Life Advisor: Ron Witte, Reader: Stan Allen

Interview with Jeffrey Mansfield & Noe Soulier Virginie Bobin, Composing Differences, les presses du réel, forthcoming in 2015

Performing Language Tacet, or the Cochlear Vertigo: Towards the Limits of Hearing, Council, forthcoming in 2015 Signs and Sounds Tacet, or the Cochlear Vertigo: Towards the Limits of Hearing, Council, December 2014, http://www. houseofcouncil.org/en/inquiries/tacet_or_the_cochlear_ vertigo/signs_and_sounds Space, Time, and Gesture* TACET 3, De l’espace sonore / From the Sound Space March 2014, www.tacet.eu

02.09

Thomas Schroepfer Cambridge, MA Research Assistant “Intersecting Ecologies,” Sheila Kennedy, in Transurban, Birkhauser, 2015

Harvard Graduate School of Design Master of Architecture, 2014 Gallaudet Graduate Fellowship Thesis nominated for James Templeton Kelley Prize: Incidents of Presence: Sensual Aesthetics and the Crisis of Meaning in the Asylum Advisor: Ingeborg Rocker

TEXTS & PUBLICATIONS

09.08

Kennedy Violich Architecture, Ltd. Boston, MA Summer Intern Minneapolis RiverFirst Masterplan Initiative Scherer Park SD Flyway Bridge SD Grand Rounds Trails SD RiverTalk iPhone app SD

06.08

Kennedy Violich Architecture, Ltd. Boston, MA Summer Intern North Bennet Street School 100% SD Shannon Vanserg 100% CD

06.08

Portable Light Project Boston, MA + Santarem, PA, Brazil Taking Charge Project Leader Luz Portatil Brasil

EDUCATION

08.04

2

CURRICULUM VITAE

Watermill Center / Robert Wilson Foundation Water Mill, NY International Summer Program Design Lead, Dresden Puppet Exhibition

The Rest is Silence Listen, The Boston Society of Architects, ArchitectureBoston, Summer 2012 (Vol. 15n2)

http://www.architects.org/architectureboston/ articles/rest-silence

CONFERENCES, LECTURES, EXHIBITIONS The Language of Creativity Conversation between Daniel Libeskind and Robert Wilson, moderated by Jeffrey Mansfield Watermill Center, NY, August 2014 Composing Differences MOMA PS1, New York, April 2014 Performance + Workshop with Noé Soulier Curated by Virginie Bobin, sponsored by the French Embassy / The French Mission for Culture and Higher Education Space, Time, and Gesture Teater Manu, Oslo, Norway Lecture & Workshops “What is Sound? What is Silence?” The Body-That-is-Deaf 2013 Sharjah Biennial, Sharjah UAE Presented as part of Tarek Atoui’s Tacet The Genius of the Deaf Experience: Infrastructures of Communication American Association of Geographers 2012 Annual Meeting, New York, NY Deaf Geographies Session


SPACE, TIME AND GESTURE

18

ARCHIVES OF PATAGONIA

20

PILGRIMAGE

50

SUBWAY CITY

70

TABLE OF CONTENTS

4

3

INCIDENTS OF PRESENCE

DIFFERENTIAL CITY

36

ACADEMIC WORK

PROFESSIONAL WORK

RIVERFIRST

78

TSAI GUESTHOUSE

80

KUNSTMUSEUM BASEL

84


INCIDENTS OF PRESENCE 4

Video Still (2013)

INCIDENTS OF PRESENCE 2014 The campus of Gallaudet University, formerly known as the National Deaf-Mute College, designed in 1867 by Frederick Law Olmsted and Calvert Vaux in Washington, D.C. survives today as an architectural artifact of Enlightenment ideals of rehabilitation and reconditioning. While these attitudes toward deafness have become antiquated, and as the University begins to open up to the neighborhood, archetypal elements of the asylum—a foreboding hall perched atop a hill, a surveillant gatehouse, and a wrought-iron fence surrounding the periphery—remain. Physically and cognitively disembodied from the fabric of the capital, the campus continues to cast an institutional gaze unto its inhabitants, while society continues to avert its gaze. Outmoded paradigms of normativity are instigating an architectural crisis. This thesis embraces the presence of the gaze as architectural substance. With the establishment of a monumental Deaf Space Laboratory at the site of the existing gatehouse, this thesis shifts the institutional gaze to the very interface between institution and the city and turns it back on itself to confront the architectural articulation of the Other with respect to the ‘normal.’ Within the proposed building itself, a gradual build-up of ostensibly identical moments that are in fact quite different is achieved by repeatedly folding the subject’s gaze is back unto itself in a strategy of persistent twinning and reflection of spaces, activities, and bodies that engage the subject with the presence of its familiar but alienated other. Marking the uncanny return of the gaze, this eclipse of the subject results in a sensory space that creates fluid boundaries that mediate the relationship between architecture and the subject, between the subject and its other, and between the institution and the city, allowing each to constitute one another. Project nominated for the 2014 James Templeton Kelley Prize Critic: Ingeborg Rocker


5

HARVARD GSD THESIS


INCIDENTS OF PRESENCE 6 Basement Plan 1 /64” = 1’

Second Floor Plan 1 /64” = 1’ PLAN C

PLAN A

0’ 8’ SCALE 1:8

SCALE 1:8

16’

SCALE 1:8

0’

8’

16’

32’

Fourth Floor Plan 1 /64” = 1’

Third Floor Plan 1 /64” = 1’ PLAN D

32’

PLAN E

0’ 8’1:8 SCALE

16’

32’

0’

8’

16’

32’


3

HARVARD GSD THESIS

2

4

7

C

1

A

B

C

B

A

PLAN B

First Floor Plan /40” = 1’

SCALE 1:8 1

0’

8’

16’

32’


The building’s central axis, a public space where users converge, forms a thickened “mirror space” that also serves as the axis of reflection. Suspended between the two reflective sides, but also contained within another layer of reflections that occur between floor-plates, these users are simultaneously constituting each other within the axis and being constituted by the gaze of their other, projected from the two volumes adjacent to the central axis.

WORKSHOP

LIBRARY

8

INCIDENTS OF PRESENCE

AXIS OF REFLECTION The Space of the Mirror

LOUNGE

LIBRARY

AUDITORIUM

FLEX

ROAD

ENTRY


HARVARD GSD THESIS CIRCULATION

GATE HOUSE + GATE HOUSE’

ENTRANCES

SLIPPAGE

TERRACES

9

AXIS OF REFLECTION


INCIDENTS OF PRESENCE 10 STACKED SCHEME

01. MIRROR

02. ROTATE to accomodate views & programmatic orientations

03. VERTICAL DISTORT to accommodate circulation

04. HORIZONTAL DISTORT to accommodate views

05. LOFTED SECTIONS

06. DEVELOPABLE SURFACES

02. NONORIENTABLE SURFACE two holes = “courtyards”

03. SIMPLIFY CURVES

04. TRIANGULATED SURFACE

05. EXTRUDED CURVES exaggerated to accommodate space & circulation

06. EMBEDDED KNOT ribbon weaves in and out of the two “courtyards,” one being interior and the other exterior

KNOT SCHEME

01. DEFINE CURVES


HARVARD GSD THESIS 11 STUDY MODELS Three articulations of a nonorientable knot.

1/8” SITE MODEL North View Arranged alongside the building’s circulation loop, glazed openings reflect one another and provide apertures through which the subject’s gaze passes and is returned from its other— that is, another subject in another part of the building.


INCIDENTS OF PRESENCE 12 LECTURE HALL VIEW Spatial and perceptual slippages

C’

G H

E I’ G’ H’

I

F

E’ F’

D

C D’

A’

A

APERTURE DIAGRAM Twinning of paired apertures


HARVARD GSD THESIS 13 1/8” SITE MODEL Florida Ave. View

CIRCULATION MODEL Twinning of paired circulation features


INCIDENTS OF PRESENCE 14 1/16� SITE MODEL Elevation View The monumental presence of the proposed building in relation to the campus turns the institutional gaze unto itself.

GATE HOUSE VIEW As mirror, the road activates the reflection of spaces, volumes, and objects, including the inverted gate house.


HARVARD GSD THESIS 15 SEATING TERRACE

SOUTH ENTRANCE

Reinforcing the returned gaze, the seating terrace articulates a spatial slippage within the building.

The sunken south entrance mirrors the north entrance, providing visitors with the sensation of observing the entry of its alienated other.


INCIDENTS OF PRESENCE 16 SECTION AA Through the building’s central reflective axis, a thickened mirror houses the building’s public programs, including a lecture hall, lounge, library, workshop, and the entry lobby, and is connected to the circulation cores.

SECTION BB The Gate House and its inverted twin mark the sunken entrances, while the street passes through a canopy created by the building’s reflective geometry.


HARVARD GSD THESIS 17 COGNITIVE MAP Exploded Axonometric The context of the project is shown along with multiple instances of twinning.


SPACE, TIME AND GESTURE 18

S PA C E , T I M E A N D G E S T U R E : GESTURAL EXPRESSION, SENSUAL AESTHETICS, AND C R I S I S I N C O N T E M P O R A R Y S P AT I A L P A R A D I G M S 2014 As Siegfried Giedion noted in Space, Time and Architecture, an understanding of space as experienced through time, brought by the Second Industrial Age, became the hallmark of modernity. In recent years, the Newtonian measurements that characterize this experience have increased urgency as measurements such as trades-per-minute, megabytes-persecond, reverberations-per-millisecond have become everyday facts of contemporary life. Moving at such rapid speeds and scales necessitates continuous instant gratification. Every action is expected to have a reaction. Every utterance is expected to have meaning. The effect can be numbing, as such profusion of information suppresses what little room we have to sense the world for ourselves. Thus conditioned to “know its place,” society has been complicit in perpetuating the conditions of its own reproduction—each body has its place in space-time. Countering these trends, the gestural stains of sign language (a visual stain) and music (a aural stain), which disrupt the regimental space and ordered temporality of language and society with its temporal and spatial excess. Most blasphemously, in its lack of a fixed meaning, the gesture postpones the fulfillment of our desire for meaning, replacing it with the desire drive that encapsulates what for Jacques Lacan wasa symptomatic form of communication—le sinthome— in which meaning is always just-out-of-reach. Denying the listener of any deeper meaning, yet having a powerful sensual resonance, the gestural excess of sign language and music bring hegemonic preconceptions about language, sound, space and the senses into crisis. In resisting a discretized spatiality, the gestural turn invites us to relate to and cohabit space and time in our own way, giving contemporary space a symptomatic fullness. Published in French and English in Tacet 03: De l’espace sonore / From the Sound Space (Paris: le presses du réel, May 2014), 120-161. Advisors: K. Michael Hays and Jana Cephas


THESIS RESEARCH 19 Asylum as heterotopia of deviation 126-127

Symbolic and operational articulation of power through architecture at Gallaudet College, Olmsted + Vaux (1967) 130-131


ARCHIVES OF PATAGONIA 20

A R C H I V E S O F P AT A G O N I A : V I C I S S T U D E S O F S PA C E A N D T I M E I N A N A LT E R E D L A N D S C A P E 2013 This project speculates on a regional-scale archive linking infrastructure and nature complementarily along the 180-km hightension high-voltage transmission line that would be constructed as part of the controversial HidroAysen project, which proposes the construction of five mega-dams scattered throughout the Chilean Patagonia with a combined hydroelectric output of 2750 megawatts. Not surprisingly, while the project would deliver a significant amount of renewable energy for Chile, it also comes under heavy indictment from conservation groups that seek to preserve one of nature’s most sublime landscapes. Despite a tradition that perceives the region as the last vestige of pristine nature on Earth, Patagonia has been an altered landscape since the first settlers descended upon the region. The slash-and-burn practices of colonial rancheros degraded soil quality beyond regeneration, opening up large, romantic vistas of the landscape. More recently, in 1976, Carretera Austral, Chile’s Route 7, framed Patagonia as a picturesque image to be experienced from the highway—an experience made even more unnatural through a vehicle. This project utilizes the construction schematics of the transmission line to build a series of archives nested within transmission towers that utilize fixed viewfinders to curate a constellation of ‘monuments.’ These monuments—found objects in the landscape that evidence space or the passage of time—foster an experience of the landscape that is not determined by experiencing space through the simultaneous passing of time. Instead, some monuments, such as the glacier, compress billions of years of geologic process. Others, such as the unused highway berm, seem to prolong the passage of time. Displaying these monuments through fixed viewfinders, the archival towers frame an intensely perceptual experience of space and time that conflates nature with infrastructure and conservation with energy. Project nominated for GSD Platform 6 and presented at PUC School of Architecture Critics: Anita Berritizbita + Kelly Doran, with Tomas Folch


1. TOWER ASSEMBLY

2. ON-SITE ERECTION

ERICKSON AIR CRANE

COLONIZING LAST FRONTIERS

25,000 lbs MAX. LIFTING CAPACITY

ERICKSON AIR CRANE ERICKSON AIR CRANE

25,000 lbs MAX. LIFTING CAPACITY 25,000 lbs MAX. LIFTING CAPACITY 22 m ROTOR22 DIAMETER m ROTOR DIAMETER

SUPPLY TRUCK MEMBERS FOR UP TO 20 STRUCTURES

PYLON HEIGHT 65 m

STRUCTURE SITE 60 m x 60m

RIGHT-OF-WAY

SETUP AREA

70m

21

4000 m

4. DEAD ENDS

ROBINSON R44 RAVEN II LINE PULLING

3. LINE STRINGING

ROBINSON R44 RAVEN II LINE PULLING

ERICKSON AIR CRANE

25,000 lbs MAX. LIFTING CAPACITY

ERICKSON AIR CRANE

25,000 lbs MAX. LIFTING CAPACITY

3-5 KM

MAX. PULL LENGTH

3-5 KM

MAX. PULL LENGTH

HYDRAULIC TENSIONER TWO-BUNDLE TENSIONER x 3 20,000` lbs

HYDRAULIC TENSIONER TWO-BUNDLE TENSIONER x 3 20,000 lbs

AYSEN TRANSMISION CONSTRUCTION PHASING, OFF-SITE TOWER ASSEMBLY

MEAN TEMPERATURE (°C)

JUL

AUG

SEP

OCT

NOV

DEC

JAN

FEB

MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

0.9°

3.0°

5.8°

8.5°

11.1°

12.7°

13.6°

13.2°

10.5°

7.4°

4.0°

1.1°

WORKER + EQUIPMENT MOBILIZATION

ACCESS ROAD SURVEY

ACCESS ROAD CONST. ROW CLEARING

SITE PREPARATION

FOUNDATION INSTALLATION

STRUCTURE ASSEMBLY + ERECTION

STRUCTURE STAKING

TRANSMISSION LINE STRINGING

FOUNDATION CURING

FOUNDATION EXCAVATION/POUR TOWER ERECTION

LINE STRINGING

CLEANUP & SITE RECLAMATION

CLEANUP + SITE RECLAMATION

TOTAL PERSONNEL

TOTAL

PEAK PERSONNEL (56)

PEAK ON-SITE PERSONNEL (36)


ANCHOR TOWERS AS SITES OF OPPORTUNITY From Construction to Archival

22

ARCHIVES OF PATAGONIA

Throughout the construction process, at least 2-4 daily trips are needed to transport personnel to the tower installation sites, and additional trips may be necessary to move large equipment. Instead of relying on these trips, pre-fabricated “huts” are transported to selected anchor tower sites—sites where the transmission line kinks greater than 5 degrees. There, these huts will consolidate worker and equipment movement as they pass through the site from initial preparation to final clean-up and site reclamation, a process which can take upwards of ten weeks to complete.

ANCHOR TOWER CONSTRUCTION YEAR 5-12

1:40000

L3

CARRETERA AUSTRAL ROTA 7-CH PUERTO MONTT TO VILLA O’HIGGINS

L2

A


PREFABRICATED “HUT” TYPOLOGIES Translating Construction Schematics into Land Use

23

COLONIZING LAST FRONTIERS

Responding to specific topography and vegetation, four pre-fabricated assemblages are recommended to capitalize on summer and winter sunlight and star-gazing opportunities. After occupation by the workers, these huts can remain on site, flown anywhere within a 20-kilometer radius, or otherwise transported and repurposed throughout the landscape to support local and tourist uses as waystations for archival visitors.

CONTINUED ARCHIVE YEAR 12+

1:40000

M1

I3

M2

AC TRANSMISSION

BAKER 2 RESERVOIR

2 x 500 kV DOUBLE CIRCUIT 65 m PYLON HEIGHT 70 m RIGHT-OF-WAY

+93.00 m AMSL (+76.55 m AMSL)

I2


ARCHIVES OF PATAGONIA 24 T-14: THE OUTCROP MONUMENT

T-44 THE BRIDGE MONUMENT OF SPACE-TIME

T-17: THE MARBLE MONUMENT TO GEOLOGIC PROCESS

T-04: MONUMENT OF DEATH AND PROLONGED REBIRTH

THE PATAGONIAN MONUMENTS Evidences of process, evidences of space as separate from time and vice versa, the monuments of Patagonia speak a language that time forgot, yet the presence of time is always present even in its absence. Some monuments compress time. Others prolong it. In both cases, these monuments teeter on the edge of the temporal, allowing the emergence of an intensely perceptual and spatial experience.

T-88: MONUMENT TO FALLEN TREES AND FOUND LUMBER

T-74: THE HOLE MONUMENT (OF ACCELERATED PROCESS)


COLONIZING LAST FRONTIERS 25

65m

32.5m

ARCHIVING PATAGONIA Through a fixed-sight viewfinder assembled at the Archival towers, archiving and framing these evidences into the Archives of Patagonia is an invitation for visitors to experience Patagonia not through a guided path but an undefined path of points in the landscape that allow visitors to define their own relationship with the landscape through space and time (or the lack thereof).


ARCHIVES OF PATAGONIA 26 MONUMENT CONSTELLATIONS Sight-Lines at the Dam and Glacier Monuments

THE DAM MONUMENT Infrastructure and Landscape

The splitting of the transmission line at the site of the proposed dam, located at the convergence of Rio Baker and a smaller tribituary, provides an opportunity to cognitively relate multiple scales of geology, energy production, and time through carefully calibrated sightlines between the two monuments and archival towers. The intersection of these monuments and sightlines creates a constellation that faciliates the hiker’s episodic moments of “discovery” that frame a profound experience of landscape.

During the construction process, worker huts are strategically situated within the reservoir, above the peak water level. Sitting directly in the sightline toward the dam from several archival towers, the huts become an orienting device that also relate landscape to megastructure.


1:40000

27

COLONIZING LAST FRONTIERS


ARCHIVES OF PATAGONIA 28

HUT TYPE A: Glacial hut composed of prefabricated units utilized during construction.

OBSERVATION DECK: Horizontal observation deck provides visual register to historical height of glacier and indicates next destination


29

COLONIZING LAST FRONTIERS


ARCHIVES OF PATAGONIA 30

T-66 INSTALLATION SITE Years 5-12 Under construction, the installation site of anchor tower T-134 provides for three worker huts and clearings to visually link the tower to archived monuments and to install high tension transmission lines.

1:40000

T-66 ARCHIVAL SITE Year 12+ Settled into its use as an archival tower, a deck registers the direction to archived monuments and vegetation is allowed to regenerate around the installation site. Two worker huts are relocated in the landscape along sightlines as hiking cabins or waystations.

1:40000


COLONIZING LAST FRONTIERS 31 AWAY FROM THE LINEAR A little-used and legally abandoned section of Carretera Austral is archived as a reminder of the space-time continuum.


32

ARCHIVES OF PATAGONIA


1:40000

33

COLONIZING LAST FRONTIERS


ARCHIVES OF PATAGONIA

THE ARCHIVAL NETWORK Landscape Constellations and the Line as Register Archival towers throughout Patagonia connect the outward gaze of the traveler-archivist to artifacts situated in the landscape, suggesting possible destinations without specifying an actual path, leaving the subject to travel on the landscape (space) rather than through it (space-time). Many paths are possible, yet there are none. Only through an aggregated and accumulated experience of the land can one truly gain full appreciation of its terrible sublime beauty. Meanwhile, the linearity of the high-tension line serves as a register for the traveler, orienting its position in space.

T01 T02

T03 T04 T05

T06 T07

T08

T09 T10

T85 T86 T87 T88

T11

T89 T12

T90 T91

T13

T14 T15

T16

34

T17

T18

T19 T22

T21

T23

T20

T26 T27

T24 T25

T28

T29

T30 T31

T32 T33

T34 T35 T36 T37 T38 T39

T42

T41

T40

T43

T44

T45 T46 T47

T48

T49 T50

T51

T52 T53 T54 T55 T56 T57 T58 T59

T60

T61 T62 T63 T64 T65 T66 T67 T68 T69 T70

T71

T72

T73

T74 T75

T76

T77

T78 T79 T80

T81

T82

T83 T84


COLONIZING LAST FRONTIERS 35 REGIONAL MODEL Topography slices are overlaid with a fluival map (showing Rio Baker, Rio Pascua and tribituaries), sight lines between archival towers and monuments, and helicopter flight ranges from worker camps.


GRID

MESH

36

DIFFERENTIAL CITY

CELL

DIFFERENTIAL CITY 2012 Differential City is a proposal for a code-generated city constantly displaced from itself. Differential City eschews linear modes of organization informed by efficiency and the shortest distance between point A and point B. Differential City displaces the direct path between these points and introduces intermediate points B, C, D, E, F‌ This operation of programmatic displacement maintains the constant overlap of movement speeds, scales, and activities as a means to increase physical mobility and opportunities for unplanned and unexpected interactions—a calculated informality. As a result, unlikely urban synergies emerge: high-density housing supported by big box retail, an industrial complex adjacent to a skate park, an urban leisure park on top of an office building. Three zones of varying density and formal organization of courtyards, building envelopes, and streets (mesh, grid, and cell), are organized based on a circle-packing logic that ensures a calibrated distribution of scalar and programmatic displacement. This project, located in the gridded district and focusing on the industrial code, challenges the straight line as a model of urban and industrial efficiency by pushing, pulling, elevating, and depressing a series of lines to create episodic moments of convergence between divergent programs and activities, allowing industrial production to exist alongside urban recreation in an unified architectural articulation. In Collaboration with Aanya Chugh and Joanna Rodriguez-Noyola Critic: Timothy Hyde


DISPLACEMENT

Vertical Circulation

Skate Park

Factory

Park

Factory

Courtyard

Factory

37

Program Connector

URBAN CODE

PROGRAM PAIRS

Barge

Factory

Boat House

Kayak Drop

Residence

Big Box Retail

Park

Commercial Development

Skate Park

Boardwalk


θ

d > 250m

d > 250m

d > 250m

d > 250m

Aspiration a highly regimented informal city. d1

d2

d3

d3

d2

[I]

θ

S

M

r < 15

TOKYOCODE

d1

d1

d > 250m d > 250m

d > 250m d > 250m

d > 250m d > 250m

d2

d2

d3

d3

d3

d3

d2

d2

d1

The City is supplied by four nodes which exist in space. High-speed transportation between these nodes are essential, thusly a pair of rigid infrastructural paths link each pair of nodes, and must intersect one another. These lines are non-negotiable, for the fastest way from Point A to Point B is straightaway.

r > 30

d1

S

S

M M

15 < r <15 30< r < 30

L

L

r > 30 r > 30

[ I-1.12 ]

The intersection of these rigid paths is an exchange point between either path, as well as the ground plane immediate to itself. As such, this intersection is the origin of a secondary urban organization.

[ I-1.13 ]

[ I-1.4 ]

This origin is also the intersection of primary local axes which bisects the rigid infrastructural axes from [ I-1.2 ].

[ I-2 ]

These orthographic axes are repeated at equidistant intervals, d < 250m along each rigid infrastructural axis.

[ I-1.6 ]

One of the bisecting axes from [ I-1.4 ] assumes the high-speed infrastructural function of one of rigid axes from [ I-1.2 ], which henceforth disappears from the grid, having fulfilled its purpose. The other bisecting axis will absorb the bulk of the commerical activity in the Slice.

[ I-1.7 ]

Each interval is trifurcated by a pair of secondary roads that are pinned along the rigid infrastructural paths at variable intervals. These variable intervals (of which there are up to three possible distances, d1, d2, and d3) are movable within a range of 50m, and alternate between condensation and expansion across each equidistant interval from [ I-1.5 ].

[ I-1.9 ]

[ I-2.1 ]

Street centerlines are taken from the various established paths from [ I-1.2 ], [ I-1.5 ], [ I-1.7 ], and [ I-1.13 ] resulting in blocks that corresponds with circles.

[ I-2.2 ]

The size of each circle corresponds to the average floor area of each building within the block specified by the circle. The range for each size, is as follows: a. Tier 3 (small circles): Aaverage < 500m2 b. Tier 2 (medium circles): 500m2 < Aaverage < 1500m2 c. Tier 1 (large circles): Aaverage > 1500m2

[ I-2.3 ]

The size of a circle also corresponds to the scalar distribution of buildings within the block specified by the circle. The scalar ratios are defined by the following matrix:

DIFFERENTIAL CITY

[ II ] [ II-1 ]

SCALE + VERTICALITY

[ III ]

Sectional Qualities

[ III-1 ]

[ II-1.1 ]

The City consists a range of sectional possibilities. Since the City is informal, there is no regulation aside from [ I-2.2 ] [ I-2.4 ] which specifies the size of a building.

[ III-1.1 ]

[ II-1.3 ]

A basic infrastructure of electrical wires and pylons, streetlights, and sewers supplies the supports the functions of the City.

[ II-1.4 ]

Intersitial buffer zones, which may consist of sidewalks, gaps, or the railroad, separate the street grid from the buildings which it services. These buffer zones come in the following width ranges:

2

A mandatory setback of 35 degrees is in effect for any construction above 10m, ensuring sunlight on the street. EXCEPTIONS: there is no restriction on the side of a block that is immediately adjacent to the railroad.

[ II-1.6 ]

Where the width of the street, ws exceeds 4m, a 1m wide walking zone, coplanar with the road surface, is added to either side of the street.

[ II-1.7 ]

On the primary streets established in [ I-1.4 ] - [ I-1.6 ], as well as segments of secondary streets that span a block delineated as “Tier 1” or “Tier 2” (see [ I-2.3 ], commercial activity must occur on the street level. Above the street level, the ratio of commercial space to residential space is 80%-20%.

[ II-1.8 ]

On the streets mentioned in [ II-1.8 ], commercial enterprises proclaim their presence through a profusion of signs (see Section III).

+3.3

[ III-3 ]

The amount of the street covered in signage relates to the number of signs in a sigmond function, where the number of signs grows rapidly after a treshold of percentage coverage has been reached, but as the street is saturated with signs, the growth plateaus. Once sign coverage plateaus, signage cannot become larger; instead, it must go down in scale.

[ III-1.4 ]

So too, must its content, as larger signs lead to smaller signs and yet smaller signs, i.e. from the restaurant awning, to the daily specials, to the menu, and finally to the fine print.

[ III-1.5 ]

A sign’s ability to be perceived from a distance is defined as its urgency. Urgency increases exponentially with the graphic-to-content ratio. The higher the graphic-to-content ratio, the more urgent the sign is. A sign with a graphic-tocontent ratio of greater than 90% to 10% is effective in instantly communicating with the urban bystander, and is frequently used in instances where a “Do Not” warning is present, such as the railroad or construction zones. A sign with a low graphic-to-content ratio communicates more content, but does not achieve instant communication, for it does not force itself onto the eye.

+1m

WHEN, w > 4m , AN ADDITIONAL 1m IS +1m ADDED TO EITHER SIDE OF THE STREET.

0 < x > 2m

This additional 1m margins are marked by a painted white line, and serves as a sidewalk. In these margins, lampposts and pylons are erected at regular intervals.

Min/Max elevated sidewalk & overhang

6

[ III-2.2 ]

The presence of the aromatic scents of food reflect the activity level of an area.

[ III-2.3 ]

The crisp air engendered by vegetation is tied to residential neighborhoods.

[ III-2.4 ]

Cigarette smoke occurs in close proximity to more cigarette smoke in spaces that have been de-facto designated smoking areas, usually adjacent to the railroad and drinking establishments.

38

Min/Max elevated sidewalk & overhang

+1m

COMMERCIALDUAL ENTRY small commercial 9 Cal.

COMMERCIALMULTIPLE ENTRY mixed scale commercial 11 Cal.

COMMERCIALPRIVATE ENTRY medium commercial 7 Cal.

COMMERCIALBALCONY ENTRY medium commercial 7 Cal.

COMMERCIALFACADE ENTRY tucked-away commercial 11 Cal.

COMMERCIALRECESSED ENTRY single-owner commercial 9 Cal. 0 < x < 2m

+1m

Min/Max elevated sidewalk & overhang

Each of these equidistant axes extend until they reach the next edge, forming a diagrid.

[ I-4.5 ]

Tier 3 (“small”)

> 90%

< 10%

0%

Tier 2 (“medium”)

> 50%

< 50%

< 10%

Tier 1 (“large”)

> 33%

< 66%

> 8%

Clusters of diamonds are extruded, creating a thickened facade.

[ I-4.6 ]

A circle is inscribed into each diamond created by this pattern.

[ I-4.7 ]

Each circle is pushed inward or outward with respect to performance criteria.

35°

35°

Architecture In between two adjacent circles, tangents perpendicular to the street are averaged to find the delimiting edge of a building’s footprint. This edge is then 4

5

TOKYOCODE

+ 10.0

+ 6.6

+3.3

100% COMMERICAL

+ 6.6

+3.3

90% RESIDENTIAL 10% COMMERICAL 100% COMMERICAL

100% COMMERICAL

RESIDENTIALFRONT ENTRY 3 Cal.

0 < x < 2m Min/Max elevated sidewalk & overhang

0 < x < 2m

w < 4m

Min/Max elevated sidewalk & overhang

+ 0.0

0 < x < 2m

0 < x < 2m

Min/Max elevated sidewalk & overhang

Min/Max elevated sidewalk & overhang

w < 4m

10 < w < 14m

+H

+H

+ 10.0

+ 10.0

+ 6.6

+ 6.6

+ 6.6

ANCHOR TENANTMODERATE URGENCY moderate number of signs

+ 0.0

RESIDENTIALSIDE ENTRY 3 Cal.

WHEN, w > 4m , AN ADDITIONAL 1m IS +1m ADDED TO EITHER SIDE OF THE STREET.

This additional 1m margins are marked by a painted white line, and serves as a sidewalk. In these margins, lampposts and pylons are erected at regular intervals.

+H

+ 10.0

VENICECODE

1.5m < w < 3m 0 < x < 4m

0 < x < 4m

Min/Max spacing between street edge & building edge

Min/Max spacing between street edge & building edge

35°

When darkness sets, and the repair shops close, the residential areas fall into silence, while the commercial zones are handed over to the music blaring in bars and clubs. SINGLE TENANTHIGH URGENCY low number of signs

+3.3

MULTIPLE TENANTSMODERATE URGENCY high number of signs

RESIDENTIALLOW URGENCY low number of signs or zero signs

Genesis of an Urban Slice

SIGN URGENCY & SCALEPURPOSES OF SIGNS

+3.3

80% COMMERICAL 20% RESIDENTIAL

80% RESIDENTIAL 20% COMMERICAL

100% COMMERICAL

100% COMMERICAL

+3.3

80% COMMERICAL 20% RESIDENTIAL 100% COMMERICAL

+ 0.0

+3.3

90% RESIDENTIAL 10% COMMERICAL

100% COMMERICAL

100% COMMERICAL

+ 0.0

0 < x < 2m

+1m

Min/Max elevated sidewalk & overhang

NO-SMOKING8M RADIUS smoking prohibited within 8m

WHEN, w > 4m , AN ADDITIONAL 1m IS +1m ADDED TO EITHER SIDE OF THE STREET.

0 < x < 2m

This additional 1m margins are marked by a painted white line, and serves as a sidewalk. In these margins, lampposts and pylons are erected at regular intervals.

Min/Max elevated sidewalk & NO-SMOKING8M RADII overhang

NO-SMOKING8M RADII smoking prohibited along buildings

+ 0.0

0 < x < 2m

if two closest entrances are more than 16m apart, a smoking enclave may emerge

w < 4m

+ 0.0

0 < x < 2m

Min/Max elevated sidewalk &

0 < x < 2m

Min/Max elevated sidewalk & overhang

SMOKINGoverhang ENCLAVEGRID DISTORTIONS due to infrastructures and subsequent distortions to the grid, smoking enclaves will emerge around these areas, around which smokers must congregage, as dunces.

NO-SMOKING8M RADII a normal street is completely covered by 8m no-smoking radii

w < 4m

10 < w < 14m

1.5m < w < 3m

Min/Max elevated sidewalk & overhang

+H

+H

+H

+ 10.0

+ 10.0

+ 10.0

+ 6.6

+ 6.6

+ 6.6

80% COMMERICAL 20% RESIDENTIAL

[I]

+3.3

100% COMMERICAL

+3.3

80% COMMERICAL 20% RESIDENTIAL 100% COMMERICAL

0 < x < 4m

0 < x < 4m

Min/Max spacing between street edge & building edge

Min/Max spacing between street edge & building edge

+ 0.0

0 < x < 2m

0 < x < 2m

Min/Max elevated sidewalk & overhang

Min/Max elevated sidewalk & overhang

[ I-2 ]

Visitors and residents converge at these nodes, which are characterized as either open or enclosed gathering spaces.

[ I-1.3 ]

A variable range of open-to-enclosed ratios may exist, from 0:1 to 1:1, as follows:

[ I-2.2 ]

[ I-2.3 ]

Only Open

Two of the three nodes in [ I-1.2 ] are designated transportation hubs, which must have a a 1:1 ratio of public to open spaces.

[ I-1.5 ]

The third node from [ I-1.2 ] rest equidistant between the transportation hubs, its central position a result of its religious function. The ratio between the transportation hubs and the religious node is 3:1.

[ I-1.6 ]

Each of the three primary nodes activate a branching algorithm in order to expand toward one another. All elements within an expansion can be traced back to one of the three seminal nodes.

Min/Max elevated sidewalk & overhang

w < 4m

10 < w < 14m

1.5m < w < 3m 0 < x < 4m

0 < x < 4m

Min/Max spacing between street edge & building edge

Min/Max spacing between street edge & building edge

9

TOKYOCODE

Local Clustering

[ II]

As each of the three clusters from section III reaches a critical point, secondary nodes, a church (enclosed) or a campo (open), are introduced to the cluster to foster local governace. Each cluster may have one of the following church-tocampo ratios: a. b. c. d. e. f.

Only Enclosed

[ I-1.4 ]

0 < x < 2m

Min/Max elevated sidewalk & overhang

8

[ I-2.1 ]

The City is supplied by three nodes which exist along a single line.

+ 0.0

0 < x < 2m

Aanya Chugh Jeffrey Mansfield Joanna Rodriguez-Noyola

Urban Clustering

0:1 1:4 1:3 1:2 1:1 2:1 3:1 4:1 1:0

w < 4m

TOKYOCODE

URBAN FORM

[ I-1.2 ]

+3.3

90% RESIDENTIAL 10% COMMERICAL 100% COMMERICAL

100% COMMERICAL

+ 0.0

WHEN, w > 4m , AN ADDITIONAL 1m IS +1m ADDED TO EITHER SIDE OF THE STREET.

This additional 1m margins are marked by a painted white line, and serves as a sidewalk. In these margins, lampposts and pylons are erected at regular intervals.

[ I-1.1 ]

a. b. c. d. e. f. g. h. i.

[ II-1 ]

0:1 1:4 1:3 1:1 1:2 2:1

MOVEMENT

Primary water transit must allow 2-way Vaporetto traffic and lengthwise Gondola docking, its width in the range of 40m < w < 70m

[ II-1.2 ]

Secondary water transit can be one of the following sizes:

[ II-1.3 ]

Each local node provides the communal infrastructure for a portion of each cluster and maintain their self-governance by subdividing from other localities within the same cluster. This division provides a practical path of secondary water transit, which service the localities on its edges. Furthermore, the medial paths of secondary water transit are tangent to circle packing around the secondary nodes, resulting in islands

[ II-1.4 ]

Along high-density primary pedestrian transit paths, crowd direction is evident, and the surrounding ground floor is 100% commercial. Above ground, 60% of the inhabitable space is commercial, 40% residential.

[ II-1.5 ]

No more than 30% of residential space is occupied along primary pedestrian transit.

[ II-1.6 ]

Along these transit paths, 1 out of every 8 buildings has a public function, i.e. Museum/Post Office.

[ II-1.7 ]

Along low-to-medium density secondary pedesterian transit paths, crowd direction is not evident, and the surrounding ground floor is 50% commercial and 50% residential. Above ground, 100% of the inhabitable space is residential.

The branch configuration is constrained by a circle-packing algorithm that selforganizes around the parent node. Each circle in [ I-1.2 ] has a radius which varies with respect to the lot size, with preference given to larger circles, signifying larger lots, at the periphery.

[ II-1.8 ]

No more than 60% of residential space is occupied along secondary pedestrian transit paths.

[ I-1.9 ]

The location of these territories may change based on the expasion of town limits but the total area of these lots stays the same.

[ II-1.9 ]

Along these secondary paths, 1 out of every 16 buildings is Public, i.e. Museum/ Post Office.

[ I-1.10 ]

The process in [ I-1.8 ] may be repeated, and new palazzos may advance a cluster of lots

[ II-1.10 ]

Along low-to-zero density vacant pedestrian travel paths, crowd direction is not evident, and the surrounding buildings are 100% residential.

[ I-1.11 ]

As the each cluster expands toward each other, like growing islands, a minimum distance, equal to the width of primary water transit, 40m < w < 70m, must be maintained ( see [ I-1.8 ]).

[ II-1.11 ]

Up to 80% of residential space is occupied along these vacant transit paths.

[ II-1.12 ]

[ I-1.12 ]

Primary water transit edges must be parallel and tangent to circles of expansion.

Bridges spanning primary water transit must be from riva to riva, and the minimum clearance beneath bridge is h > 9m

VENICECODE

COMMERCIALDUAL ENTRY small commercial 9 Cal.

Alternate crossings of primary transit include the following:

4

5

[ III ] [ III-1 ]

a. Traghetto: shortest linear path across waterways via an old Gondola stripped of ornamenation. Maximum capacity is two Gondoleers and 13 passengers. On either end, a wooden platform and a ticket collector await each trip. b. Vaporetto: a diagonally zig-zagging route across primary water ways via a large, motorized modern watercraft. Operated by a single driver, with a maximum capacity of 230 passengers. On each stop, a floating metal dock serves as a sheltered station, with ticket vending machines. [ II-1.15 ]

a. riva: parallel and adjacent to primary water transit i. adjacent to primary water transit: 4.5m < w < 12m ii. adjacent to secondary water transit: 2.5m < w < 4m b. calle: land-locked pedestrian transit: 1.5m < w < 9m c. sotoportego: tunnel through building mass: 1m < w < 3m d. riva + sotoportego hybrid: 1m < w < 4m

[ I-1.8 ]

VENICECODE

Bridges over secondary water transit can span any two types of pedestrian paths, i.e. riva to calle, and the minimum clearance beneath bridge is h > 9m to allow for a standing Gondoleer to row.

[ II-1.14 ]

Pedestrian transit may take one of the following forms:

[ I-1.7 ]

3

[ II-1.13 ]

Scales of movement

[ II-1.1 ]

a. wide: allowing for 2-way Gondola traffic and small boat docking, 7m < w < 12m b. narrow: allowing for two way gondola traffic, 3.5m < w < 7m

EXCEPTION: 1 in every 10 islands may borrow a minor node from a neighboring island.

ARTICLE III STAIRWELLS AS ORGANIZATIONAL Precedent study of the dense ANCHORS urban fabrics

COMMERCIALSINGLE ENTRY large commercial 9 Cal.

These bisecting axes are repeated at equidistant intervals, compliant to component and module assemblage across each edge.

[ I-4.4 ]

ARTICLE X EXCLUSION OF OBNOXIOUS BEHAVIORS

TOKYOCODE

[ I-1 ]

2

[ I-4.3 ]

L

+H

+ 10.0

80% COMMERICAL 20% RESIDENTIAL

100% COMMERICAL

+ 0.0

During daytime hours, crowds of people can be heard throughout the commercial areas; in the residential zones, the roar of the automobile repair shops are audible intermittently.

+ 6.6

80% RESIDENTIAL 20% COMMERICAL

0 < x < 2m

7

Aspiration a loosely regimented informal city.

VENICECODE

+3.3

80% COMMERICAL 20% RESIDENTIAL

+ 0.0

Certain aspects of the slice must have a specific decibel signature, each of which has a specific range.

[ III-3.3 ]

+ 6.6

+3.3

+ 0.0

Min/Max elevated sidewalk & overhang

Aural Perception

COMMERCIALSINGLE ENTRY large commercial 9 Cal.

100% COMMERICAL

0 < x > 2m

M

TOKYOCODE

+H

+ 10.0

+ 6.6

[ III-3.2 ] +H

+ 0.0

TOKYOCODE

At the architectural scale, the vertical edges replace the major infrastructural paths of [ I-1.2 ], with bisecting axes on either end of each edge, which calibrate the subdivision of the facade.

35°

A range of repulsive smells contend with attractive smells to guide the city dweller’s sense of the space. In order to reach the source of a pleasing smell, one must walk through a series of repulsive smells that discourage the city dweller from loitering at a certain area. Repulsive smells include automobile and building exhaust, railroad detritus, and cigarette smoke, while attractive sounds include food and vegetation.

35°

100% COMMERICAL

[ I-4.2 ]

35°

80% RESIDENTIAL 20% COMMERICAL

[ III-3.1 ]

ARTICLES VI + VII CONTROLLED CHAOS + URGENCY + 10.0

+ 10.0

Olfactory Perception

[ III-2.1 ]

+H

90% RESIDENTIAL 10% COMMERICAL

Facades materialize through one or more of the following techniques:

ARTICLE III STAIRWELLS AS ORGANIZATIONAL ANCHORS

+H

+ 6.6

100% COMMERICAL

Where there is a steady flow of vehicular traffic or buildings with high energy demands, exhaust smoke asserts itself in the space, intermingling with aromatic dishes of the surrounding eateries.

+ 6.6

c > 15% coverage 5 < c < 15% c < 5%

[ III-1.3 ]

+ 10.0

90% RESIDENTIAL 10% COMMERICAL

Railroads are uninhabitable and relatively unkempt areas, resulting in a morass of garbage superimposed with the odor of electrical smoke. With such an odor, there is a buffer zone between the railroad and the rest of the urban fabric, as specified in Section II.

[ III-2.6 ]

+ 10.0

The businesses on the primary commercial street from [ I-1.6 ] declares their existence by putting up signs. The density of signs is proportional to the density of commercial activity. The following thresholds are established:

Prada

a. lofting the vertical edges to build enclosing planes b. insinuating a grid within a curtain-wall logic c. re-cycling and modifying the urban grid script, including the bisecting grid of [ I-1.4 ] and [ I-1.5 ], as well as the trifurcating lines of [ I-1.7 ] to produce a diamond grid

No building or series of buildings in a block may violate the block’s zoning categorization by skewing their total area.

[ I-3 ] [ I-3.1 ]

TOKYOCODE

+H

+H

[ III-2.5 ]

Visual Perception

[ III-1.2 ]

[ III-2 ]

EXCEPTIONS: if the building is only two stories, it is 100% commercial.

+3.3

[ I-2.4 ]

3

100% COMMERICAL

a. sidewalk: 0 < w < 2m b. gaps: 0 < w < 2m c. railroad: 10 < w < 14m [ II-1.5 ]

PERCEPTION

a. heavy coverage: b. moderate coverage: c. light coverage:

Urban massing may be:

Around the exchange point from [ I-1.3 ], urban packing is conducted using a circle-packing algorithm wherein preference is given to a chosen scale. i.e.

TOKYOCODE

[ II-1.2 ]

[ I-1.11 ]

Archetype of TOKYO CODE Prada Omotesando, H+dM

Variations with respect to circulation access and setbacks, are possible (see Section II)

[ I-4.1 ]

Each block is packed in with yet smaller circles, whose numbers are distributed using this matrix in a circle-packing algorithm.

a. small-scale, densely packed b. medium-scale, moderately packed c. large-scale, lightly packed

Aanya Chugh Jeffrey Mansfield Joanna Rodriguez-Noyola

projected until it meets another edge that has been averaged, to form the corners of the buildable footprint. The four corners of the buildable footprint are projected into the z-dimension, forming the buildable volume.

Technique (c) is chosen.

Building Size

Each secondary road from [ I-1.7 ] rotates about their origin independently of one another at 45-degree intervals with respect to circle-packing (see [ I-1.11 ]). Each secondary road extends until it reaches one of the primary streets from [ I-1.4 ] and [ I-1.5 ].

[ I-4 ]

Block Zoning

Each orthographic axis of primary streets from [ I-1.4 ] and [ I-1.5 ] extends beyond a specified bounding box, connecting adjacent neighborhoods and delineating the basic structure of the street grid.

[ I-1.10 ]

[ I-3.3 ]

Teritary streets span parallel streets every two circles along a path (including the rigid infrastructural axis from [ I-1.2 ] as well as the primary and secondary streets from [ I-1.5 ] and [ I-1.7 ]).

S

[ I-1.8 ]

[ I-3.2 ]

Measurements for circles are established as follows: a. small circles: r < 15m b. medium circles: 15m < r < 30m c. large circles: r > 30m

[ I-1.3 ]

[ I-1.5 ]

Genesis of an Urban Slice

r < 15 r < 15

should the large scale be preferred, the exchange point will attract a ratio of 80% large circles, 10% medium circles, and 10% small circles in its immediate vicinity. The scale would then decrease proportionately with distance away from this exchange point.

Urban Grid

[ I-1.1 ] [ I-1.2 ] L

15 < r < 30

d > 250m d > 250m

URBAN FORM

d1

[ I-1 ] θ

Due to the changing water levels, stairs continue below water to allow boat access at all water levels. Each street type from [ II-1.3 ] have specific stair configurations: a. riva stairs: 80% parallel to canals, 20% perpendicular to canals b. calle stairs: 20% parallel to canals, 80% perpendicular to canals c. private stairs: only in palazzos behind the colonnade.

[ II-1.16 ]

Visual Perception Along primary pedestrian transit, commerce increases proportional in relation to a street’s width, w.

[ III-1.2 ]

These primary pedestrian transit paths consist a spectrum of flat window displays, protruding signs, street umbrellas and tables.

[ III-1.3 ]

Along these paths, street coverage, including the building surfaces, signage, and other objects, vary from 85%-95%.

[ III-1.4 ]

Commercial activity in surrounding ground floors engenders maximum variation in color along primary pedestrian paths.

[ III-1.5 ]

Along the secondary pedestrian transit paths, minor infrastructural elements and personal items are visible

[ III-1.6 ]

Along vacant pedestrian paths, maximum decay is visible, infrastructure is exposed and ground floor windows are barred. In these parts, dark building sides create a vertical shaft of light, culminating into a poetic dead end.

[ III-2 ]

Olfactory Perception

a. extreme high tide: pedestrian access limited to wooden platforms on the primary pedestrian paths of [ II-1.4 ]. In this state, pedestrian travel on secondary paths is possible only with rain boots or gumption. During this state, bridges are dead ends for secondary forms of water transit. b. extreme low tide: pedestrian and water travel are disconnected, and difficulities emerge in the transport of goods and services.

[ III-2.1 ]

Along the primary pedestrian transit paths, gamey smells of human bodies, sweat, sunscreen, and food prevade. Occasionally the smell of water also impinges upon the senses.

[ III-2.2 ]

Along secondary pedestrian transit paths, smells of vegetation, trash, and food are present. Occasionally the smell of water intensifies.

[ II-1.17 ]

Spontaneous roof transit pathways connect individual roofs, creating clusters of accessibility and challenging the distinction between public and private realms.

[ III-2.3 ]

Along vacant pedestrian transit paths, earthy smells waft from decaying walls, some water, and vegetation.

[ II-1.18 ]

These clusters may encompass buildings that are no more than 3 meters apart, the maximum jumping length.

[ II-1.19 ]

VENICECODE

Due to frequent flooding, temporary water level conditions are as follows:

PERCEPTION

[ III-1.1 ]

[ III-3 ]

Clusters occur in the following 3 distinct planes due to jumping restrictions: a. high roof planes (5-6 stories): 21-25m span, forms 20% of skyline b. medium roof planes (3-4 stories): 14-18m span, 70% of skyline only substantial transport network of roof clusters c. low roof planes (1-2 stories): 6-10m span, 10% of skyline

VENICECODE

6

Aural Perception

[ III-3.1 ]

Along primary pedestrian transit paths, sounds of street vendors, tour guides, crowds are at the 80db range.

[ III-3.2 ]

Along secondary pedestrian transit paths, sounds of footsteps, faint chatter are at the 60db range.

[ III-3.3 ]

Along vacant pedestrian transit paths, only distant echoes and water are audible.

7

VENICECODE

of Shimokitazawa (Setagata, Tokyo) and Venice.

COMMERCIALMULTIPLE ENTRY mixed scale commercial 11 Cal.

COMMERCIALPRIVATE ENTRY medium commercial 7 Cal.

COMMERCIALBALCONY ENTRY medium commercial 7 Cal.

COMMERCIALFACADE ENTRY tucked-away commercial 11 Cal.

COMMERCIALRECESSED ENTRY single-owner commercial 9 Cal.

RESIDENTIALFRONT ENTRY 3 Cal.

RESIDENTIALSIDE ENTRY 3 Cal.

ARTICLES VI + VII CONTROLLED CHAOS + URGENCY

1. Large Commercial Requirements: large floorspace 100% storefront immediate street access

2. Medium Mixed-Use (Retail + Office) Requirements: bilateral entries 100% storefront immediate street access

3. Medium Mixed-Use (Retail + Office) Requirements: multiple floor entries 50% storefront immediate street access

4. Medium Residential Requirements: ground floor commercial elevated entries balcony over street tucked-away access

5. Medium Mixed Use (Retail + Office) Requirements: ground floor commercial elevated entries balcony over street tucked-away access

Circulation as an thickened program inscribed onto—or into—buildings

SINGLE TENANTHIGH URGENCY low number of signs

ANCHOR TENANTMODERATE URGENCY moderate number of signs

MULTIPLE TENANTSMODERATE URGENCY high number of signs

RESIDENTIALLOW URGENCY low number of signs or zero signs

6. Medium Office Requirements: multiple floor entries balcony over street 0% storefront immediate street access

7. Large Commercial (Flagship) Requirements: single tenant continuity in appearance 100% storefront

8. Large Commercial (Office Building) Requirements: multiple tenants ground floor retail rapid vertical movement

SIGN URGENCY & SCALEPURPOSES OF SIGNS

ARTICLE X EXCLUSION OF OBNOXIOUS BEHAVIORS

Overlapping Zones

Shared Zones

Courtyards

Courtyards + Thickened Skin

Differential City

Code-driven generation of the Differential City: thickened circulation and courtyards NO-SMOKING8M RADIUS smoking prohibited within 8m

NO-SMOKING8M RADII smoking prohibited along buildings

NO-SMOKING8M RADII if two closest entrances are more than 16m apart, a smoking enclave may emerge

NO-SMOKING8M RADII a normal street is completely covered by 8m no-smoking radii

SMOKING ENCLAVEGRID DISTORTIONS due to infrastructures and subsequent distortions to the grid, smoking enclaves will emerge around these areas, around which smokers must congregage, as dunces.

9. Large Commercial (Office Building) Requirements: large floorspace ground floor retail rapid vertical movement


Activity Expenditures

Correlation between expenditure and height

Movement in Expenditure Zones

90°

45°

6 Cal/min

ZONE OF LOW EXPENDITURE vertically slow & horizontally fast (vertically by foot, horizontally by machine)

30°

10 Cal/min

ZONE OF HIGH EXPENDITURE vertically slow & horizontally slow (movement primarily by foot)

ZONE OF LOW EXPENDITURE vertically fast & horizontally fast (vertically by machine, horizontally by machine)

9 Cal/min 15°

0.5 Cal/min

Expenditure Zones

7 Cal/min

16 Cal/min

5° 4° 0° 4° 5°

15°

0 Cal. 1 story

30°

6 Cal. 3 stories

Low Expenditure

9 Cal. 3 stories

12 Cal. 4 stories

High Expenditure

3 Cal/min 45°

1 Cal. / .01 mile

Zone of High Expenditure

90°

slow horizontal and vertical movement continuities between roofplane (larger clusters) multiple infrastructure layers

moderate horizontal movement some transition between roofplanes (roofplane clusters form)

Zone of Low Expenditure

faster horizontal + vertical movement (by machine) less transition between roofplanes

Footprint and Circulation Types

Property Ownership

0 Cal. 10 stories

0 Cal. 30+ stories

Low Expenditure

39

Property Ownership and Circulation Types

Zone of Moderate Expenditure

15 Cal. 5 stories

URBAN CODE

3 Cal/min

Distribution of Circulation Types

Elevators

Distribution of Circulation Types

Ramps

Elevators

Stairs

Generation of Building Envelopes and Courtyards from Circle-Packing Code

Ramps

Stairs

Combined Distribution

Building Envelopes

Courtyards


DIFFERENTIAL CITY 40

FLATNESS IS NOT PREDETERMINED. Instead, it must be produced by an alignment of points in space.

DISTANCE GOVERNS Identical distance is retained with adjacent inclines and declines.

ALIGNMENT GOVERNS Alignment between segments are retained based on (a) angles of inclination or declination, or (b) based on points in space.


90°

Alignment governs

L6 L6

30°

L8

L5

L7

10 Cal/min

L5

9 Cal/min 15°

al/min

5° 4° 0° 4° 5°

15°

3 Cal/min

30°

3 Cal/min 45°

90°

PARTY WALL

2.

BEAMS

3.

ANGLES OF INCLINATION & DECLINATION Each angle of inclination and declination, as well as activities

DOUBLE PARTY WALL + PUBLIC ROOF

L6 L6

4.

L8

4

L4

Alignment governs

5.

ENVELOPE

L4

L6 L6

caloric expenditures ranging from low (0-3 Cal.), medium (4-7 Cal.), and high (7+ Cal.)

L7

L4

PUBLICL SPACE

Alignment governs

L3

L2

L3

L2

L1

L3

L6 Alignment governs

Alignment governs

L6 L6

L8

L5

L7

L5

L8

L7

FLATNESS IS NOT PREDETERMINED. Instead, it must be produced by an L8 alignment of points in space. L

L7

4

L6

L4

L6

Alignment governs

L4

Alignment governs L4

L6

41

1.

L8

L7

7 Cal/min

URBAN CODE

45°

L6

L3

L2

L3

L2

L1

L3

L6

PLANES OF INCLINATION & DECLINATION Must (a) align to each other, based on points in space, (b) retain identical distance with adjacent inclines & declines, or (c) both.

Alignment governs

10 ft 10 ft 10 ft

10 ft 10 ft 10 ft

WITH OR AGAINST THE GRAIN

ALIGNMENT OUTCOMES

or against the grain, in the interest of caloric expenditure or spatial character.

LINATION & DECLINATION n to each other, based on ce, (b) retain identical adjacent inclines & (c) both.

10 ft

EMERGENT SPATIALITIES

10 ft 10 ft

10 ft 10 ft 10 ft

WITH OR AGAINST THE GRAIN or against the grain, in the interest of caloric expenditure or spatial character.

EMERGENT SPATIALITIES alignment rules, form courtyards and spatial-programmatic pockets.

ROOF PLAN

alignment rules, form courtyards and spatial-programmatic pockets.


DIFFERENTIAL CITY 42 SOUTH VIEW Entrance to underground gallery

NORTH VIEW Main entrance from street


URBAN CODE 43 INTERIOR VIEW WITH TOWER Ground floor lobby and atrium

EAST VIEW Public waterfront park


DIFFERENTIAL CITY 44

VIEW EAST FROM FLUSHING RIVER Reaching out to the edge of the water, the proposed architecture facilitates the confluence of disparate yet complementary activities.


45

URBAN CODE


DISTRIBUTION OF FOOTPRINTS

Footprint served per vertical circulation system

A > 500 ft (small)

DIFFERENTIAL CITY

EXPENDITURE ZONES High Expenditure Moderate Expenditure Low Expenditure

500 ft

< A < 1,500 ft (medium)

2

2

1,500 ft 2 < A (large)

> 90%

< 10%

0%

< 10%

> 40%

< 50%

> 33%

< 50%

> 12%

SECTORS Industrial Sector Commerical Sector Institutional Sector Residential Sector

PROGRAMS Small Comme Large Comme Flagship Co Small Resid Two-Family Detached Re Large Wareh Small Indus Garage Park Small Offic Medium Offi Large Offic Mall Park

46

ZONE SCALES Small Medium Large Extra Large

2

SIGN COVERA LINKAGES Destinations Highways Boulveards Streets Buildings

HORIZONTAL CIRCULATION Railroad Highway Boulveard + Sidewalk Street + Sidewalk Narrow Street

HORIZONTAL SPEED 0

0 1

SIGN URGENC 0


LOCATION OF VERTICAL CIRCULATION At Street On Side Deep within building On building exterior

# STORIES 0 1 2 3 4 5 10+ 30+

VERTICAL CIRCULATION Stair Type A Stair Type B Stair Type C Stair Type D Stair Type E Stair Type F Stair Type G Stair Type H Stair Type I Ladder Elevator Ramp None

1

0

INCLINE 0° incline 4° incline 5° incline 15° incline 30° incline 45° incline 60° incline 90 ° incline

47

ce ice ce

VERTICAL SPEED

URBAN CODE

ercial ercial ommercial dential Detached Residential esidential house strial

AGE 1

CY 1

AIR 80% 60% 40% 20%

RIGHTS saturation saturation saturation saturation

of of of of

permissible permissible permissible permissible

zoning zoning zoning zoning


48

DIFFERENTIAL CITY


49

URBAN CODE


PILGRIMAGE 50

PILGRIMAGE 2011 Pilgrimage is a proposal for a performing arts center in Boston adjacent to Paul Rudolphâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Government Services Center (19621971) that seeks to revive the troubled project of brutalism, with its ethos of raw functional rationalism through the stark articulation of building systems, circulation flows, programmatic volumes, and scale. The unapologetic monumentality of Government Services Center failed partially because the large-scale urban renewal efforts evicted the site of its once-flourishing social fabric and isolated itself inside a ring of urban walls. Mostly, it failed because its impenetrable envelope muted the post-Fordist, cybernetic theater of inputs, outputs, and circulation flows that are part and parcel to brutalist architecture. This project proposes two theatrical volumes organized around an armature of columns and cores and oriented to maximize visibility along Merrimac St. and from the elevated plaza. A double-layered structural shell consisting of an exterior louvered screen and a double-glazed skin on the interior layer loosely envelops the two theatrical volumes, resulting in void spaces where back-of-house activities intersect with front-of-house functions, blurring the boundary between public and private. This transparent envelope further exploits the dual performativity of the theater archetype by revealing both the on-stage performance and the secondary, rational performance of back-of-house activities that occur in the void space, which becomes stage-like and presents itself to the city alongside the actual stages. Finally, a dormitory for visiting artists hovers above the existing building, providing a focal counter to the theatrical volumes and allows the architecture to resist a static rendering of its relationship to the city. These volumes, appearing to float and organize activities around them, become dynamic monuments that tempt the inhabitants of the city to venture into the defined yet ambiguous space of the building, and circulate around it, as in a ritual pilgrimage. Critic: Eric HĂśweler


51

SITE | SITUATION | SYSTEMS


WC

RESIDENCE

DORMS

KITCHEN

DORM LOBBY

THE INTERCHANGE

BACK LOBBY

BAR

WC

WC

ORCHESTRA TRAP ROOM

LOBBY

PLAZA

STAGE

AUDITORIUM

WC

DRESSING ROOMS

WC

52

AMPHITHEATER

LOADING DOCK

PARKING GARAGE

BLACK BOX LOBBY

GIFT SHOP

SCHOOL

STORAGE

GREEN ROOM

BLACK BOX

READING ROOM

DRESSING ROOMS

SCHOOL LOBBY (FRONT)

SCHOOL LOBBY (BACK)

COMMON SPACE STOR

WORKSHOP

ADMIN OFFICES

STOR

STOR

STOR

STOR

WC

WC

WC

WC

WC

CLASSROOM

CLASSROOM

REHEARSAL STUDIO

REHEARSAL STUDIO

CLASSROOM

CLASSROOM

REHEARSAL STUDIO

REHEARSAL STUDIO

CLASSROOM

CLASSROOM

CYBERNETIC SYSTEM This project contains four programmatic clusters: front-of-house, back-of-house, a performing arts school, and live/work dormority facilties for visiting artists. The original Government Services Center, with its post-Fordist ethos of functional efficiency, is complemented with a diagram that aims to more closely approach the cybernetic project set out in Stafford Beer’s “Platform of Change,” where relationships and adjacencies are augmented by the performativity of the in-between.

LIBRARY

DRESSING ROOMS

BACK OF HOUSE

RESTAURANT

performance hall

PILGRIMAGE

FRONT OF HOUSE

CINEMA


SITE | SITUATION | SYSTEMS 53 PROGRAM Dual Performativity of the Theater

ENCLOSURE Armature / Shell / Skin


PILGRIMAGE 54

MASSING Performing to the city

MASSING + CIRCULATION Performance of movement

GIFT SHOP GIFT SHOP DORMS DORMS

AMPHITHEATER AMPHITHEATER

bar bar CINEMA CINEMA

INTERCHANGE INTERCHANGE

auditorium auditorium

LIBRARY LIBRARY

GREEN GREEN ROOM ROOM SCHOOL SCHOOL

restaurant restaurant PLAZA PLAZA + + LOBBY LOBBY GARAGE GARAGE

0 0

1 1 x 250 x 250

2 2

3 3

4 4

5 5

6 6

7 7

8 8

9 9 10 10 11 11 12 12 13 13 14 14 15 15 16 16 17 17 18 18 19 19 20 20 21 21 22 22 23 23 24 24 PROGRAM FLOWS Typical Daily Use of the Building


55

SITE | SITUATION | SYSTEMS


56

PILGRIMAGE


57

SITE | SITUATION | SYSTEMS


58

PILGRIMAGE

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

VESTIBULE ENTRANCE HALL BOX OFFICE BLACK BOX LOBBY BLACK BOX RESTAURANT KITCHEN BOOKSTORE READING ROOM OUTDOOR THEATER GARDENS AMPHITHEATRE HYDRAULIC PLATFORM WELCOME DESK GALLERY LIBRARY LOUNGE REHEARSAL STUDIO SMALL STUDIO CLASSROOM

97'

Level 0 Plan 1 /96” = 1’

21 22 24 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39

STORAGE SHOP PARKING GARAGE ADMIN OFFICES BAR CONTROL ROOM TRAP ROOM ORCHESTRA AUDITORIUM DRESSING ROOMS STAGE GREEN ROOM CONCESSIONS SMALL WORKSHOP INTERCHANGE CINEMA / FLEX PRESENTATION FLEX WORKSHOP DORM LOBBY DORM ROOMS


SITE | SITUATION | SYSTEMS 59 12

'-3

"

12

'-3

"

12

'-3

"

12

'-3

"

12

'-3

"

5

6

11

12

'-3

"

12

'-3

"

12

'-3

"

12

'-3

"

7

12

12

'-3

"

9

12

'-3

"

12

'-3

"

12

4

'-3

"

12

'-6

"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

13

1

2

8

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

10

12'-0"

3

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-5"

11'-6"

11

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"


60

PILGRIMAGE


SITE | SITUATION | SYSTEMS 61 12'

-3"

12'

-3"

12'

-3"

12'

-3"

12'

-3"

12'

-3"

1

12'

-3"

12'

-3"

12'

-3"

12'

-3"

12'

-3"

12

2

12'

-3"

12'

-3"

12'

-6"

13

20

20

22

16

21

3

14 12'-0"

1

12'-0"

12'-0"

23

18

12'-0"

18

20

15

17

12'-0"

12'-0"

19

20

20

12'-0"

15 19

11'-6"

24

12'-5"

Level -2 Plan 1 /128” = 1’

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"


PILGRIMAGE 62

+140.45

+125.42

+109.92

+93.42

+76.92

+60.42

+44.92

+21.92

+0.00


SITE | SITUATION | SYSTEMS 63 +188.00 +184.00

+170.00

+156.00

+142.00

+128.00

+110.90

+73.23

+50.08


64

PILGRIMAGE


SITE | SITUATION | SYSTEMS 65 12'

-3"

12'

-3"

12'

-3"

12'

-3"

12'

-3"

12'

-3"

12'

-3"

1

12'

-3"

12'

-3"

12

12'

-3"

12'

-3"

2

12'

-3"

12'

-3"

12'

-6"

13

22

16

21

14

12'-0"

12'-0"

23

12'-0"

14 18

12'-0"

18

12'-0"

15 19

19

11'-6"

12'-0"

12'-0"

17

12'-5"

Level -1 Plan 1 /128” = 1’

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-5"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"


10 10

'-0"

'-0"

10

10

'-0"

'-0"

10

10

'-0"

'-0"

10

'-0"

'-0"

10

10

'-0"

10

'-0"

10

'-0"

39

7

Level 8 Plan 1 /128” = 1’

10 10

'-0"

'-0"

10

10

'-0"

'-0"

10

10

'-0"

'-0"

10

'-0"

'-0"

10

'-0"

10 10

'-0"

'-0"

10

10

'-0"

'-0"

10

10

'-0"

'-0"

10

'-0"

'-0"

12

'-3"

10

38

10

'-0"

'-0"

12

10

'-3"

'-0"

12

'-3"

10

PILGRIMAGE

10

'-0"

10

'-0"

10

38

12

'-3"

12

'-3"

12

'-3"

12

'-3"

12

'-3"

12

'-3"

12

'-3"

12

'-3"

12

66

'-3"

12

'-3"

12

'-3" 12

'-6"

12

'-3"

12

'-3"

12

12'-0"

'-3"

12

'-3"

12

12'-0"

'-3"

12

12'-0"

'-3"

12

'-3"

12

12'-0"

'-3"

12

12'-0"

'-3"

12

'-3"

12

12'-0"

'-3"

12

12

12'-0"

11'-6"

'-6"

12'-0"

'-3"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-5"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-5"

10 10

'-0"

'-0"

10

12'-0"

10

'-0"

'-0"

10

10

'-0"

'-0"

10

12'-0"

10

'-0"

11'-6"

12'-0"

10

'-0"

12'-0"

10

'-0"

10

'-0"

'-0"

38

Level 5 Plan 1 /128” = 1’ 12

'-3"

12

'-3"

12

'-3"

12

'-3"

12

'-3"

12

'-3"

12

'-3"

12

'-3"

12

'-3"

12

'-3"

12

'-3"

12

'-3"

12

'-3"

12

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

'-6"

12

12'-0"

'-3"

12

12'-0"

'-3"

12

'-3"

12

11'-6"

'-3"

12

'-3"

12

'-3"

12'-5"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12

'-3"

12'-0"

35

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12

'-3"

12

'-3"

12

'-3"

12

'-3"

36

12

'-3"

12

'-3"

12

'-3" 12

'-6"

12

'-3"

12

'-3"

12

12'-0"

'-3"

12

'-3"

12

12'-0"

'-3"

12

12'-0"

'-3"

35

12

'-3"

33

12

12'-0"

'-3"

12

12'-0"

'-3"

12

'-3"

36

12

12'-0"

'-3"

12

12

'-6"

12'-0"

'-3"

12'-0"

11'-6"

34

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0" 12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

33

34 11'-6"

12'-5"

Level 3 Plan 1 /128” = 1’


10

10 10

10

'-0"

'-0"

'-0"

'-0"

10

10

10

10

'-0"

'-0"

'-0"

'-0"

10

10

10

10

'-0"

'-0"

'-0"

'-0"

10

10

'-0"

'-0"

'-0"

'-0"

'-0"

'-0"

'-0"

10

'-0"

39

10

10

'-0"

10

'-0"

10

10

10

10

39

Level 7 Plan 1 /128” = 1’

10

10

'-0"

'-0"

10

Level 6 Plan 1 /128” = 1’

10

'-0"

'-0"

10

'-0"

'-0"

10

10

10

'-0"

'-0"

10

'-0"

37

10 10

'-0"

'-0"

10

10

'-0"

'-0"

10

10

'-0"

'-0"

10

'-0" 12

12

'-3"

'-0"

'-3"

10

10

'-0"

'-0"

12

12

10

'-3"

'-3"

10

'-0"

37

12

12

'-3"

'-3"

12

12

'-3"

'-3"

12

12

'-3"

'-3"

12

12

'-3"

'-3"

12

12

'-3"

'-3"

12

12

'-3"

'-3"

12

12

'-3"

'-3"

12

12

'-3"

'-3"

12

12

'-3"

'-3"

12

12

'-3"

'-3"

12

12

'-3"

'-3"

12

12

'-3"

'-3"

12

12

'-6"

'-6"

12

12

'-3"

'-3"

12

12

'-3"

'-3"

12

12

'-3"

'-3"

12'-0"

12'-0"

'-3"

12

12

'-3"

12

12

'-3"

12'-0"

12'-0"

'-3"

12

12

'-3"

'-3"

12'-0"

12'-0"

'-3"

12

12

'-3"

12

12

'-3"

12'-0"

26

12'-0"

'-3"

12

12

'-3"

'-3"

12'-0"

12'-0"

'-3"

12

12

'-3"

12

12

'-3"

12'-0"

12'-0"

'-3"

12

12

'-3"

12

12'-0"

12'-0"

11'-6"

'-6"

11'-6"

'-6"

12'-0"

'-3"

12

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-5"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

10 10

'-0"

'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-5"

67

10

'-0"

'-0"

12'-0"

10

SITE | SITUATION | SYSTEMS

7

7

26

10

10

10

'-0"

'-0"

12'-0"

10

12'-0"

'-0"

'-0"

10

10

10

12'-0"

12'-0"

'-0"

'-0"

12'-0" 12'-0"

12'-0" 12'-5"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

11'-6"

11'-6"

12'-0"

37

12'-5"

Level 4 Plan 1 /128” = 1’

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

Level 4 Plan 1 /128” = 1’ 12

12

'-3"

'-3"

12

12

'-3"

'-3"

12

12

'-3"

'-3"

12

12

'-3"

'-3"

12

12

'-3"

'-3"

12

12

'-3"

'-3"

12

12

'-3"

'-3"

12

12

'-3"

'-3"

12

12

'-3"

'-3"

12

12

'-3"

'-3"

12

12

'-3"

'-3"

12

12

'-3"

'-3"

12

12

'-3"

'-3"

12

12

'-6"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

30

12'-0"

'-6"

12'-0" 12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

26

12

12

'-3"

12'-0"

12'-0"

'-3"

12

12

'-3"

'-3"

12'-0"

12'-0"

'-3"

12

12

'-3"

12

12

12

12

'-3"

'-3"

12

30

12

'-3"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

'-3"

12'-0"

12

'-3"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-5"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12

'-3"

12'-0"

12

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12

'-3"

'-3"

12

12

'-3"

'-3"

12

12

'-3"

'-3"

26

12

'-3"

12

'-3"

12

12

'-3"

'-3"

12

12

'-3"

32

'-3"

12

12

'-3"

'-3"

12

12

'-6"

'-6"

12

12

'-3"

'-3"

12

12

'-3"

'-3"

12

12

'-3"

12

'-3"

12'-0"

12'-0"

'-3"

12

'-3"

12

12

'-3"

12'-0"

12'-0"

'-3"

12

12

12'-0"

12

'-3"

29

12

'-3"

27

12

25 12

'-3"

12'-0"

'-3"

28 29

12'-0"

31

12'-0"

'-3"

'-3"

12

12

'-3"

'-3"

26

12'-0"

12'-0"

'-3"

12

12

'-3"

12

12

'-3"

12'-0"

12'-0"

'-3"

12

12

'-3"

'-6"

12'-0"

'-3"

12

12

'-6"

30

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

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12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

11'-6" 12'-5"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

Level 1 Plan 1 /128” = 1’ 27

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

25

12'-0" 12'-0"

12'-0" 12'-0"

30

30 30

12'-0"

28 29

12'-0"

12'-0"

29

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-5"

Level 2 Plan 1 /128” = 1’ 31

12'-0"

12'-0"

11'-6"

30

11'-6"

12'-5"

11'-6"

'-3"

11'-6"

'-3"

12'-0"

32

11'-6"

10

'-0"

10

'-0"

'-0"


68

PILGRIMAGE


SITE | SITUATION | SYSTEMS 69 GARAGE

AMPHITHEATER TRUCK ACCESS SCHOOL ENTRY

PAVILION STAGE

TRAP ROOM

DANCE STUDIO CLASSROOM

ENTRANCE HALL CONCESSION

LIBRARY GARDEN

BAR SHOP

DANCE STUDIO


SUBWAY CITY 70

S U B WAY C I T Y 2007 Subway City is a speculative proposal that recalibrates urban experience along a strip extending across midtown Manhattan, from Weekhawken, NJ to Queens, and bounded by 29th and 43rd Streets, or roughly the site and scale of Superstudio’s Continuous Momument. Within this slice of Manhattan, urban activity is concentrated toward the center of the slice, around three prominent nodes—Times Square, Herald Square, and Port Authority. With the introduction of a system of people movers—conveyor sidewalks—located on street level, underground, or several stories high, this proposal accelerates movement along the east-west axis to complement the general north-south directionality of the existing subway system. With the prospect of accelerated mobility, people movers become attractors that collect and dispense inhabitants of the city at nontraditional termini strategically located away from existing nodes of midtown activity, elongating the fabric of urban activity horizontally along the strip. Where people movers cut through buildings, a series of notches articulates a dynamic shift in the relationship between infrastructure and the urban fabric. To complement the strong vertical continuity of midtown Manhattan, revealed in the project research, and the east-west system of people movers, this project proposes a third architectural element—a series of triangulated reservoirs that collect and drain people between the people movers and the vertical circulation cores located within buildings. Occurring where people movers pass through buildings several stories high, these triangulated reservoirs diffuse horizontal movement along the north-south axis and elevate the public spaces of surrounding buildings to introduce new sectional relationships between program and built spaces. Critic: Ron Witte


71

PRINCETON SOA


SUBWAY CITY 72 SUPERPLAN: PEOPLE MOVERS + RESERVOIRS Weekhawken, NJ to Queens, bounded by 34th St. and 43rd St.


73

PRINCETON SOA


SUBWAY CITY 74

RESEARCH: HERALD SQUARE FLAT MODEL 1/16â&#x20AC;? Plexiglas, 10 layers: elevators (4), building volumes (1), subway entrances/exits (2), subway tunnels (2), and street layout (1).

VERTICAL RELATIONSHIPS Relating elevators and subway entrances/exists reveals strong vertical continuity.

SITE MODEL: HERALD SQUARE People movers, running east-west on street level and cutting through buildings three stories high, generate a series of collisions that intensify the urban experience. Reservoirs placed alongside people movers vertically shifts the buildingsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; public programs, while also fostering north-south movement.

ANCHORS Anchored to elevator cores, building shells occupy the interstitial zone between the cores, the subway tunnels, and the street layout.

THE NEW YORK FIELD The abstraction of New York City as an agglomeration of elevator cores re-presents the object-to-field dynamics on new terms: a vertical city.


75

PRINCETON SOA


CONTEXT Claiming neighboring structures

76

SUBWAY CITY

IDENTITY Claiming visibility

PROGRAM Claiming building space for use

STREET Claiming sidewalk & street

RESERVOIRS Claiming urban fabric


77

PRINCETON SOA


RIVERFIRST 78

RIVERFIRST 2011 RIVERFIRST, a collaboration of KVA MATx and Tom Leader Studio, won the international 21st century riverfront design competition sponsored by the Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board (MPRB) and the Walker Art Museum. RIVERFIRST is a multifaceted planning, landscape, conservation, sustainable transportation and architectural design project to address 21st century urban challenges in Minneapolis: Urban Ecology, Water, Mobility, and Green Business Networks. The creation of strategic map representations of the urban district allowed the design team to create new ecological synergies between existing urban industrial territory and natural riparian systems. The project territory includes the design of large scale interventions to increase the carrying capacity of the river, improve river water quality and create a multi-tasking public park system with non-traditional soft infrastructure to mitigate anticipated climate driven flooding. Initiated to provide riverfront public access and improve the ecological health of 5.5 miles of the Upper Mississippi River in downtown Minneapolis along the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s industrialized Port district, this project is the largest riverfront development project in the United States. Seven sites for near-term development include a continuous Riverfront Trail System with solar powered Park WIFI network and River Talk mobile phone application; floating Bio-Haven Islands providing 8 acres of protected riparian habitat for migrating birds and endangered wildlife; a restored wetlands and comprehensive storm and run-off water remediation and planned development of 60 acres of Port and Park land with mixed use residential and light industrial buildings. Kennedy Violich Architecture, Ltd. and Tom Leader Studio, with Sheila Kennedy, Frano Violich, Jungmin Nam, Kyle Coburn, Phil Seaton, and Drew Cowdrey


KENNEDY VIOLICH ARCHITECTURE 79

Priority Projects 0 – 5 Years Scherer Park District

Bo01, Malmö, Sweden

Priority Projects 0 – 5 Years Scherer Park District

Bo01, Malmö, Sweden

Waitangi Park, NZ View of Hall Island from River

Site section looking North (Hall Island on the left)

Metamorphosis 1: Jose Ulloa Davet + Delphine Ding

Winter View of Hall Island from Plymouth Bridge, Swimming / Skating Barge in foreground

29

Site section through Scherer Park looking South, Hall Island on right

30


TSAI GUESTHOUSE 80

TSAI GUESTHOUSE 2010 The guesthouse brief asked for three main elements: a bedroom, a workroom and a gallery for the two collectors’ art. One simple and highly effective gesture—a Y-shaped ground plan—served to link these elements at isolated points and to define the overall appearance of the guesthouse. The small bathroom, kitchenette and walk-in closet—the latter of which conceals the staircase to the basement and garage—consist of compact, freestanding boxes that simultaneously constitute the rear walls of the bedroom and workroom. In contrast to the galvanized corrugated metal façade of the main house, the guesthouse is a timber structure clad in corrugated corten steel, which rusts over time and so merges unobtrusively with the landscape— particularly in fall, when the foliage of the trees turns into a riot of red and gold. The landscape also plays a major role in the interior design of the guesthouse, for each of the three main rooms offers a different perspective of the extensive grounds: the view is exalted at these points, and thus becomes a part of the house. 2013 American Architecture Award presented by the Chicago Athenaeum HHF Architects + Ai Weiwei, with Simon Hartmann, Tilo Herlach, Simon Frommenwiler, Mio Tsunemaya, and Madeline Kessler, photos by Iwan Baan


1

2

3

2

3

4

HHF ARCHITECTS

D

C

4

5

C

D

CRAWFORD & ASSOCIATES ENGINEERING P.C.

ENGINEERING CONSULTANT

A C

HHF architects ALLSCHWILERSTRASSE 71A 4055 BASEL SWITZERLAND +41 61 756 70 10 PHONE +41 61 263 70 11 FAX info@hhf.ch - www.hhf.ch

B

551 WARREN STREET HUDSON, NY 12534

D

1

IT IS A VIOLATION OF THE NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION LAW FOR ANY PERSON TO ALTER THESE PLANS, SPECIFICATIONS OR REPORTS IN ANY WAY, UNLESS HE IS ACTING UNDER THE DIRECTION OF A LICENSED PROFESSIONAL ENGINEER.

B

B

THE AUTHOR TAKES NO RESPONSIBILITY FOR ANY DIMENSIONS OBTAINED BY SCALING FROM THIS DRAWING. IF NO DIMENSION IS SHOWN THE RECIPIENT MUST ASCERTAIN THE DIMENSION SPECIFICALLY FROM THE ARCHITECT OR BY SITE MEASUREMENT AND MAY NOT RELY UPON THIS DRAWING. SUPPLYING THIS DRAWING IN DIGITAL FORM IS SOLELY FOR CONVENIENCE AND NO RELIANCE MAY BE PLACED ON ANY DATA IN DIGITAL FORM. ALL DATA MUST BE CHECKED AGAINST THE HARD COPY.

client:

CHRISTOPHER TSAI 404 EAST 76TH ST. APT#22A NEW YORK CITY, NY 10021

TSAI STUDIO

project: DATE

REVISION

date / sign

A

A

scale drawing title paper size

02/08/2010 | jm n/a exteror images archD 60.96 cm x 91.44 cm 24" x 36"

drawing number

A-102 1

2

3

4

5

81

3

HHF architects + FAKE design

2

Fake Design 258 CAOCHANGDI CHOAYANG DISTRICT BEIJING CHINA 100102 +86 10 845 64194 PHONE/FAX

1

4


82

TSAI GUESTHOUSE


5

D

D 620

621

A 622

623

X 624

625

4" 6'-

-4" " 1' 5'-4 "

4" 2'-

-10'

-0"

(619

'-6'

')

0" 5'-

4"

8" 1 1/

158.7sft

1'-1

Tech/ Storage

C 2'-0

25

"

'-4"

5'-5

"

2'-0"

6'-2"

ENGINEERING CONSULTANT

r=

6"

0" 2'-

5'-

9'-1 '-5"

17 D1

C

A 896.1 sft

'-1"

627

36

Garage/ Workshop

(619

'-

14'-3"

-0"

11'-5"

628

629

-10'

6'')

Z

1'-4" 5'-4"

630

25'-4"

C '-4"

IT IS A VIOLATION OF THE NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION LAW FOR ANY PERSON TO ALTER THESE PLANS, SPECIFICATIONS OR REPORTS IN ANY WAY, UNLESS HE IS ACTING UNDER THE DIRECTION OF A LICENSED PROFESSIONAL ENGINEER.

r = 26'-

0"

25

'-0"

-10'

-0

'-6'

')

'-0"

12

r = 32

B

19 " (6

551 WARREN STREET HUDSON, NY 12534

627

628

D1 D1

HHF architects ALLSCHWILERSTRASSE 71A 4055 BASEL SWITZERLAND +41 61 756 70 10 PHONE +41 61 263 70 11 FAX info@hhf.ch - www.hhf.ch

626

20

CRAWFORD & ASSOCIATES ENGINEERING P.C.

630

'-1"

B

B

THE AUTHOR TAKES NO RESPONSIBILITY FOR ANY DIMENSIONS OBTAINED BY SCALING FROM THIS DRAWING. IF NO DIMENSION IS SHOWN THE RECIPIENT MUST ASCERTAIN THE DIMENSION SPECIFICALLY FROM THE ARCHITECT OR BY SITE MEASUREMENT AND MAY NOT RELY UPON THIS DRAWING. SUPPLYING THIS DRAWING IN DIGITAL FORM IS SOLELY FOR CONVENIENCE AND NO RELIANCE MAY BE PLACED ON ANY DATA IN DIGITAL FORM. ALL DATA MUST BE CHECKED AGAINST THE HARD COPY.

HHF ARCHITECTS

4

HHF architects + FAKE design

3

2

Fake Design 258 CAOCHANGDI CHOAYANG DISTRICT BEIJING CHINA 100102 +86 10 845 64194 PHONE/FAX

1

5'-1

0"

5'-4

CHRISTOPHER TSAI 404 EAST 76TH ST. APT#22A NEW YORK CITY, NY 10021

TSAI STUDIO

project: DATE

8'-2

REVISION

"

622

621

621

Y

B C 622

02/08/2010 | jm

date / sign

A

A

3/16" = 1'

scale

basement plan

drawing title paper size

623

N

Usable Interior Area: 1072sf

archD 60.96 cm x 91.44 cm 24" x 36"

drawing number

3

4

5

1

2

3

4

5 Fake Design 258 CAOCHANGDI CHOAYANG DISTRICT BEIJING CHINA 100102 +86 10 845 64194 PHONE/FAX

2

D

D 620

621

A 622

623

X 624

625

'-6"

18

1"

5'-1 1/2"

6'-10 7/16"

Stock 22.8 sf

6'-7

"

3'-6

Skylight (4')

C "

3/16

3'-1

6'-7

1 5/

2'-7"

1/2" drob War

3'-4

8"

"

" "

Bathroom 48.3 sf

1'-8

"

5/8"

Skylight (2')

2'-2"

630

'-0"

Z

Balcony 74 sf

Atelier 2 173.5 sf

Wardrobe

'-0" 5'-1 5/16"

26 r=

2'-7"

r = 32

6'-0"

12'-3"

Skylight (6')

12'-4"

628

629

" r = 6'-5

5'-5"

9'-1"

6'-5

627

6'-5"

5'-8

A

towel closet

e

6'-7

ENGINEERING CONSULTANT

'-1"

11

3'-4

6'-0"

551 WARREN STREET HUDSON, NY 12534

628

Office 211 sf

C

CRAWFORD & ASSOCIATES ENGINEERING P.C.

627

Balcony 110 sf

HHF architects ALLSCHWILERSTRASSE 71A 4055 BASEL SWITZERLAND +41 61 756 70 10 PHONE +41 61 263 70 11 FAX info@hhf.ch - www.hhf.ch

626

630

B

HHF architects + FAKE design

A-107 1

C IT IS A VIOLATION OF THE NEW YORK STATE EDUCATION LAW FOR ANY PERSON TO ALTER THESE PLANS, SPECIFICATIONS OR REPORTS IN ANY WAY, UNLESS HE IS ACTING UNDER THE DIRECTION OF A LICENSED PROFESSIONAL ENGINEER.

25

'-9"

Entrance/ Atelier 1 586.9 sf

B

B

±0 (629'-6")

THE AUTHOR TAKES NO RESPONSIBILITY FOR ANY DIMENSIONS OBTAINED BY SCALING FROM THIS DRAWING. IF NO DIMENSION IS SHOWN THE RECIPIENT MUST ASCERTAIN THE DIMENSION SPECIFICALLY FROM THE ARCHITECT OR BY SITE MEASUREMENT AND MAY NOT RELY UPON THIS DRAWING. SUPPLYING THIS DRAWING IN DIGITAL FORM IS SOLELY FOR CONVENIENCE AND NO RELIANCE MAY BE PLACED ON ANY DATA IN DIGITAL FORM. ALL DATA MUST BE CHECKED AGAINST THE HARD COPY.

client:

0

62

CHRISTOPHER TSAI

"

404 EAST 76TH ST. APT#22A NEW YORK CITY, NY 10021

5'-9

Entry 38 sf

TSAI STUDIO

project: DATE

6'-2

REVISION

"

622

621

621

Y

B C 622

date / sign

A

A

scale drawing title paper size

623 N

Usable Interior Area: 1169 sf Usable Exterior Area: 222 sf

02/08/2010 | jm 3/16" = 1' ground oor plan archD 60.96 cm x 91.44 cm 24" x 36"

drawing number

A-108 1

2

3

4

5

83

" 1' -4"

client: 0

62


KUNSTMUSEUM BASEL 84

KUNSTMUSEUM BASEL EXTENSION 2009 The Kunstmuseum Basel is considered one of the most prominent art museums worldwide. It has a long established tradition with a collection of works representing the highest artistic standards. Since its founding in 1661 the Kunstmuseum Basel has continuously acquired and developed to become the innovative index of current artistic production that it is today. A donation to the Basel-City canton made possible the unique opportunity to finally realize a necessary spatial expansion - through a new building - on a neighbouring parcel. Excerpt from the final report of the jury: ‘ … [the achievement of this design concept] is a precise, cleanly and thoroughly detailed building accomplished through a distinct orientation and direct relationship to the entrance portal of the existing historic structure. In terms of its urban spatial context this composition is captivatingly cohesive: the new extension building appears selfconfident and independent in relation to its surrounds. The volume is prominently exposed on the Burghof parcel, yet through turning and orientation remains reserved in its position with respect to the existing Kunstmuseum. The maximum façade height of the new building is pre-specified at 21 m, and the available land parcel is fully built to the limit within the block interior. The remainder is the structure and optimisation of the ground plan. The result is a larger storage capacity that provides a maximum amount of useable space over four levels. Within this structure predetermining stipulations were derived from the circulation cores and load-bearing concept; however, these give the architectural volume rhythm and zoning for a reasonable and useful disposition of the various areas into a succession of exhibition spaces. 4th Prize in Invited Competition HHF Architects + Ai Weiwei, with Simon Hartmann, Tilo Herlach, Simon Frommenwiler, Christian Weyell, Isidor Burkhardt, Kasia Maksel, Anna Smorodinsky, Mio Tsunemaya, and Madeline Kessler


85

HHF ARCHITECTS


86

KUNSTMUSEUM BASEL


+20.75

+20.75

+20.75

+20.75

1.1 SONDERAUSSTELLUNG

1.1 SONDERAUSSTELLUNG

1.2 ERWEITERUNG

1.2 ERWEITERUNG

+12.90

+12.90

1.3 SAMMLUNG

1.3 SAMMLUNG

1.3 SAMMLUNG

1.3 SAMMLUNG

+5.70

+5.70

3.1 ANLIEFERUNG FOYER-ERWEITERUNG

1.3 SAMMLUNG

1.3 SAMMLUNG

5.1 BESUCHERTOILETTEN

-6.70 4.1 DEPOT

4.1 DEPOT GRAFIKEN

HHF ARCHITECTS

±0.00

±0.00

-6.70

4.1 DEPOT FILM/FOTO

4.1 DEPOT GRAFIKEN

4.1 DEPOT FILM/FOTO

4.1 DEPOT

-11.85

-11.85 6.2 TECHNIKZENTRALE

4.1 DEPOT

6.2 TECHNIKZENTRALE

6.2 TECHNIKZENTRALE

-17.00

-17.50

SCHNITT C-C

87

SCHNITT B-B

B

BAUL

C

INIE

5.2 PAUSENRAUM 30m2

5.1 SANITÄTSZIMMER 15m2

6.1 LOGE 27m2

3.2 VELO ABSTELLPLÄTZE

EINGANG ANLIEFERUNG/FOYER

3.1 ART HANDLING 40m2

3.1 ART HANDLING 60m2

± 0.00

- 3.35

5.2 GARDEROBEN/ NASSZELLEN 58m2

3.1 QUARANTÄNE ZWISCHENLAGER 40m2

± 0.00

D

D 2.1 FOYER 308m2

3.1 ANLIEFERUNG/ ERWEITERUNG FOYER 270m2

A

A 3.1 LKW KISTENLAGER 50m2

6.3 ETAGENRAUM SCHWACHSTROM 20m2

± 0.00

BAUL INIE

5.3 PUTZRAUM 8m2

A E

± 0.00

A

5.4 ANRICHTE CATERING EVENTS 33m2

A

3.3 PARKPLÄTZE 25m2

5.4 ENTSORGUNG, CONTAINER 20m2

E

+2.85 ± 0.00

- 6.70

B

C ± 0.00

A

2.2 VERBIDUNGSTRAKT 500m2

A

- 6.70

HOF

- 6.70

KASSE

A

A FOYER

A

ERDGESCHOSS

0

1

5


KUNSTMUSEUM BASEL 88 ST.ALBAN-GRABEN

EINGANGSBEREICH

SCHNITT A-A M 1:200

KASSE


HHF ARCHITECTS 89 +20.75

6.2 RÜCKKÜHLER

1.1 SONDERAUSSTELLUNG

1.1 SONDERAUSSTELLUNG

+12.90

1.1 SAMMLUNG

1.1 SAMMLUNG

+5.70

-0.10

3.1 ANLIEFERUNG FOYER-ERWEITERUNG

2.1 FOYER

DUFOURSTRASSE

2.3 WARENLIFT

±0.00 ELT ALLMEND

2.1 SHOP/INFODESK

1.1 SAMMLUNG

1.1 SAMMLUNG

2.2 VERBINDUNGSTRAKT

-6.70

4.1 DEPOT

4.1 DEPOT

-11.85

-17.00

6.2 TECHNIK

4.1 DEPOT


Profile for Jeffrey Mansfield

Selected Work 2007-2014  

Selected Work 2007-2014  

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