Page 1

Colonial IU 20 Supports for Continuous School Improvement 2012-2013

Clear Standards Fair Assessments

Achievemen dent t Stu Stu t de en

nt Student A eme chi iev ev h em Ac t n

t en Achievemen t dent Stu

Safe & Supportive Schools

CIU 20

Stu de

ent vem hie Ac nt

Studen t A chi ev em

Materials & Resources

Curriculum Framework

Instruction

“A good plan is like a road map: it shows the final destination and usually the best way to get there.” – H. Stanely Judd


Dear Colleagues, It is CIU 20 Curriculum Department’s honor and privilege to assist our regional schools in the pursuit of excellent and effective professional learning for their teachers. We know that teaching quality is of vital importance, especially in these hard times. Shirley Hord, Learning Forward’s Scholar Laureate, states it very effectively in her blog post (11/7/10), “The school, as we all know, is the site for student learning. That’s the reason we have schools. We may engage in substantial discourse about what students are to learn, how they are to learn it, and when, but student learning remains the ultimate goal. We also know that the most significant factor in whether students learn is teaching quality. Not just teacher quality, but teaching quality.” In the spirit of collaboration and support – we offer this menu of services. It is intended to be a resource for you as you plan effective professional learning that supports teaching quality. The offerings in this menu are also intended to be customizable to your specific contexts and needs. Looking forward to an excellent 2012 – 2013 school year in partnership with all of you! With warm regards,

Kathy Emeigh, Director of Curriculum, CIU 20

As always, we remain dedicated to your students and to the people who serve them.


DOING MORE WITH LESS In this age of accountability, we, as school leaders have many decisions to make. In order to assist you in your professional learning goals and planning – we have included part of an article from “The Learning Principal” (from Learning Forward), summer 2012 issue. The suggestions from the article will help school leaders harness limited resources in order to craft one of the most powerful strategies they have – to improve teacher effectiveness through high-quality professional learning. How should school leaders respond when resources become limited and there are calls to trim the budgets? The author offers the following suggestions: 1. Stop spending money on ineffective professional learning; bringing in speakers and haphazardly sending people to conferences and institutes without plans for follow-up or sharing what’s learned rarely bring about long-term changes in practice. 2. Think differently about how teacher leaders are used to support the learning of their colleagues, how veteran teachers support the learning of novices, and how coaches and department chairs support the learning of their teams. 3. Restructure the school day so grade-level and subjectarea teams have time to meet and develop structures that hold all accountable for demonstrating their learning and its impact on students. 4. Examine how current technology is used to support professional learning….. Frederick Brown (frederick.brown@learningforward.org) is director of strategy and development at Learning Forward. (Above as adapted and summarized by Kathy Emeigh, Director of Curriculum, CIU 20)


The figure below represents the National Geographic School Publishing Professional Development process. It is meant to be a collaborative and data-driven approach in designing and planning ongoing professional learning. We have placed it in the menu of services because it is an excellent model as you continue planning for effective professional learning that increases teaching quality and thus affects student learning. The collaborative nature of this model is essential.

As your collaborative partners – please feel free to contact us with every stage of professional development – from initial planning, to gathering and analyzing data, to action planning, and to execution and monitoring.

To schedule professional development or technical assistance, please use the online Training Request Form, by visiting http://www.ciu20.org/curriculumservices/request-training.aspx.


TABLE OF CONTENTS Curriculum Staff Contact Information .....................................................................................................2 Administrators ........................................................................................................................................3 Assessment, School Improvement Plans, AYP .........................................................................................7 Assistive Technology .............................................................................................................................10 Autism Support .....................................................................................................................................12 Behavior Support ..................................................................................................................................14 Curriculum Development & Alignment ...................................................................................................16 Data Analysis ........................................................................................................................................19 Differentiated Instruction (DI) ................................................................................................................20 Early Childhood.....................................................................................................................................22 English Language Learners....................................................................................................................28 IDEA/NCLB...........................................................................................................................................29 Inclusive Practices ................................................................................................................................30 Instructional Coaching ..........................................................................................................................32 Interactive Global Classroom ................................................................................................................34 Literacy (K-5) ........................................................................................................................................36 Literacy (6-12) ......................................................................................................................................45 Parent Supports....................................................................................................................................51 PSSA & PASA........................................................................................................................................56 Progress Monitoring ..............................................................................................................................58 Research-Based Instructional Strategies ...............................................................................................59 Response to Instruction and Intervention (RtII) ......................................................................................61 STEM ....................................................................................................................................................62 Support Staff Training ...........................................................................................................................72 Supplemental Services Colonial Academy .........................................................................................................................73 Flight Team (Crisis Response) .......................................................................................................74 IMS Library ...................................................................................................................................75 Printing Department......................................................................................................................76 Meeting Dates (2012-2013) Curriculum Advisory Council ..........................................................................................................77 Gifted Network ..............................................................................................................................77 PA Institute for Instructional Coaching Network .............................................................................78 Network Administrators Group ......................................................................................................78 Reading Network...........................................................................................................................79 Response to Instruction and Intervention Network .........................................................................79 Special Education District Contact ................................................................................................80 Technology Advisory Council .........................................................................................................80


CURRICULUM STAFF CONTACT INFORMATION Kathy Emeigh, Director of Curriculum Services ................................ 610-515-6546 kemeigh@ciu20.org Amaal Awadalla, Assistant Director of Program Development ......... 610-515-6561 aawadalla@ciu20.org Marian Beck, Assistant Director of Curriculum ................................ 610-515-6503 mbeck@ciu20.org Denise Kaminski, Training and Consulting Staff Supervisor ............. 610-515-6525 dkamisnki@ciu20.org Heather Brown, Coordinator of Educational Technology .................. 610-515-6537 hbrown@ciu20.org Julie Eates, Coordinator of Professional Development ..................... 610-515-6549 jeates@ciu20.org

Training & Consulting Staff Andra Bell............................ 610-515-6411 ...............abell@ciu20.org Michelle Davis ..................... 610-515-6432 ..............mdavis@ciu20.org Kirsten DeRoche .................. 610-515-6504 ..............kderoche@ciu20.org Sherry Hartman ................... 610-515-6557...............shartman@ciu20.org Stacy Kulics ......................... 610-515-6426 ..............skulics@ciu20.org Donna Lloyd ......................... 610-515-6420 ..............dlloyd@ciu20.org Melissa Petrilak ................... 610-515-6542 ..............mpetrilak@ciu20.org Michell Ressler .................... 610-515-6530...............mressler@ciu20.org Natalie Sokol ....................... 610-515-6558...............nsokol@ciu20.org Joana Spinelli ...................... 610-515-6505...............jspinelli@ciu20.org Kristin Starosta.................... 610-515-6508...............kstarosta@ciu20.org

HOW TO REQUEST PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT Colonial Intermediate Unit 20 offers customized professional development services to meet the needs of its member districts, charter, and career and technical schools. Professional Development is offered on a wide-range of topics including, but not limited to, Curriculum & Instruction, Special Education and Educational Technology. CIU20 Training and Consulting (TaC) staff also provide services in the area of Assistive Technology for teachers/staff and student support. The majority of these services are available at no cost.

To schedule professional development or technical assistance, please use the online Training Request Form, by visiting http://www.ciu20.org/curriculum-services/ request-training.aspx.

-2-


ADMINISTRATORS • Classroom Diagnostic Tool (CDT) Overview     This workshop will provide administrators with a working knowledge of the CDT and the interactive and dynamic reporting suite, as well as providing long range district and/or building implementation of the use of the CDT. The CDT is a free set of online assessments designed to provide diagnostic information in order to guide instruction and provide support. The CDT is offered to students in grades 6-12 and is currently available for use in PA schools and classrooms. The CDT reporting system is fully integrated with the Standards Aligned System (SAS). • Classroom Diagnostic Tool (CDT) Next Steps  The Next Steps training is a follow-up training to support districts in continuing CDT implementation. The training will provide a brief review of the CDT, hands-on content simulations, review of new enhancements, and guidance and practice for one-on-one student conferencing. • Common Core State Standards (CCSS) 101     This course is designed to introduce administrators to the format, content and intent of the CCSS for mathematics and English Language Arts. At the end of this interactive session, participants will understand the organization of the two sets of standards, the on-line resources to support them, and the timeline for alignment by PA schools. In addition, time will be given to begin planning for integration of the CCSS into district curriculum planning. • Common Core State Standards: Transition to PA Common Core for Math and English Language Arts     These trainings will focus on the transition to PA Common Core for Math and English Language Arts. Objectives include: • Gain a deep understanding the PA Common Core Standards • Explore the instructional shifts as related to PA Common Core • Develop skills to assist in transitioning to PA Common Core • Share effective strategies for transition to PA Common Core • Each session can be customizable to support a districts’ current transition continuum. • Classroom Walkthrough with Reflective Practice     This is a PIL approved training series that will provide central office and building administrative teams with the knowledge, tools and resources to monitor the instructional program, develop consensus on the best practice, collect data to inform decision-making and engage faculty in a professional learning community through Classroom Walkthroughs (CWTs) and other data sources. • Reading Apprenticeship for Administrators     Reading Apprenticeship™ is a framework for helping students improve their literacy skills across all subject areas. This workshop will provide administrators with tools to aid in monitoring the effectiveness of the implementation of Reading Apprenticeship™. Participants will receive and -3-


ADMINISTRATORS become familiar with the Innovation Configuration Map which identifies the components of Reading Apprenticeship™. The understanding of these components and their variations will assist the administrators in monitoring and supporting the implementation of Reading Apprenticeship™. • Differentiated Instruction for Administrators     This workshop will provide administrators with tools to aid in monitoring the effectiveness of the implementation of differentiated instruction across all buildings. Emphasis will be placed on the ability to recognize components of differentiated instruction which include differentiating process, content and product using student interests, learning profile and readiness. Participants will receive and become familiar with the Innovation Configuration Map on DI which identifies the above components of differentiated instruction. The understanding of these components will assist administrators in supporting teachers as they implement differentiated instruction. • Co-Teaching for Administrators     This workshop will provide administrators with a tool in monitoring the effectiveness of the implementation of co-teaching across all buildings. Emphasis will be placed on the ability to recognize the six models of co-teaching and their characteristics. Participants will receive and become familiar with the Innovation Configuration Map on Co-teaching which identifies the six models of co-teaching and subsequent lesson planning. The understanding of these models and planning will assist administrators in supporting teachers as they implement co-teaching in their classrooms. • Using Data     This year-long professional development opportunity is designed to facilitate school and district data teams through a process of analyzing data and managing and sustaining change resulting from ongoing collaborative inquiry into student learning problems. The course combines a focus on increasing data literacy combined with facilitation skills and increased knowledge and awareness of equity issues underlying key assumptions and decisions relative to programmed and classroom instructional decisions. Teams meet monthly and analyze a variety of data sources to identify and verify root causes. • Power Teaching in Math: An Overview for Administrators     Pennsylvania Power Teaching in Math is an instructional framework designed to energize mathematics education across the Commonwealth. Power Teaching provides teachers with the tools necessary to deliver rich, powerful lessons by connecting core math resources with PA’s Standards Aligned System. After this workshop, administrators will be able to not only identify the key components of a Power Teaching lesson, but also have a clear expectation of what a Power Teaching lesson should look like when conducting walkthroughs and observations. • Levels of Teaching Innovation (LoTI) Moodle Course  Focus on improving student achievement using 21st Century Leadership and -4-


ADMINISTRATORS data-driven decision-making  Conduct classroom walkthrough with H.E.A.T.  Design professional development opportunities that target greater rigor and relevance, LoTI and research best practices  Create Next Step Action Plan  Act 45 approved (30 hours) • Creating Professional Learning Communities (PLC) in Your Building/District     PLC describes a collegial group of administrators and school staff who are united in their commitment to student learning. They share a vision, work and learn collaboratively, visit and review other classrooms, and participate in decision making (Hord, 1997b). The benefits to the staff and students include a reduced isolation of teachers, better informed and committed teachers, and academic gain for students. Hord (1997b) notes, “As an organizational arrangement, the professional learning community is seen as a powerful staff-development approach and a potent strategy for school change and improvement.” This workshop will focus on practical ways to begin and maintain this form of professional development for your staff. This is an Act 45 approved course. • Building a Culture of Teaming in Your School     This interactive workshop will focus on a variety of ways to build an environment of respect, teaming and collaboration. Surveys, team-building activities, personality tests, and resources will help create understanding and improve the partnerships between all professionals serving together to meet the needs of their students. • Energizing Your Staff Meetings     This session will help administrators make staff meetings results-oriented and focused on student learning. Use of process-oriented tools such as 30 minute meeting protocols, video clips, book clubs and reflective exercises as well as collegial coaching and data discussions will be modeled, practiced and then planned. • Modeling the Integration of Technology Tools to Communicate and Collaborate with Your Staff     Administrators will be guided in the use of tools such as blogs, wikis, Moodle, discussion boards, voice threads and/or podcasts. Support in this area can be provided on an individual or group basis. • Innovation Configuration (IC) – Developing IC Maps     An IC Map identifies and describes what one would observe in a setting in which an “innovation” is implemented. An innovation is any program or initiative that is being implemented in the school. These maps are used to reflect on the level or degree of implementation of the program/initiative. This training will provide the framework to develop innovation configuration maps for any program being implemented.  Using IC Maps to monitor the implementation of: -5-


ADMINISTRATORS • Reading Apprenticeship • Co-teaching • Differentiated Instruction • Interactive Whiteboards • RtII • Effective Professional Development Planning  There is professional development planning and then effective professional development planning that leads to increased student achievement. • How to find time for professional development • How to develop a comprehensive plan • How to get staff to buy in • How to monitor plan effectiveness • Continuous School Improvement Planning     Consultation & facilitation for continuous school improvement planning     Organizing staff around continuous school improvement goals     Monitoring continuous school improvement plan progress     Facilitated local self-study (PDE tool for School Improvement)     Data Retreats     Comprehensive Strategic Planning Training & Technical Assistance in strategic planning process & online plan completion tool for the following six required plans: • Chapter 4 (formerly the district strategic plan) • Technology Plan • Induction Plan • Special Education Plan • Professional Education Plan • District Improvement Plan (only if in District Improvement due to AYP issues)     Quality Review Process for School Improvement Plans upon request • School Improvement I, Corrective Action I plans reviewed as mandated by PDE

-6-


ASSESSMENT, SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLANS, AYP • Continuous School Improvement Planning     Consultation & facilitation for continuous school improvement planning     Organizing staff around continuous school improvement goals     Monitoring continuous school improvement plan progress     Facilitated local self-study (PDE tool for School Improvement)     Data Retreats     Comprehensive Strategic Planning Training & Technical Assistance in strategic planning process & online plan completion tool for the following six required plans: • Chapter 4 (formerly the district strategic plan) • Technology Plan • Induction Plan • Special Education Plan • Professional Education Plan • District Improvement Plan (only if in District Improvement due to AYP issues)     Quality Review Process for School Improvement Plans upon request • School Improvement I, Corrective Action I plans reviewed as mandated by PDE • 4Sight Benchmark Assessment Training & Technical Assistance     Understanding the design of 4Sight benchmarks     Facilitating the administration of 4Sight benchmarks     Facilitating the scoring of 4Sight benchmarks     Setting up school/student data in the Member Center     Generating and reading proficiency and subscale reports in the Member Center     Understanding how AYP is computed in Pennsylvania     Identifying students needed to score proficient or above to achieve AYP     Analyzing 4Sight data to estimate the number of students proficient in reading in each of the AYP subgroups     Using 4Sight subscale reports to identify strengths and areas of concern for each AYP subgroup and classroom     Using the development of a reader model to assist in analysis of student data for students who are significantly below grade level     Prioritizing and planning instruction based on 4Sight subscale reports and other available data     Developing quarterly plans for instruction focused on student areas of concern     Developing a plan to involve school staff in quarterly data analysis and planning of instruction in response to the analysis • PA Assessment Anchors     Explain the assessment anchors and their relationship to improve student performance as measured by the PSSA    Connect the anchors to current district assessment, curriculum and instructional practices    Adjust current assessment, curriculum and instructional practices to ensure -7-


ASSESSMENT, SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLANS, AYP student proficiency on the PSSA    Coordinate the delivery of standards driven general and special education instruction including the development of standards-based IEPs • Classroom Diagnostic Tool (CDT) Overview    This workshop will provide teachers with a working knowledge of the CDT and the interactive and dynamic reporting suite, as well as providing long range classroom implementation of the use of the CDT. The CDT is a free set of online assessments designed to provide diagnostic information in order to guide instruction and provide support. The CDT is offered to students in grades 6-12 and is currently available for use in PA schools and classrooms. The CDT reporting system is fully integrated with the Standards Aligned System (SAS). • Classroom Diagnostic Tool (CDT) Next Steps  The Next Steps training is a follow-up training to support districts in continuing CDT implementation. The training will provide a brief review of the CDT, handson content simulations, review of new enhancements, and guidance and practice for one-on-one student conferencing. • Common Core State Standards (CCSS) 101    This course is designed to introduce teachers to the format, content and intent of the CCSS for Mathematics and English Language Arts. At the end of this interactive session, participants will understand the organization of the two sets of standards, the on-line resources to support them, and the timeline for alignment by PA schools. In addition, time will be given to begin planning for integration of the CCSS classroom instruction. • Common Core State Standards: Transition to PA Common Core for Math and English Language Arts     These trainings will focus on the transition to PA Common Core for Math and English Language Arts. Objectives include: • Gain a deep understanding the PA Common Core Standards • Explore the instructional shifts as related to PA Common Core • Develop skills to assist in transitioning to PA Common Core • Share effective strategies for transition to PA Common Core • Each session can be customizable to support a districts’ current transition continuum. • Strategies for Closing the Achievement Gap in Special Education    Recommended audience – All administrators involved within the feeder pattern, including Title I and Special Education Coordinators    District teams will critically analyze the systems that influence the identification, progress and achievement of students with special learning needs.    Specific strategies for reducing the achievement gap will be provided. • PA Alternative Standards    Aligning IEP goals/objectives to Alternate Standards and Assessments • Overview of Accommodations and Modifications of Curriculum -8-


ASSESSMENT, SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLANS, AYP Participants will discuss and develop a common definition of terms related to adaptation, accommodation and modification.  Participants will consider ways to accommodate and modify the classroom environment. The following areas can be modified in a variety of practical ways: • Classroom environment or setting • Presentation of instruction • Pace, time or scheduling • Curriculum content • Student response to instructional information • Adapted materials or equipment • Organizational strategies that promote independence • Types of instruction that address diverse learner needs • Assessment and grading considerations demonstrate true mastery of information by all students Facilitate Data Retreats Facilitate grade-level teams Utilize data walls Analyze data utilizing:  4 Sight • Determine student growth and performance relative to statewide grade-level expectations • Identify individual student needs • Assess program effectiveness to guide professional development  PVAAS • Analysis of student growth • Measure of student progress from year to year  PAAYP • Alignment of practical instructional strategies to the content standards • Application of the Assessment Anchor Content Standards to planning and instruction • Maximize supports for all learners • Strategies to increase student efficacy and independence  eMetric • Analysis of PSSA data • Identify academic strengths/weaknesses and performance gaps • Evaluation of instructional effectiveness 

• • • •

-9-


ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY • Services:   Provide awareness of assistive technology   Participate as a consultant to the multidisciplinary team in identifying students’ needs, demands of the environment and the required tasks. • Assist the team in working through the evaluation to a assessment in order to recommend Assistive Technology supports. • The assessment is done on-site in collaboration with other team members and is ongoing   Provide resources for use of assistive technology as a means to improve/ increase inclusion in the general education setting   Provide on-site technical assistance to aid in the successful implementation of assistive technology   Provide specific training on hardware and software to meet identified student needs   Provide assistance in the acquisition of assistive technology equipment   General Workshops: • Assistive Technology Workshop (What is AT?)  Can be tailored to suit the needs of target audience (itinerant therapists, special education teachers, parents)  Half-day workshop • Assistive Technology Assessment Process training  Collecting and analyzing data, SETT process, developing and implementing an action plan (special education teachers, therapists, administrators)  Half-day or full-day workshop  Using Voicethread in the Inclusive Classroom  Accessible Instructional Materials (AIM)  Equipment-Specific – Outcomes of the Assistive Technology Evaluation Process: • Kurzweil - talking word processor with word prediction (literacy tool) • Read and Write Gold - talking word processor with word prediction, electronic text reader (literacy tool) • ReadOUTLoud for Bookshare - software program that reads DAISY books downloaded from Bookshare • Coordination of Communication Device Trainings with Vendors • Intellitools Classroom Suite Training (suite of literacy and math tools) • Dragon Naturally Speaking–overview of features and functionality (half-day, special education teachers and SLPs) • Accessibility features for MAC and Windows Operating Systems (half-day, special education and regular education) • WORD tools for writing and reading (full day, regular and special education teachers) - 10 -


ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY • Proloquo2go • iPads and iPods in the classroom  Universal Design for Learning (UDL):   • Workshops and Training Options:  Universal Design for Learning Introduction and Overview (half-day)  Universal Design for Learning in Depth (for the schools and districts interested in beginning implementation of UDL): This workshop will begin with an overview of the guiding principles of UDL and will allow participants time to reflect on current practices and help align them with UDL. Participants will also have the opportunity to develop lessons and curriculum that is universally designed. **Recommended as three two-hour sessions or three half-day sessions throughout the school year or one semester** • Podcasting  Strategies to integrate podcasting as an authentic learning tool  Free technology tools  Teacher/student podcasts

- 11 -


AUTISM SUPPORT • Workshops/Trainings: Workshops are provided for, but not limited to, the following core topics in the area of Autism and Asperger Syndrome: Communication and Social Skills, Academic Instructional Strategies, Positive Behavior Support, and Transition Planning. The trainings can be presented individually or in any order. They include:  Developing Social Skills for Students with Autism and Asperger’s Syndrome: Social Skill Assessment and Intervention Methods for social skill assessment and the concepts of skill versus performance deficits, and accommodation versus assimilation will be presented. Discussion and practice with social skill intervention for such topics as thoughts/ feelings, reciprocal interactions, role playing/behavioral rehearsal, cognitive flexibility, and emotional regulation will be included. Training can also be provided on specific strategies such as social narratives (e.g., Social Stories©, Comic Strip Conversations, and Power Cards). •Target audience: School staff working with students with Autism or Asperger’s Syndrome  Developing Effective Academic Teaching Strategies for Student with Asperger’s Syndrome and High Functioning Autism (HFA) This session will provide participants with an overview of the academic needs and characteristics of students with Asperger’s Syndrome and HFA. Specific instructional strategies for reading comprehension and writing will be presented with practice opportunities. Key academic behaviors necessary for school success will also be discussed and instructional strategies provided. •Target audience: School staff working with students with HFA or Asperger’s Syndrome  Developing Behavior Plans and Data Collection Tools for Students with Autism Using Positive Behavior Support as a foundation, participants will practice collecting antecedent-behavior-consequence (ABC) data using direct observation and interviews/rating scales. Participants will then learn strategies for analyzing data and using data to create positive behavior support plans. Discussion time for behavior intervention strategies will also be provided. •Target audience: School staff working with students of any age with Autism or Asperger’s Syndrome  Developing Transition Plans with Outcome Based IEP Goals for Students with Autism Participants will learn person-centered planning methods and models for developing outcome based transition plans. Self-determination, post secondary education and employment will also be presented and discussed within the context of transition planning. •Target audience: School staff working with students with Autism or Asperger’s Syndrome in middle and high school - 12 -


AUTISM SUPPORT • Presuming Competence: Creating a Learning Environment for ALL  Understand the concept of presuming competence and the least dangerous assumption for ALL students  Develop a list of potential supports for students to promote inclusion  Create a correlation between the Civil Rights Movement and Presuming Competence  Anticipate and address barriers to presuming competence  Define the current paradigm and the potential dangers of its current influence on society • Services: Consultation is also available to districts and school teams to assist with developing and implementing interventions, instructional strategies and accommodations/modifications for students with Autism and Asperger’s Syndrome in the areas of social skills, communication, academic performance, behavior and inclusion. All consultation focuses on the use of assessment information and data to make intervention and instructional decisions.

- 13 -


BEHAVIOR SUPPORT • School-Wide Positive Behavior Support (SWPBS)  For schools beginning to implement SWPBS, training and consultation can include, but is not limited to, an overview presentation to the faculty, building needs assessment and 3-5 days of training for the core SWPBS team that includes development of expectations, lesson plans, acknowledgement systems and dissemination procedures.  For schools implementing SWPBS, training and consultation can include, but is not limited to, monthly meetings with the core SWPBS team and assistance with data collection, data analysis, problem solving and assessment of implementation fidelity. Additional topics can include expanding into the targeted/secondary and individual tiers with data collection and intervention strategies.  For schools interested in developing a system for collecting and analyzing school-wide behavior data, training can be provided for SWIS (School-Wide Information System; www.swis.org), an online database that schools can purchase in order to facilitate their SWPBS problem-solving efforts.  Support and consultation can also be provided to districts interested in implementing SWPBS on a district level. • Functional Behavioral Assessment (FBA) Training  On-site training and consultation can be provided to school-based teams conducting FBA’s and developing positive behavior support plans based on the assessment data. The emphasis will be on building team capacity to conduct FBA’s and to provide training and support to their fellow teachers.  Topics can include (but are not limited to): • Positive Behavior Support • Basic behavioral principles (e.g., antecedents, positive and negative reinforcement) • Direct observation tools (e.g., data sheets) and techniques (e.g., interval data collection) • Other data collection tools (e.g., interviews and rating scales) • Data analysis and graphing • Developing data-based, positive behavior support plans • Implementation fidelity • Data collection for monitoring progress and making data-based decisions • Training other staff in FBA procedures

- 14 -


BEHAVIOR SUPPORT • Classroom Management On-site training and consultation can provide assistance with assessing current classroom management structures and implementing strategies for such topics as increasing student engagement, establishing consistency in expectations and consequences, creating positive teacher-student interactions, strategically increasing reinforcement and evaluating teacher behavior. • Consultation/Program Development for Emotional Support Programs A wide range of consultation activities to assist school districts in providing effective educational programming for students with behavior disorders including, but not limited to, classroom organization, effective instruction, classroom-based behavioral interventions, creating alliances with families, and collaborative strategies to improve student behavior.

- 15 -


CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT & ALIGNMENT • Curriculum Alignment  Overview and Implementation of PA Academic Standards and Assessment Anchors  Adopt an Anchor • A PDE tool to create shared responsibility for assessment anchors across the content areas  Aligning PA Academic Standards, Assessment Anchors and the Curriculum • Examine and analyze the PA Assessment Anchors/PA State Standards at designated grade levels • Examine the current curriculum and determine the “big ideas” • Highlight the PSSA Assessment Anchors currently covered in the curriculum • Flag any PSSA Assessment Anchors not treated or taught in the current district curriculum • Establish the pace of instruction of the curriculum • Determine continued areas of planning and need • Examine the Eligible Content and indicate the minimum depth of the content required at the grade level • Indicate the Prior Skills needed for the development of each Anchor at the grade level • Analyze the final map to ensure all PSSA Assessment Anchors have been incorporated in a workable scope and sequence that is manageable with the grade level curriculum and resources • Examine and analyze the progression of the Assessment Anchors through all grades to ensure a logical and developmental incorporation into your district curriculum  Curriculum Mapping Process  SAS Curriculum Mapping tool  Integrating the National Educational Technology Standards for Administrators, Teachers and Students (NETS-A, NETS-T, NETS-S)  Assessing the National Educational Technology Standards • Common Core State Standards (CCSS) 101  This course is designed to introduce teachers to the format, content and intent of the CCSS for Mathematics and English Language Arts. At the end of this interactive session, participants will understand the organization of the two sets of standards, the on-line resources to support them, and the timeline for alignment by PA schools. In addition, time will be given to begin planning for integration of the CCSS classroom instruction. • Common Core State Standards: Transition to PA Common Core for Math and English Language Arts     These trainings will focus on the transition to PA Common Core for Math and English Language Arts. Objectives include: • Gain a deep understanding the PA Common Core Standards - 16 -


CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT & ALIGNMENT • • • •

Explore the instructional shifts as related to PA Common Core Develop skills to assist in transitioning to PA Common Core Share effective strategies for transition to PA Common Core Each session can be customizable to support a districts’ current transition continuum. Classroom Diagnostic Tool (CDT) Overview  This workshop will provide administrators and teachers with a working knowledge of the CDT and the interactive and dynamic reporting suite, as well as providing long range classroom implementation of the use of the CDT. The CDT is a free set of online assessments designed to provide support. The CDT is offered to students in grades 6-12 and is currently available for use in PA schools and classrooms. The CDT reporting system is fully integrated with the Standards Aligned System (SAS). Classroom Diagnostic Tool (CDT) Next Steps  The Next Steps training is a follow-up training to support districts in continuing CDT implementation. The training will provide a brief review of the CDT, handson content simulations, review of new enhancements, and guidance and practice for one-on-one student conferencing. Integrating Technology into the Curriculum  Tailored to district needs, the Coordinator of Educational Technology offers trainings, presentations and instructional support to member districts looking to embed the use/integration of technology into the curriculum including, but not limited to: • Content Management Systems (Moodle) • Web-based technologies for collaboration • Emerging Technologies • 21st Century Teaching and Learning • Videoconferencing in the classroom • Intel Education Tools • Thinkfinity • Using Interactive Whiteboards Effectively • Validating Web-based Research and Resources • Social Networks in K-12 Education • Internet Safety and School Concerns • Google Earth • Google Docs • Defined STEM • Safari • United Streaming Digital Media in the Classroom  Basics of Integrating Digital Media into the Classroom  Creating Dynamic Student Multimedia Projects Using Digital Media - 17 -


CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT & ALIGNMENT  Using Video to do Digital Storytelling • Electronic Resources for Student Research and Increasing Knowledge  Searching and Evaluating Internet-based Content • U.S. Copyright Law & Digital Millennium Copyright Act  Presentations and/or support at the building level (or department level) pertaining to use of electronic resources in the classroom

- 18 -


DATA ANALYSIS • • • •

Facilitate Data Retreats Facilitate grade-level teams Utilize data walls Analyze data utilizing:  4 Sight • Determine student growth and performance relative to statewide grade-level expectations • Identify individual student needs • Assess program effectiveness to guide professional development  PVAAS • Analysis of student growth • Measure of student progress from year to year  PAAYP • Alignment of practical instructional strategies to the content standards • Application of the Assessment Anchor Content Standards to planning and instruction • Maximize supports for all learners • Strategies to increase student efficacy and independence  eMetric • Analysis of PSSA data • Identify academic strengths/weaknesses and performance gaps • Evaluation of instructional effectiveness • Classroom Diagnostic Tool (CDT) Overview  This workshop will provide teachers with a working knowledge of the CDT and the interactive and dynamic reporting suite, as well as providing long range classroom implementation of the use of the CDT. The CDT is a free set of online assessments designed to provide support. The CDT is offered to students in grades 6-12 and is currently available for use in PA schools and classrooms. The CDT reporting system is fully integrated with the Standards Aligned System (SAS). • Classroom Diagnostic Tool (CDT) Next Steps  The Next Steps training is a follow-up training to support districts in continuing CDT implementation. The training will provide a brief review of the CDT, handson content simulations, review of new enhancements, and guidance and practice for one-on-one student conferencing. • Classroom Walkthroughs with Reflective Practice  This is a PIL approved training series that will provide central office and building administrative teams with the knowledge, tools and resources to monitor the instructional program, develop consensus on the best practice, collect data to inform decision-making and engage faculty in a professional learning community through Classroom Walkthroughs (CWTs) and other data sources. - 19 -


DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION

      

• Implementing Differentiated Instruction in the Classroom – A series of five, twohour workshops are available on-site.   Workshop 1: Overview & Principles of Differentiated Instruction • Define differentiated instruction • Understand and use the terminology associated with differentiated instruction • Identify and delineate the research that supports differentiation • Identify key features of an effectively differentiated classroom and compare to the traditional classroom   Workshop 2: Instructional Strategies & Applications that Support Differentiation • Determining student readiness skills and interest • Analyze differentiated learning tasks and apply to your present instructional setting   Workshop 3: More Instructional Strategies & Applications that Support Differentiation • Identify the rationale for using extension menus, cubing, anchor activities and cooperative learning activities as ways to differentiate instruction in your classroom • Produce models for instruction that can be utilized in your current classroom setting   Workshop 4: Assessment and Management of Student Work • Grading and assessment procedures • Classroom management and organizational techniques • Discuss on-going and cumulative assessment   Workshop 5: Analysis of Lesson Planning Using Differentiated Instructional Practices • Examine and review teacher differentiated lessons • Work through barriers to differentiating instruction in your classrooms • Work with colleagues to apply differentiated instructional principles to future lessons • Other Training Possibilities for Differentiated Instruction include:   Brain Research Basis for Differentiated Instruction   Flexible Grouping   Using Essential Questions to Guide Instruction   Communicating Differentiated Instruction to Parents/Community   Connecting Understanding by Design and Differentiated Instruction  Utilizing technology as a tool for Differentiated Instruction   Grading and Reporting Practices for Differentiated Instruction   Facilitating Lesson Plan Development • Utilizing an Innovation Configuration Map to assess the fidelity of implementation - 20 -


DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION of Differentiated instruction • Building a Strong Foundation for Core Reading Instruction: Differentiating Reading Instruction K-2    Learn how to use formative assessment to target instructional needs  Utilize strategies for grouping to increase instructional flexibility  Explore strategies for supporting primary readers • Building a Strong Foundation for Core Reading Instruction: Differentiating Reading Instruction Grades 3-5    Learn how to use formative assessment to target instructional needs  Utilize strategies for grouping to increase instructional flexibility  Develop an understanding of utilized tiered assignments

- 21 -


EARLY CHILDHOOD A number of the Early Childhood workshops will be offered as professional development workshops at IU 20; however, all session topics may be customized to meet individual district needs. • Early Childhood Topics  Supporting Every Child • Develop strategies that support inclusive environments • Gain understanding of ways to adapt learning centers to meet the needs of all learners • Gain ideas for open ended activities that allow children of different ability levels to work together  Introduction to Early Intervention • Evaluate IDEA and its impact in early childhood • Understand the role of the classroom teacher • Learn how to successfully implement an IEP • Develop strategies that best address the needs of identified students in your program  Overview of Autism • Recognize the basic characteristics of a student identified with autism • Identify key points that positively effect the child’s interaction in your classroom • Learn strategies to provide quality interaction with autistic students  Overview of Hearing Disabilities of Children in Early Childhood Programs • Determine the basic characteristics of a student identified with hearing disabilities • Understand key issues that contribute to success of hearing impaired students in your classroom • Review strategies to provide quality interaction with hearing impaired students • Early Childhood Language Essentials for Teachers of Reading and Spelling (LETRS®)  The Early Childhood LETRS Supplemental Module provides quality professional development for early childhood educators interested in helping young children build a strong foundation in early literacy skills. The program provides descriptions of the development of language and literacy in ways that create a deeper understanding of these important processes while offering practical strategies for building these skills in young children.  Early Childhood LETRS is appropriate for early childhood educators working with preschool and kindergarten children as well as early elementary children experiencing difficulty with the literacy process. It is also appropriate for early care and education providers who are interested in enhancing their own interactions with the children in their care.  This module requires a book. The book is titled - 22 -


EARLY CHILDHOOD LETRS for Early Childhood Educators. The book cost is $41.95 and it can be ordered from the following site: http://store.cambiumlearning.com. • Promoting Social & Emotional Competence These trainings help teachers structure classroom environments to alleviate children’s challenging behaviors. Each of these trainings build upon one another to promote positive learning environments for young children.  Promoting Student Success: Building Relationships and Creating Supportive Environments • Describe the relationship between children’s social emotional development and challenging behavior • Evaluate how challenging behavior serves as a function for children • Support the relationship between environmental variables, children’s challenging behaviors and social emotional development • Uncover strategies that can be used to (1) build positive relationships with children, families and colleagues; (2) design environments, schedules and routines; (3) structure transitions; (4) help children learn rules and routines; and (5) plan activities that promote engagement • Use descriptive acknowledgement and encouragement to support children’s positive social behaviors • Evaluate their work with children related to building relationships and the structure and design of their environment  Social Emotional Teaching Strategies • Discuss why it is important to be more intentional about teaching social emotional skills • Identify strategies for supporting the development of friendship skills • Define emotional literacy and identify activities that build “feeling vocabularies” • Acknowledge the importance of providing opportunities for children to begin to understand their own, as well as others’, emotions • Comprehend why children need to learn to control anger and handle disappointment and be able to identify strategies to teach anger management skills • Know the importance of teaching problem solving and be able to identify problem solving steps  Individualized Intensive Interventions: Developing a Behavior Support Plan • Explore the difference between Positive Behavior Supports and traditional discipline approaches • Define forms and function of communication and identify the behavioral mechanisms that contribute to viewing challenging behavior as communicative - 23 -


EARLY CHILDHOOD

     

• Identify methods that may be used to determine the function of challenging behavior • Use interview and observation data to determine the communicative function of challenging behavior and develop behavior hypotheses Literacy Ideas  Looking at our Preschoolers as Readers and Writers • Determine how to establish an environment that promotes literacy • Develop techniques that promote literacy development • Explore ways to encourage literacy development  Developing Oral Language in the Early Childhood Classroom • Learn when and how language is developed • Understand the components of the development of oral language • Develop strategies of nurturing language development  Fun with Phonemic Awareness • Review how phonological awareness develops • Understand the developmental levels of phonemic awareness • Explore creative techniques to liven up phonemic activities  Math and Literature    • Understand how literature helps learners to make connections to content    • Determine how literacy helps to make math “real” for learners    • Analyze how to utilize literature to teach problem solving skills  Weaving Poetry Across the Year (K-2) • Discover how poetry can develop:  Fluency  Understanding the concept of print  Comprehension  Syntax  Phonological and phonemic awareness  Literacy Work Stations • Organize, set-up and implement literacy workstations  Becoming Teachers of Craft for Young Writers • Understand the developmental stages of emergent writing • Examine how students can learn to read like writers • Explore structures of narrative texts using touchstone texts to inform writing  Setting Up Non-fiction for Primary Classrooms • Address aspects of the non-fiction classroom including: setting up the classroom, mini-lessons, conferences, read-alouds, inferring from visual text features and developing quality responses to non-fiction texts Assessment  Examine observation skills that are necessary in today’s early childhood - 24 -


EARLY CHILDHOOD classrooms      Determine guidelines for types of assessment that benefit your classroom      Learn how assessment can help make appropriate instructional decisions • Content Area Ideas  Math in Pre-K/Kindergarten Classrooms       • Learn how to correlate state standards to learning centers and daily class work       • Recognize how the classroom influences learning       • Understand how to use models in the classroom       • Know how to use a “problem solving approach” to foster student learning  What’s in that Mud Puddle? Natural Science in Early Childhood • Discover why an inquiry based approach to science is important in the early childhood classroom • Use the scientific method in your classroom • Explore discovery centers • Incorporate environmental education in the classroom  Isn’t that Science? Integrating Science • Explore thematic ideas that encourage metacognition • Examine strategies that utilize literature and explore scientific concepts • Discover strategies that demonstrate integration of scientific concepts and ideas in other content areas  Celebrations for the 21st Century • Investigate how to implement the anti-bias curriculum in the classroom • Establish an atmosphere where diversity is an integral part of the curriculum  Social Studies in Pre-K/Kindergarten Classrooms • Design instruction utilizing an inquiry based approach • Implement the 10 thematic strands of social studies • Develop activities to encourage positive social development  Integrating Social Studies • Integrate social studies into the early childhood curriculum • Develop strategies to tap into community resources and nurture community involvement • Acquire resources for integrating literacy activities into the social studies content areas • Family Involvement      Literacy Bags       • Discover how using literacy bags can enrich your classroom       • Uncover how to utilize literacy bags to provide an opportunity for parental involvement as well as reinforcement to the skills you are working on in your classroom - 25 -


EARLY CHILDHOOD  Scrapbook Project: An Opportunity to Encourage Family Involvement       • Learn about a project that aligns with PA standards       • Discover a classroom activity that integrates kid writing while developing family involvement       • Develop understanding of the benefits of family involvement in emergent literacy  Building Bridges: Nurturing Parent-Teacher Relationships • Recognize the benefits of parental involvement • Understand the various types of parental involvement • Be aware of strategies that promote more effective communication between parents and staff • Other Workshop Topics  Early Childhood Transitions • Examine current research and trends on setting the stage for positive transitions • Examine critical transition points during preschool years • Learn how to provide positive support and guidance to make the steps of the journey more positive for children  Align Curriculum with Early Learning Standards • Examine and analyze the early learning standards • Address how teachers/directors can properly align curriculum • Apply to daily plans  Work Sampling System • Understand how to appropriately document information for the Work Sampling System • Gather strategies for utilizing work  Collaborating in our Preschool Classrooms • Understand the importance of collaboration at several levels • Examine characteristics of effective teams • Creativity Workshops  Concepts of Creativity      • Explore your own creativity      • Understand how important creativity is in developing children’s thinking skills      • Explore how children benefit from an environment that nurtures creativity      • Learn ways to integrate art and creativity into your program  Environments that Inspire Learning      • Examine how to establish a quality learning environment      • Explore innovative techniques for classroom design  Making a Case for Play      • Understand the definition of play      • Examine research based support of a play-based environment      • Create an action plan of ways to incorporate play in your classroom - 26 -


EARLY CHILDHOOD  Brain Research 101: Activities to Build a Child’s Young Brain During this workshop, participants will examine highlights of current brain research. Topics will address:      • Matching instruction to how the brain learns best      • Strategies on how to teach toward learning styles      • Suggestions to enhance multiple intelligences in learning centers

- 27 -


ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS Participants will discuss and develop an awareness of the challenges faced by English Language Learners as they try to adjust to content in a general education setting. Participants will learn various strategies for building comprehension amongst English Language Learners and consider an assortment of teaching practices for increasing student achievement for those learning English as a Second Language. The following areas may be addressed:  Building Oral Language Development in the Classroom  Effective Teaching for ELLs  The What, Why and How of Vocabulary Instruction for ELLs  Making Standards-Based Lessons Understandable for ELLs • Language Essentials for Teachers of Reading and Spelling (LETRS®) for Teaching English Learners  LETRS for Teaching English Learners addresses the key principles of effective instruction for English language learners (ELLs). This training provides participants with in-depth professional development that addresses:      • Critical components of teaching reading to English learners • Challenges encountered by English learners while learning English • Instructional strategies proven effective with English learners • Effective and engaging vocabulary, academic language, and oral language instruction  This module requires a book. The book is titled Teaching English Learners: A Supplementary LETRS Module for Instructional Leaders. The book cost is $41.95 and it can be ordered from the following site: http://store.cambiumlearning.com. •

- 28 -


IDEA / NCLB • Reauthorization of IDEA 2004 – (IDEIA – Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act) • Legislative Impact of IDEIA • No Child Left Behind: the impact on delivery and effectiveness of instruction PA STATE BOARD REGULATIONS: • CHAPTER 14 (Special Education)  Overview of regulations and implementation requirements  Procedural Safeguards – FAPE in the LRE (Free and Appropriate Public Education in the Least Restrictive Environment)  Evaluation  IEP Development  Measurable Goals and Objectives  Connecting to IDEA 2004 (IDEIA) • CHAPTER 15 (Protected Handicapped Students)  Overview of regulations and implementation requirements  Procedural Safeguards  Service Agreements • CHAPTER 16 (Gifted)  Overview of regulations and implementation requirements  Procedural Safeguards  Gifted IEP (GIEP)  Program implementation for special education students who are gifted

- 29 -


INCLUSIVE PRACTICES As a community of learners, it is important to determine instructional supports that will maximize student participation and interaction, promote independence, build on learners’ strengths, be generalized across the school and community settings and benefit all students. • Technical supports for staff and students who would benefit from the services listed below:  Assistive technology assessment and needs  Classroom observation  Facilitation and/or participation on multi-disciplinary teams  Collaboration and consultation with team members • Overview of Inclusive Practices  Legal basis for inclusion (e.g. Oberti, Gaskin, IDEA ‘04)  Types of inclusion (e.g. physical, academic and social)  Components of an effective inclusion program • Overview of Accommodations and Modifications of Curriculum  Participants will discuss and develop a common definition of terms related to adaptation, accommodation and modification  Participants will consider ways to accommodate and modify the classroom environment. The following areas can be modified in a variety of practical ways: • Classroom environment or setting • Presentation of instruction • Pace, time or scheduling • Curriculum content • Ways that a student may respond to instructional information • Adapted materials or equipment • Organizational strategies that promote independence • Types of instruction that address diverse learner needs • Assessment and grading considerations demonstrate true mastery of information by all students • Continuous System of Supports for Academic Inclusion Special education students historically have had a difficult time generalizing content, processes and procedures from one academic class to another. A continuous system of support “casts a wider net” for student success. The consistency of core practices and procedures frees students to focus on content and mastery of content.  Through a series of guiding questions, participants will identify and refine existing procedures that support students’ growth.  A facilitator will guide participants to agree on common core practices and procedures that support academic inclusion success for all students (e.g. common procedures for vocabulary instruction, note taking and graphic organizers).  Participants will consider how using their core practices over time, across grade levels, would increase student capacity for mastery. - 30 -


INCLUSIVE PRACTICES • Co-Teaching and Collaboration Co-Teaching occurs when two educators jointly deliver instruction to a group of diverse students, primarily in one classroom. The teachers have different knowledge, skills and talents, but have joint responsibility for designing, delivering, monitoring and assessing instruction. The following workshops can be adjusted and adapted to meet the needs of your district:  Overview of Co-Teaching • Definitions of inclusion, co-teaching and collaboration • Student and teacher goals of co-teaching • Characteristics of effective teams • Classroom management considerations • Roles and responsibilities of each teacher • Styles of co-teaching • Outlining the history of inclusion  Practical Considerations for Co-Teaching to Ensure Success for Teachers and Students • Getting started • Avoiding the pitfalls • Communication considerations • Planning for co-teaching • Monitoring stages of team growth  District-Specific Needs and Concerns • Accommodations and modifications of curriculum • Utilizing an Innovation Configuration Map to assess the fidelity of implementation of co-teaching • Disability Awareness The purpose of these trainings is to increase understanding and awareness of disability. This workshop is a highly interactive, discussion-based training.  F.A.T. City  Beyond F.A.T. City • Presuming Competence: Creating a Learning Environment for ALL  Understand the concept of presuming competence and the least dangerous assumption for ALL students  Develop a list of potential supports for students to promote inclusion  Create a correlation between the Civil Rights Movement and Presuming Competence  Anticipate and address barriers to presuming competence  Define the current paradigm and the potential dangers of its current influence on society

- 31 -


INSTRUCTIONAL COACHING A strand of workshops or facilitated study groups designed to launch and sustain coaching as a cultural practice in schools • Coaching: Problem-Based Approach to Literacy Coaching K-3 Participants will learn how literacy coaches are used within schools to strengthen practices, define the role of the coach and create suggestions for building relationships in the school community.  Roles and Misperceptions about Literacy Coaches       Identifying Needs and Working with Teams to Meet those Needs J. LITERA Identifying Needs and Working with Individuals to Meet those NeedsCY • Coaching: Relationship Building and Transition Strategies Participants will acquire understanding about the differentiation between coaches and supervisors, a variation of coaching activities, how to perform the role and the transition process from teacher to coach.  Distinction between Coaches and Supervisors        Roles and Activities of Instructional Coaches J. LITER  How a Coach Performs Different Roles (K-5  Transitioning from Teacher to Coach • Coaching: Communication Skills for Coaches K-12 Participants will examine the communication tools necessary to become an effective coach.  How Coaches Create a Common Language        Critical Communication Skills for Coaches J. LITERA How Coaches Design Quality Visitation Cycles and Presentations (K-5  Practices and Protocols that Aid in Teacher and Student Learning • Coaching: Models and Your Schools K-12 Participants will learn to understand that quality coaching models inspire coaches to positively affect school culture, support significant changes in school learning, promote reflection and decision-making, honor adult learners, strive for student achievement, and serve teachers, students and the system.  The Key Components of Coaching Models       Building Trust with Teachers  How Coaches Identify Models to Fit Different Situations) • Coaching: The Role of Data K-12 Participants will uncover how coaches use data to inform and impact teacher and student performance. Types of data, which data to use, how to gather and interpret data, and how to respond to the data in order to make an impact will be discussed.  Diverse Types of Data for Coaches to Use       Determining Data to be Used J. LITER  How Coaches Gather and Interpret Data (K-5  How Coaches Respond to Data - 32 -


INSTRUCTIONAL COACHING •

Coaching: Application of Learning Styles K-12 Participants will engage in a myriad of facets about learning styles and their implications.  Characteristics and Needs of Adult Learners       Discovering Styles of Learning  Identifying the Learning Styles of Teachers  Incorporating Teachers’ Learning Styles into Their Instruction

- 33 -


INTERACTIVE GLOBAL CLASSROOM • These virtual opportunities allow the learning experience to expand beyond the walls of the classroom. Educators can collaborate with other classrooms at a national and international level and participate in virtual simulations.  MAGPI (Mid-Atlantic Gigapop in Philadelphia for Internet2), part of the University of Pennsylvania, provides: • Inquiry based learning by going beyond the four walls of their own classrooms • Virtual and cost-effective experiences • Participation in real time interactive experiences • Connection with providers around the world • Opportunities including digital library repositories, creating your own virtual experiences and using remote scientific instruments • www.magpi.net       NASA Distance Learning Network provides: • Opportunity for students to connect with NASA experts and education specialists through videoconferencing and webcasting • STEM related content • FREE events • http://www.nasa.gov/ (click on the educator tab)  CILC (Center for Interactive Learning and Collaboration) / TWICE (Two Way Interactive Connections in Education) provides: • Access to interactive videoconferencing K-12 content • Collaborative projects with educators across the world and share reflections • Cost effective events • www.cilc.org • www.twice.cc  Ann Arbor Hands-On Museum provides: • Live, interactive 45-minute program • Program kits that are provided for materials and learning activities to use prior to and during the program • Extension activities that are included to promote learning after the session • Programs that address National Science Education Standards • Activities that are geared toward the elementary level • http://www.aahom.org/programs/distance learning/  E-mission provides: • Live, simulated, problem-based experiences • Student-centered, team-based atmosphere that students interrupt real time data to make decisions and solve problems • A website that contains standards-based materials and lessons to prepare students for their mission • Activities that enforce Math, Science, Communication and Critical- 34 -


INTERACTIVE GLOBAL CLASSROOM Thinking skills • www.e-missions.net  Cleveland Museum of Art provides: • Enrichment in the following content areas: history, languages, science, math and visual arts through distance learning • Connection with students across the country and interaction with museum educators • Lessons designed for K-12 classrooms • http://www.clevelandart.org/learn/distance%20learning.aspx  Penn State Nanotechnology Lab provides: • Cutting edge technology and instrumentation into your classroom, laboratory, and industry site by offering on-line remote access to nanotechnology processing instruments • An engineer from Penn State University to orchestrate the instrument’s use, while offering additional assistance via audio and visual internet software • Instruments avaiable for use:  AFM: Atomic Force Microscopy  FESEM: Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy  Profilometry  UV-Vis Spectrophotometry • Free resources • http://nano4me.org/ (Click on Educators tab and then Remote Access tab)

- 35 -


LITERACY (K-5)

     

 

• ANSWER Key to Open Response The ANSWER Key to Open Response is a routine for students to incorporate in answering reading comprehension open response questions, also sometimes referred to as constructed response questions. These types of questions are often found on high-stakes assessments, but they can also be used to support the comprehension and mastery of information from various content reading material. In order to effectively answer an open response question, a student must carefully read a sample of text and respond in writing to a given question using specific, relevant evidence from the text. In order for the response to truly reflect a student’s comprehension, the student must apply three sets of skills: reading comprehension, organization of information, and writing. The ANSWER Key to Open Response teaches students specific steps to follow in applying these three sets of skills. • Brain Research and Its Application on Reading and Math    This half-day training will encourage teachers to make practical considerations and application of the findings related to brain research in education.    Background about the complex act of reading and math, in addition to practical strategies and guidelines for designing successful reading and math programs, will be provided.    Brain-compatible lesson plan development, activities and assessment will be addressed. • Language Essentials for Teachers of Reading and Spelling (LETRS®) Each of the 12 modules requires six hours of professional development which can be presented as one full day session, two 3-hour sessions or three 2-hour sessions. In addition, follow-up coaching and modeling is suggested.    Module 1: The Challenge of Learning to Read • The first module in the LETRS series explores the reasons why many students have reading difficulties and explains how children learn to read. Case studies illustrate the progression of reading development; the influences of biological, genetic, cognitive, environmental, and instructional factors in learning to read; and the components of effective reading instruction. A “four-part processing system” model is explored in detail.  Module 2: The Speech Sounds of English: Phonetics, Phonology, and Phoneme Awareness • This module introduces phonemes (speech sounds) and discusses the importance of phonological awareness in reading and spelling instruction. Module 2 also discusses the features of consonants and vowels and covers some of the problems that children who speak other languages or dialects may have when learning English.  Module 3: Spellography for Teachers: How English Spelling Works • This module explores the structure and history of English spelling from several angles: phoneme-grapheme correspondences, letter patterns within words, syllables, meaningful word parts (morphemes), - 36 -


LITERACY (K-5) and historical layers in the orthography. The module addresses differences between syllables and morphemes, between “irregular” and “high-frequency” words, and among six syllable types. After learning this content, teachers can approach phonics, spelling, and word study with confidence.  Module 4: The Mighty Word: Building Vocabulary • Vocabulary instruction differs from other areas of reading. This module addresses varied approaches to instruction, including indirect (contextual) and direct methodologies, and stressing techniques for fostering word use, knowledge of word relationships, and awareness of word structure and its connection to meaning. Participants apply what they have learned about vocabulary instruction to several examples of narrative and expository text.  Module 5: Getting Up to Speed: Developing Fluency • Comprehensive reading instruction includes deliberate fluency building at the subword, word, phrase, and text levels for those students who read too slowly. This module reviews the rationale for a fluency component in lesson design. Participants learn and practice techniques for speed drills, repeated reading, simultaneous and alternate oral reading, calculating reading fluency, and charting the results of exercises.  Module 6: Digging for Meaning: Teaching Text Comprehension • Comprehension instruction is one of the most researched areas in reading education, yet it is also one of the most challenging. This module addresses the research base for teaching comprehension, the reasons why children have difficulty with comprehension, and approaches for teaching comprehension at the phrase, sentence, paragraph, and passage levels. Questioning techniques and strategies that are useful before, during, and after reading are reviewed. Exercises include text analysis for planning instruction.  Module 7: Teaching Phonics, Word Study, and the Alphabetic Principle • Effective, enjoyable, systematic phonics instruction involves many subroutines that are all practiced in this module. The sequence and substance of concept development in code-based instruction is emphasized, including the importance of applying learned skills to reading and writing. Answers to common questions are provided, including, “How Much Phonics?”, “Who Needs Phonics?”, “What Kind of Phonics?”, and “Why Phonics?”  Module 8: Assessment for Prevention and Early Intervention • In this module, screening and progress monitoring assessments are distinguished from diagnostic and outcome assessment. The rationale for early screening with fluency-based measures is reviewed. DIBELS® is used as one of the examples of a valid, reliable, efficient - 37 -


LITERACY (K-5) approach to early screening. A developmental spelling inventory is taught. Exercises include review of classroom reports and individual case studies in light of children’s instructional needs and the “threetier” concept of intervention.  Module 9: Teaching Beginning Spelling and Writing • This module addresses writing instruction for children in grades K-2 who need to be taught the component skills that underlie composition. Drawing on recent research at the University of Washington that explicates the cognitive and linguistic components of composition skill, a framework for analyzing writing samples is applied to several examples of students at different levels of achievement. Instruction that builds automaticity in critical components while teaching children the stages of the writing process is explained and modeled.  Module 10: Reading Big Words: Syllabication and Advanced Decoding • Module 10 adresses the instructional needs of students in grades 3 and up who are inaccurate and/or slow in reading and spelling multisyllabic words. Beginning with phoneme-grapheme mapping, the module goes on to address systematic teaching of syllabication, syllable spelling types, and ending rules. Morphology–including inflections, Anglo Saxon compounds, Latin and Greek roots and affixes, and derivational word learning processes–is addressed in some depth. An Advanced Decoding Survey is included with this module along with lists of instructional resources and programs.  Module 11: Writing: A Road to Reading Comprehension • If students actively seek, organize, and reformulate information in their own words, their reading comprehension is likely to improve. Module 11, designed for all classroom and content area teachers, presents a few major strategies that help students process and remember the main ideas in written text. Additionally, it reviews the many causes of reading comprehension difficulties and addresses the research consensus on teaching reading comprehension. Text structure and its relation to comprehension are explored, and participants learn to implement the Key Three Routine, to include construction of topic organizers, note-taking, and summarizing. A list of effective curriculum materials for teaching older students to read and write is included in the module.  Module 12: Using Assessment to Guide Instruction • Module 12 is an advanced module for intermediate and middle school educators to help them identify and pinpoint the instructional needs of all struggling readers. The module describes efficient, reliable, and research-based assessment strategies that enable a school staff to focus on the effectiveness of instruction. Participants review a strategic - 38 -


LITERACY (K-5) plan for screening students and learn how to assemble a group of suitable assessments for individual and classroom use. Diagnostic tests that measure decoding and word analysis, spelling, written composition, reading fluency, and comprehension are demonstrated and rehearsed. Case studies allow participants to discuss and analyze assessment results and their implications.  Each module requires a book. The 2nd Edition for Modules 1-9 is $31.49. The book for Modules 10-12 is in the process of being revised. Books can be ordered from the following site: http://store.cambiumlearning.com. READING A series of reading workshops are designed to maximize the information gathered from the DIBELS assessment, to provide more in-depth analysis of the building blocks of literacy, and finally, to offer educators specific tools/strategies to assist individual students with meeting grade level targets.      Using Data to Improve Reading Instruction - guides educators through the process of using the DIBELS assessment to plan effective reading instruction for individual students and small and large student groups • Building grade level teams • Review assessment data to improve instruction • Grade level teams set goals for systematic program improvement  DIBELS Next measures are brief, powerful indicators of foundational early literacy skills that: • Are quick and efficient to administer and score • Serve as universal screening (or benchmark assessment) and progress monitoring • Identify students in need of intervention support • Evaluate the effectiveness of interventions • Support the RtII/Multi-tiered Model  DIBELS Next Transition training for schools that currently use 6th edition and are transitioning to DIBELS Next • Participants will:  Gain understanding of the changes to the scoring rules  Review the scoring rules for the measures that have not changed  Develop understanding of new measures  DIBELS Next Essentials for those new to DIBELS Next • Participants will:  Explore the foundations of DIBELS Next, including the purposes, design, and uses  Understand the administration and scoring of each measure - 39 -


LITERACY (K-5)   

  

  

  

  

 Understand how DIBELS Next data can be used as a framework for data-based decision-making   Phonics and Word Study – provides an in-depth analysis of alphabetic principle, its impact on beginning literacy and specific tools to develop the skill in young children • Phonics and Word Study – Grades K-2  Impact on early reading acquisition  Five phases on word learning  Explicit vs. Embedded Phonic Instruction  Lesson sequence for teaching phonics in early literacy  Spelling-Reading Connection  Spelling and Phonic Inventories  Strategies and techniques to enhance reading and spelling skills • Word Study – Grades 3-5  Sequence of instruction for the development of advanced decoding skills  Instructional materials that support word study skill development  Spelling-Reading Connection  Spelling Inventories  Word Study strategies and techniques   Comprehension Strategies – Grades 3-5 Provides an overview of research on reading comprehension and strategies for classroom implementation • Overview of research on reading comprehension • Factors that influence reading comprehension • Reading comprehension strategies that students should use • Teaching techniques to address reading comprehension strategies • Intervention framework to comprehension • Assessing and diagnosing a struggling reader’s comprehension   Using Running Records to Drive Instruction – K-2 Teachers • Recording and analyzing running records using the three sources of information: meaning, structure and visual • Analyzing running records to identify patterns of student responses • Using the data to improve instruction using the three sources of information   Creating Fluent Readers – Grades K-2 • Analysis of fluent reading • Impact of fluency on literary skills • Specific tools and strategies are modeled to develop fluent reading • Rubrics for fluency are reviewed   Improving Oral Reading Fluency – Grades 3-5 - 40 -


LITERACY (K-5)

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

 •

• Analysis of fluent reading • Impact of fluency on literacy skills • Specific tools and strategies are modeled to develop fluent reading • Rubrics for fluency are reviewed   Literacy Work Stations – Grades K-2 • Overview of literacy work stations: the purpose and impact on instruction • Managing students using multiple literacy work stations • Setting up literacy work stations • Specific tools and strategies to implement work stations   Literacy Work Stations – Grades 3-5 • Overview of literacy work stations: the purpose and impact on instruction • Managing students using multiple literacy work stations • Setting up literacy work stations • Specific tools and strategies to implement work stations   Making Words Stick: Vocabulary Instruction – Grades K-2 • Overview of the research on the impact of direct vocabulary instruction • Guidelines for selecting vocabulary words • Multiple high leverage strategies for classroom instruction modeled   Making Words Stick: Vocabulary Instruction – Grades 3-5 • Overview of the research on the impact of direct vocabulary instruction • Guidelines for selecting vocabulary words • Multiple high leverage strategies for classroom instruction modeled   Phonemic Awareness – K-2 Teachers • In-depth analysis of phonemic awareness and its impact on literacy development • Overview of the research-based literacy skill sequence • Tools and strategies needed to develop the skill in beginning readers • Assessment tools to measure phonological awareness   Mini-Workshop Part I: Getting Students to Look at Print – K-1 • Active from the start • Strategies and techniques to use with students to foster visual attention to the print   Mini-Workshop Part II: Looking at Print Hands-on Techniques to: • Use with students that will help them visually attend to different parts of the word • Help students understand how words work • Target Audience: K-2 Teachers Setting Up Non-fiction for Primary Classrooms  Address aspects of the non-fiction classroom including: setting up the classroom, mini-lessons, conferences, read-alouds, inferring from visual text - 41 -


LITERACY (K-5)

   

features and developing quality responses to non-fiction texts • Building a Strong Foundation for Core Reading Instruction: Differentiating Reading Instruction K-2   Learn how to use formative assessment to target instructional needs  Utilize strategies for grouping to increase instructional flexibility  Explore strategies for supporting primary readers • Building a Strong Foundation for Core Reading Instruction: Differentiating Reading Instruction Grades 3-5   Learn how to use formative assessment to target instructional needs  Utilize strategies for grouping to increase instructional flexibility  Develop an understanding of utilized tiered assignments WRITING • Writing Workshop: A Place for All Students to Develop Themselves as Writers An overview of the Writing Workshop components and possibilities for mini lessons when launching a Writing Workshop will be presented and discussed.  Grades K-2  Grades 3-5 • Writing Process: Powerful Instructional Design: Intervention in an Inclusive Setting Applicable strategies/processes that are specifically designed to include struggling writers will be explored and applied.  Grades 4-11 • Using Data to Improve Written Language Skills for Students Each session is two hours in length. Sessions I and II are prerequisites for Session III.    Session I: Participants will learn how to progress monitor students’ writing samples.    Session II: Participants will explore specific instructional strategies and interventions designed to boost student writing performance.  Session III: Participants will develop a plan to improve specific students’ writing using their progress monitoring data and effective instructional strategies and interventions.  All grades • Grammar: A Gatekeeper to Improving Writing Instruction Teachers will explore the conventions of writing in order to inform their instruction and transform their students’ writing.  Grades 4-8 • Writing to the Prompt Nested in Writing Workshop Teachers will be offered practical ways to scaffold their students’ thinking and writing to prepare for assigned writing topics within the context of a writing workshop.  Grades 3-8 • Finding a Place to Live Like a Writer: A Writer’s Notebook Participants will discover how a writer’s notebook is an essential tool intended to springboard students into developing their voice and craft for writing. - 42 -


LITERACY (K-5)  Grades 2-8 • Writers in Transition: Teaching Revision Strategies By the end of the primary grades, children have mastered the alphabet, a sense of the story and the basics of writing workshops. A unit of study in the writing workshop on revision is a great way for these writers in transition to take on a multitude of ways to refine and improve their writing. Lessons, strategies and goals of the unit of study will be viewed and discussed.  Grades 3-6 • Weaving Poetry across the Year (K-2)  Discover how poetry can develop: • Fluency • Understanding the concept of print • Comprehension • Syntax • Phonological and phonemic awareness • Weaving Poetry across the Year: Gearing Up for the PSSA Teachers will develop a lens which enables them to understand the tools a poet uses to craft poetry. Close analysis will reveal how to analyze and interpret poetry on the PSSA.  Grades 3-6 • Becoming Teachers of Craft for Young Writers  Understand the developmental stages of emergent writing  Examine how students can learn to read like writers  Explore structures of narrative texts using touchstone texts to inform writing • POWERful Instructional Strategies for Writing - Grades 1-5 • Mini-sessions using research based explicit instructional strategies to improve a student’s writing • Each mini-session will focus on one specific mode of writing using the “POWER” steps. These steps have been proven to be highly effective for all writers, including the struggling writer. • Mini-sessions:         Fact Paragraphs         Descriptive Writing         Short Report (Expository)         Imaginative Story         Personal Narrative         Persuasive Essay Follow Up Training • Additional training is available to individual and grade-level teachers on-site, to follow up on knowledge and skills from participation in district sponsored CIU 20 workshops. • The job-embedded training is intended to assist in the on-going efforts of the principal, reading supervisor, reading specialist and/or literacy - 43 -


LITERACY (K-5) coach to build capacity and increase student literacy achievement. • Services could include mini-workshops, technical assistance, question and answer sessions, observing struggling students, analyzing student work and providing recommendations. • Training must be requested by the principal and/or reading supervisor.  Integrating the National Educational Technology Standards for Administrators, Teachers and Students (NETS-A, NETS-T, NETS-S)  Assessing the National Educational Technology Standards  Electronic Resources for Student Research and Increasing Knowledge

- 44 -


LITERACY (6-12)

     

 

• ANSWER Key to Open Response The ANSWER Key to Open Response is a routine for students to incorporate in answering reading comprehension open response questions, also sometimes referred to as constructed response questions. These types of questions are often found on high-stakes assessments, but they can also be used to support the comprehension and mastery of information from various content reading material. In order to effectively answer an open response question, a student must carefully read a sample of text and respond in writing to a given question using specific, relevant evidence from the text. In order for the response to truly reflect a student’s comprehension, the student must apply three sets of skills: reading comprehension, organization of information, and writing. The ANSWER Key to Open Response teaches students specific steps to follow in applying these three sets of skills. • Brain Research and Its Application on Reading and Math    This half-day training will encourage teachers to make practical considerations and application of the findings related to brain research in education.    Background about the complex act of reading and math, in addition to practical strategies and guidelines for designing successful reading and math programs will be provided.    Brain-compatible lesson plan development, activities and assessment will be addressed. • Language Essentials for Teachers of Reading and Spelling (LETRS®) Each of the 12 modules requires six hours of professional development which can be presented as one full day session, two 3-hour sessions or three 2-hour sessions. In addition, follow-up coaching and modeling is suggested.    Module 1: The Challenge of Learning to Read • The first module in the LETRS series explores the reasons why many students have reading difficulties and explains how children learn to read. Case studies illustrate the progression of reading development; the influences of biological, genetic, cognitive, environmental, and instructional factors in learning to read; and the components of effective reading instruction. A “four-part processing system” model is explored in detail.  Module 2: The Speech Sounds of English: Phonetics, Phonology, and Phoneme Awareness • This module introduces phonemes (speech sounds) and discusses the importance of phonological awareness in reading and spelling instruction. Module 2 also discusses the features of consonants and vowels and covers some of the problems that children who speak other languages or dialects may have when learning English.  Module 3: Spellography for Teachers: How English Spelling Works • This module explores the structure and history of English spelling from several angles: phoneme-grapheme correspondences, letter - 45 -


LITERACY (6-12) patterns within words, syllables, meaningful word parts (morphemes), and historical layers in the orthography. The module addresses differences between syllables and morphemes, between “irregular” and “high-frequency” words, and among six syllable types. After learning this content, teachers can approach phonics, spelling, and word study with confidence.  Module 4: The Mighty Word: Building Vocabulary • Vocabulary instruction differs from other areas of reading. This module addresses varied approaches to instruction, including indirect (contextual) and direct methodologies, and stressing techniques for fostering word use, knowledge of word relationships, and awareness of word structure and its connection to meaning. Participants apply what they have learned about vocabulary instruction to several examples of narrative and expository text.  Module 5: Getting Up to Speed: Developing Fluency • Comprehensive reading instruction includes deliberate fluency building at the subword, word, phrase, and text levels for those students who read too slowly. This module reviews the rationale for a fluency component in lesson design. Participants learn and practice techniques for speed drills, repeated reading, simultaneous and alternate oral reading, calculating reading fluency, and charting the results of exercises.  Module 6: Digging for Meaning: Teaching Text Comprehension • Comprehension instruction is one of the most researched areas in reading education, yet it is also one of the most challenging. This module addresses the research base for teaching comprehension, the reasons why children have difficulty with comprehension, and approaches for teaching comprehension at the phrase, sentence, paragraph, and passage levels. Questioning techniques and strategies that are useful before, during, and after reading are reviewed. Exercises include text analysis for planning instruction.  Module 7: Teaching Phonics, Word Study, and the Alphabetic Principle • Effective, enjoyable, systematic phonics instruction involves many subroutines that are all practiced in this module. The sequence and substance of concept development in code-based instruction is emphasized, including the importance of applying learned skills to reading and writing. Answers to common questions are provided, including, “How Much Phonics?”, “Who Needs Phonics?”, “What Kind of Phonics?”, and “Why Phonics?”  Module 8: Assessment for Prevention and Early Intervention • In this module, screening and progress monitoring assessments are distinguished from diagnostic and outcome assessment. The rationale - 46 -


LITERACY (6-12) for early screening with fluency-based measures is reviewed. DIBELS® is used as one of the examples of a valid, reliable, efficient approach to early screening. A developmental spelling inventory is taught. Exercises include review of classroom reports and individual case studies in light of children’s instructional needs and the “threetier” concept of intervention.  Module 9: Teaching Beginning Spelling and Writing • This module addresses writing instruction for children in grades K-2 who need to be taught the component skills that underlie composition. Drawing on recent research at the University of Washington that explicates the cognitive and linguistic components of composition skill, a framework for analyzing writing samples is applied to several examples of students at different levels of achievement. Instruction that builds automaticity in critical components while teaching children the stages of the writing process is explained and modeled.  Module 10: Reading Big Words: Syllabication and Advanced Decoding • Module 10 adresses the instructional needs of students in grades 3 and up who are inaccurate and/or slow in reading and spelling multisyllabic words. Beginning with phoneme-grapheme mapping, the module goes on to address systematic teaching of syllabication, syllable spelling types, and ending rules. Morphology–including inflections, Anglo Saxon compounds, Latin and Greek roots and affixes, and derivational word learning processes–is addressed in some depth. An Advanced Decoding Survey is included with this module along with lists of instructional resources and programs.  Module 11: Writing: A Road to Reading Comprehension • If students actively seek, organize, and reformulate information in their own words, their reading comprehension is likely to improve. Module 11, designed for all classroom and content area teachers, presents a few major strategies that help students process and remember the main ideas in written text. Additionally, it reviews the many causes of reading comprehension difficulties and addresses the research consensus on teaching reading comprehension. Text structure and its relation to comprehension are explored, and participants learn to implement the Key Three Routine, to include construction of topic organizers, note-taking, and summarizing. A list of effective curriculum materials for teaching older students to read and write is included in the module.  Module 12: Using Assessment to Guide Instruction • Module 12 is an advanced module for intermediate and middle school educators to help them identify and pinpoint the instructional needs of all struggling readers. The module describes efficient, reliable, and - 47 -


LITERACY (6-12) research-based assessment strategies that enable a school staff to focus on the effectiveness of instruction. Participants review a strategic plan for screening students and learn how to assemble a group of suitable assessments for individual and classroom use. Diagnostic tests that measure decoding and word analysis, spelling, written composition, reading fluency, and comprehension are demonstrated and rehearsed. Case studies allow participants to discuss and analyze assessment results and their implications.  Each module requires a book. Currently, each book per module (1-9) is approximatley $33.00. The book for Modules 1012 is in the process of being revised. Books can be ordered from the following site: http://store.cambiumlearning.com. READING • Reading ApprenticeshipTM (Strategies for Reading across the Content Areas)      Getting buy in from secondary content area teachers      Using case studies to develop a knowledge base in reading      Embedding high leverage instructional practices      Strategies for implementing extensive reading      Strategies for developing schema and vocabulary      Assessment of student growth      Program development  Integrating technology to support Reading Apprenticeship  Ongoing support for district Reading Apprenticeship trainers • Reunion Sessions • Coaching • Modeling • Co-planning sessions • Classroom Walkthroughs with a Reading Apprenticeship focus • Utilizing an Innovation Configuration Map to assess the fidelity of implementation of Reading Apprenticeship • Research-Based Reading Intervention Programs for Struggling Adolescents  Corrective Reading – Decoding  Corrective Reading – Comprehension  REWARDS   • WRITING • Writing Process–Powerful Instructional Design: Intervention in an Inclusive Setting  Applicable strategies/processes that are specifically designed to include struggling writers will be explored and applied.  Grades 4-11 • Using Data to Improve Written Language Skills for Students - 48 -


LITERACY (6-12)

  •

Each session is two hours in length. Sessions I and II are prerequisites for Session III.  Session I: Participants will learn how to progress monitor students’ writing samples.  Session II: Participants will explore specific instructional strategies and interventions designed to boost student writing performance.  Session III: Participants will develop a plan to improve specific students’ writing using their progress monitoring data and effective instructional strategies and interventions.  All grades Grammar: A Gatekeeper to Improving Writing Instruction  Teachers will explore the conventions of writing in order to inform their instruction and transform their students’ writing.  Grades 4-8 It’s All in the Poetry: Embedding Poetry into an Existing Curriculum to Develop Writing Skills  Based on instructional routines for teaching poetry by Nancie Atwell, this workshop will present a lively way for teachers to have poetry included in middle school curriculums every day. Lessons about fine writing and its application to poems, narratives and expositions of their own will be presented in ways that will help students gain perspective about their identities and make sense of the world while simultaneously honing their skills as critical readers and writers.  Grades 6-8 Finding a Place to Live Like a Writer: A Writer’s Notebook  Participants will discover how a writer’s notebook is an essential tool intended to springboard students into developing their voice and craft for writing.  Grades 2-8 Writers in Transition: Teaching Revision Strategies  By the end of the primary grades, children have mastered the alphabet, a sense of the story and the basics of writing workshops. A unit of study in the writing workshop on revision seems to be a great way for these writers in transition to take on a multitude of ways to refine and improve their writing. Lessons, strategies and goals of the unit of study will be viewed and discussed.  Grades 3-6 Implementing Mode Specific Writing Rubrics  Integrating the National Educational Technology Standards for Administrators, Teachers and Students (NETS-A, NETS-T, NETS-S)  Assessing the National Educational Technology Standards  Electronic Resources for Student Research and Increasing Knowledge POWERful Instructional Strategies for Writing - Grades 6-12  Mini-sessions using research based explicit instructional strategies to improve a student’s writing - 49 -


LITERACY (6-12)  Each mini-session will focus on one specific mode of writing using the “POWER” steps. These steps have been proven to be highly effective for all writers, including the struggling writer.  Mini-sessions: • Fact Paragraphs • Descriptive Writing • Short Report (Expository) • Imaginative Story • Personal Narrative • Persuasive Essay  Follow Up Training  Additional training is available to individual and grade-level teachers on-site, to follow up on knowledge and skills from participation in district sponsored CIU 20 workshops.  The job-embedded training is intended to assist in the on-going efforts of the principal, reading supervisor, reading specialist and/or literacy coach to build capacity and increase student literacy achievement.  Services could include mini-workshops, technical assistance, question and answer sessions, observing struggling students, analyzing student work and providing recommendations.  Training must be requested by the principal and/or reading supervisor.

- 50 -


PARENT SUPPORTS These trainings are identified to support and enhance parental involvement. These trainings are available by district request. • Indicator 8: School Facilitated Parent Involvement  Indicator 8 Needs Assessment. • The results of this assessment will identify priority areas of focus for your school.  Module 1: Welcoming All Families Into the School Community • Assist school personnel in addressing means by which to establish and/or foster an inclusive, supportive and accepting school culture that welcomes and engages families in the school and classroom level  Module 2: Communicating Effectively • Help develop meaningful, collaborative partnerships between home and school in an effort to increase student academic and social achievement  Module 3: Supporting Student Success • Support student success within school and home environments through active family involvement  Module 4: Speaking Up for Every Child • Inform the educational community about the importance of having a family member or other adult to advocate for every child  Module 5: Shared Decision-Making • Inform the educational community about shared decision-making through the development of learning communities that share the power in an effort to improve teaching and learning  Module 6: Collaborating with Community • Helps to identify your school’s strengths and areas of growth in relation to Family-School Partnerships • Assistive Technology • Assistive Technology Workshop (What is AT?) • Can be tailored to suit the needs of target audience (itinerant therapists, special education teachers, parents) •Half-day workshop  Equipment-Specific – Outcomes of the Assistive Technology Evaluation Process: • Kurzweil - talking word processor with word prediction (literacy tool) • Read and Write Gold - talking word processor with word prediction, electronic text reader (literacy tool) • ReadOUTLoud for Bookshare - software program that reads DAISY books downloaded from Bookshare • Coordination of Communication Device Trainings with Vendors • Intellitools Classroom Suite Training (suite of literacy and math tools) • Dragon Naturally Speaking–overview of features and functionality - 51 -


PARENT SUPPORTS (half-day) • Accessibility features for MAC and Windows Operating Systems (half-day) • WORD tools for writing and reading (full day) • Proloquo2go • iPads and iPods in the classroom  Universal Design for Learning Introduction and Overview (half-day) • Autism Support  Developing Social Skills for Students with Autism and Asperger’s Syndrome: Social Skill Assessment and Intervention Methods for social skill assessment and the concepts of skill versus performance deficits, and accommodation versus assimilation will be presented. Discussion and practice with social skill intervention for such topics as thoughts/ feelings, reciprocal interactions, role playing/behavioral rehearsal, cognitive flexibility, and emotional regulation will be included. Training can also be provided on specific strategies such as social narratives (e.g., Social Stories©, Comic Strip Conversations, and Power Cards).  Developing Effective Academic Teaching Strategies for Student with Asperger’s Syndrome and High Functioning Autism (HFA) This session will provide participants with an overview of the academic needs and characteristics of students with Asperger’s Syndrome and HFA. Specific instructional strategies for reading comprehension and writing will be presented with practice opportunities. Key academic behaviors necessary for school success will also be discussed and instructional strategies provided.  Developing Behavior Plans and Data Collection Tools for Students with Autism Using Positive Behavior Support as a foundation, participants will practice collecting antecedent-behavior-consequence (ABC) data using direct observation and interviews/rating scales. Participants will then learn strategies for analyzing data and using data to create positive behavior support plans. Discussion time for behavior intervention strategies will also be provided.  Developing Transition Plans with Outcome Based IEP Goals for Students with Autism Participants will learn person-centered planning methods and models for developing outcome based transition plans. Self-determination, post secondary education and employment will also be presented and discussed within the context of transition planning.    Communicating Differentiated Instruction to Parents/Community • Early Childhood Topics  Supporting Every Child • Develop strategies that support inclusive environments • Gain understanding of ways to adapt learning centers to meet the needs of all learners • Gain ideas for open ended activities that allow children of different - 52 -


PARENT SUPPORTS ability levels to work together  Introduction to Early Intervention • Evaluate IDEA and its impact in early childhood • Understand the role of the classroom teacher • Learn how to successfully implement an IEP • Develop strategies that best address the needs of identified students in your program  Overview of Autism • Recognize the basic characteristics of a student identified with autism • Identify key points that positively effect the child’s interaction in your classroom • Learn strategies to provide quality interaction with autistic students  Overview of Hearing Disabilities of Children in Early Childhood Programs • Determine the basic characteristics of a student identified with hearing disabilities • Understand key issues that contribute to success of hearing impaired students in your classroom • Review strategies to provide quality interaction with hearing impaired students      Promoting Student Success: Building Relationships and Creating Supportive Environments • Describe the relationship between children’s social emotional development and challenging behavior • Evaluate how challenging behavior serves as a function for children • Support the relationship between environmental variables, children’s challenging behaviors and social emotional development • Uncover strategies that can be used to (1) build positive relationships with children, families and colleagues; (2) design environments, schedules and routines; (3) structure transitions; (4) help children learn rules and routines; and (5) plan activities that promote engagement • Use descriptive acknowledgement and encouragement to support children’s positive social behaviors • Evaluate their work with children related to building relationships and the structure and design of their environment  Looking at our Preschoolers as Readers and Writers • Determine how to establish an environment that promotes literacy • Develop techniques that promote literacy development • Explore ways to encourage literacy development  Fun with Phonemic Awareness • Review how phonological awareness develops • Understand the developmental levels of phonemic awareness • Explore creative techniques to liven up phonemic activities - 53 -


PARENT SUPPORTS      Literacy Bags       • Discover how using literacy bags can enrich your classroom       • Uncover how to utilize literacy bags to provide an opportunity for parental involvement as well as reinforcement to the skills you are working on in your classroom  Scrapbook Project: An Opportunity to Encourage Family Involvement       • Learn about a project that aligns with PA standards       • Discover a classroom activity that integrates kid writing while developing family involvement       • Develop understanding of the benefits of family involvement in emergent literacy  Building Bridges: Nurturing Parent-Teacher Relationships • Recognize the benefits of parental involvement • Understand the various types of parental involvement • Be aware of strategies that promote more effective communication between parents and staff  Early Childhood Transitions • Examine current research and trends on setting the stage for positive transitions • Examine critical transition points during preschool years • Learn how to provide positive support and guidance to make the steps of the journey more positive for children  Concepts of Creativity       • Explore your own creativity       • Understand how important creativity is in developing children’s thinking skills       • Explore how children benefit from an environment that nurtures creativity       • Learn ways to integrate art and creativity into your program  Making a Case for Play       • Understand the definition of play       • Examine research based support of a play-based environment       • Create an action plan of ways to incorporate play in your classroom  Brain Research 101: Activities to Build a Child’s Young Brain During this workshop participants will examine highlights of current brain research. • IDEA/NCLB CHAPTER 14 (Special Education)   • Overview of regulations and implementation requirements   • Procedural Safeguards – FAPE in the LRE (Free and Appropriate Public Education in the Least Restrictive Environment) • Evaluation   • IEP Development - 54 -


PARENT SUPPORTS  • Measurable Goals and Objectives  • Connecting to IDEA 2004 (IDEIA) CHAPTER 15 (Protected Handicapped Students)  • Overview of regulations and implementation requirements  • Procedural Safeguards • Service Agreements  CHAPTER 16 (Gifted)   • Overview of regulations and implementation requirements   • Procedural Safeguards   • Gifted IEP (GIEP)   • Program implementation for special education students who are gifted Inclusive Practices  Disability Awareness The purpose of these trainings is to increase understanding and awareness of disability. This workshop is a highly interactive, discussion-based training. • F.A.T. City   • Beyond F.A.T. City  Presuming Competence: Creating a Learning Environment for ALL • Understand the concept of presuming competence and the least dangerous assumption for ALL students • Develop a list of potential supports for students to promote inclusion   • Create a correlation between the Civil Rights Movement and Presuming Competence   • Anticipate and address barriers to presuming competence   • Define the current paradigm and the potential dangers of its current influence on society Literacy  Phonemic Awareness – K-2 Teachers • In-depth analysis of phonemic awareness and its impact on literacy development • Overview of the research-based literacy skill sequence • Tools and strategies needed to develop the skill in beginning readers • Assessment tools to measure phonological awareness

     

   •   

- 55 -


PSSA / PASA

                                         

• Data Tools Utilization  eMetric • Analysis of PSSA data • Identify academic strengths/weaknesses and performance gaps • Evaluation of instructional effectiveness  PVAAS • Analysis of student growth • Measure of student progress from year to year  4Sight Benchmark Assessment Training & Technical Assistance  • Understanding the design of 4Sight Benchmarks  • Facilitating the administration of 4Sight Benchmarks  • Facilitating the scoring of 4Sight Benchmarks  • Setting up school/student data in the Member Center  • Generating and reading Proficiency and Subscale Reports in the Member Center  • Understanding how AYP is computed in Pennsylvania  • Identifying students needed to score Proficient or Above to achieve AYP  • Analyzing 4Sight data to estimate the number of students Proficient in Reading in each of the AYP subgroups  • Using 4Sight subscale reports to identify strengths and areas of concern for each AYP subgroup and classroom  • Using the development of a reader model to assist in analysis of student data for students who are significantly below grade level  • Prioritizing and planning instruction based on 4Sight Subscale Reports and other available data  • Developing quarterly plans for instruction focused on student areas of concern  • Developing a plan to involve school staff in quarterly data analysis and planning of instruction in response to the analysis  Classroom Diagnostic Tools (CDT) Overview  • This workshop will provide teachers with a working knowledge of the CDT and the interactive and dynamic reporting suite, as well as providing long range classroom implementation of the use of the CDT. The CDT is a free set of online assessments designed to provide diagnostic information in order to guide instruction and provide support. The CDT is offered to students in grades 6-12 and is currently available for use in PA schools and classrooms. The CDT reporting system is fully integrated with the Standards Aligned System (SAS).  Classroom Diagnostic Tool (CDT) Next Steps • The Next Steps training is a follow-up training to support districts in continuing CDT implementation. The training will provide a brief review of the CDT, hands-on content simulations, review of new enhancements, and guidance and practice for one-on-one student conferencing. - 56 -


PSSA / PASA  CCSS (Common Core State Standards) and Graduation Requirements     • In this interactive workshop, participants will:  Develop an understanding of the Keystones  Analyze the Keystone Exam Eligible Content and Assessment questions  Develop an understanding of Webb’s Depth of Knowledge and its comparison to Bloom’s Taxonomy  Review resources available from PDE  Consider classroom practice to support students in the Keystones • PASA (Pennsylvania Alternate State Assessment) training topics include: student enrollment, teacher training for test administration and PASA evaluations • Providing Supports for Student Achievement (PSSA): A Collaborative Practicum      Alignment of practical instructional strategies to the content standards      Application of the Assessment Anchor Content Standards to planning and instruction      Maximize supports for all learners      Strategies to increase student efficacy and independence • Overview of Accommodations and Modifications of Curriculum  Participants will discuss and develop a common definition of terms related to adaptation, accommodation and modification.  Participants will consider ways to accommodate and modify the classroom environment. The following areas can be modified in a variety of practical ways: • Classroom environment or setting • Presentation of instruction • Pace, time or scheduling • Curriculum content • Ways that a student may respond to instructional information • Adapted materials or equipment • Organizational strategies that promote independence • Types of instruction that address diverse learner needs • Assessment and grading considerations demonstrate true mastery of information by all students

- 57 -


PROGRESS MONITORING FOR SPECIAL & REGULAR EDUCATION        

•    

Progress Monitoring for Special Education Teachers   Measurable goals and objectives   Specific skills and general outcomes Progress Monitoring   Data Analysis   Intervention strategies for Progress Monitoring (e.g. reading, math & specific skills)  DataNotGuessworkTM (DNG) - Dr. Susan Leddick - data sampling strategies for Regular Education

• Using Data to Improve Written Language Skills for Students Each session is two hours in length. Sessions I and II are prerequisites for Session III.  Session I: Participants will learn how to progress monitor students’ writing samples.  Session II: Participants will explore specific instructional strategies and interventions designed to boost student writing performance.  Session III: Participants will develop a plan to improve specific students’ writing using their progress monitoring data and effective instructional strategies and interventions.  All grades

- 58 -


RESEARCH-BASED INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES

 

     

 

    

• Classroom Instruction that Works Training Series – A series of workshops based on ASCD’s number one selling book by Robert Marzano, which highlights the top nine instructional practices that have been shown across multiple studies to increase student achievement. Workshops can be tailored to meet school/district time frames; however, follow up is essential.    Cooperative Learning • Essential elements of effective cooperative learning • Research on effective cooperative learning • Strategies for organizing and managing cooperative learning groups • Strategies for using cooperative learning to meet academic objectives    Non-linguistic Representations •Thinking MapsTM Effective use of graphic organizers        One day or two half-day sessions for mastery of eight graphic organizers each connected to a cognitive process        Across classrooms, over time, the maps provide support to assist students with higher level thinking Define the eight Thinking MapsTM and their cognitive purposes Determine the appropriate use of the maps and transfer Thinking MapsTM into classroom instruction Identify how Thinking MapsTM align to the Pennsylvania State Standards Implement a common visual language across grade levels and content areas    Goal Setting & Feedback - DataNotGuessworkTM(DNG) •DNG is a tool for monitoring the progress of groups of students using data sampling strategies. An overview of DNG can be conducted as a separate training or combined with other trainings such as Thinking MapsTM.    Similarities & Differences •Strategies for using comparing/contrasting, classifying, simile and metaphor across the curriculum are modeled    Summarizing/Note-taking •Strategies for effective note-taking and summarizing across the curriculum are modeled    Questioning, Cues and Advanced Organizers •Questioning techniques, effective uses of prompts and cues, and advanced organizers will be reviewed    Activating Prior Knowledge •Strategies for eliciting prior knowledge will be modeled    Generating and Testing Hypotheses - 59 -


RESEARCH-BASED INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES •Strategies for generating and testing hypotheses will be modeled     Reinforcing Effort •Explore the types of reinforcement and which has the highest effect on student achievement •Strategies for reinforcing effort seamlessly throughout the school day will be modeled     Homework and Practice •Strategies for effectively assigning and checking homework will be reviewed •Strategies for engaging parents/caregivers will also be addressed

- 60 -


RESPONSE TO INSTRUCTION AND INTERVENTION (RTII)

         

       

•     

    •

Response to Instruction and Intervention (IDEA 2004/IDEIA)    Overview of the Pennsylvania Three Tiered Model   Grade level data analysis meetings   Use of Standard Protocol Interventions   Effective instructional strategies in a RtII framework   Scientifically Validated Reading Program • Core Reading Program • Supplemental Reading Program • Intervention Reading Program   School-wide behavior support project   The role of IST in a RtII framework   Special education eligibility with a RtII framework   Integrating multiple school-based supports in a RtII framework Utilizing an Innovation Configuration Map to assess the fidelity of implementation of RtII

- 61 -


STEM (SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING AND MATH) • The STEM Competencies are:           Global Awareness  Communication Skills  Analytical Thinkers  Techology Literate  Digital Literacy  Problem-Solving The following workshops provide the opportunity to integrate STEM in the content areas: • Defined STEM      A web-based application designed to promote effectiveness and relevant connections between STEM classroom content and STEM career pathways, Defined STEM provides teachers a resource where they can access highly effective media content and related support materials. These resources and materials allow teachers to connect STEM career awareness to existing lessons and standards-based curriculum. * Please note this web-based application is only available to districts that are connected to PAIUNet. • Nanotechnology      Inclusion of Nanotechnology in the science curriculum will foster interdisciplinary explorations of science in K-12 classrooms. Because nanotechnology is an emerging interdisciplinary field, it can be included in physical science, chemistry, physics, biology, environmental sciences, and engineering. Nanotechnology provides connections between and among the sciences that will help students to develop an understanding of the relationships between disciplines. • LEGO MINDSTORMS      With LEGO MINDSTORMS Education, convert classrooms into a hands-on robotics laboratory! Students will model real-life mechanisms and use creativity, logic, and problem-solving skills while learning key STEM concepts.      Robot Classroom Set available for loan from the IU 20 IMS Library. • Common Core State Standards (CCSS) 101  This course is designed to introduce teachers to the format, content and intent of the CCSS for Mathematics. At the end of this interactive session, participants will understand the organization of the two sets of standards, the on-line resources to support them, and the timeline for alignment by PA schools. This course will also integrate the Keystone Mathematics Exam Eligible Content into the presentation. In addition, time will be given to begin planning for integration of the CCSS and Keystone Eligible Content into classroom practice and instruction. • Common Core State Standards: Transition to PA Common Core for Math and English Language Arts     These trainings will focus on the transition to PA Common Core for Math and English Language Arts. Objectives include: - 62 -


STEM (SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING AND MATH) • • • • •

•          •       •       •          •   

Gain a deep understanding the PA Common Core Standards Explore the instructional shifts as related to PA Common Core Develop skills to assist in transitioning to PA Common Core Share effective strategies for transition to PA Common Core Each session can be customizable to support a districts’ current transition continuum. Math Work Stations: Getting Started K-5  Gather strategies for creating and implementing math work stations in classrooms  Develop an understanding of how math work stations complement a standards-based classroom Brain Research and Its Application on Reading and Math   This half-day training will encourage teachers to make practical considerations and application of the findings related to brain research in education.   Background about the complex act of reading and math, in addition to practical strategies and guidelines for designing successful reading and math programs will be provided.   Brain-compatible lesson plan development, activities and assessment will be addressed. Providing Supports for Student Achievement (PSSA) in Reading and Math Practicum   A strong component of this session is a professional “collection” of teacher ideas that have been successfully implemented statewide.   Topics that will be addressed include Assessment Anchors connected to instructional practices, effective vocabulary instruction and powerful scaffolded strategies for reading and math fluency. Developing Effective Mathematical Ideas....Building Conceptual Understanding of Student Mathematical Reasoning in Number Systems   This professional development opportunity is offered to help teachers deepen their content knowledge about number systems.   The seminar series will explore and examine the Big Ideas of Numbers and Operations in grades K-6 by analyzing the instructional strategies that assist students’ learning of the base ten system and the four basic operations. Differentiated Instruction in the Elementary Math Class Using Investigations   This three day training series focuses on incorporating differentiated instructional practices, using the Investigations math program, in grades 1-4.   Teachers will explore how to differentiate the components of the program such as classroom routines, games and lessons.   Differentiated strategies such as tiering, extension menus, ThinkDOTs, RAFTs and anchoring activities are addressed and applied to support teachers in implementing the math program to meet diverse learners. Differentiated Instruction Using Everyday Math   This professional development opportunity for teachers in grades 1-6 will - 63 -


STEM (SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING AND MATH)

      •          •

•   

  

introduce and examine how to incorporate differentiated instructional principles and practices into the Everyday Math program.   This four-day training highlights how to embed differentiated instructional strategies such as tiering, extension menus, ThinkDOTs, cubing and anchoring activities into this core math program.   Teachers will also explore how to adapt the components of the program including Everyday Math games for use with a diverse class. Building Math Number Sense in Early Childhood   Developing a strong sense of number is a precursor for succeeding in mathematics.   Exposing students early and often to activities that build on one’s sense of number is the key to strengthening one’s ability in computation.   This interactive workshop will present various ideas to develop a strong foundation with numbers that will lay the groundwork for future success with mathematics. Power Teaching in Math for Grades 1-12  This workshop provides an instructional framework designed to energize mathematics education.  Power Teaching offers professional development that will provide math teachers with tools to deliver rich, powerful lessons by connecting core resources with PA Standards Aligned Systems.  This workshop also connects the PA Big Ideas in Math to cooperative learning techniques that have effectively improved student achievement. Supporting Students with Special Learning Needs in Mathematics – A series of seven workshops are offered on-site   Workshop 1 - Effective Practices in Math Instruction for Basic Facts Operations This training will address the need to develop more efficient methods for basic operations as well as how to apply them in the classroom. • Apply strategies to help students develop a strong understanding of number relationships • Examine how students develop understanding of the basic operations • Identify and utilize three computational strategies that build fluency • Implement effective strategies for fact retrieval • Diagnose deficiencies in basic operations and select effective strategies for remediation • Effective strategies for problem-solving   Workshop 2 - Intervention Strategies for Basic Math Operations •Incorporate different levels of intervention for basic facts to develop mental fluency •Define what it means to be mathematically proficient •Implement various models of effective instruction •Identify the difference between drill and practice and their place in classroom instruction - 64 -


STEM (SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING AND MATH)

  

  

  

              

•Explore the importance of mental math •Recognize effective strategies for problem-solving   Workshop 3 - Algebra Instruction for Students with Special Learning Needs • Identify characteristics that impede students in their understanding of mathematical concepts • Implement the Big Ideas of Algebra using concrete, semi-concrete and abstract models • Apply effective instructional strategies in teaching algebra • Identify effective strategies for problem solving   Workshop 4 - Geometry Instruction for Students with Special Learning Needs •Understand effective strategies for problem-solving •Identify van Hiele’s levels of geometric thought and apply each strategy level into the classroom •Define spatial sense, its relevance to geometry and how to incorporate rich experiences/modeling of spatial sense into instruction •Exercise instructional strategies to help define 2-3D shapes and their properties using tangrams, Rosemary’s circle, nets, polyhedras, etc. •Find the area using geoboards •Establish lines of symmetry •Determine the types of assessment that can be used in deepening mathematical understanding   Workshop 5 - Measurement Instruction for Students with Special Learning Needs •Identify big ideas pertaining to measurement •Apply three instructional goals to standard units of measure •Explore procedures for measuring standard units in the metric and customary systems and also their relationships •Investigate various types of measurement including, but not limited to, linear, area, capacity, weight, mass, time, temperature and angles •Determine the importance of estimation and use it in measurement   Workshop 6 - Data Analysis & Probability for Students with Special Learning Needs    •Develop a repertoire of methods to collect, analyze and draw conclusions to interpret data and/or by applying the basic concepts of probability    •Construct circle graphs and develop percentages with circle/pie graphs    •Display data using graphical representations; i.e. bar graphs, circle graphs, stem-and-leaf plots, histograms, line graphs, box-and-whisker plots, scatter plots, etc.    •Apply experimental approaches to probability and identify their benefits - 65 -


STEM (SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING AND MATH)

  

•                •        

   

•   

•Determine the probability for simple events, area models and explore the outcomes of experiments with independent and dependent events  Workshop 7 - Problem-Solving Supports for Students with Special Learning Needs    •Solve problems in both mathematical and everyday concepts •Implement problem solving strategies in different mathematical situations •Determine the approach, materials and strategies to be used in designing and solving problems •Develop open-ended questions based on the PSSA •Develop item-specific rubrics and performance assessments •Embed problem solving in all categories of mathematics Using Math Rubrics to Strengthen Understanding   Explore the organizational level rubrics, prompts and student anchor papers   Provide training sessions on the PDE math rubrics using released tests   Help students increase their proficiency in solving open-ended mathematical problems such as those on the PSSA   Use rubrics designed specifically for student use and written in student appropriate language   Identify and clarify specific performance expectations and provide goals for student achievement Aligning Math Curriculum  PA Academic Standards and Assessment Anchors    • Develop open-ended questions    • Develop item-specific rubrics    • Determine gaps and overlaps in curriculum    • Provide instructional uses for the PSSA item banks  Common Core State Standards (CCSS) 101 Big Ideas of Mathematics (Grades 6-8)–A series of eight workshops     Incorporate activities that encompass the Big Ideas of Mathematics  Share and discuss the latest pedagogy and strategies involving mathematics  Understand why students struggle in mathematics  Collaborate and develop activities for use in the classroom  Apply research-based strategies to help students understand math concepts and skills • Workshop 1–Basic Facts and Operations • Workshop 2–Fraction Concepts & Computation with Fractions • Workshop 3–Decimal & Percent Concepts & Decimal Computation • Workshop 4–Data Analysis • Workshop 5–Probability • Workshop 6–Algebraic Concepts • Workshop 7–Geometry • Workshop 8–Measurement - 66 -


STEM (SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING AND MATH) • Using Children’s Literature to Teach Mathematics (Grades K-2 or 3-5)–A series of five full-day workshops  Realize the impact children’s literature has on the understanding of math skills and concepts  Acquire practical suggestions for utilizing children’s literature to teach mathematics  Engage in various math activities that utilize children’s literature • Workshop 1–Numbers & Operations • Workshop 2–Measurement • Workshop 3–Geometry • Workshop 4–Algebraic Concepts • Workshop 5–Data Analysis & Probability • Instructional Technology Boot Camp  In this four day series, teachers, leaders or computer facilitators learn how to utilize and incorporate technology tools into the curriculum. Educators will learn facilitation skills to lead professional developments in their school district.  This professional development can also be offered on-site.  Understand how to create projects that follow copyright guidelines  Learn and implement best practices in managing a classroom with computers or laptops  Explore wikis, blogs, podcasts, Voicethread, Glogster, Keystone Commons, Wall Wisher, Audacity and many more  Ongoing support is provided for teacher leaders who participate in the series • iTouches and iPads in the Curriculum  Identify ways the iPod Touch and iPad can be incorporated into the classroom  Explore free and/or low-cost apps that are available through iTunes  Create content, such as podcasts and PowerPoints, that can be uploaded to students’ iTouches to extend learning outside the classroom  Learn accessibility features that are built into the iTouch and iPad to help learners with special needs  An iTouch case containing 20 iTouches can be loaned out to districts through the CIU 20 IMS library • Geocaching 101  Understanding the basics of geocaching  Design and create a geocache  Incorporate geocaching into the classroom • Digital Storytelling: Using a Green Screen in the Classroom  Examine copyright friendly sites for images and music  Identify practical applications of digital storytelling  Incorporate best practices to integrate digital storytelling  Develop assessments to evaluate digital story projects  Green Screen kits can be loaned out to districts through the IMS library • SAFARI Montage - 67 -


STEM (SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING AND MATH)

• •

 Offered free to districts connected to the PAIUnet  Video-on-demand and digital management platform that is preloaded with numerous high-quality educational content that are aligned to the PA standards  Searchable engine, teacher guide, closed captioning and quiz creator are some of the features that are included  Training opportunities can be flexible according to the district’s needs, i.e. two hours, half day or full day training. On-site training is available. Curriculum Alignment  Curriculum Mapping Process  SAS curriculum mapping tool  Integrating the National Educational Technology Standards for Administrators, Teachers, and Students (NETS-A, NETS-T, NETS-S)  Assessing the National Technology Standards Evaluation of online courses Integrating Technology into the Curriculum  Tailored to district needs, the Coordinator of Educational Technology offers trainings, presentations and instructional support to member districts looking to embed the use/integration of technology into the curriculum including, but not limited to: • Web-based technologies for collaboration • Emerging Technologies • 21st Century Teaching and Learning • Videoconferencing in the Classroom • Intel Education Tools • Thinkfinity • Using Interactive Whiteboards Effectively • Validating Web-based Research and Resources • Social Networks in K-12 Education • Internet Safety and School Concerns • Google Earth • Google Docs • Content Management Systems (Moodle) • Defined STEM • Safari • United Streaming Digital Media in the Classroom  Basics of integrating digital media into the classroom  Creating dynamic student multimedia projects using digital media  Using video to do video storytelling  Streaming digital media Electronic Resources for Student Research and Increasing Knowledge  Searching and evaluating internet-based content - 68 -


STEM (SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING AND MATH) • U.S. Copyright Law and Digital Millennium Copyright Act  Presentations and/or support at the building level (or department level) pertaining to use of electronic resources in the classroom • Differentiated Instruction  Connecting Understanding by Design and Differentiated Instruction  Utilizing technology as a tool for Differentiated Instruction • Literacy (6-12)  Technology Tools as a means to activate literacy  Implementing Mode Specific Writing Rubrics • Integrating the National Educational Technology Standards for Administrators, Teachers, and Students (NETS-A, NETS-T, NETS-S) • Assessing the National Educational Technology Standards • Electronic Resources for Student Research and Increasing Knowledge  Reading Apprenticeship and Technology • Integrate technology tools to enhance PA strategies • Technology can be utilized for Talking to the Text, Metalogs, discussions and meta-cognitive conversations • 21st Century Coach’s Meetings  Sessions are offered throughout the year to sustain and support technology coaches  Network with other technology coaches across the region  Gain professional development on technology tools and best practices • Promethean Training  Promethean Training for Beginners • Learn how to use the basic tools and access content embedded in the resource library of ActivInspire • Hands-on training provides educators with the confidence and increased comfort level to utilize the Promethean Board in their classroom • Explore lessons created from teachers across the world on Promethean Planet’s website  Advanced Promethean Training • Take your knowledge of Promethean a step further to create interactive lessons • Topics include creating containers, using the magic eraser, creating captions and different ways to hide text  Using ActiVotes or ActivExpressions in the Classroom • Learn how these voting devices can help drive your instruction to engage each student in their learning • Embed questions in flipcharts or ask ad-hoc questions to assess student learning • Utilizing Innovative Configuration Maps to assess the fidelity of implementation of - 69 -


STEM (SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING AND MATH) interactive whiteboards • Levels of Teaching Innovation (LoTI) Moodle Course  Focus on improving student achievement using 21st Century Leadership and data-driven decision-making  Conduct classroom walkthrough with H.E.A.T.  Design professional development opportunities that target greater rigor and relevance, LoTI and research best practices  Create Next Step Action Plan  Act 45 approved (30 hours) • H.E.A.T. Series for Teachers (Higher Level Thinking Processes, Engaged Learning, Authenticity, Technology Use) Moodle Courses  These are four separate moodle courses that are offered to teachers. Teachers do not need to take all four courses. They may choose which ones are best aligned to their professional development goals. Each course is 7.5 Act 48 hours.  Higher Level Thinking Processes • Explores principles of Bloom’s Taxonomy and complex thinking strategies to analyze and improve instructional practices in the classroom • Revise a lesson that demonstrates students’ use of higher order thinking skills as the culminating activity • Other themes include: Identifying Factual Data, Bloom’s Taxonomy Review and Thinking Skill Implementation Strategies  Engaged Students • Explores strategies for engaging students and promoting their active role in the classroom • Participants will create a lesson plan using active learning techniques as the culminating activity • Other themes include: Engaging Questions, Teacher Strategies for Student Engagement and Increasing Student Engagement  Authentic Connections • Focuses on ways to infuse authentic, real-world situations into learning • Participants collaborate on an authentic performance task as their culminating activity • Other themes include: Making Authentic Student Connections, Employing 21st Century Themes and Assessing Authentic Student Products  Technology Tools • Explores a variety of free online tools and how they can be integrated into the curriculum and enhance learning • Participants present a portfolio sample that analyzes technology tools - 70 -


STEM (SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING AND MATH) as their culminating activity • Other themes include: Exploring Technology Tools, Sharing Technology Tools and Implementing Technology Tools • Podcasting  Strategies to integrate podcasting as an authentic learning tool  Free technology tools  Teacher/student podcasts • Follow–Up Training      Additional training is available, to individual and grade-level teachers on-site, to follow-up on knowledge and skills from participation in district sponsored CIU 20 workshops.      The job-embedded training is intended to assist in the on-going efforts of the principal, math supervisor, math specialist and/or math coach to build capacity and increase student proficiency in math.      Services could include mini-workshops, technical assistance, question and answer sessions, lesson modeling, analyzing student work and conducting an error analysis.      Training may be requested by the principal and/or math supervisor.

- 71 -


SUPPORT STAFF TRAINING Paraprofessional Training  Role and Responsibilities  Characteristics of Disabilities  Instructional Strategies in support of reading/literacy and math  Student Data Collection  Effective Behavioral Management  Teaming and Communication  Confidentiality  Understanding IEP Goals and Objectives  Test preparation for CIU 20 Highly Qualified Paraprofessional Assessment: math, reading and writing • Training for Bus Drivers of Students with Special Needs - Each of the four trainings will address specific topics to assist bus drivers in providing their students with success. Four, one-hour trainings, or one four-hour training containing all modules, are offered at your school site and will address one or all of the issues listed. They include:  Module 1 - Confidentiality: The Do’s and Don’ts  Module 2 - The Thirteen Disability Types in Special Education  Module 3 - Visual Strategies and Communication  Module 4 - Using Behavioral Strategies • Basic Instructional Technology Tools Accessible via the Internet • Presuming Competence: Creating a Learning Environment for ALL  Understand the concept of presuming competence and the least dangerous assumption for ALL students  Develop a list of potential supports for students to promote inclusion  Create a correlation between the Civil Rights Movement and Presuming Competence  Anticipate and address barriers to presuming competence  Define the current paradigm and the potential dangers of its current influence on society

- 72 -


COLONIAL ACADEMY

Alternative Education ***** Emotional Support ***** Autistic Support ***** Life Skills ***** Culinary Arts ***** Construction Management ***** Art Education ***** Counseling/Clinical Supervision Colonial Academy 1353 Jacobsburg Road Wind Gap, PA 18055 610-863-5550 - 73 -


Flight Team (Crisis Response) Services to District in the Event of Crisis or Trauma: The Coordinator and Flight Team will provide assistance in consultation with the superintendent and administrative team. These services are available 24 hours/7 days a week.

Reasons to initiate crisis response: Death of student (suicide, accident, natural, other) Death of faculty, staff or school community member Trauma (natural disaster, accidents, crime, other)

Coordinator and Flight Team will: • assist teachers in announcing the death • • • •

to students staff the Safe Room provide direct support to staff in a faculty Safe Room provide support to parents assist in organizing information to be released

To Initiate Response, Call: Nikki Baker, LPC, BCBA Treatment Coordinator W: 610-515-6554 C: 610-703-5937 Backup Coordinator if Nikki cannot be contacted: Janie A Hecker, M.Ed. Program Supervisor W: 610-515-6471 C: 484-239-5109

- 74 -


ims library

RESOURCES AVAILABLE TO ENHANCE PROFESIONAL DEVELOPMENT & ENGAGE LEARNERS! instructional content

instructional technology tools

Video Clips: A cost effective approach to providing your staff with quality professional development from national presenters.

Dynamic technology tools that educators can integrate seemlessly into their curriculum to promote sutdent engagement in the classroom.

Including, but not limited to: ¤Digital Cameras ¤iPad and iTouch Classroom Sets ¤Kindles ¤Document Cameras ¤Green Screen Studio Kits ¤Nintendo DSi XL ¤Classroom Performance Systems ¤Accessories for Promethean and SMART Boards ¤Flip Cameras ¤Teachscape ‘Reflect’ 360 Degree Video System

Including, but not limited to: •Carol Ann Tomlinson •Robert Marzano •Jay McTighe •Douglas Reeves •David Sousa •Mike Schmoker •Heidi Hayes Jacobs •Richard & Rebecca Dufour •Stephen Covey ...and more!

To sign out these resources, please call 610-515-6401. - 75 -


- 76 -


2012-2013 MEETING DATES Curriculum Advisory Council (CAC) 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM September 20, 2012 - Conference Room A/B October 18, 2012 - Northampton / Pike Room November 30, 2012 - Northamptom/Pike Room December 19, 2012 - Elluminate Session January 23, 2013 - Northampton/Pike Room February 22, 2013 - Northampton/Pike Room March 20, 2013 - Northampton / Pike Room April 19, 2013 - Northampton/Pike Room May 22, 2013 - Northampton / Pike Room June 20, 2013 - Northampton / Pike Room

Joint Meeting with District Contacts TBD

Gifted Networking Meetings 12:30 PM - 3:30 PM November 14th, 2012 - Conference Room 1 February 14th, 2013 - Conference Room 1 May 14, 2013 - Pike Room

- 77 -


PA Institute for Instructional Coaching (PIIC) Coaches’ Networking Meetings 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM Conference Room 1 October 5th, 2012 December 7th, 2012 February 8th, 2013 May 20th, 2013

Network Administrators Group (NAG) Meetings 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM (unless otherwise noted) Monroe Room October 19th, 2012 November 15th, 2012 January 17th, 2013 February 21, 2013 (joint virtual meeting with TAC) March 21st, 2013 April 18th, 2013 May 16th, 2013

- 78 -


The Reading Network Meetings *8:30 AM - 11:30 AM & *12:30 PM - 3:30 PM Northampton/Pike Rooms October 17, 2012

Future meeting dates will be announced at first meeting.

*Participants will have the option to attend the morning session, afternoon session, or both sessions. An agenda of topics for the sessions will be distributed at the beginning of the 2012-2013 school year (Joint meeting with the Response to Instructional Intervention Network)

Response to Instruction and Intervention Network Meetings *8:30 AM - 11:30 AM & *12:30 PM - 3:30 PM Northampton/Pike Room October 17, 2012

Future meeting dates will be announced at first meeting.

*Participants will have the option to attend the morning session, afternoon session, or both sessions. An agenda of topics for the sessions will be distributed at the beginning of the 2012-2013 school year (Joint meeting with the Reading Network)

- 79-


Special Education District Contact Meetings 12:00 - 4:00 PM September 28, 2012 - Conference Room A/B October 12, 2012 - Northampton / Pike Room November 16, 2012 - Northampton / Pike Room December 14, 2012 - Conference Room A/B January 25, 2013 - Conference Room A / B February 22, 2013 - Conference Room A/B March 15, 2013 - Northampton / Pike Room April 12, 2013 - Northampton / Pike Room May 17, 2013 - Conference Room A/B

Technology Advisory Council (TAC) 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM (unless otherwise noted) Monroe Room September 20, 2012 (1:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.) October 12, 2012 (virtual meeting) November 9th, 2012 December 7th, 2012 January 18th, 2013 February 21st, 2013 (joint virtual meeting with NAG) March 8, 2013 April 12, 2013 (virtual meeting) May 10, 2013

- 80 -

Menu of services  

this is what we do.

Advertisement