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Joshua Ayares


The Pardon Gray Educational Center is conceived of as a place where the community can congregate for educational lectures about its local ecology, natural habitat and agricultural importance. It hopes to be a place where school children can come and meet and learn in an interactive environment. In keeping with its colonial agricultural heritage, a small part of the Pardon Gray Preserve will be made available once a week to the first farmers' market to be held in Tiverton.

Site Plan

Site Plan

RISD team 2008: Josh Ayares, Jung Chen, Cassandra D’Alessandro, Carlos Endriga, Jonathan Knowles, Eun Joo Nicole Kim, Jonathan Mort, Candace Reeve, Glorian Rodriguez, Virginia Stout, Ben Wolk-Weiss

Tiverton, Rhode Island

Pardon Gray Learning Center

Pardon Gray Preserve


Scale 3/8” = 1’

Floor Plan

UP

9

10

9

4

3 2

A

6 6

1

The Pardon Gray Educational Center is conceived of as a place where the community can congregate for educational lectures about its local ecology, natural habitat and agricultural importance. It hopes to be a place where school children can come and meet and learn in an interactive environment. In keeping with its colonial agricultural heritage, a small part of the Pardon Gray Preserve will be made available once a week to the first farmers' market to be held in Tiverton.

Site Plan

Site Plan

5

A

7

8

RISD team 2008: Josh Ayares, Jung Chen, Cassandra D’Alessandro, Carlos Endriga, Jonathan Knowles, Eun Joo Nicole Kim, Jonathan Mort, Candace Reeve, Glorian Rodriguez, Virginia Stout, Ben Wolk-Weiss

Tiverton, Rhode Island RISD team Rhode 2008: Josh Ayares, Jung Chen, Cassandra D’Alessandro, Carlos Endriga, Jonathan Knowles, Eun Joo Nicole Kim, Jonathan Mort, Candace Reeve, Glorian Rodriguez, Virginia Stout, Ben Wolk-Weiss Tiverton, Island

Pardon Gray Learning Center Pardon Gray Learning Center

B

Pardon Gray Preserve Floor Plan UP

UP

N

Mechanical Room Vestibule Closet Kitchenette Bathroom Conference Room 8. Green Room 9. Classroom 10. Green Room

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Program:

B


RISD team 2008: Josh Ayares, Jung Chen, Cassandra D’Alessandro, Carlos Endriga, Jonathan Knowles, Eun Joo Nicole Kim, Jonathan Mort, Candace Reeve, Glorian Rodriguez, Virginia Stout, Ben Wolk-Weiss

Tiverton, Rhode Island

Pardon Gray Learning Center

Scale 3/8” = 1’

South Elevation

Elevation

Scale 3/8” = 1’

B Section

Scale 3/8” = 1’

A Section

Sections


2008: Josh Josh Ayares, Ayares, Jung JungChen, Chen,Cassandra CassandraD’Alessandro, D’Alessandro,Carlos CarlosEndriga, Endriga,Jonathan JonathanKnowles, Knowles,Eun EunJoo JooNicole NicoleKim, Kim,Jonathan Jonathan Mort, Candace Reeve, Glorian Rodriguez, Virginia Stout, Ben Wolk-Weiss RISD team 2008: Mort, Candace Reeve, Glorian Rodriguez, Virginia Stout, Ben Wolk-Weiss

Rhode Island Island Tiverton, Rhode

Learning Center Center Pardon Gray Learning

Scale 3/8” 3/8”==1’1’ Scale

South Elevation Elevation North

Elevation

Scale 3/8” = 1’

B Section West Elevation Scale 3/8” = 1’

Scale 3/8” = 1’

A Section Scale 3/8” = 1’ East Elevation

Sections Elevations


N

A

B

C

D

E

F

RISD team 2008: Josh Ayares, Jung Chen, Cassandra D’Alessandro, Carlos Endriga, Jonathan Knowles, Eun Joo Nicole Kim, Jonathan Mort, Candace Reeve, Glorian Rodriguez, Virginia Stout, Ben Wolk-Weiss

Tiverton, Rhode Island

Pardon Gray Learning Center

Scale 1/4” = 1’

Framing Grid

Framing Structure

A

B

C

D

E

F

The structural system is conceived of as a series of skeletal ribs that collectively build a framework to contain the roof, wall and floor panels. The heavier supports are within the courtyard space and begin to extend and open toward the eastern and western views. The rib structures above are paired at the end with double column supports which allow a small window for light and views.

South Elevation

Scale 1/8’ =1’

Section Cuts


N N

and central core.

The building itself is an educational and performative tool.isAs these diagrams The building itself an educational and show, the building an performative tool. is Asfundamentally these diagrams instrument for solariscollection. Due an to show, the building fundamentally the latitudefor and Newcollection. England climate, instrument solar Due to we have assessed designated the latitude and New and England climate, several methods for controlling thermal we have assessed and designated conditions and meeting electrical several methods for controlling thermal needs. During the winter, when the sun conditions and meeting electrical angles lower, solar heating needs. are During thepassive winter, when the sun strategies employed through the angles are are lower, passive solar heating southern green-spaces and clerestory strategies are employed through the widows, with the integration of a southernalong green-spaces and clerestory performative wall within of the widows, alongsouthern with the integration a courtyard. green-spaces become performativeThe southern wall within the vital tools for us to allow daylight and courtyard. The green-spaces become solar radiation to allow penetrate vital tools for us to daylightwhile and limitingradiation thermal to loss.penetrate Subsequently, solar while throughout the summer months, the limiting thermal loss. Subsequently, southern facing roof panels become throughout the summer months, the performative, the panels green-spaces southern facing roof become become shading the devices,green-spaces and several performative, ventilations strategies areand employed become shading devices, several through the strategies green spaces, ventilations are clerestory, employed and central core. through the green spaces, clerestory,

Floor Plan Not ot Scale

Floor Plan Not ot Scale Winter & Summer

Winter & Summer

Heat Storage Floor

N

N

Heat Storage Floor

Not ot Scale

Floor Plan

Not ot Scale

Floor Plan

RISD team 2008: Josh Ayares, Jung Chen, Cassandra D’Alessandro, Carlos Endriga, Jonathan Knowles, Eun Joo Nicole Kim, Jonathan Mort, Candace Reeve, Glorian Rodriguez, Virginia Stout, Ben Wolk-Weiss Tiverton, Rhode Island

Pardon Gray Learning Center Pardon Gray Learning Center Tiverton, Rhode Island

Solar Collection - Summer Solar Collection - Summer

Solar Collection - Winter Solar Collection - Winter

Air Circulation Air Circulation

Performance Diagrams Performance Diagrams


RISD team 2008: Josh Ayares, Jung Chen, Cassandra D’Alessandro, Carlos Endriga, Jonathan Knowles, Eun Joo Nicole Kim, Jonathan Mort, Candace Reeve, Glorian Rodriguez, Virginia Stout, Ben Wolk-Weiss

Tiverton, Rhode Island

Pardon Gray Learning Center

Building Systems Assembly


RISD team 2008: Josh Ayares, Jung Chen, Cassandra D’Alessandro, Carlos Endriga, Jonathan Knowles, Eun Joo Nicole Kim, Jonathan Mort, Candace Reeve, Glorian Rodriguez, Virginia Stout, Ben Wolk-Weiss Tiverton, Rhode Island

Pardon Gray Learning Center Pardon Gray Learning Center Tiverton, Rhode Island

Interior Interior

Exterior Exterior


The Design|Build Studio, a collaborative learning laboratory of students and faculty of RISD and Brown for the exploration of alternative energy architecture invites you to a reception and exhibit of its 2009 Sustainable Energy Learning Center. 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm May 20th 2008 Location:RISD Museum - BeneďŹ t Street Entrance RSVP: archdept@risd.edu About the Design|Build Studio: Building on the learning and success of their collaborative efforts in the Department of Energy’s Solar Decathlon competition, faculty and students of RISD and Brown endeavor, through curricular projects and investigation, to explore, design and build structures that are completely independent of traditional sources of energy. The Studio has successfully designed a learning center powered mostly through solar energy and plans to install this structure at the Pardon Gray Preserve in Tiverton, RI, within the next year. This installation will be concurrent with an installation of its 2005 Solar House on the grounds of Portsmouth Abbey School in Portsmouth, RI.


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3

Mission Hill A pedagogy of resilience. An architecture of resilience. Communities of low socio-economic status are at risk of trauma, of immobility, of depression. Resilience can be considered as a psychological buffer to these risk factors, promoting agency, self-efficacy, and connectedness. In this way, a community organism can be healthier and more viable in its larger context. The architecture of resilience is opportunistic, autodidactic, and symbiotic with the assets of the community, designed to capitalize on innate abilities and strengths. By acknowledging the barriers to social mobility in an impoverished community, I have proposed a framework whereby people can be better connected to the assets of their neighborhood, and to each other.

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ssion Hill

The lotus flower symbolizes, in various cultures, peace, purity, unity, enlightenment, transcendance, resurrection, serenity, immortality, and creative power. It was chosen for this project for its capacity to inspire, and will appear on literature and promotions for the interventions. It will also be the primary signifier of the location of each individual intervention, emblazoned on flags flown from lampposts in front of each building.

2

The lotus flower symbolizes, in various cultures, peace, purity, unity, enlightenment, transcendance, resurrection, serenity, immortality, and creative power. It was chosen for this project for its capacity to inspire, and will appear on literature and promotions for the interventions. It will also be the primary signifier of the location of each individual intervention, emblazoned on flags flown from lampposts in front of each building. The second means by which members of the Mission Hill community may locate themselves with respect to thisThe new initiative is by the use of sidewalk space in front of the buildings. For each intervention, the specific second means by which members of the Mission Hill community may locate themselves with requalities of resilience been out asinthe intention of the and are characterized by symbols despect to this new initiativehave is by the use ofcalled sidewalk space front of the buildings. Forwork, each intervention, the specific qualities of resilience have been called out as the intention of the work, and are charactersigned to be evocative of the intention without the need for written language. In a multi-ethnic neighborhood ized by symbols designed to be evocative of the intention without the need for written language. In a such as Mission Hill, finding a Mission common is exceedingly important. multi-ethnic neighborhood such as Hill,language finding a common language is exceedingly important.


community d aycare ground oor fl plan

scale : 1/4 inchfoot = 1 second fl oor plan


Locating a daycare above a nail salon, among many other shops and near office buildings, provides short term care for children of parents shopping in the area. This supports the local economy by allowing people to take better advantage of local stores and resources, providing more jobs and creating a sense of belonging. The daycare is designed for the allowance or mitigation of views. The transparent floor allows parents within the salon to maintain a visual connection. The low ribbon windows provide the children views while maintaining privacy. On the ground floor, the glass partition allows for visual connections between salon patrons and residents next door. Above, the transparent stairwell facilitates further connection to the residents of the adjacent building.


section a floor plan community sewing bank

b

scale: 1/4 inch = 1 foot

a

b

floor plan community sewing bank

section a

scale: 1/4 inch = 1 foot

section b

section a


The multi-functional quality of the space allows for the convenient use of resources, improves community, family, and one’s management of time. The sewing pavilion allows for common tasks to take place within connected spaces, allowing patrons to socialize while simultaneously completing daily tasks. The three main functions: making, mending and washing clothing, all reside around a central circulation path. This pathway opens up towards the street bringing in the community and gathering them at the end. Sectionally, the sewing pavillion steps down to create a semi-private gathering space at the hinge of the two programs.

making of

clothing

washing of clothing

Procession down to gathering making of

clothing

washing of clothing

Opening up towards street

mending of clothing


= 1 foot 3/16 inch = 1 foot communitycommunity workbenchworkbench scale: 3/16 inchscale:


workwork reflection reflection

recursive activity recursive activity work reflection

recursive activity

chop saws double heighted space space medium skill cuts planersdouble heighted rest viewing and viewing rest and

space allows light space for for restrest allows light double heighted space rest and viewing 4x8 sheets, large beginner cuts

table saws

refined cuts space for rest refined allows cutslight rough cuts

bandband sawssaws drill presses drill presses

details, details,

smaller advanced advanced cuts cuts verticalsmaller program

refined cuts

As one moves up the floors it is equivalent to moving through the steps in the building process. The users are working toward the top floor, developing skills, creating a sense of community, self efficacy and support by allowing the participants to work towards a common goal. This in turn builds resilience. The workshop enhances the ideas of resilience through the recursive activity of work and reflection and creates a space based upon the program of refining and enhancing skills. The spaces for rest allow for light.

band saws drill presses

details, smaller advanced cuts

chopchop sawssaws planers planers

chop saws planers

medium skill cuts medium skill cuts

medium skill cuts

tabletable sawssaws

4x8 sheets, 4x8 sheets, beginner largelarge beginner cuts cuts

rough rough cuts cuts

vertical program vertical program 4x8 sheets,

table saws

large beginner cuts rough cuts

vertical program


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I have had a number of opportunities, both academic and professional, to study the urban landscape. Through rigorous investigation and synthesis of data, byMexicoworking Portland City closely with communities on charrettes and comprehensive planning, I have learned a great deal about cities, neighborhoods, and placemaking.

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Kyoto

Charleston

Bilbao

Seattle

Amsterdam

Stockholm

Genoa


Amsterdam is a city of canals and waterways, of dams and dykes, and of many cultures. The largest city in the Netherlands, a country which sits primarily below sea-level, it is an important port in northern Europe. Sometimes called “the Venice of the North,” it is the most ethnically diverse city in the world, and well-known for its liberal attitudes.

It is adjacent to rail service, and has its own shopping within walking distance of the residents. Access to the neighboring islands is via cleverly designed bridges and walkways, and because of the houses’ relationship to the water, residents are able to dock privately in front of their own homes.

Borneo and Sporenburg are the names of two man-made peninsulas in the Eastern Docklands of Amsterdam, part of a group of four former industrial ports repurposed for urban inhabitation. The first of these was KNSM Island, named for the shipping company that owned the docks on the island. Borneo Sporenburg was conceived and developed as a primarily residential extension of urbanity on the outskirts of the city. It is notable for its density of similarly scaled, yet individually designed, row houses which front the water’s edge, and whose open spaces are predominantly within the private structures.


The Figure Ground Plan reveals how the morphology of the Central District disintegrates into a less cohesive urban structure.

The steep topography encroaches on the Central District.

The grain of the lateral streets (oriented E-W) reveals a rich pattern of streets, except in the Central District.

The grain of the longitudinal streets (oriented N-S) reveals a rich pattern of streets, except in the Central District. The width of the grain relates the historic development patterns (with more frequent rhythms in the older districts.)

Hong Kong Infra-Scape Central Waterfront of Hong Kong -- International Urban Planning & Design Competition

EXISTING CITY PLAN

Central Waterfront of Hong Kong -- International Urban Planning & Design Competition

EXISTING TOPOGRAPHY

Central Waterfront of Hong Kong -- International Urban Planning & Design Competition

EXISTING LATERAL GRAIN

Central Waterfront of Hong Kong -- International Urban Planning & Design Competition

EXISTING LONGITUDINAL GRAIN

Future Land

mass

1969

2003

1915

1956

1866

Future Land Mass 1969

2003

1956 1915

1866

Central Waterfront of Hong Kong -- International Urban Planning & Design Competition

EXISTING OPEN SPACE

(+)

Central Waterfront of Hong Kong -- International Urban Planning & Design Competition

EXISTING ROADWAYS

(+)

Lateral bridges (running E-W) follow the flow of the major roadways, while the N-S bridges provide more linear and direct routes across the highways and roadways. They tend to align with existing street patterns.

Central Waterfront of Hong Kong -- International Urban Planning & Design Competition

The successive layers of reclamation have followed bands of development, of varying size. The typology of some of the wharf and pier structures still resonates in Hong Kong’s current urban fabric. The central district was dominated by the harbor cove until 1956.

The size and complexity of the road systems are most pronounced around the central district, and the International Financial Tower. The roads are narrower, and more abiding of block structures in the historic districts. Ramps and turning radii required of large roadways impact the shape of buildable lots and city blocks.

The location of open spaces are unevenly distributed, with unintelligible patterns of connections between open spaces. The size and configuration vary, except in the financial district. The open spaces are often “left over” spaces, without a strong figural presence.

Central Waterfront of Hong Kong -- International Urban Planning & Design Competition

HISTORY OF RECLAMATION

(+)

The lateral grain of the urban fabric bends and adjusts to the shifts in the profile of the waterfront.

CROSS-MAPPING: ROADWAYS AND PEDESTRIAN BRIDGES

Central Waterfront of Hong Kong -- International Urban Planning & Design Competition

Tall buildings are organized in bands running parallel with the waterfront.

The longitudinal grain frequently registers with the rhythm of piers and wharfs on the historic waterfront.

CROSS-MAPPING: HISTORY AND LATERAL GRAIN

Central Waterfront of Hong Kong -- International Urban Planning & Design Competition

CROSS-MAPPING: HISTORY AND LONGITUDINAL GRAIN

Central Waterfront of Hong Kong -- International Urban Planning & Design Competition

A network of short, medium and long pedestrian bridges span roadways, and are linked to interior spaces and courtyards. The network is not completely inter-connected throughout the city.

EXISTING TALL BUILDINGS

Central Waterfront of Hong Kong -- International Urban Planning & Design Competition

(+)

(+)

The towers follow the flow and direction of the urban fabric’s lateral grain, except when the towers are closer to the embanked hills, where regular street patterns break down in order to accommodate the steeply sloped roads.

A pattern of tall buildings relating to the longitudinal grain is evident, except in the Central District.

Central Waterfront of Hong Kong -- International Urban Planning & Design Competition

CROSS-MAPPING: TALL BUILDINGS AND LATERAL GRAIN

Central Waterfront of Hong Kong -- International Urban Planning & Design Competition

EXISTING PEDESTRIAN BRIDGES

CROSS-MAPPING: TALL BUILDINGS AND LONGITUDINAL GRAIN

(+)

Three clusters of semi-cohesive networks of buildings (and their public spaces) are identifiable. Yet a coherent and legible pattern, governed by an underlying logic (other then happenstance) is not discernable.

Central Waterfront of Hong Kong -- International Urban Planning & Design Competition

This map of the historic overlay of reclamation projects shows the relationship between the new government center and the historic harbor.

CROSS-MAPPING: TALL BUILDINGS AND PEDESTRIAN BRIDGES

The new P2 Boulevard links important cultural, governmental, and financial centers, while completing an efficient street network.

Central Waterfront of Hong Kong -- International Urban Planning & Design Competition

Central Waterfront of Hong Kong -- International Urban Planning & Design Competition

A new urban fabric is knitted together along the spine of the newly created infra-scape.

HISTORICAL REFERENCE IN NEW BUILDING

New pedestrian bridges extend existing lateral bridges and connect them to the new waterfront.

PROPOSED ROADWAYS

Central Waterfront of Hong Kong -- International Urban Planning & Design Competition

Central Waterfront of Hong Kong -- International Urban Planning & Design Competition

A new urban fabric establishes a stronger lateral grain in the Central District.

PROPOSED CITY PLAN

A seemingly random pattern of open spaces is integrated into a more continuous, interconnected and accessible system of open spaces.

PROPOSED PEDESTRIAN BRIDGES

Central Waterfront of Hong Kong -- International Urban Planning & Design Competition

Central Waterfront of Hong Kong -- International Urban Planning & Design Competition

A new urban fabric establishes a stronger longitudinal grain in the Central District.

PROPOSED LATERAL GRAIN

The new government buildings help anchor and connect the array of tall buildings in the Central District, while creating and defining new open public spaces.

PROPOSED OPEN SPACE

Central Waterfront of Hong Kong -- International Urban Planning & Design Competition

Central Waterfront of Hong Kong -- International Urban Planning & Design Competition

PROPOSED LONGITUDINAL GRAIN

This composite map shows the highly integrated network of open spaces, buildings, bridges, and roadways which create a rich and vibrant new district.

PROPOSED TALL BUILDINGS

Central Waterfront of Hong Kong -- International Urban Planning & Design Competition

PROPOSED INTERVENTION


As part of a design studio focusing on site analysis as a tool for design, I worked with a group of students to develop a light-touch, temporary installation using only furring strips and sisal rope. Our construction spanned, and augmented, a natural threshold between conditions on the landscape.


Our studio worked with Farm Fresh Rhode Island, a nonprofit organization based in Providence, to develop a winter farmers’ market which would complement and consolidate their thriving summer markets. The program would be vendorspecific, a means to engage the customer and display their wares. My concept was based on a self-organizing marketplace, in which modular forms could be appropriated as the needs of the user might change over time. The relationship between seller and buyer defines, and is defined by, the physical placement of the modules. The final built structure comprised three components which could be used alone or in concert, as the needs of the individual and the market dictated.


Flocks is an ephemeral physical intervention into the urban landscape of Cambridge Street that contributes to the awareness and appreciation of Cambridge’s rich cultural heritage. Inspired by human migration, the project seeks to create a memorable experience that celebrates the dream that fuels long and difficult migrations and the coming together of groups to create a new life. Reflective plastic film birds are suspended from high-tech nonmetallic rope. This lightweight super-structure allows the birds to “fly,” as the flock is activated by the interaction of the individual birds in response to changing environmental conditions of light and wind.


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2

3

4

project location module 3 - cambridge library / KOS

5

locations along cambridge street

160 ft.

inman square

module-1

elm street

cambridge public library/ king open school

module-2 sciarappa street

module-3 lechmere installation diagram station materials plan

- Bird: with monofilament connection flocks - Net : Spectra line with loops + crosslines + spacing line

- Superstructure: Amsteel-blue rope with connectors

module-4

- Clamp Assembly: custom clamp and connectors at lamppost

module-5

clamp assembly @ lamppost Spectra line Spectra cross-line bird, typ.

flocks

Spectra spacing line - continuous Superstructure (Amsteel-blue rope)


Since graduating from architecture school, I have had the opportunity to work as a design consultant to a high-end residential contractor in the Boston area. I have provided design expertise, technical drawings, and renderings for a number of small-scale projects.


1"x8" COLLAR TIES OVER BATHROOM 16" O.C.

SECTION c-c

EAST ELEVATION

ANDERSEN 24"x36" 2030 STYLE OR SIMILAR

CERAMIC TILE (FLOOR + WALLS)

HURRICANE TIES (TYP)

HOMASOTE 21" COMPOSITE SOUND BOARD

SECTION b-b

SECTION a-a

2"x8" RAFTERS 16" O.C. (TYP) ROOF-MOUNTED DUCT FOR BATHROOM EXHAUST FAN

EXTERIOR FINISH: 1/2" PLYWOOD SHEATHING 1 LAYER "TYVEK" HOUSE WRAP SIDING TO MATCH EX. 2"x6" EXTERIOR WALLS 16" O.C. (TYP)

R-30 THERMAL INSULATION

RECESSED SHELVING

GLASS PARTITION R-21 THERMAL INSULATION 1/2" GYPSUM BOARD WALLS & CEILING FINISH

3/4" T & G PLYWOOD SUB-FLOOR

NOTE: THESE DRAWINGS ARE FOR BIDDING AND PERMITTING ONLY. ALL DIMENSIONS AND STRUCTURAL MEMBERS MUST BE VERIFIED BY LICENSED CONTRACTOR.

INSIDE WALL BRACKET


c

4'-3"

14'-1"

4'-3"

3'-10"

17'-5"

STRUCTURAL RIDGE BEAM (OPTIONAL) SIZED BY MANUF.

a

5'-7"

a

PROPOSED ADDITION

EXISTING SECOND FLOOR PLAN

3'-10"

b

4'-6"

21'-2"

PROPOSED ADDITION

EXISTING SECOND FLOOR PLAN

4'-6"

c

PROPOSED ADDITION

b


es renovations Joshua Ayares, Assoc. AIA

Peter DeLuca 111 Channing Rd. Deck

No.

Description

Date

North Elevation Project number Date Drawn by Checked by

2010.02 July 19, 2010 JJA RJS

A101 Scale 1/4" = 1'-0"

7/19/2010 2:02:57 PM

'-0"


10/12/2010

10/12/2010

10/12/2010

10/12/2010



Ayares Portfolio