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THEORY OF THOUGHT


Theory of Thought: Symbolism Copyright Š 2012 by Jason Shaw All rights reserved. This book may not be reproduced or sold in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by using any information storage and retrieval system, without prior written permission of the Author or Sonshaw Inc. This book cover design and the Theory of Thought logo are properties of Sonshaw Inc., and all their rights are reserved. Jason Shaw www.sonshaw.com First Edition, May 2013 Printed in Canada

ISBN-13: 978-0-9868699-0-7

ISBN 978-0-9868699-0-7

9 780986 869907 >

THEORY OF THOUGHT


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THEORY OF THOUGHT


for one neo eon

V


VI

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TABLE OF CONTENTS PREFACE INTRODUCTION

0

13 15

MODELS PATTERNS SYMBOLS ATTRACTION PHILOSOPHY PHYSICS MECHANICS

I II III IV V VI VII

21 47 73 105 131 157 189

EPILOGUE GLOSSARY CITATIONS

231 237 249

MODELS

CHAPTER I

Circle

23

Thought

24

Organizations

25

Systems

26

Line

27

Cooperation

28

Simultaneity

29

Relationship

30

Symmetry

31

Connectivity

32

Complexity

33

Ancient Thought

34

Trees

35

Perspectives

36

Diagrams

37

Darwin’s Tree

38

Neural Network

39

Unit of Thought

40 VII


Assembly

41

Categorizing

\42

Human Mind

43

Mind and Brain

44

PATTERNS

CHAPTER II

Energy

50

The Living Force

51

Time and Space

52

Arc and Line

53

Measure of Energy

54

Constant

55

Rotation

56

Wave

57

Harmonic Oscillator

58

Constant e

59

Subatomic Motion

60

Periodic Tables

61

Spiral Galaxy

62

Pushing and Pulling

63

Constant

64

Arrangement

65

Spiral

66

Pascal’s Triangle

68

Wave Fibonacci’s Tree

SYMBOLS

VIII

67 69

CHAPTER III

Iconic Symbols

77

Symbols of Jesus

78

Zodiac

79

Intelligence

80

Glyphs of Thought

81

Numbers

82

Letters

83

Intersection

84

Freemasonry

86

Pyramids

87

Pythagorean

88

Yin Yang

89

Architecture

90

Monad

91 THEORY OF THOUGHT


Dyad

92

Triad

93

Space

94

Tetrad

95

Decad

96

Tetractys

97

Hexagon

98

Flower of Life

99

Quantum Theory

100

Theory of Thought

102

Theory of Everything

ATTRACTION

101

CHAPTER IV

Order

106

Attraction

109

Matter

110

Molecules

111

Units of Structure

112

Gravitational Orbit

114

Gravitation

115

Electromagnetism

116

Concentration

117

Interaction

118

Abstract Mass

120

Intelligence

121

Cycle of Attraction

122

Periodicity

123

Motion

124

Different Models

126

Environments

127

PHILOSOPHY

CHAPTER V

Space

134

Networked Space

Complex Space

136

Systems vs. Networks 137

Networked Universe

138

Universal Concepts

139

Circle and Line

140

Circular Overload

141

135

IX


Spacetime

142

Mindspace

143

Angle of Depth

145

Dualism

146

Three Principles

147

The Angle

148

Reflection

149

Superposition

150

Quantum Mechanism 151

Funda-mental

152

PHYSICS

CHAPTER VI

The Standard Model

162

Particle Physics

163

Perspective

164

Bridging Spacetime

165

Folding Space

166

Folded Space

167

Bosons

168

Four Forces

170

Force Fields

171

Roots of the Dyad

173

Framework

174

Integer Spin

175

Half-Integer Spin

176

Quark Model

177

Principles of Force

178

Charge

179

Growth

182

Change

183

Balance

184

Fluctuation

185

Economics

186

MECHANICS

X

CHAPTER VII

Sun Models

192

Shared Concepts

194

Evolution

195

Hierarchical Models

196

Human Form

197

Truncation

200 THEORY OF THOUGHT


Lune of Hippocrates

201

Symbolic Forms

202

Approximations

203

Mind-Matter Engine

204

The Mechanics

205

Physical

206

Intelligence

207

Waves

208

Equilibrium

209

Mechanical Parts

212

Euler’s Constant

213

Combustion

214

Vis Viva

215

Lines of Interaction

216

Friction

217

Relationship Models

218

Scales of Growth

219

Inverse Square Law

220

Radiation

221

Ordered Mechanism

222

Number Line

223

Moving Matter

224

Abstract Machine

226

World of Symbols

227

EPILOGUE

231

GLOSSARY

237

CITATIONS

249

XI


XII

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PREFACE The idea for this book struck me on November 21st, 2006. I began writing hours later on November 22nd. My mind fell into a euphoric state with feelings of an epiphany. The sensation lasted for about a week, until November 29th, and to this day, I have considered it my moment of enlightenment. It was a strange state of mind that produced an unstoppable rush of ideas. It felt like my mind was rewiring itself, because a single idea touched upon everything I knew. Quickly enough, my thoughts were re-arranged into a new paradigm. It has taken me over six years to work through my paradigm shift and to describe it concisely. This book is my way of dealing with it, of looking directly at it and proudly proclaiming that I have overcome it, victoriously. January 6 th, 2013

XIII


‘The difference between making a breakthrough and not can often be just a small element of perception.’ — Brian Greene

XIV

THEORY OF THOUGHT


inv aro

INTRODUCTION

As a person thinks, events occur in the physical world. Matter is manipulated. Doors are opened. Documents are written. Bodies are moved. Time is shifted. Any thought, however trivial, may cause one to stare, blink, and shudder. Single ideas gather into complex streams of ideas and eventually, systems are forged, organizations are founded, and societies are built. Thoughts forge the material world. As the popular saying goes, our existence is ‘mind over matter’, but how can that phrase be explained scientifically? Generally, when discussing the way in which the brain interacts with the world, we use the following simple model: the brain commands the body and the body manipulates matter. Our traditional framework for explaining how thought manipulates matter has remained the same for millennia. The following theory on thought will expand our notion of thought and matter by exploring the concept of a hyperdimensional space uniting the brain, body, and mind. Theory of Thought synthesizes the abstract world of thought with the physical world using a new paradigm. It assembles a unique model that explains energy, light, gravity, motivation, love, and other driving forces as consequences of hyperdimensional organizations interacting through an XV

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invisible complexity of space and time that is embedded within everything around us. I think the universe is more profound than we commonly believe, because it extends beyond a collection of bits of matter in a 4-dimensional spacetime. Reality may be better defined according to a geography of minds rather than a geography of bodies. One can also argue that the reality of nature has more to do with symbolic forms of structure, as described by metaphysics, rather than physically tangible ones. Metaphysicists believe in abstract forms that exist beyond the material world, as elaborated by Plato’s Theory of Forms. If this notion were proven true, the composition of the Universe may be shown to be less materialistic, and more abstracted than we commonly believe. In this book, l illustrate that the Universe is designed to contain symbolic forms of structure, while matter and thought are the means by which we experience them. This book is about thought; but not in any conventional way. What it sets out to do, is to explain a thought as a real structure that really exists, and is interwoven with matter, symbols and forms. This theory argues that the sum of all brains do not contain the sum of all possible thoughts. The Universe itself is the complete sum of all possible thoughts. A brain is but a complex organization that has evolved to coordinate the motion of the increasingly complex forms of thought assembled in the Universe. So where in the Universe are these forms of thought stored? I've always been intrigued by the notions within string theory, and M-theory. At its root, string theory predicts that the dimensions of space go beyond the traditional physical dimensions. The traditional physical dimensions are height (up and down), width (left and right), depth (front and back), and time (travel across space). This book will refer to these dimensions, also known as spacetime, as the 'physical dimensions', or the 'physical space'. String theory goes beyond the physical dimensions because it predicts the existence of extra dimensions, which it calls ‘higher dimensions’. String theory proposes that the Universe contains at least 6 more infinitesimally small dimensions that are folded into each other at XVI

THEORY OF THOUGHT

every p been o equatio quantum advance accepta

Essenti interwo walk do physica model, can vis dimensi perspec perceive entity hyperdim bending far beyo that an theory, all-enco book's intercon very di higher-d unclear For all these m abstrac and phi space. M applying within a


erything

ecause it acetime. ds rather of nature ibed by s believe rated by osition of stracted iverse is thought

sets out s, and is the sum Universe complex reasingly e in the

M-theory. o beyond mensions nd back), ensions, 'physical cause it ‘higher t least 6 other at

every point in space. It should be noted that these dimensions have never been observed. However, by including these abstract dimensions within equations essential to modern physics, gravity may be reconciled with quantum mechanics. As a consequence of its potential for scientific advancement, the study of these extra dimensions has fueled a broad acceptance of string theory within the physics community. Essentially, all dimensions are omnipresent. The higher-dimensions are interwoven with the height, width, depth, and time dimensions. So as we walk down the road, our bodies, and every atom within it, travel through the physical dimensions; and according to string theory's higher-dimensional model, our bodies are also moving through the higher dimensions.1 One can visualize matter being folded (or unfolded) through these extra dimensions as it moves through them. The net result is that there are two perspectives. The first one is from the physical space where the body is perceived as having a distinct, physical shape, as a three-dimensional entity moving across time. The second one is a comprehensive hyperdimensional perspective, where the body is a fluctuating field, bending through the entirety of a hyperdimensional space, with a structure far beyond the observed three-dimensional entity. Theory of Thought posits that an intangible higher dimensional space is a part of mindspace. In this theory, called thought theory, ‘hyperdimensional space' refers to the all-encompassing space that includes and extends beyond spacetime. This book's particular model of hyperdimensional space provides an interconnected theory similar to that of string theory, while explaining itself very differently. According to string theories, the exact number of higher-dimensions that may exist is only proposed theoretically and is still unclear. There is little empirical evidence for the dimensions themselves. For all we know, these dimensions only exist within the imaginations of these mathematicians and their abstract mathematics. I approach their abstraction from a different perspective, and I propose an in-depth logical and philosophical context for the existence of some higher-dimensional space. My arguments take the notion beyond any contemporary theory by applying the higher dimensions as properties for the structure of thought within a mind. XVII

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Th sy dr fra ca co ref the sc be co dim we


ver hin with ific oad

are we the nal One tra wo y is nal ive eld, ure sits his the his an self of still es. of heir cal nal by ght

Thoughts are bound to us, in a way that may be more fundamental than our bond to matter. I’m writing these series of books to prove that the Universe was designed to contain abstract structures of thought, and to show that matter is their physical perspective. I believe that physics is in need of a philosophy that explains the rational for the construction of the Universe, because the divide between empirical evidence and presupposition has grown too far to ignore any longer. The gap must be bridged with a comprehensive theory that binds the complex arrangement of matter, thought, and the metaphysical notion of a mind. Several questions arise and here are some important ones: Where do minds exist in the Universe? What do structures of thought look like? And how do these structures interact in relation to our laws of physical science? I will address these questions by introducing a series of visual diagrams that I believe explain how the Universe is fundamentally organized. This book reveals a Fundamental Mechanism founded on semiotics and symbolism. It is a mathematical architecture revealing symbolic organizations driven across a universal mindspace. This mechanism cycles across a framework of universal laws and forces order upon hyperdimensional entities, called models. Note that within this book, I have carefully reframed many commonly known concepts to help establish my final conclusions. Most reframed words are bolded, and their respective definitions can be found in the glossary in the back of this book. In doing so, I hope to establish a scientific framework supporting that all physical arrangements of matter can be better understood as symbols residing within a mindspace. Symbols are collections of models that navigate across both the physical and abstract dimensions of mindspace simultaneously and ultimately, construct the world we experience.

XVIII

THEORY OF THOUGHT


than our Universe how that eed of a Universe, tion has d with a matter,

do minds d how do ce? I will ms that I

otics and nizations across a entities, ed many ns. Most found in tablish a atter can bols are abstract he world

I dedicate this book to my mom, who has patiently supported my journey. Thank you to all my colleagues and friends who have helped me cross it. Special thanks to Marc Kandalaft for guiding the design of my work along the way. I also thank the Wikipedia organization for providing many of the necessary pieces to complete my rudimentary description of mindspace. I would not have reached my goals without their amazing contribution to our society.

XIX


‘God does not play dice with the Universe’ — Albert Einstein

XX

THEORY OF THOUGHT


CHAPTER I

MODELS

BA S I C U N IT

C ONTAINER circle

Th ized ture that its e to ex mind Ven thou mind itsel ever

Stru our thos Thes ism. and resid foun thou mind

The 1) a a se of m and

PATHWAY line

MODELS

In th They mod ingly be fu 21


Thought theory hypothesizes that the structure of thought must be visualized in a logical and geometric nature in order to discover the true architecture of a mind, because a mind is made of thought. This chapter will show that thought has distinct properties, which a mind employs to interact with its environment. My view is that a mind and its thoughts interact according to exactly five relationship models. These 5 relationship models force a mind into the configurations illustrated by system, network, hierarchical, Venn, and mechanical based diagrams. The Universe is designed to relate thought across these five fundamental model types. And through a hidden mind-matter balancing mechanism, this abstract world of models reflects itself into the physical arrangements in spacetime that we experience everyday. Structures of thought exist all around us. For example, all material forms in our environments are clearly arranged. People had to think to produce those arrangements of things: buildings, cars, roads, signs, furniture, etc. These material arrangements are imbued with thought, leading to symbolism. All matter is inherently symbolic as its values are stored within visible and invisible arrangements. This theory is an examination on where value resides. How do symbols gather power and energy? I believe the answer is found in examining matter and thought. In thought theory, matter and thought are interwoven to produce symbols. Symbols are bound to the mindspace and are governed by its rules. The hyperdimensional space of models (mindspace) contains three parts: 1) a set of physical dimensions that can illustrate thought within matter. 2) a set of higher dimensions that defines thought as complex arrangements of meaning. 3) another set of higher dimensions that rest between thought and matter, propagating the mind-matter mechanism in waves. In this section I will go over the abstract models that permeate a mindspace. They are founded entirely on the symbolism of the circle and line. Each model builds upon these two basic concepts. Diagrams that relate increasingly advanced concepts will emerge as I argue that the Universe can only be fully described if related back to them. 22

THEORY OF THOUGHT


e visualarchitecwill show act with ccording force a archical, to relate a hidden reflects perience

CIRCLE

A simple architecture for a container

forms in produce ure, etc. symboln visible re value nswer is tter and d to the

C O NTA I N E R

ee parts: matter. 2) gements thought

ndspace. ne. Each increascan only

Philosophically speaking, the circle ultimately describes a single, united container. In metaphysics, it is the ideal state of creation. It represents a void in space, a unity, an organization, a cycle, and a completion.1 The circle is the most important of all known shapes. For example, our Sun is a floating circle in the sky, providing energy and influencing the thoughts of humanity since the dawn of time.

MODELS

23

At be rat ab


ted sa The n is hts

THOUGHT

A substance contained by a circle

ANY O R G A N IZ ATI O N

TH O U G HT

A thought, or an idea, is ultimately described as a circle. Any organization can be thought of within its boundary. In this following example, I will use a corporate organization, however, all forms of material objects are interwoven with abstract ideas, and can be bounded by the ideals of the circle.

24

THEORY OF THOUGHT


ORGANIZATIONS Outer vs. inner systems

TH O U G HT O F A N Y B US I N E S S outer-organization

MANAGEMENT DIVISION MARKETING DIVISION

innerorganizations

SALES DIVISION

SUPPORT DIVISION ACCOUNTING DIVISION

MANUFACTURING DIVISION

SYSTEM DIAGRAM

All complex organizations of matter contain smaller organizations called inner-organizations that are divided in thought. Inner-organizations are different sets of resources that support or give life to their container called the outer-organization. The whole organization may be that of a company, or perhaps that of a human body. Within a human body, the inner-organizations are commonly called ‘organs’. MODELS

25

The imp ide an this bio


ed are ner fa he

SYSTEMS

An inside region is segregated from an outside region

INSIDE

O UT S I D E

CORE

CONNECTION

SYSTEM

The circle is the prototypical enclosed system. In nature, a perfect circle is impossible to find, however in philosophy, as Plato argued, the circle is the ideal and most respected shape. As a shape, the circle requires an inside, an outside, and a border separating its inside and outside. Scientists call this concept a ‘system’ and it can help model other concepts ranging from biological beings to pockets of hot air to the nucleus of an atom. 26

THEORY OF THOUGHT


circle is le is the n inside, tists call ing from

LINE

The extension of the circle

PATH WAY

In contrast to the circle, the line is disconnected; it has disjointed end points. This property distinguishes it from the circle, and imbues the line with a distinct purpose: to bridge circles. In metaphysics, the line represents a relationship. It represents a pathway and a distance. It can be a road between cities or a relation between any two thoughts. Circles, thoughts, organizations, systems, symbols and arrangements of matter are various words for explaining the same, basic phenomenon: the exchange of resources between models in mindspace. MODELS

27


COOPERATION

Symbolic of the mindspace fabric

RESOURCE( S ) CONNECTION ( S ) (to other resources )

ORGANIZ ATION

In thought theory, the complete notion of a symbolic organization requires two structures: the circle and the line. The circle stores resources that have value, while the line transfers them to other organizations. In a physical sense, the line can be a pathway that exchanges something tangible. While in an abstract sense it can be a pathway that exchanges something intangible. For example, when two people are speaking to one another, they are connected by a line that exchanges abstract and physical forms of resources such as knowledge and heat, respectively. 28

THEORY OF THOUGHT


SIMULTANEITY

Maintaining more than one connection

Systems can have a large number of connections that interact with many systems simultaneously. Some of their connections can travel long distances into far away regions of the mindspace. These lines could represent the exchange of photons of light, or perhaps the exchange of some other moving object. Connectivity is deeply interwoven with our interpretation of the Sun because the Sun maintains the most connections of any object in our solar system.

MODELS

29

All tha tho Thr to will


any ong reme taany

RELATIONSHIP

Two outside systems sharing resources

SYSTEM A

core

SYSTEM B

connection

resources

connection

(sharing) communication

core

resources

REL ATIONSHIP

All symbols are forced into relationships with other symbols. Even systems that seem disconnected must in fact be connected across some distance. In thought theory, distance is abstracted into a concept called symmetry. Through symmetry, symbols communicate and exchange energy according to the Fundamental Mechanism, which is based on quantum mechanics; I will explain this mechanism in greater detail later in the book.

30

THEORY OF THOUGHT


systems tance. In mmetry. ccording hanics; I

SYMMETRY

Relationships exchange values

123 units

What is the meaning of this connection? What is shared and how much of it?

340 units

Through the higher dimensions of mindspace, a system transcends into a symbol. A symbol’s complex arrangement exerts an attractive force upon external symbols that builds increasingly complex relationships. Within relationships, symbols share resources, and the value of the exchanged resources (symmetry) can be highly abstract and complicated to measure. The values also fluctuate when each organization’s complex arrangements are transformed over time.

MODELS

31


o a pon hin ged ure. nts

CONNECTIVITY Relationships fuel growth

D I S C O N N E C TE D SYS TE M S

I NTE R C O N N E C TE D SYS TE M S

Inner-organizations are bound into a whole organization that is greater than the sum of its parts. Disconnected organizations, that aren’t sharing resources, cannot survive within an outer-organization and they will always eventually disappear from it. The relationships between inner-organizations fuels progress and sustains the lifespan of the outer-organization. So any organization, or society, that appears to be to be healthy and growing contains a well connected group of inner-organizations.

32

THEORY OF THOUGHT


COMPLEXITY

The measure of connectivity

A DD S IZE TO T H E O RG A N IZ AT IO N = A D D C I R C LE S

low interconnectivity low complexity

A DD CO M P LE XI T Y TO T H E O RG A N IZ AT IO N = A D D LI N E S

high interconnectivity high complexity

Communication feeds the survival of each organization in the group. Every organization contains a balance between its size and complexity known as the complexity ratio (henceforth c-ratio). Size is the number of its inner-organizations. Complexity is the number of its inter-connections. The c-ratio is like the fingerprint of the organization, and is fundamental in explaining a symbol’s communication patterns across its arrangements of matter. The equation for the c-ratio is: # of lines # of circle

MODELS

33


oup. exity er of ons. al in s of

ANCIENT THOUGHT Tree of Life, ancient

crown Kether

wisdom

understanding Binah

Chokmah

strength

love

Geburah

Chesed

community Hod

light Tifereth

Jesod

continuity Nezach holy reflection

Malkuth physical kingdom

HEBREW JEWISH M YS TI C I S M

Ancient Pythagorean geometers and philosophers believed in logical hierarchy defined by the four dimensions of intelligence: meanings, patterns, numbers, and letters. All minds access these dimensions to identify and categorize organizations that share perspectives. In the figure above, the outer-organization is called the Tree of Life. Relationships between the abstract ideas of love, power, and wisdom have shaped been shaped into the design of a tree.

34

THEORY OF THOUGHT


TREES

Hierarchical organizations

N E T WO RK MO D EL

H IER A RCH I CA L MO D EL

TI M E

Tree-network diagrams are forms of hierarchical models. The treenetwork diagram explains complexity, with respect to time. It also helps explain ancestry, symmetry, and division. Not only do organizations communicate and share resources, but there is a hierarchy of communication and sharing that grows and stretches across time. In mindspace, new symbols are assembled into the branches of these trees, while older symbols provide the fuel for growing new branches of hierarchy. The hierarchical model is significant because it is the primary blueprint used for the arrangement of matter in nature. Using this basic blueprint, all people rearrange matter into increasingly ordered hierarchies. MODELS

35

Or mo ex tra tho fra ex


elps muand ols ide l is of nto

PERSPECTIVES

Different views on organizational complexity

TO P V I E W

SIDE VIEW

SO C I E TI E S

TR E E S

SYSTEM DIAGRAM

HIERARCHICAL DIAGRAM

Organizations can be viewed from different perspectives. The system model helps illustrate organizational sub-division. A network model helps explain organizational communication, and the hierarchical model illustrates time and depth. Understanding these models will help us understand thought, and how systems of thought exist within a hyperdimensional framework of complexity that permeates the arrangement of matter we experience in spacetime. 36

THEORY OF THOUGHT


DIAGRAMS

The complexity of organized societies

ANY SOCIETY

SPECIALTY GROUP B

DEPTH

C O M PLE X IT Y

SPECIALTY GROUP A

SPECIALTY GROUP C

SPECIALTY GROUP D

sub speciality group a

sub speciality group a

sub speciality group b

sub speciality group b

SPECIALTY GROUP E

sub speciality group c

S IZ E

BREADTH HIERARCHICAL DIAGRAM

Every complex organization can be mapped using a similar diagram. The complexity component reveals new branches, while the size component fills branches with new resources. Organizations then use these energydistributions to interact with neighboring organizations. Organizations with the most effective distribution patterns vis-a-vis the competing organizations within their environments, will appear to survive the longest, because the relative arrangement between organizations generates a relative lifespan. MODELS

37

Da usi dia on spe tho


The fills gywith ons the .

DARWIN’S TREE Tree of Life, 1863 AD

Darwin was the first scientist to explain that organizations evolved over time, using natural selection. His powerful theory is described using a tree-network diagram. Darwin visualized populations of animals growing and dividing from one another. Time forces the evolution of specialties that differentiate new species from their predecessors. The same idea applies to structures of thoughts, symbols, and all organizations in general. 38

THEORY OF THOUGHT


NEURAL NETWORK Organized in patterns

*artistic rendering

The neural arrangements in the brain organize information using the principles of systems, networks, and hierarchical tree-network models that I’ve described. Fundamentally, the brain is a manifestation of interconnected patterns that are sensed from the physical world. Its purpose is to manage patterns by evaluating the hidden complexity of material arrangement. The brain identifies and values the relationships in external patterns, and it converts these patterns into exactly four dimensions of intelligence (letters, numbers, patterns, and meanings). When a brain is unable to convert what it experiences into wellorganized models, a person will create the wrong relationships with his or her environment and may inadvertently lower his or her value, from what appears to outsiders as poor decision making. MODELS

39

The the hol ma am rea nic


ples bed. are uatand nto anellher ars

UNIT OF THOUGHT Its simple nature

INDIVIDUAL THOUGHT UNIT

REL ATIONSHIP OF THOUGHTS

The brain assembles the sensory information it receives into units. It encodes these units across its mindspace. The model (or arrangement of models) that holds these units together is called a symbol. The units of information that makeup a symbol are bound together into relationships, and assembled across a mental map. Resources flow between units of symbols, and if resources fail to reach important units, stacks of models will collapse, neurons will stop communicating, and thoughts will disappear. 40

THEORY OF THOUGHT


encodes dels) that tion that d across es fail to commu-

ASSEMBLY

Thoughts are ordered into sequences

Could be a molecule, or any sequence of ideas

Assemble stacks [A]

Through an abstract force of nature, called attraction, separated, yet related units join into arrangements that I call stacks. This abstract force of nature controls symbols, as well as matter. In fact, systems and organizations of all scales are under the influence of attraction, forcing them to assemble into complex arrangements within mindspace.

MODELS

41


yet e of zato

CATEGORIZING

Attraction forces units into meaningful models

ME ANING Category Value Similarity Ancestry Association Relation

Stacks of thought can form into complex strands of thought, building complexity.

The principle feature of the living brain is that it translates arrangements of matter into abstract models. The brain is a translation device between the physical world and the metaphysical world. 2 With respect to Kant’s theory, the unconscious brain is capable of mapping all the hidden relationships present within an environment. Thought theory states that the unconscious builds this map by using the five relationship models of mindspace. The conscious brain then decodes the unconscious map into 12 distinct properties: meanings, shapes, numbers, letters, periods, amplitudes, frequencies, wavelengths, height, width, depth, and time. Within the unconscious, abstract models are under the control of the laws of mindspace. Through consciousness, as an active region that scans the mental map, the models of mindspace come to life and emit thought. Thinking minds can be found at every scale of the Universe, working according to these same processes. The questions arise: How do minds connect? Why do they connect? When, where, which, or whose minds are connected? The answers to these questions will help explain how minds interact across mindspace, forging physical reality. 42

THEORY OF THOUGHT


HUMAN MIND

A very complex set of relationships

family bicycle

wife games

books school Sun

kids home

water pets

job

sex friends

clothes food

car music

body

THE MIND

My mind is the complete 'thought of me' and it only contains relationships. For example, it is the relationships I have with the objects I own, the people I know, the things I’ve sensed, and so forth. In its hyperdimensional environment, a mind can be influenced, supported, or hurt by other minds. All minds inhabit the abstract region of space, while the brain inhabits its physical region. The activities taking place within the mind drive physical reality by controlling the brain and body with a fundamental mechanism. MODELS

43

Sin the ha die bra co dis ful min wh tur ap ha


ips. ople onnds ical y by

MIND AND BRAIN

Symbols can be shared by more than one mind

songs

family

home

water

school

spouse

games kids

books THE MIND

pets

friends boat

job food

bicycle

Sun

artworks

car

coffee

body

NETWORK

Since the mind and the brain are different entities, I will clarify each of their roles. The brain is an organ, and it dies with a body. On the other hand, a mind is a collection of models that can persist long after a brain dies. As a brain is assembled, a mind flows into it. During a lifetime, the brain coordinates the construction of the mind. However, a mind will continue affecting the real world long after a brain that developed it has disappeared. A mind is an assembly of patterns that have been successfully ordered together into organizations across an abstract space. And a mind can only truly disappear if all of its inner-organizations disappear which is a very improbable event. A mind can inhabit any material structure. However, a brain, as a complex management center for minds, only appears in physical space when an organization of models in mindspace has reached a particular scale of c-ratio. 44

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THEORY OF THOUGHT

Ultimate mind tha in tune models


From the perspective of the conscious brain, you have ideas about your family, however, you are not directly connected to your family. You are a separate entity with its own disconnected existence. That being said, from the perspective of the mind and the unconscious, your being is innately tied to that of your family, because of the relationships you share with them. Individuality is a grey area within the mind’s world, since the mind is a network of relationships. And because a symbol can maintain many relationships simultaneously, minds can appear to have significant overlap. As minds navigate and interact across these models creating symbols, people and things appear somewhere in physical space. Scientifically speaking, it has been proposed that an interaction between minds causes the collapse of the wavefunction and creates the quantum mechanical perspective of the physical world. 3 Ultimately, each brain and body is a physical reflection of a metaphysical mind that inhabits and navigates mindspace. As such, the mind is naturally in tune with the goal of mindspace: building, maintaining, and breaking models of relationships.

MODELS

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‘Nature's grand book, which stands continually open to our gaze, is written in the language of mathematics. Its characters are triangles, circles, and other geometrical figures, without which it is humanly impossible to understand a single word of it; without these, one is wandering around in a dark labyrinth.’ — Galileo Galilei, 1623

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THEORY OF THOUGHT


CHAPTER II

PATTERNS

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E N E R GY

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The PATTERNS

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Theory of Thought : Symbolism