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COED COED--Y-GLYN And District LIFE Your Community Magazine Win in our competition! A meal for two and a bottle of wine at the Squire Yorke

Have you written a will? Read our legal Q&A A Voice through the Decades Sixties...A reader shares his thoughts

June 2011


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Large Print Edition If you would like to receive a large print edition of this magazine leave a message on 0770 7992387 or email jane@coed-yglyn.com and it will be delivered.

Please mention Coed-y-Glyn & District life magazine when responding to any of the adverts in this magazine We have received no funding or grants with this magazine . Our advertisers ensure we can continue bringing your mag to your door. Advertise Your Business To advertise your business in Coed-y-Glyn & District Life email margot@coed-y-glyn.com or call 0770 7992387 for more information or visit www.coed-y-glyn.com

Get in touch Coed-y-Glyn & District Life PO Box 2339, Wrexham LL11 1AA

Telephone 0770 7992387 info@coed-y-glyn.com

Jane Redfern Jones (Editor & Content)

Margot Wicksted (Sales & Content)

‚Money couldn’t buy friends but you get a better class of enemy‛ Spike Milligan Coed-y-Glyn & District Life is the community magazine for Coed-y-Glyn, Green Park, Maes Tomas, Longueville, Derwen Court, Howard’s Field, Hermitage Park, Erddig Road, The Ithens and local businesses. Distribution 600 copies plus internet. Established 2008. Disclaimer: The views in coed-y-glyn & District Life are not necessarily the views of the editorial team and businesses advertised are not in any way endorsed by us.


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Editors Corner… My children often ask me which season is my favourite, and I always say that I love something about all the seasons, and the diversity in weather that we get in this county. I wouldn’t like to live somewhere that’s hot all the time, nor somewhere that is cold all the time. In spring I love the way that everything seems to be regenerating and ‘springing’ into life, in summer I love the warm weather and being able to spend more time outdoors, in autumn the colours and the cooler weather, and in winter the snow (Christmas just wouldn’t be the same if it was hot and sunny).

INSIDE THIS ISSUE:

News

4

Wildlife

6

Voices Through the Decades

8

People Page

9

The combinations of weather, season, light, feelings and thoughts that you find here are everchanging, not allowing us to get bored, or take good weather for granted.

Eisteddfod

10

Poetry

11

This time of year I love being outdoors, love taking a long walk with my dogs and looking at the trees, flowers, the sky and listening to the sounds of nature. I like the quiet and getting away from the noise of the television, radio etc ( I can never understand someone going for a walk in the country and wearing headphones to listen to music). In the school holidays we spent a couple of nights sleeping in a tent in the garden, with a tawny owl and hedgehog for company!

Quiz

12

Law

14

Children’s Page

16

History

19

Events

24

The Last Word

27

I’m very late doing my hanging baskets this year but hopefully they’ll be up and flourishing by the time this mag is being delivered. I’m hoping for a bit less rain than we had last year though – the bad weather didn’t do my baskets or my grow bags much good! Jane Cover photo of Phil Jones and Paul Ffoulkes from Clos Ystrad, Coed-y-Glyn, preparing for a charity bike ride (see page 5) Thank you to everyone who has contributed to this magazine, and to our team of delivery helpers. Please keep sending in your news, comments and pictures. We always love to hear from you.


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News...news...news... RED CROSS Many thanks to all those who collected and contributed to this years Red Cross Week during May. A grand total of £448 was raised from Green Park, The Ithens and Coed-y-Glyn making it their best total so far. The Ithens team of collectors have now retired, so if you are up to the challenge of filling the gap, please contact Elaine Cole on 01978 290295.

Have you lost a Ring?

Marie Curie March Collection, Ffordd Glyn.

As I have received no response to my request in the April edition of Coed y Glyn & District Life re the ring which was enclosed in a Marie Curie envelope and no-one has come forward to claim it, I contacted them for advice again. Marie Curie have not so far been able to accept the ring as they have no document to state it has been donated to them. In accordance with their instructions, I have now handed the ring over to Wrexham Police and it is at present classed as a lost item. If intentional, I am anxious to thank the person involved for their generous gift to Marie Curie, but at the same time must, in the meantime ,make sure that every effort has been made to find the rightful owner and return it to them, if so desired. If an owner is identified the ring can be returned to them - please contact Wrexham Police Station as soon as possible. After the official time allowed to claim, if an owner has not been identified, the ring will be returned to me, when I as the owner of the property then, will be able to deal with this matter further. I would appreciate it if the person concerned, or anyone on Ffordd Glyn who has mislaid a ring, would please phone me on 356277 or call at 64 Ffordd Glyn, as soon as possible.

Football memories On S4C recently they were showing programmes from their archives, among which was Joey Jones' benefit match at the Racecourse in 1993, when a Wrexham team played a Liverpool team and drew 2 - 2. There were 10,000 watching ! Joey is a popular Coed y Glyn ‘Celeb’. A guest player for Liverpool was Ian Rush who played with Joey at Liverpool and Wales. Another guest player for Wrexham was Wrexham born Mark Hughes (Whose in-laws live in Hermitage park) and he and Joey and Rush all played together for Wales.

Please mention Coed-yGlyn & District life when responding to any of the adverts In the magazine

Wrexham Chamber of Tourism & Trade Local businesses working together to promote Wrexham County and support local people and businesses. Email Nigel at Eyecatchercomm@aol.com for more information or call into HSBC Wrexham to join (ask for Louise Harper)


News

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Right: Introducing our Districts newest regular visitor: Evelyn May Wicksted born 31st May at 07:07 hrs at the Maelor Hospital.

Charity Bike Ride Phil Jones and Paul Ffoulkes (our cover stars), both residents of Clos Ystrad, Coed-y-Glyn, embarked on a London to Paris bike just as we were about to go to print. It is in aid of Nightingale House Hospice. The ride is 178 miles over 3 days. www.justgiving.com/Phil-jones5 www.justgiving.com/Paul-Ffoulkes. We'll post an update in the next issue on how it goes!

Spotted!

Students

Below: Celebrity of the Month, Elaine Burrows, The Ithens looking for her dinner! Picture Margot Wicksted

Rooms to let locally in large town house from 30th June 2011. Ring John on 07730 401 143

School Fete St Giles School fete is on 1st July 2011 at 3pm.

Summer Fayre At Ysgol Bodhyfryd, Thursday 23rd June 2.30 - 5.00pm.

Help needed On Saturday 25th June Nightingale House Hospice desperately need more volunteers to help with marshalling the Ladies Midnight Walk. If you are able to lend a hand please contact Eleri on 01978 314292 ASAP!.

visitwrexham.org


A walk on the wild side ... Spring's all but disappeared as I write, but the avian wildlife activities are still carrying on apace. Our second clutch of Bluetits have hatched in the garden nestbox, and the parents are frantically flying to and fro to keep the greedy chicks well fed ; I've a suspicion that my tame blackbird has also got a second clutch of eggs, but time will tell on that score - in the meantime she's forever clucking at me the moment I set foot into the garden, asking for mealworms. Down in Erddig Park, after the usual interminable wait, the pair of swans proudly showed off this year's brood to me on May 13th - five strapping cygnets. Unfortunately, when I was looking for them yesterday (28th May) I could only count four of the babies and my fears were confirmed today when, armed this time with a pair of binoculars, I was again unable to see more than four. Mute Swans have a very long gestation period (perhaps not too surprising given the size of the eggs and subsequent chicks) : whereas most of our local common birds have a quite short period between laying the last egg and the kids hatching (blackbirds 13-14 days, bluetits 12-15 days) the Mute Swan takes about 35 days so my wait to see the cygnets, from the time the Pen started sitting to the babies first time out on the lake seemed forever. Let's hope the remaining four are reared successfully and we can all have the pleasure of witnessing their experimental first flights, through to Mom and Dad showing them the way out into the big wide world of the University of Life. In our garden, the Greater Spotted Woodpeckers are visiting evry few minutes at times, feeding on Suet Balls and Peanuts (when they can get a look in from those damned Jackdaws !) It's a great pleasure, particularly when chilling out in the lounge in the evening, to see the constant to-ing and fro-ing of the gorgeously coloured beasties - they fly unerringly straight at the feeders with spot-on landings - take a nut or two, then fly off to a dead tree stump in the garden where they lodge the nut in a crevice in preparation for eating it. We're looking forward to them bring the babies here to show them where the fast-food restaurant is. Males, females and babies are all easily distinguished by their head colourings - the males have a small red spot on the nape of the neck; the females have an all-black head, and the chicks heads are red all over. On the subject of woodpeckers, regular walkers along the river bank near the lake can't help but hear the noise created by the nest of Greater Spotted Woodpeckers in an ash tree near the gate. I first thought it might be a Green Woodpecker's nest, but after patiently waiting to spot Mom or Dad feeding the chicks, I was able to confirm it was the Spotted beasty. The reed-beds in that area are also very noisy with the constant chatter of the warblers (although seeing one's a bit of a miracle) who said the countryside's quiet ? On a different (non-birdy)


with Bryan chesworth note, have you all seen the excellent display of Flag Iris in the reed beds around the lake this year - I first noticed them 3 or 4 years ago, but they've spread well now and are un-missable while the reed growth is still young. It's a very common plant in the UK, growing at damp edges of ponds, lakes and rivers. It grows to about 150 cm (60 inches) and has (if you can get close enough) a very nice, sweet smell. I'm surprised that our Common Spotted Orchids are still only in leaf, when many/most of the other wildflowers are so far forward. There have been patches of the orchid near the lake for ... as many years as I can remember (well, may be 25 years or so) and they seem to migrate from place to place as the water table varies each year. Last year there was an excellent display between the lake and the "Stone Bridge" plus a strong patch developing near the weir. They normally flower in June / July but I can see no sign of flower buds yet. The leaves on the ones I've seen so far look strong and healthy so perhaps I need to be a bit more patient before the flowers appear. The leaves are quite easy to spot (if you'll pardon the pun) - narrow strap-like leaves about 6 inches or so tall at the moment, green with purplish or brown, sometimes near-black spots. Don't be tempted to pick or uproot these lovely small plants though - they won't succeed in your garden because they need specialised conditions including a particular soil fungus to flourish, and they're a UK protected species so you could be prosecuted for disturbing them. Stop press, as I'm finishing off these notes : our second blue-tit brood this year, in the garden nest box, are carrying out their first flights - from the nest box to adjacent small trees and shrubs. It's a delight to see.

Wildlife activities run by North-East Wales Wildlife Fancy looking for otter-traces along the Clywedog in Erddig area?contact S_G_Brown@tiscali.co.uk Rhydymwyn is a wildlife site which was once a munitions factory and so has been surrounded by security fencing for 80 years and free from public interference and trespass. They have full time highly qualified wildlife staff and run activities and courses at their sites all over North-East Wales. Booking is essential for their courses even if free: 01352 742 115 or admin@newwildlife.org.uk . Please mention Coed-y-Glyn Life. Most courses are only ÂŁ5 for a full day and suitable for young and old. Staff and volunteers are all CRB checked.


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Voices through the decades

people

The Bus Pass Years. My name is Keith Foster and I live on Ffordd Glyn and I have been asked what my memories are as a sexagenarian. My first recollection is a street party in St. Helens on the Coronation of our present Queen. I would be about 5 years old, dressed in stripped pyjamas and face blackened with burnt cork. The streets were rows of terraced houses and we all knew our neighbours. I could name between 50 – 70 families. I played street games every day (no cars), made our own amusements – trolley (plank of wood with 4 old pram wheels), elastic gun for firing berries and small stones (no health & safety in those days). As a teenager I watched England win the World Cup, Neil Armstrong step on to the moon and saw Cassius Clay (Mohammed Ali) at his best. The music was by The Beatles, Rolling Stones, Elvis and Cliff Richard etc which are still being played today. This was the era of the ‘Teddy Boys’ with long Frock Coats with velvet collars, drain pipe trousers and 1 inch Crepe soled shoes (Brothel Creepers). The hair was a Quiff at the front and a ‘DA’ at the back held up with Brylcreem. The 1960’s was the time of ‘Sex’, ‘Drugs’ and ‘Rock and Roll’ which missed St. Helens (but I will admit to using Brylcreem).

What I miss now is the interaction between people. We have become more insular. My father-in-law and I would go to the Catholic Club every Friday night and after a few pints would start a lively discussion on how to put the world to rights. We don’t spend enough time talking to our neighbour; we all have a tale to tell, so do yourself a favour, say ‚Hello to your neighbour‛. Many thanks Keith for your memories. For those unfamiliar with the initials DA, politely put is short for ‘Ducks Bottom’ Margot.

Obituary Danny Davies and family, of Erddig Road, wishes to thank all friends and family for their support and care following the loss of his sister Daneida, at Hillbury House, Erddig, aged 85 years, on 3rd May 2011. The funeral service and committal were at Pentrebychan Crematorium on Tuesday, 24th May 2011.


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PEOPLE

LINDA SUBACCHI

My name is Linda Subacchi, and I live in the Ithens with my husband David. We have three children, Gina, Matthew and Alicia. I was born in Aberystwyth during the early sixties (no comments please!) to Welsh speaking parents and I have three sisters. The only one to leave the area, I went to train at the Royal Shrewsbury Hospital (Copthorne) in 1979. Once qualified I nursed in a cancer unit for 2 years then I left to move to Bangor North Wales. The move came about when David, by now my husband, had a transfer with his job. Another big change was also about to happen with the birth of our first child Gina. We lived in Llandegfan Anglesey for five wonderful years and during this time I also had my son Matthew. Not only was I busy being a mum, I also worked at Ysbyty Gwynedd caring for the elderly. In 1989 we moved to Wrexham, a big town compared to my previous homes. As Gina attended school and Matthew nursery, I worked many evening / nights shifts to keep myself busy. By now we had our third child Alicia. During this time I also worked as a fundraiser for the N.S.P.C.C. going around Welsh schools gaining confidence to talk to and teach children. My interests lead me to work for Ysgolion Meithrin later joining the team working with children who have learning difficulties at the Special Education Centre (which is now Asda, Wrexham). From there I joined the team at my current post at Ysgol Bodhyfryd. I have been a member of the P.T.A. and presently I am the chair of governors at Ysgol Plas Coch. My children: Gina graduated at Glyndwr University, Matthew at Aberystwyth University and Alicia has just completed her first year at Aberystwyth. I have a keen interest in politics and have a great need to help care for people within my community. As a member of Offa Community Council for the last 15 years my area is Hermitage between Kingsmill Road and Benions Road (approx.). A good listener, I try my best to help residents with their problems and feel strongly that their voices and views are heard. I am also a Board member of the Community First team based at Luke O’Connor House, Hightown, and help run a Youth Forum at Hightown Community Centre on a Monday evening. We have up to 10 young adults who come to discuss occurring issues within their community and also organize events to educate the youngsters. I am also a member of the sub-housing group who has been involved in the demolition of the Hightown flats. This is a very sensitive issue where I have worked closely with officers and residents. I do wonder sometimes where I find time to fit my working hours, my life is busy but I would not change anything. Many thanks Linda for having the time to put this article together with only 24 hours notice. Margot


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Eisteddfod—news from the organisers Go bonkers for bunting Go bonkers for bunting is the National Eisteddfod’s simple message when launching the latest campaign to promote this year’s festival. The aim is to create a sea of colour across the Wrexham area, as we encourage everyone locally – businesses and local people – to go bonkers for bunting. We’re looking for your help in this campaign, so please join us and put a poster in your window, some bunting in your gardens, or have our literature on display in your shops, to help us to show the whole of Wales that there’s a great welcome for the Eisteddfod and for the rest of Wales in Wrexham. It’s very important that we show the welcome that exists for the Eisteddfod in the area which will soon be hosting this wonderful festival, and we always encourage people to give things their own local stamp. Send us a photo of your shop or home – when decorated – and we’ll organise a competition with prizes for the best decorated home in the area. The WI will be presenting a trophy to the business which has done most to promote the Eisteddfod visually locally, and we’ll be putting some of our favourites on our website. So please join us and get in touch to order your flags and posters gwyb@eisteddfod.org.uk or you can use our online order form – and let’s work together to go bonkers for bunting.

Special offer – two for the price of one Remember, we’ve got a two tickets for the price of one scheme, which is aimed at local people living in the Wrexham area. The scheme is a chance for local people to enjoy Wales’ leading festival on their doorstep, on Lower Berse Farm, off Ruthin Road, Wrexham. This is the first time for the Eisteddfod to be held in Wrexham since 1977 and local residents have been busily preparing for the week for almost two years. If you live within Wrexham County Borough, you can order your two for one tickets until 18 July. Call the Ticket Line on 0845 4090 800 or go to www.eisteddfod.org.uk and click on ‘Tickets’. Over 15,000 leaflets and order forms will also be distributed throughout the area. There are 10,000 two for one tickets available, so hurry to be part of this special offer. And if you order your tickets before 30 June, you’ll save up to 12% on a Maes (field) ticket price.

Some handy Welsh phrases… Bore da (BOH-reh DAH) Good Morning Da iawn (DAH ee-YOWN) Very good Diolch (DEE-olch) Thanks Iechyd da! (YEH-chi-DAH) Cheers! Nos da (NOS dah) Goodnight Prynhawn da (Prin-HOWN DAH) Good afternoon Croeso I Gymru (CROY-so ee GUM-ree) - Welcome to Wales


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A Poem for june

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Cerdd ar gyfer Mehefin

The cuckoo sings in April The cuckoo sings in May By the middle of June it changes its tune And then she flies away. We all know the little rhyme and it really is sad that the cuckoo seldom visits our area these days.We have a lovely tradition in Wales that if you hear the cuckoo you wll live for another year. We had all better visit West Wales before the middle or this month since there is a better chance of hearing the song. Y Gog Olwen Canter Mi wn iti gael dy greu yn ddihiryn ond i mi 'rwyt ti'n gymysgfa o lawenydd a thristwch. Daw'r haf yn gyflawn pan glywaf dy ddeunod, ond eto, mi wn fod trychineb o'th Ă´l, a daw cwmwl, am imi glywed yn y cefndir, y ddeunod y gnul angau This poem conveys simply the fact that the cuckoo is a scoundrel - (it lays its egg in another bird's nest.), a mixture of happiness and sadness. Its double note signifies the ending of summer and clouds to follow and symbolises the way that joy is often followed by sadness. Diolch Olwen am gerdd berthnasol iawn ar gyfer y mis hwn. Gobeithio eich bod chwi'r darllenwyr wedi mwynhau'r gerdd hefyd. Tan y tro nesa - os byw ac iach ! Liz Williams

Did you know‌ In medieval Wales there were five classes of society recognised by the law: 1. The prince and his family 2. The bonheddwyr, or people of known ancestry. They could own land and make legally binding contracts. 3. The taeogion, or unfree people, who were tied to the land that they rented. 4. The caethion or slaves with no rights at all. 5. The alltud, or foreigners, who had some rights. In 700 around 10% of the population were bonheddwyr, but by 1300 that had increased to around 60%.


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Quiz 1. A type of Indian cooking using a special clay oven? 2. A special case in which two or three decanters are visible but locked up? 3. A ballroom dance of Argentinean origin in 4-4 time? 4. A straight line touching but not intersecting a curve or circle? 5. A Japanese poem of five lines, the first and third lines having five syllables and the others seven? 6. In which continent is Lesotho? 7. How long is the Orinoco River in South America? Is it 481, 681 or 1,281 miles long? 8. Which popular English holiday resort is situated on Poole Bay, half way between Poole and Christchurch? 9. Four US states surround this lake, Indiana to the south, Illinois on the SW, Wisconsin on the W and one that shares its name on the north and east? What is the lake called? 10. The Mediterranean island of Sardinia is part of which EU country? Answers on page 27. Thanks to Paul Murphy from TLC Nursing for supplying the quiz (see ad on page 21) Don’t forget Monday nights are Quiz Nights at the Squire Yorke. Time: 9.30pm.

Just for fun What brought about the broadsheet paper? This is said to be due to the 1712 imposition in Britain of a newspaper tax, based on the number of pages in the paper. Publishers therefore doubled the size and halved the number of pages in order to pay less tax, giving us the modern broadsheet format, although this is currently being phased out by many national papers. Similarly, a tax imposed on the width of the frontage of houses, is responsible for the famously narrow houses of Amsterdam.

Quote:

‚ When I told the people of Northern Ireland that I was an atheist, a woman in the audience stood up and said, ‘Yes, but is it the God of the Catholics or the God of the Protestants in whom you don’t believe?‛ Quentin Crisp.

Some useless facts... Law reformer Jeremy Bentham left his entire estate to London’s University College in 1832 on condition that he be stuffed, dressed in his finest clothes and mounted in a chair from where he would continue to attend the annual meeting of the university’s board of governors. His figure is still brought out to preside over an annual debate. The British eat twice as many baked beans per head as Americans do. William the Conqueror ordered that everyone should go to bed at eight o’clock. Some 80,000 umbrellas are lost annually on the London Underground.


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Legal Q & A’s Ruth Heap is a Solicitor specialising in Wills, Trusts and Estates Solicitor at Hillyer McKeown LLP. Her areas of expertise include Will drafting, trust administration, probate and estate administration, elderly client advice, court of protection work including registration of Enduring Powers of Attorney, Lasting Powers of Attorney and Deputyship matters. Here Ruth tackles a question posed by many of us; ‚How can I ensure that my funeral wishes are carried out after I’m gone?‛ ‘It is advisable to make plans as to funeral and burial arrangements before the time arrives. It may seem logical that if we tell our nearest and dearest of the plans we have made, then these will be carried out. But in reality, those we share these details with may not legally be able to make decisions regarding funeral arrangements. The law states that the person whose duty it is to bury or dispose of our body is the person who has the ‘right to possession’ of it and therefore has the right to dictate funeral and burial arrangements. If there is a Will then this will be the Executors of that Will. If you were to die without leaving a Will the rules are different. In this case, the law sets out a list of people, in order of priority, who have the right to dispose of your body and make funeral arrangements. Priority is given to a surviving spouse, then to children, and then further blood relations. In today’s society where many couples live together without being married, note that this list does not include cohabitees. It is possible to ask the court to resolve any dispute which may arise when planning funeral arrangements. However, court proceedings are best avoided as not only are they stressful but also lengthy and potentially expensive. In an age of increasing variety of faiths, beliefs, religions and personal preferences regarding funerals and burials it its perhaps even more important than ever to make sure that if a person has fixed ideas about what they want their funeral arrangements to entail, then preparations are made. The good news is that there are ways to go about this and they are relatively simple to implement. Make sure that you make a Will and within that Will you must appoint Executors whom you trust to carry out your wishes. You can appoint whoever you wish as an Executor. Once you have made a Will, make sure your Executors know that they are named in the Will and also make them aware of the arrangements you want for your funeral as it can often be after the funeral that the full details of the Will are revealed to other family and friends.’ If you have a question regarding Wills, Trusts and Estates, Family Law, or Conveyancing and would like to see your question featured in the magazine please email Ruth.Heap@law.uk.com.


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children

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Colouring fun

This picture is of Duke at Erddig, waiting to be tacked up so that he can start work giving visitors carriage rides around the property. Can you colour him in? Picture Jane Redfern Jones

Can you solve these anagrams? They are all

Can you say these tongue-twisters?

types of fruit.

Red lorry, yellow lorry.

ANNABA LEPPA GANORE PEARG CHEAP WIKI MULP TRASERRWBy RAECTINEN

Which wristwatches are Swiss wristwatches? A skunk sat on a stump and thunk the stump stunk, but the stump thunk the skunk stunk. Greek grapes Many an anemone sees an enemy anemone.

DID YOU KNOWâ&#x20AC;Ś Butterflies taste with their hind feet.? And< every night, wasps bite into the stem of a plant, lock their mandibles into position, stretch out at right angles to the stem, and, with legs dangling, fall asleep.


children

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Holiday wordsearch It’s nearly school holiday time so here’s a fun wordsearch full of things to do on holiday and places to go! Words can go in any direction. Just to make it a little bit harder one of the words listed isn’t there! Do you know which one?

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Erddig, Chirk Castle, Ty Mawr, Bellevue, Park, Alyn Waters, Football, swim, picnic, play, draw, holiday, walk, run, dance, friends, fun,

Jokes… Why did the chicken get in trouble? Because it used fowl language! What's little and quick and has 32 wheels? A spider on roller skates! Why did the chicken cross the Internet? To get to the other site! What do sheep do on sunny days? Have a baa - baa - cue! What do you call the pub on Mars? A Mars Bar!


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Fantastic fun We have all had a bad dream at some point and know that this can be a very scary experience, especially for children. Sometimes the dreams can be so scary that children can become afraid to go to bed at night for fear of having another scary dream. A good way to tackle these fears, or just a fun activity if you are lucky enough to have only sweet dreams is to make a dreamcatcher. Dreamcatchers have been part of the Native American culture for generations. They believe that the night air is filled with dreams both good and bad. The dreamcatcher when hung near or over your bed swinging freely in the air catches the bad dreams in its net and they then perish with the first light of the new day. The good dreams spiral around the web and pass through the centre and back to you. Traditionally dreamcatchers are made from a hoop made from a bendable twig about a foot long. Have an adult make a hoop and wrap a short piece of thin wire around the overlapping

ends. Cut a few feet of twine and tie one end to the twig hoop. String a few beads onto the twine and push the beads towards the tied end. Wrap the twine around the other side of the hoop. The next step is to string a few more beads on the twine and then wrap the twine around the far side of the hoop. Repeat this until you have an interesting webbing design. Tie a short length of twine on the hoop, string a bead or two on it and then tie a feather onto the end. Repeat this until you have two or three hanging feathers and then hang the dreamcatcher near your bed. A simpler method for younger children is to use a strong paper plate. To make this you need to cut out the centre so you are left with just the rim. This can be painted or coloured for a decorative touch. When the rim is completely dry punch holes every inch or two with a hole punch all the way round the rim. String some yarn back and forth from one side to the other to form a web design. If you have some beads these can be strung on to the yarn as you go along. At the bottom of the dreamcatcher tie a piece of yarn ( about fifteen inches long ) letting the ends dangle freely from the paper plate rim. Then all that is left to do is attach some feathers and beads to the ends. Repeat this until you have two or three pieces of yarn hanging down . Attach a piece of yarn to the top of your dream catcher to hang it above your bed. Whichever method you choose will be fun and are enjoyed by both boys and girls. You could choose yarn , beads and feathers to co ordinate with your bedroom or go on a scavenger hunt to find some feathers for a more natural look. You can follow what Sharonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s up to at facebook.com/ fantasticfunhouse..


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history A history of Clocks and watches in the Wrexham area Over the centuries methods of timekeeping have responded to changes in technology, fashion and popularity. Timekeeping has become more accurate; clocks and watches have become more readily available, no longer the prerogative of the wealthy. For much of their recent history they have been respected items of furniture or jewellery as well as having practical value. Standard Time Sir Sanford Fleming invented standard time in 1878. Alarm Clocks An early prototype of the alarm clock was invented by the Greeks around 250 BC. The Greeks built a water clock where the raising waters would both keep time and eventually hit a mechanical bird that triggered an alarming whistle. The first mechanical alarm clock was invented by Levi Hutchins of Concord, New Hampshire, in 1787. However, the ringing bell alarm on his clock could ring only at 4 am. On October 24, 1876 a mechanical wind-up alarm clock that could be set for any time was patented (#183,725) by Seth E Thomas. Self-winding Watch Swiss John Harwood invented the self-winding watch in 1923. Wrexham Clocks From the seventeenth Century onwards clock making developed in Wrexham as in many other Welsh settlements. At that time, Wrexham was a thriving market town at the centre of a prosperous agricultural area. The coal, iron and lead industries were also expanding. The Eighteenth Century therefore saw the rise of several wealthy landowners including the Wynns, the Lloyds and the Yorkes. The long-case clock became a fashionable item of furniture and intricately ornamented watches were stylish items of jewellery. Local research has revealed that between 1650 and 1900 Wrexham had a considerable clock and watch making trade. There is strong evidence of a family tradition in the industry, son following father. The Ratcliffes were working in Wrexham by the 1960’s; the Hampsons between 1719 and 1780 and the Fernals around 1770. Some of the earliest clock makers were Humphrey and William Maysmore of Town Hill between 1716 and 1730. Hampson clocks were particularly well made and the family is considered to be amongst the elite of the early clock makers. Many local brass dialled clocks produced by the Hampson family still exist in the Wrexham area. In 1728, Thomas Hampson moved into the High Street of Wrexham, where he worked in a building known as ‚The Clock‛. By 1748 he had moved to Charles Street. His sons followed him in the trade and it may also be that the family is related to other clock making families within the area.


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competition

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This month’s winner... WIN A MEAL FOR TWO and a bottle of wine in our Best Travelled Competition. This month’s winner of the Coed-y-Glyn & District Life Travelling Mag Competition are Clive and Kay Richards from the Ithens on the 17th floor of the Grand Hotel, Arrecife, Lanzarote.

To enter take our magazine on holiday or a day out and photograph it. You or someone else should be in it and a picture of a landmark needs to be recognisable. There is a Prize of a meal for two and a bottle of wine, donated by the Squire Yorke, for the best photograph printed. Send your entries to margot@coed-y-glyn.com or to the address on page 2. Our Travelling Mag Competition is open to everyone who has our magazine in their possession and not just residents of the District.

The Squire Yorke

- Your feedback could win you £1,000. Simply log on

to www.tellusandwin.co.uk and enter the following code 2408. Participants should be 18 years and over.

The Squire Yorke is offering 2 free desserts for Any entries sent in but not printed.


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Phil Benfield & Sons Professional Treecare Tree Surgery, Felling and Hedge-Cutting Fully Insured ~ Free Quotes Tel 01978 822465 / 0780 3317131 Longridge, Newbridge, Wrexham, LL14 3JQ NPTC Qualified Over 30 years experience Seasoned Hardwood Logs For Sale

T.L.C. Nursing and Homecare Plus Ltd For all your nursing and homecare needs Director and Registered Manager: Paul Murphy RGN—Licenced by C.S.S.i.W.

Tel/Fax: 01978 351596

Flowers on the Corner Designer Florist

Fresh flowers & plants, wedding designs, birthdays & anniversaries, funeral tributes, corporate work, gifts & cards, balloons.

Gatewen Road, Wrexham, LL11 6YA

01978 720362 By appointment only. Weekdays 8.30am—6.30pm Saturday 8.30am—1.00pm

The Old Post Office, Victoria Road, Wrexham,

01978 311774

www.flowersonthecorner.net

Secretarial & Business Support Confidential. CV on request Ring Margot on 0770 7992387

JW Jones Electrical Services Reliable & responsible electrical contractors. All types of domestic work undertaken, no job too small. 01978 355655 / 07711821996 jwjelectrical@btinternet.com NICEIC Approved Contractor

Chris’ Luxury Travel •Airport Transfers •All UK airports covered •Executive hire •Same day courier service •Any distance •6 seater executive vehicle •credit card facility available •Free estimates

07958 730 077 ~ 0800 118 24 52 chrisluxurytravel@live.co.uk Mention Coed-y-Glyn Life for £5 discount off any airport transfer


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Call us on 01978 359401 / 07521 273507

Bryn-y-Grog Antiques Centre Marchwiel on A 525 Wrexham/Whitchurch Rd. 17th/18th Century Furniture, also Pine/Oak items, Ceramic, Glass, Jewellery, Pottery, Pictures, Coins, Collectables etc . Instant cash paid for unwanted goods. Up to 40 Dealers buying and selling – bring your unwanted goods for immediate cash pay out.

01978 355 555 – 10am to 5pm Daily

CAREER COUNTDOWN Job searching involves more than just waiting for your dream post to be advertised, writes Jane Redfern Jones. Opportunities for career development have never been better, but getting your dream job involves good planning, organization, persistence and patience. A well-planned path to your ideal career will enhance your personal development and greatly improve the chances of achieving your desired position. Although some private sector jobs may be filled without being advertised, most jobs such as those in the NHS and Council will be. Cathy Taylor, RCN nursing careers adviser, says: ‘Many employers will have someone in mind for the job, through word of mouth or if someone has been acting in the role temporarily. ‘Using networking skills, undertaking informal visits, shadowing and sending off speculative CVs are still worth the effort as employers will find it very hard not to be influenced by getting to know a potential candidate before the interview.’ Keep an eye out for jobs advertised in journals, local and national newspapers and on the internet. Many companies now advertise positions on their own websites. Be wary of taking the first job you are offered unless you are certain that it fits your career plans. Always take time to research an employer beforehand. If you do get an interview for a new job, arrange an informal visit before the interview. By setting realistic targets and actively seeking opportunities, you will soon reach the top of your career ladder. Believe in yourself and others will too.


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Offers valid until 30/6/11, subject to availability (while stocks last). Prices apply to private motorists only and include VAT. Offers correct at time of going to print and we reserve the right to amend prices without prior notification. Discounts only available in centre and apply to standard forecourt prices. 10% discount cannot be used in conjunction with Price Promise. We recommend that valves are fitted to tubeless tyres and that the wheels are balanced; a charge will be made for this service.

Find the Coed-y-Glyn & District Life Magazine on Facebook at Www.facebook.com/communitymagazine Page 23


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WHAT’S ON…

Midsummer Sunrise Walk 21st June See the sun rise over Chirk Castle's historic parkland on the longest day of the year. Enjoy a guided walk with the Head Warden, followed by a delicious full Welsh breakfast. Venue: Chirk Castle. Time: sunrise (call for details). Contact Chirk Castle on 01691 777701 or email wyoc@wrexham.gov.uk. Box Office: 01691 777701 - advanced booking is required. Price: £15 includes breakfast.

Summer Solstice evening walk along the River Dee in Erbistock 21st June. Meet the ranger in the Boat Inn car park. (Grid Ref: SJ 354413). 4.5 miles/2.5 hours. Wear boots/ sturdy shoes. No Dogs. Snack. Grade B+. Meet the ranger in the Boat Inn car park. Starts at 6.30pm. This is event is suitable for Suitable for 16+. Contact Country Parks on or email countryparks@wrexham.gov.uk.

The Orchestra of Welsh National Opera 22nd June. Operatic and Orchestral Highlights. This evening of operatic highlights, brought to life by the world-class Orchestra of Welsh National Opera, is a perfect night out for Opera lovers and also those new to opera. Soprano: Naomi Harvey; Tenor: Geraint Dodd; Conductor: James Lowe. Special chamber concerts will also take place at Wrexham County Borough Museum. Visit wno.org.uk/wrexham for details. Venue: William Aston Hall, Glyndwr University. 7.30pm. Contact Wrexham TIC on 01978 292015 or email wyoc@wrexham.gov.uk. Price: Balcony £15, stalls £12 / £10 , front stalls £9 / £7.

Wrexham and Borderlands Business Fair 22nd June. Business Fairs UK invites you to this exhibition, which will showcase around 40 companies from a wide variety of business sectors. Also, workshops and demonstrations; sales and marketing clinics, 'Ask the Expert'; business advice and information, business start-up advice; networking zones and other special attractions. Venue: Catrin Finch Centre, Glyndwr University. 10.30am - 3.30pm. Contact Glyndwr University on 0151 709 8932 or email kathy@businessfairsuk.com

Welsh National Opera in Wrexham 24th June. This programme of beautiful music for Wind instruments includes Mozart’s Serenade for Wind Octet Eb K375 and Gounod Little Symphony for Winds (1885). This concert will finish at 6.45pm which allows audience members time to make their way to William Aston Hall for the evening concert at 7.30pm. Venue: Wrexham County Borough Museum. 6.00pm. Contact WCBC Museum & Archives on 01978 297460 / 01978 292015 or email museum@wrexham.gov.uk. Advanced booking is required. Price: £5.00.

Music in the Park 24th June. Free summer evening, live music concerts from the bandstand. Venue: Bellevue Park. 7.00 – 9.00pm. Contact Richard Aram on 01978 264150 or email bellevue.park@wrexham.gov.uk.

Local Celebration of National Gypsy Roma Traveller History Month. 24th June. A community celebration of local Gypsy and Traveller culture. There will be exhibitions and activities, children's activities and refreshments. The purpose is to provide an informal setting in which to celebrate National Gypsy Roma Traveller History Month and learn about Traveller culture. Members of the Multi Agency Forum will also be in attendance. Please note there is limited parking available at Bellvue Park. Venue: Bellvue Park, Wrexham. 1.00pm start. Contact Gillian Grainger on 01978 292535 or email gillian.grainger@wrexham.gov.uk.

Funky Flowers Workshop 25th June. Learn how to make fantastic funky flowers from old pop bottles. Please bring your own plastic bottles if possible. Venue: Oriel Wrecsam. 1.00pm 3.00pmContact Oriel Wrecsam on 01978 292093 or email oriel.learning@wrecsam.gov.uk. Price: free.


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WHAT’S ON…

Wrexham Mind Body and Spirit Fair. 26th June. We provide a relaxed, positive environment where people can try alternative or complimentary therapies, explore their own spiritual side and acquire beautiful hand-crafted gifts. The exhibitors attending vary with each event but you will always find mediums, clairvoyants, tarot readers, aura photographers, spiritual healers and alternative therapists. You will also find a wide range of goods on sale such as crystals, ethnic jewellery and crafts, books, aromatic products and much, much more. There are also Talks and Demonstrations throughout the day. If you need some quiet space, visit our Chill-Out room, a quiet place with relaxing music and a candle to help focus your thoughts. Visit www.energyevents.biz for more information. Venue: Catrin Finch Centre, Glyndwr University, Mold Road, Wrexham.

See Cranford at Erddig The Chapterhouse Theatre Company enters its 12th season of touring open-air theatre at some of the most beautiful country houses, castles and heritage sites across the UK and Ireland. The company has established itself as one of the most successful and acclaimed touring company’s in the country. The local venue to Wrexham is of course Erddig. For many years it has played host to shows from Chapterhouse and other touring companies with plays performed in the Rose Garden. Open-air theatre lends itself perfectly to pre-show picnics creating an enjoyable and memorable experience for the audience. A wonderful opportunity for friends and family to sit back and enjoy the pleasure of each other’s company whilst indulging in a glass of chilled summer wine and watching a fantastic evening of entertainment. The first show of the summer is on Saturday June 25th at 7.30pm. It is Cranford written by Laura Turner and adapted from the novel by Elizabeth Gaskell. Relax into a lazy summer’s evening of delightful entertainment as you are transported to the sleepy Victorian town of Cranford. This brand-new adaptation of Cranford will bring a smile to young and old alike as the adventures and dramas of life in the countryside are brought to you as part of the national celebrations of Gaskill's bicentenary. Tickets are going fast so make sure you reserve a place in the garden before it is sold out. Prices are £12 for adults, £8 for children and a family ticket is £35. Bring a picnic to enjoy before curtain up. The performance starts at 7.30pm on Saturday June 25th and the gates open at 6.30pm. Call now on 01978 355314 to book your place.

Look out for the NEW local website

www.visitwrexham.org. Find local events, places to visit, history, wildlife and much, much more!


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In the garden Make the beds Summer bedding is an ideal way of providing a quick fix. If you havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t planted out pots and containers yet, there is still time, but use a loam-based compost, as it has the guts to feed the hungry performers. Bear in mind that pelargoniums, petunia and most silver-leaved tender perennials like a bright position and will flower more profusely and over a longer period if rewarded with sunshine. Nicotianas, impatiens and even begonias can cope with a little shade, but keep them in a warm place until they are well established before putting them in the shade.

Cut back the perennials Many of the early-flowering perennials such as Papaver orientale, brunnera, tellima and the Mayflowering Geranium sylvaticum and G phaeum will have already flowered and may well be leaving a hole. Cutting them back hard to the base as soon as the flowers are over will provide a fresh crop of foliage and in some cases a second round of flowers later in the summer when things lose that fresh green that is so plentiful now. If it is dry, water thoroughly immediately afterwards, and in a fortnight new growth will cover bare ground.

Grow your own strawberries To help ripen strawberries and keep the fruit from getting splashed by mud, it is traditional to bed them down with straw. A bundle of fleece, placed under the fruit, will also work if straw is hard to come by. Alpine strawberries are far less interested in sunbathing and will keep you in fruit the summer long even in dappled shade. If you want to keep them in one place, seek out a non-running form such as "Alexander". You couldn't find a prettier groundcover under the roses.

Tie up the toms Young tomatoes should be planted outside if they haven't been already. Pinch out the side shoots and tie in loosely to canes. You wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t need to start feeding until the first truss is set. Feed with a product high in potash, such as Tomorite, to encourage fruit formation and ripening.

Keep an eye on the sweet peas Tie in sweet peas if you planted early, and if you planted late, pinch out at 6in to encourage branching. In dry weather water well or you'll see the buds aborting and energies wasted.

If you are interested in advertising your business in the Coed-y-Glyn News please email margot@coed-y-glyn.com or phone/text 0770 7992387. Sign up for a 5 month ad in the magazine and you will receive one month free. Email margot@coed-y-glyn.com for more information.


THE LAST WORD... No man is an island. Family, friends and neighbours are essential in our day to day lives. We may prefer our privacy, keep to ourselves and our perceptions of others may be completely wrong. However, by remaining aloof we may actually be building ourselves problems which leave us isolated and vulnerable when least expected. Serious stuff for the back page, but nevertheless based on personal events somewhere over the Atlantic Ocean recently. As in previous years, I have enjoyed solo trips to Vancouver Island on Canada’s west coast to visit family. I get to travel and my husband doesn’t. For the price of a ticket my beloved has his meals cooked, labelled and frozen. Cupboards are stocked and instructions left. This year my trip would be coinciding with my birthday and, not wanting to give him undue stress deciding Cadburys or Nestles, I thought I would try my luck at putting in a request. He agreed and upgraded my flight. Travelling on my own, and going against character, I prefer to keep myself to myself. I enjoy being an observer without expecting the opposite to be true. Flying ‘Premier’ was a real treat as it got me from check-in to leather seat fast. However, to point out, this was a Thomas Cook flight and not Virgin Atlantic. Nevertheless the luxury was never ending driven purely by the fact that my (small) bottom fitted the seat and the risk of developing DVT was reduced considerably by being able to stretch my entire 5’3‛

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frame in comfort. Apart from some free booze ending up in my handbag and complimentary headphones, I was travelling celebrity status. A George Clooney lookalike sat next to me reading the Guardian whilst plugged into his iPod, which suited me, this would be a no speak zone. I didn’t want his newspaper and he certainly didn’t look like a Daily Mail reader. Somewhere out to sea my anti-social resolve began to weaken as I was finding myself in a certain predicament that was proving detrimental to my stress levels. I would have to swallow my pride and ask for help. My aloofness was crumbling rapidly. Not born to be an island, I needed a bridge and this fellow passenger was my only route to getting to grips with the in-flight entertainment and the stupid freebie headphones. He was watching the Kings Speech and I wasn’t, my logic and common sense seized at passport control. Hoping a little lipstick remained and relieved I never had the cheese and onion sandwiches, I put on my best ‘can you help me’ smile followed by an ‘Excuse me please’. He had probably thought me a complete Wally since leaving British airspace but my body language had not been conducive to help<. I really enjoyed the film eventually as he did reading my newspaper. We shared sweets, enjoyed the occasional banter and the long journey turned into an enjoyable 9 hours. As Keith Foster writes in our ‘Decades’ page ‘say hello to your neighbour’, you really never know when you may need them, as I found, happily with no lasting consequences! Best regards Margot

Quiz answers: 1)Tandoori 2) Tantalus 3) Tango 4) Tangent 5) Tanka 6) Africa 7) 1,281 8) Bournemouth 9) Michigan 10) Italy.

Do you have any news to share? Email to info@coed-y-glyn.com or post to Coed-y-Glyn & District Life, PO Box 2339, Wrexham LL11 1AA.


EXCELLENT FOOD in your Town Centre So many hotels & restaurants sell cheap frozen meals made in a factory & just microwave them. Not us, we have trained chefs cooking meals to order from fresh ingredients delivered in daily & you really can taste the difference, yet still at modest prices

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SPEND THE NIGHT WITH US ROOMS from only £45 Wynnstay Arms Hotel

Wynnstay Arms Hotel Right at the heart of Wrexham Yorke Street, Wrexham LL13 8LP

Telephone - 01978- 29 -10- 10 www.wynnstay-hotel-wrexham.co.uk


Coed-y-Glyn & District Life Magazine