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NEWHOME Winter 2014

HOUSING OPTIONS

Attitude Changes in Pittsburgh’s Home Buyers

Kitchen Ideas Style With Smarts

Interior Design Trends Kacin Companies Village At Stonegate


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what’s inside NEW HOME 0

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WINTER 2014

Publisher’s Message

06 1 22 2 35 4 6 9 0

Housing Options

Pittsburgh is experiencing a shift in home ownership. Learn whether or not this is a new trend or just a temporary change in how we chase the American dream.

Kitchen Trends Interior Design for the New Builder Profile Kacin Companies Trends Year

Project Profile

Changing our

The future of kitchen

development in Penn

lifestyle and living

renovation and

provides quality

environment to save

design seems to be 

craftsmanship and

money and protect

the intersection of

authentic

taste and ease of

architecture.

our natural resources.

use, with a lot of          

A. Richard Kacin

Village at Stonegate Ray Snoznik’s housing

Township downsizes maintenance without downsizing living space.

New Construction Listings Housing

developments in our Greater Pittsburgh region.

personality thrown into the mix, in whatever proportion  the recipe calls for.

www.greaterpittsburghnewhome.com

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4 GREATER PITTSBURGH’S NEW HOME

| Winter 2014


Publisher’s Message

PUBLISHER

Kevin J. Gordon kgordon@carsonpublishing.com GRAPHIC DESIGN

Jaimee D. Greenawalt PRODUCTION

Carson Publishing, Inc. design@carsonpublishing.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Jeff Burd Erin O’Donnell Linda Simon CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

Jan Pakler Photography Carson Publishing, Inc Edgewater Realty Kacin Companies R.A. Snoznik Construction ADVERTISING SALES

Kevin J. Gordon 412-548-3823 X202 kgordon@carsonpublishing.com SPECIAL THANKS

Ray Snoznik and A. Richard Kacin, Builders Association of Metropolitan Pittsburgh, Coldwell Banker Real Estate, Dollar Bank, Heartland Homes, Howard Hanna Real Estate Services, Northwood Realty, Ryan Homes and Prudential Preferred Realty. MORE INFORMATION

Greater Pittsburgh’s NEW HOME is published quarterly by Carson Publishing, Inc., 500 McKnight Park Drive, Pittsburgh, PA 15237; www.greaterpittsburghnewhome.com 412-548-3823 No part of this magazine may be reproduced without written permission by the Publisher. All rights reserved. This information is carefully gathered and compiled in such a manner as to ensure maximum accuracy.  We cannot, and do not, guarantee either the correctness of all information furnished nor the complete absence of errors and omissions. Hence, responsibility for same neither can be, nor is, assumed.

T

he new year starts with some good data about the state of the national economy.  Within the last few weeks of 2013, unemployment claims fell, homes sales inched higher, the final GDP estimate for the third quarter jumped to 4.1% and consumer spending and sentiment moved higher.  All that information suggests that U.S. companies are doing better than expected. Pittsburgh’s economy will certainly benefit from improved national conditions.  Any additional confidence that local businesses get from a better national economy could make the difference between a mediocre 2014 or a stellar year!  One shining star for the year was our housing market, which ended up with more than 5,500 units started in the sixcounty metro area.  That’s the highest number of new homes or apartments in 15 years or more. Consider these positive statistics about our Greater Pittsburgh region:  Regional employment is at an all-time high, with 1,179,188 people working in our seven-county region;  Steady job growth is responsible for this record employment.  Our area grew 2.5 percent over the past five years;  Rising home values are up 5.8 percent, managing to climb above 2008 levels;  Lower cost of living.  When it comes to the cost of housing, utilities, groceries and other living essentials, few regions are less expensive; Young adults are moving here.  Last year, some 1,800 more people moved to the region than left, a trend that began in 2008.  And most are young adults, bringing a high level of education and their future families with them;  Crime rates nationally have fallen, and Pittsburgh still remains one of the safest major metropolitan regions in the nation! All of this good news is creating stronger consumer confidence, hopefully moving our housing market from robust recovery to boom!

www.greaterpittsburghnewhome.com

This issue of NEW HOME features Pittsburgh’s overall shift in housing options.  This trend is led mostly by younger people, where buyers place a higher value on being near lifestyle amenities—such as theaters & sporting venues—and have the desire to walk, live and work in the same place. Eco-friendly living is not just a passing trend, but a complete lifestyle. These new buyers value diversity over conformity in their homes and lifestyle.   The mortgage crises left an indelible mark on the housing market which has resulted in a reversal of the growth trend in home ownership. Over the next decade we’ll learn whether or not that’s the start of a new trend of lower ownership or just a temporary change in how we chase the American dream. In addition, you will enjoy meeting Richard Kacin and Ray Snoznik, two successful contractors servicing our housing industry for many decades. Recovery to boom... Let’s keep our fingers crossed!  All the best in 2014!

Kevin J. Gordon www.greaterpittsburghnewhome.com

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FEATURE

HOUSING

Options

6 GREATER PITTSBURGH’S NEW HOME

| Winter 2014


New home buyers looking at existing communities throughout the Pittsburgh area will notice that the architecture of homes is very similar from neighborhood to neighborhood. Historically, in Western Pennsylvania, new construction tended to follow the crowd rather than break away from the herd. Builders build what is already out there and known to sell because that is what is working; they tend not to buck the trend. That may seem like faulty logic since one would think that the more options a buyer has the better, since humans tend to like variety. Variety has its limits, however. Being daring and trying a different flavor at an ice-cream store is a $3 risk; most people would not take that risk when dealing with the single biggest investment of their lives—a new home. www.greaterpittsburghnewhome.com

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FEATURE

A

fter decades in the residential real estate market as realtor and developer, Northwood Realty Services President Tom Hosack says he sees a change in the attitude of Pittsburgh’s home buyers. The stock of existing homes is full of traditional architecture but Hosack sees a shift. “It may be just that Western PA is joining the rest of the country but Pittsburgh is getting less conservative,” he says.


P

ittsburgh has a working-class heritage and workingclass people do tend to be more conservative but there also weren’t a lot of options for buyers to try something different. Breaking away from conservative tastes in homes is a chicken or egg kind of thing. Within the last five years, a host of factors – an improving economy, demographic changes, Pittsburgh’s ‘hipness’ and a change in how buyers think – came together to influence builders to give something new a try. It turned out there were people willing to try something new. The real spark for all of this change, however, was the 2008 recession when a lot of potential buyers became renters. The individuals who were coming into homeownership could no longer get mortgages, or pay mortgages, and instead chose to rent. As home values declined across the country and lending tightened, apartment vacancy rates steadily plummeted. In a market like Pittsburgh, with fairly high apartment occupancy levels already, the increase in renters pushed vacancy to nearly zero. The growing workforce for the companies exploring the Marcellus Shale formation became another source of demand for rental units. Apartments became a hot commodity and more were needed.

than banks, were encouraging developers to build apartments. Large institutional lenders made it known that there was money available to build apartments, and builders listened. These firms—insurance companies and investment lenders— saw apartments as a safe way to get some return on their investment, especially at a time when everything else looked unsafe. The new construction of apartment buildings is probably the most obvious change in housing. Anyone who has driven around Pittsburgh lately would have noticed numerous apartment buildings going up. Pittsburgh is a market that historically has had few new apartments in any given year, but the number of new apartment units in 2013 is nearly twice as many as the number built in all of 2012.

The impetus for new apartments also came from companies who wanted to lend money for new construction. Generally speaking, the financing mechanism for apartments is not banks, but rather, large institutional lenders like insurance companies. Insurance companies make money by investing the premiums that are paid to them in order to meet their commitments for return on investment. Apartments were being pushed by investors because there was no better place to put money. This situation really fuelled the increase in this type of housing. Investment interest was below 1% and institutional lenders, other 8 GREATER PITTSBURGH’S NEW HOME

| Winter 2014

Even someone living in Pittsburgh with little to no interest in the housing market would notice all of this new construction. However, with all of this growth, there are legitimate concerns about the supply of apartment units growing to the point that rents will then decline. There are currently 4,000 apartment units in the pipeline, which is much greater than in the past in Pittsburgh. Although younger people—who make up one of the bigger groups of apartment renters—are continuing to move into the Greater Pittsburgh area, the trend towards apartment renting may top off as economic stability returns to pre-2008 levels. Marty Gillespie, president of Heartland Homes sees the apartment boom as hav-


ing more life but feels that Pittsburgh is ready for a change in style. He expects to try a different product in development projects he is planning with partner Dan Caste.

population of Pittsburgh is getting older while at the same time, adults under 35 are rapidly moving here for technology and natural gas jobs, both of which are job fields that continue to grow.

“There aren’t many cities where you see the three-story walkup apartment building being built, outside of Pittsburgh,” he observes. “We are developing the former Highland Country Club property on Gass Road in Ross and the Meeder Farm in Cranberry and plan to build townhomes for rent in both.”

While apartments have been on the upswing, it is pretty safe to say that one of the bigger victims of the housing crises was the condominium. There is no other category of home that experienced such steep declines in value in most markets around the US. Until recently, financing for condos was nearly impossible, for those interested either in buying or building. The desire to have alternatives to traditional housing, the new move towards urbanism, and the fact that the overabundance of condos has been absorbed has led to the condo becoming attractive again.

On the upside, in the Pittsburgh market, the two demographic groups that represent the highest share of renters—adults under 35 and over 55—are the two fastest growing groups in the area. The current

The new construction of apartment buildings is probably the most obvious change in housing. Anyone who has driven around Pittsburgh lately would have noticed numerous apartment buildings going up.

While there is relatively little chance that another large project like 151 First Avenue or Three PNC will be started any time soon, smaller projects in healthy niches in the Pittsburgh market are going forward again. Another market that is also moving forward is housing for 55 and over, which is still a growing segment in the housing industry. 15 years ago, as developers began to pay attention to the aging population in America, the trend was towards more institutional solutions for adults 55 and over. The institutional solutions included large independent facilities that connected to assisted living and nursing care so that the transition from one facility to the next would be easier. In less than a decade, it became clear that the individuals in that age range found that style of living to be not independent enough. Instead, they felt that style of living was the first step towards a nursing home. Builders and developers responded to this quickly and the zero maintenance quad-home emerged as the next big thing for 55 and overs. Communities like Adams Crossing in the north or Arden Mills in the South Hills flourished. Builders like Weaver Homes and Hawthorne Partners grew significantly by serving this market. But over the past year or two there has been evidence

www.greaterpittsburghnewhome.com

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that some 55 and overs are still searching for a different option in housing. Although the ease of zero maintenance living is desirable, potential residents wished for it to feel more like a neighborhood rather than a retirement community. These changes in preferences have also influenced the owners of continuum of care facilities, like Concordia or Lutheran SeniorLife. New construction now boasts 1,400-1,500 sq. ft. apartments and amenities that are similar to what a single-family homeowner would expect. This model recognizes that the older buyer is happy to give up things like lawn maintenance and side walk shoveling but doesn’t want to turn to rocking chairs just yet.

10 GREATER PITTSBURGH’S NEW HOME

they can receive a customized list of opportunities. All apartments have patios and balconies, and feature wood pillars, high ceilings, and rooms decorated in soft, neutral colors. Instead, the new places for 55 and overs that are being built have much more upscale amenities. Owners of these communities for older residents offer the same lifestyle amenities as the private, residential maintenance-free lifestyle communities. One of the newest communities, Lutheran SeniorLife’s Overbrook Pointe, is located in Mars. It is a maintenance-free living community; however it offers a wide array of activities for its residents, all of whom fill out a survey about their interests and activities so that

| Winter 2014

This 55-an-over demographic group has been the target audience for Traditions of America as well. This Radnor, PA builder is currently developing a new neighborhood in Ohio Township called Sewickley Ridge. Sewickley Ridge will have 241 homes, including a mix of single-family and garden homes along with a 7,700 square foot clubhouse, fitness center and heated swimming pool. According to Nathan Jameson, director of operations for Tradi-


tions of America, construction of the first homes began in October. “Because of the success of a previous project, Liberty Hills, people were able to envision the new homes and what the lifestyle looks like!” “I think the story of Sewickley Hills is that people aren’t leaving Allegheny County after all. The higher taxes are offset by the savings from our homes,” he says. We talk to our buyers about the total cost of ownership in our communities. When you consider the cost of maintaining an older home, the cost of a health club or of maintaining a swimming pool every year, all of those are included in the amenities of Sewickley Ridge.” In general, buyers now are looking for even more upgraded finishes, with those finishes that were considered to be an “upgrade” 10 years ago now viewed as being standard. Perhaps the most interesting reason these standards have changed is a result of popular televi-

sion shows. With shows like “House Hunters” and “Selling New York”, HGTV makes people feel that the only way to add value to a home is through stainless steel appliances and granite countertops. These messages on tele-

vision shows have permeated buyers’ consciousness and have raised the bar on their expectations of finishes. With this constant reinforcement of the idea that investing in high-end finishes pays off in the end, new home buyers are

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looking to take advantage of the upgrades available when customizing their homes.

The urban market is not the only place where limited land is affecting buyers’ tastes in finishes. Buyers are willing to accept a townhome that has a fairly small yard in order to live in a nice, more upscale home. 12 GREATER PITTSBURGH’S NEW HOME

| Winter 2014

“I think people are looking even more at upgrading the products that go into a home without expanding the square footage of the homes,” says Michael Kamon, partner in Signature Homes, which is building an upscale duplex community called Fields of Nicholson in Franklin Park. “This goes to automation and security, as well as the finishes of the home. I think the buyer is looking for more out of the home.” Kamon’s buyer tends to be an empty-nester looking to move into a smaller but well appointed home but the same sense of upgraded home is also driving the buying decisions for homes that are in the 2,000 to 2,500 square foot range. That trend seems to be especially true in townhomes. Because of the nature of townhomes,


it is difficult to vary the architecture and layouts from one to the other so the finishes and amenities are how a buyer can distinguish his or her home from the neighbor’s. The emphasis on finishes is especially pronounced in newer urban projects. Whether the home is a row house or condominium, urban dwellings generally are smaller and less flexible in their floor plan design because of the space constraints. Upgraded finishes help a homeowner or landlord distinguish their property from another. It’s difficult to make a splash with a layout in an urban townhome or apartment but top-of-theline finishes and appliances can add a premium to the value of a property. The urban market is not the only place where limited land is affecting buyers’ tastes in finishes. Buyers are willing to accept a townhome that has a fairly small yard in order to live in a nice, more upscale home. Although having a yard is still something many new buyers are

The Art of Downtown Living

interested in having, when their budget necessitates cuts be made from the wishlist, many are willing to part with acres and not with stainless-steel appliances. Townhomes are replacing the detached single-family starter home that has been the norm for decades because the cost of land has pushed the price of a modest home to up over $250,000. That is not to say homeowners have abandoned the idea of having a big lot, it is just that the economics of the market have pushed buyers to think differently. “I think the attached product – particularly the townhome – is becoming much more prevalent on the new construction front. I personally think that is not being driven by the demographics of the buyers but by the cost structure of the developer,” explains Northwood’s Tom Hosack. “When I first started in this business people paid $25,000 for a half-acre lot and it’s a dramatically different world now. People are paying $100,000-plus for a quarter acre lot. So I think it’s forcing

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the entry level buyer to get into the townhome environment.” Although townhomes are becoming increasingly popular, Hosack notes that the market for the traditional large suburban home has not gone away. “I still see that there is demand – not a huge demand – for the larger more rural feeling lots, the two-to-five acre lot,” he says. “The cost tends to be so high and there also aren’t that many custom builders out there anymore but there are still buyers.” Hosack points out that The Summit in Marshall Township, which had only a couple of homes in its first couple of years is attracting buyers. “There have been 11 contracts there this year.” Hosack feels the economics of the land are also having an influence on one of the more popular architectural styles of recent years: the quad-plex product. “There was a quad rage for a while but that has cooled down somewhat because

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the quad is not nearly as efficient on the ground,” Hosack notes. “People also talk about one-level living being so popular but I’m not seeing it. We still like having an upstairs. Buyers may like having a first floor master but they want the other bedrooms on a second floor. Gillespie made a similar observation about one-level living. “We have an office in Raleigh, NC. There was a lot of demand for first floor master bedrooms there from young people,” he remarks. “It wasn’t from twenty something’s but the couples that were in their thirties and forties, whether or not they had kids. That’s not a trend I’ve seen here in Western PA yet.” Whether or not one-level living becomes a trend in the Pittsburgh market is something that, as of right now, time can only tell. One trend that is taking hold in Pittsburgh has helped boost the residential

The last three to four years have seen the population of metropolitan Pittsburgh increase after several decades of decline. This influx of population occurred during the recession, when new construction dropped by almost half, which left a shortage in the supply of available new housing.

market. The last three to four years have seen the population of metropolitan Pittsburgh increase after several decades of decline. This influx of population occurred during the recession, when new construction dropped by almost half, which left a shortage in the supply of available new housing. The increase of people moving to Pittsburgh during a time of low supply helped to accelerate the appreciation of housing and encouraged landlords to raise their rents. By this time in 2013, it may no longer seem like living Downtown is all that trendy but the growth in residents in the Golden Triangle is by far the most significant housing trend in the last decade. In the last 15 years the downtown area has seen several major new construction projects, as well as renovations of old buildings into new apartments and all filled up rapidly. The overall trend in population growth and increasing rents is affecting options Downtown more than any other area.

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14 GREATER PITTSBURGH’S NEW HOME

| Winter 2014


Since the new millennium, when the 2000 census showed 3,500 people living Downtown, the population has grown by 5,000 more residents, according to the Pittsburgh Downtown Partnership’s 2013 annual report. At one time, observers were concerned about the inability of developers to build affordable housing Downtown but the growth of demand and of living options has made it clear that; A) the perception of affordable is different for city dwellers; and B) that the price of living Downtown isn’t a deterrent to growth. With demand being sky-high, what incentive do developers have to make units affordable? Five years ago, the rents at the Penn Garrison Lofts were $1.25/square foot; the rents in 2013 have reached $2.00/ square foot and higher. The demand is so high that rents will continue to go up for the foreseeable future. Those conditions are attracting higher-priced and more extravagant projects. Although this is a good thing, it is making Downtown very expensive.

This leaves the door open for someone to develop downtown housing that is affordable but with the costs of construction rising, the more likely reaction by the market will be for development of cooler urban housing options in the next ring outside of Downtown that is currently underdeveloped. There is a growing demand from younger people who are moving into the city, who are not able or willing to pay the rents or sales prices for the higher end housing options in the Golden Triangle but who want to be near the action. With rents now nearly as high in South Side or the Shadyside/East Liberty corridor, the neighborhood that is experiencing a boom in new housing options is Lawrenceville. If you want to get ahead of the next trendy area, look for interesting options for living in the Strip, on the North Side or West End.

the desire to walk, live and work in the same place. Eco-friendly living is not just a passing trend, but a complete lifestyle. These buyers value diversity over conformity in their homes. The mortgage crises left an indelible mark on the housing market which has resulted in a reversal of the growth trend in home ownership. Over the next decade we’ll learn whether or not that’s the start of a new trend of lower ownership or just a temporary change in how we chase the American dream. In Pittsburgh, the shakeup created the chance for a whole different stock of housing options. Regardless of the bigger picture trends, Pittsburghers have caught a glimpse of the variety of housing options that exist and they will want more. NH

Pittsburgh has experienced a shift in housing, led mostly by younger people, where buyers place a higher value on being near lifestyle amenities—such as theaters & sporting venues—and have

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Interior Design Trends That Help Save Money, Your Health, And The Planet!

16 GREATER PITTSBURGH’S NEW HOME

| Winter 2014


It’s no secret that people are living longer. It’s also no secret that people are spending their later years in and out of ideal health, or with new needs that require they adapt their lifestyle and living environment. And with a longer life, comes the need to budget more aggressively—to prudently plan the expenditure of retirement funds and monthly allowances so that as much comfort and efficiency can be maximized in a home for the duration of the owners’ living years. It’s a time when we all hear about the effects of globalization on our everyday choices; how our decisions about building materials and where to build impact the earth and future generations. It’s become such an important consideration that new standards have been emphasized and enforced by industry organizations in order to protect our natural resources from over harvesting. In turn, builders and owners are provided with economic

incentives for abiding by these new standards. This ultimately results in cost savings during renovation, or at least a return on investment (ROI) after building a home with energy savings built into the master plan. Is it possible for universal design to meet the standards of older owners and to also save them money when it’s time to sell? Is it possible that new interior design will be using reclaimed and recycled materials so that manufacturing costs and fuel costs will be minimized for the owner? Is it also possible that natural resources like sunlight, wood, and energy will be what determines the blueprint of a house and all that goes inside of it? Is it possible for appliances, those items of convenience notorious for consuming energy, to actually be the first step in replenishing the earth’s resources? The answer to all of these questions is “YES.”

www.greaterpittsburghnewhome.com

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F

irst, there is the actual home itself and the decisions made that will affect its use by an extended family and aging owners. How “universally designed” the home is will also affect the resale value. Universal design is simply a method of considering the many possible needs of those living in the house. It’s not unusual to find extended families, non-traditional families, or aging owners building homes that have wider hallways, modified bathrooms, and kitchens with lower cabinetry and two-toned countertops to highlight edges and sharp corners. Builder David Bachman from Sewickley says that the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is often a good guideline to build by when dealing with clients who plan to age in place. “Zero step showers, bigger bathrooms, wider doors and hallways are what the clients need and want. Cabinetry may cost a bit more, but most of these clients would upgrade anyway—most ADA cabinets are not excessively decorative.” Such features aren’t necessarily just for older homeowners, but for extended families using strollers as well as wheelchairs, or for homes with greater need for intergenerational comfort. There is a certain amount of leeway when designing a home for such clients and for owners aging in place and those with special needs. Together with the builder, it’s possible to modify guidelines to various degrees to meet the level of personalization needed. In bathrooms, where accidents often occur (slippery surfaces, early morning and nocturnal activity when light is minimal and people are groggy), it’s especially important for even traditional designs to consider modifications for safety purposes. “In baths, while we utilize ADA principles, we do not always follow it to the full degree. An example is the 5’ radius in the bathroom. We can get the 18 GREATER PITTSBURGH’S NEW HOME

proper side loading commode space, but often the client will not want the full radius. I call that ADA lite,” Bachman says. Universal Design Vs. Aging in Place Universal design and aging in place design serve similar purposes, but are usually executed at different points in a home’s lifecycle. If a home is traditionally designed, then adding universal design elements to it would be like providing a spoon with a bowl of ice cream. Can the ice cream be eaten without the spoon? Sure, but it’s a lot more comfortable and convenient with it. Universal design augments the layout and design of a house, making it possible for greater, and more varied, use by a spectrum of individuals. It serves the needs of aging individuals, but also those

who may be in their 20s and buying their first home. It’s simply a method of making life easier for the owner; for instance, lower cabinets and wider hallways. This means that multi-generational families (think wheelchairs and strollers traversing the same hall, or a zero-grade entrance front door for icy days when toddlers and elders are walking to the sidewalk) can easily live in the home from the start, without the need to call in specialists later

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to add on, or modify, existing structures. Custom homes and production builders are quickly catching on that this is a useful trend that encompasses the requirements of many of their buyers, if not presently, then definitely in the future. Certified Aging in Place Specialists (CAPS) are usually called to make very specific modifications to a design that will allow aging owners, or those with special needs, to live safely and comfortably in the home. It’s an expense usually made later in home ownership, whereas universal design is an upfront cost because it involves immediate add-ons in anticipation of possibly making aging in place modifications more efficient and less noticeable. If prices for universal design in the beginning stages of home design seem prohibitive, realize that the cost to artfully, and inconspicuously, incorporate grab bars, or to widen hallways later, may be even more costly without the proper foundation to do so. Also, as universal design becomes a more commonplace option from production builders and custom builders, the price points for it will vary thanks to market competition and how extensive the owner’s needs are. Perhaps the most obvious difference between aging in place and universal design is that the latter is oftentimes not as obvious as the former. Universal design can afford to be more aesthetically-conscious because it usually happens as part of a design, not an afterthought. The National Association of Home Builders has many members who are CAPS and universal design specialists who are finding benefit in combining both design philosophies in a single home. For instance, a recessed pocket in the shower wall to accommodate a grab bar when


needed. CAPS design isn’t as focused on aesthetics as universal design. That’s why elements of universal design make the best aesthetic sense and are best implemented right away, such as a stepless front porch that blends well with the rest of the home if done beautifully and professionally. Until now, CAPS specialists have wonderfully managed to synthesize many factors: budgetary restriction, function, and looks. When combined with universal design, the variable of aesthetics becomes easier to perfect. Since universal design is becoming more popularly requested, builders are at an advantage if they capitalize on its many benefits. With more marketplace demand comes better chances for affordability and more appealing, or innovative, options. Every project is an opportunity to use universal design and to educate owners about its function and convenience, all without sacrificing attractive design. Bill Owens, CAPS, CGR teaches universal design and CAPS design throughout the country and believes that knowing how to use both, as well as synthesizing the best of both, is vital for remaining a competitive builder and a happy homeowner: “As for the future of housing, universal design is truly a paradigm shift in how we approach design and how we build houses.” For the Multi-Generational Family For those expecting to remain in their home as they age, or who must make space for parents or aging family members, there are a few renovation options that don’t negatively affect resale value. Bachman notes that tight compartmentalization of a first floor is the antithesis of what most people look for when renovating for singlefloor living. Citing that many of his clients love the airiness and light that an open floor plan creates, they try to make first floor living an addition renovation, versus sacrificing existing (even “unused”) space for the master suite. Most buyers prefer an open floor plan, but in the case of space restriction, the next best thing is to build in the space least used. “When we cannot add on a bedroom for space or economic reasons, we typically put the bedroom in the dining room.”

“From my experience, people are green to the extent it effects the green in their wallet. In other words, they want energy efficient homes/additions as long as there is an economic payback.

Julie Rost of Prudential Preferred Realty, Pittsburgh office, agrees that lower level “in-law” suites can actually be a draw for some buyers, and can possibly positively affect value. “Assuming you have the space, lower level ‘In-Law Suites’ are a great way to incorporate extended family while also building value in your home. Carving out an additional bedroom and adding a full bath can make that happen.” With economic fluctuation and the growing number of young adults moving back in with their families, the ‘In-Law’ suites aren’t really just for in-laws anymore, rather they serve a multitude of purposes that makes the investment extremely attractive for buyers who either want to age in place, or who have lifestyles that necessitate self-sufficient quarters. It’s never worth it, as far as resale value is concerned, to add kitchenette space though. “What you use as an In-law suite can also easily work for families with live-in nannies, grown children, and longterm guests so you’re protected on the sell side,” says Rost.

Much like aging in place elements that help the existing residents, Rost corroborates that upgrades to one family may not render financial gains at resale. “Always bear in mind that the custom upgrades you ‘splurge’ for are more likely to be considered investments in your lifestyle and not necessarily an investment in your investment. Solid ROIs come when countertop and cabinetry materials are proportionate to the home’s value.” There’s a fine balance, however, between “greening” to preserve the integrity of the environment and greening simply for an ROI. Bachman’s clients mainly go for the middle road, making energy-efficient changes that might not be the most aggressive available, but which provide a fairly solid ROI as soon as possible. “From my experience, people are green to the extent it effects the green in their wallet. In other words, they want energy efficient homes/ additions as long as there is an economic payback. Working as an Energy Star homebuilder, I have found that there is an ROI ‘sweet spot’ of a HERS rating between the high ‘50’s and the high ‘60’s—most clients will choose a package that will yield a rating in that range. To get much lower, the return on investment is not good.” Of course, utility costs are always a concern when building, or renovating, a home, and though it sometimes make sense utility-wise to compartmentalize the home layout so that only used areas are being heated or cooled, Bachman doesn’t foresee a trend towards radically modifying aesthetics for the sake of green initiatives. “Clients do not want to sacrifice the aesthetics and bright, open floor plan that they want. The same thinking applies to renovation.” Making the Great Outdoors Greener In climates like Southwestern Pennsylvania, there are a few marked months of respite from the cold, and those months are relished like water after drought. Spending time outdoors is not so much a luxury as it is a necessity when most of the year has been spent huddled indoors with recirculated air and minimal sunlight. As outdoor patios and decks become “living spaces” complete with top of the line furniture and decorative fireplaces and wet bars, there is a way to make these spaces “green” while also saving reasonable amounts of

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money doing so. The return on investment for creating ecologically-sound outdoor living spaces may not be as great as the ROI for doing so indoors, but it can impact the utility bill and the overall health of the global environment. When choosing patio materials, stick with what’s natural, or what has been salvaged. Natural stone pavers, concrete pavers and even paving stones made from recycled materials (e.g. rubber) are great choices.

Downspouts and rain barrels that help to collect rainwater and runoff can be used to water plants and flowers without turning on the faucet.

Patio furniture is slightly more complex, as there are many options that make great ecological sense, but which will be at a heightened cost. If budget is a concern, secondhand furniture is the best purchase one can make. Due to the exposure this furniture weathers year in and year out, it will be replaced regularly, and so buying a gently used, good quality set makes wonderful financial sense. Otherwise, furniture made from Forest Steward Council (FSC) certified wood guarantees that the harvesting practices were performed with high environmental integrity in areas that will be closely monitored for environmental degradation. There is also a plethora of

ecycle, Reuse, Reclaim Demolishing a bathroom? Save the tiles. Updating a foyer? Dust off the wall sconces and put them aside. Replacing hallway flooring? Keep the wood that’s still in good condition. Removing an outdated mirrored wall from the living room? Don’t throw the segments away just yet…a hammer and some glue will make it useful once again. Part of “greening” a house means reusing

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modern, sleek, and fun furniture manufactured by American and European countries that are made from recycled and reclaimed materials. If there is indoor furniture awaiting discard or simply sitting unused in a recessed corner collecting dust, repurpose it for outdoor use. Make sure that it is lacquered or painted using all-weather materials so that it withstands the elements; however, it can breathe new life into an otherwise useless piece of furniture for practically no investment at all. Do stay away from Teak wood, though. Teak takes a lot of time to mature and has been overharvested for commercial use. Water is vital in keeping outdoor spaces looking lush, but often at a high financial, and maintenance, cost. There are a few ways to combat this, many of which are simple. Downspouts and rain barrels that help to collect rainwater and runoff can be used to water plants and flowers without turning on the faucet. It’s nature’s way of literally raining money from the sky, money that will add up over the course of a season. Landscape architects are especially adept at creating green solutions that look beautiful and stylish. Some homes make decorative drainage systems the focal point of an avant-garde outdoor living space. Permeable paths made of gravel allow for water to seep into the decorative

perfectly viable materials that already exist in a home, or that come from other people’s renovations. For many, adding solar panels, buying new Energy Star appliances, or using all bamboo flooring isn’t a financial option, but cost savings can be immediate if one concentrates on using what’s already available. Habitat for Humanity is best known for building homes for people in need of well-built,

secure housing. The organization isn’t only in the service of providing homes, but they also sell the scraps from renovation to people looking for reclaimed materials. 100% of the proceeds from these sales goes to philanthropic housing efforts and charity, so not only does purchasing from Habitat for Humanity reduce the carbon footprint, it helps to save buyers money while providing much-needed funds for those without a safe place for their family to live. Take it one step further, and


borders and neighboring soil, nourishing plants while preventing run off water from flowing into the streets and causing storm drainage problems. Again, it’s about retaining what is given naturally so that it prevents unwanted runoff in areas that won’t benefit, i.e. the streets. Related to issues of water use is vegetation chosen for an outdoor space. It’s only logical that when trying to reduce one’s footprint on the planet, limit the need for resources, and saving money that lowmaintenance plants be the best choice for outdoor living. They require less water, less attention, and some even have medicinal properties (e.g. succulent aloe plants) that can be used as home remedies for nasty grilling burns and sunburns! Also, there’s no having to pay the neighborhood kid to water the flowers during vacation. In addition, plants and trees provide obvious shade. Instead of cutting down perfectly healthy trees which pose no structural threat to the house, consider leaving them to provide the perfect hammock posts, or to provide shade for the patio when it’s midday. Cutting down viable trees for a cleaner “sightline” doesn’t make the best financial sense sometimes, especially when the alternative is moving indoors to crank up the A.C. because there’s no natural cover on a sunny day. Keep the

consider that using reclaimed building materials saves on fuel costs, as well. Without the need to harvest, manufacture, and transport items such as lumber, the demand for fuel is diminished. Even driving to a local home goods store is an expenditure of gasoline, and though it might seem minimal to drive down the block, the amount of energy needed to harvest new wood is quite extensive. Recycling and reclaiming materials also has a social impact. Living in an era when the atrocities of labor abuse is unearthed every minute by media resources across the globe, it makes sense that people feel uncomfortable using new materials that have hurt the planet, its people, or which don’t possess

soil for plants and shrubs rich by composting food scraps. Again, it’s a free way to maximize the life of the soil and to save on often-toxic fertilizers. And if the thought of composting drudges up ideas of free-lovin’ music festivals, granola, and daisy bumper stickers, know that even the highest paid celebrities consider composting an important part of their ecologically-friendly practice, and these individuals could afford to purchase a fertilizer plant, let alone a few bags every summer. Floodlights consume a lot of energy, so consider a few alternatives; for instance, path-illuminating solar lights and other forms of solar-operated lighting. Decorative solar lighting has come a long way since its inception, and often produces a much more soothing glow than incandescent wavelengths. Another way to combat excessive light pollution and use is to install motion detectors. This prevents a constant stream of energy being needed to illuminate darker regions of the perimeter, turning on only when motion has been detected. Smart home technology allows for almost anything in the home to be turned on and off at the touch of a finger, even from across the globe. Going to a summer concert? Don’t bother to turn on the lights before leaving when the sun has yet to set. Wait until it’s dusk and take out a tablet to

the social (and structural) integrity of its predecessors. Even appliances can be bought directly from manufacturers for less. Want a SubZero? Find a used one in good condition from someone locally instead of paying premium retail and delivery prices. Looking for a copper sink or unique hutch? Go antiquing and barter for the best possible deal. Sometimes, the most beautiful pieces are those handmade in the past, when artistic integrity was found in even the simplest of household items. Green building is catching on in the building trades. McGraw-Hill Construction predicts that 20% of residential construction and 25% of commercial

turn said lights on when it’s dark enough to be needed. This saves energy and also helps to protect the house from thieves who may surmise that floodlights turned on at 4:00pm is for one reason: the owner isn’t going to be home until dark. Greening a home is a comprehensive practice that takes into account the interior and exterior use. Is there a return on investment? Absolutely, especially as Energy Star rated appliances are added to the configuration and utility costs are slashed, both for the exteriors and interiors of a home. The savings are enhanced by building a home that has universal appeal, namely through design which allows for multiple generations to use the space comfortably and safely. As with any redesign or renovation, owners should be careful not to overly-personalize the space if resale value is a concern. As builders become more savvy about aging in place design, universal design, and greening however, these are options which future buyers will be hard-pressed to live without, for these standards will become ubiquitous in homebuilding, and will be found to maximize savings and the use of a property over time. NH

and institutional building will be green this year. There’s a stringent certification process for a forest to be considered sustainably harvested, and the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) is responsible for enforcing the criteria for certificate holders. Sustainable harvesting means that practices won’t negatively impact future generations by exhausting the long-term productivity of the material. Social, economic, and environmental factors are all considered. FSC-certified wood is the most popularly-demanded material in the McGraw-Hill database for over 60,000 projects, outnumbering requests for all other energy efficient products, including those by EnergyStar.

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New Kitchen Trends For The

New Year

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MARRYING STYLE WITH SMARTS

A

s a child, I marveled at the way my peers were allowed to “hang out” in their parent’s dining room. I couldn’t comprehend how this was allowable: my own grandmother had been on the local evening news because she commissioned an artist to hand-carve the border of her dining room area rug (over which many meals were barely eaten so as to not stain the cream fibers). And yet, my friends would nonchalantly bring bowls of macaroni and cheese, or roast beef leftovers and handfuls of Doritos into the area deemed “sacra saint” in my home. Clearly, these families had missed the memo: kitchens were for cooking, eating, playing Chinese Checkers, taking phone calls, arguing about turkey carving (or anything else, for that matter), hiding candy on the top shelf so as not to spoil dinner, opening acceptance letters and thank you notes, and storing sweaters in the second oven. Kitchens were where all of life’s business happened, and where parties congregated (despite the fact that over ten hours of decorating and cleaning were spent on the “living areas”). What were dining rooms for anyway, except for holidays and being told not to walk on the freshly vacuumed rugs? Today, it seems even more appropriate that the design and household appliance industries focus heavily on this irrevocable shift. Despite the fact that most homes still have traditional dining rooms, the emphasis has shifted towards the kitchen, which in many ways, is the true heart of a home. Because many homeowners are knocking down walls to make space for a variety of other modern needs, it makes sense that designers and homeowners want to make the kitchen as visually appealing as it is functional.

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Regardless of what color combinations chosen, remember this cardinal rule: colors will make no difference if the lighting isn’t right. “Paint it Black” Though probably not wise to turn to classic rock legends for design advice, Sir Mick Jagger had something right: sometimes, you just want to paint it black. This might seem counter-intuitive. Most people’s automatic assumption when repainting a kitchen space is that it has to be neutral or “clean and bright.” Not so. Neutrals can certainly be incorporated for a unique, stunning look (Yes! Neutrals can be eye-catching… more on that later), but it is essential that we lose the fear of color in the kitchen. The re-emergence of vintage-style kitchens of 1950’s blues, pinks, and yellows abound in savvy households throughout the country, and this is a wonderful opportunity to turn 24 GREATER PITTSBURGH’S NEW HOME

an outdated kitchen into a statement. If you can’t beat’em, join’em, is the mentality here, and it has been winning lots of fans and followers as new homeowners find themselves in a difficult economy and a pea-green kitchen with not much left to spend on frivolity or kitchen vanity. If enhancing the vintage uniqueness of a kitchen is a non-option, darker tones or brighter colors are wonderful alternative options. Once reserved only for design competitions or custom-kitchens, this is a trend that’s most likely here to stay because it has caught on with DIYers and traditional lay audiences alike.

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There are usually three colors that designers will employ when designing a kitchen. Proportionally speaking, much of the kitchen will consist of an anchor shade, a secondary color, and lastly, an accent color used sparingly for a splash of differentiation. These colors can just as easily be three different neutrals, or bright colors. It is best to remember, however, that countertops and worktops are considered a color as well, which means that if a kitchen island’s cabinetry is painted black and the rest of the cabinetry a bright, blue-based red, the aluminum countertops are the third color. They all work together to make a cohesive whole which needn’t be “boring,” but which must not accost the eye of the be-


in a design-conscious way can make a beautiful impact and lend an air of organic modernity to any home. If looking for the drama of a monochrome kitchen, be sure to play with different shades of the same color. An all-white kitchen isn’t usually what it seems to be. Usually, designers playing with monochrome use varying shades of white and cream, tricking the eye into believing it’s monochrome when keeping visual dimension through the use of some darker, and some lighter, shades. Greys are becoming increasingly popular for this look, as well, and it’s easy to incorporate different tones and shades being that metallic appliances and accents like chairs, hoods, and light fixtures are also their own special shade of grey. Black makes a great secondary anchor color in these situations, and for tertiary accent color in a grey kitchen, acid yellows, oranges, reds, and even a true blue can be very appealing. The secret is relegating this tertiary color in a seemingly “monochrome” kitchen to only one or two places (i.e. a pantry door and a kitchen rug in lemon rind yellow, or interior cabinet walls and a decorative bowl on the kitchen table in flame orange). Regardless of what color combinations chosen, remember this cardinal rule: colors will make no difference if the lighting isn’t right. It only makes sense that if you’re going darker, more lighting may have to be added to offset the loss of brightness. No one wants to compromise visibility while

holder. If the countertops closely mimic the anchor color or the secondary color, then a bright tertiary color (e.g. turquoise or persimmon) would add some interest to an otherwise sleepy combination. An often overlooked way to add much-needed color to a kitchen is bar stools. These are items that can be replaced or refinished/ repainted in a few years’ time if trends or preferences change, so it’s worth it to take a chance on them since they can add a much-needed kick of color without the permanency of new cabinets or backsplashes. And don’t underestimate the punch that wood can make. With all of the graining and staining options out there these days, mixing different stains

they’re slicing, chopping, or stirring, or feel like they’re hiding out in a cave. Dark colors create a mood, for sure, but they must be supported by lighting which do their modernity justice. Speaking of walls, there has been a shift in backsplash preference, and much of it has to do with the elimination of glass tile mosaics and the introduction of more industrial, contemporary looking tiles and traditional glass slabs. Glass mosaics have been used heavily for over a decade, and many homeowners today are looking for more industrial-inspired kitchens that portray a feeling of simplicity and do away with fussiness or overly-complex wall décor that detracts from the beauty of their new appliances or the expert graining of the wood accents and floors. Many designers have inspired homeowners to use tile for the entire kitchen wall, sometimes incorporating undulating glass textures to give an almost three- dimensional appearance. If tiled walls seem too modern, Carerra marble offers a much more traditional feel without sacrificing up-to-date style. It cannot be emphasized enough that even the smallest of kitchens will look astoundingly brighter and fresher by covering the walls in natural stone. If using Carerra marble, nickel fixtures and stainless steel appliances highlight the grey veining in this classic white stone from Italy. This isn’t only a viable option for smaller cooking spaces, but in terms of material costs, it’s also less costprohibitive in a tighter space simply because there is less wall to cover. Other stone tiles to consider are travertine, slate, and limestone. As long as it’s properly sealed, wallpaper adds drama, interest, and a lot of texture to kitchen walls. It’s a way to implement creative design www.greaterpittsburghnewhome.com

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a cook more control over the heating process. Magnetic heat (induction) allows for prompt temperature fluctuation and can take food from a simmer to a sear in moments. Hybrid models are available, too, which could produce cost savings if induction tops are prohibitive for a tight budget. These cooktops have two induction burners and two standard electric burners, and options abound from respected manufacturers like Frigidaire, Samsung, Electrolux, and LG.

outside of china patterns. It’s completely on trend, and being used for modern homes, traditional homes, and transitional homes alike. If painting walls, one eyecatching color isn’t enough impact for a homeowner, wallpaper is an ideal solution. Many manufacturers are taking wallpaper to a new level by not trying to be demure about its contribution. Color and distinct designs draw the eye to the walls where the viewer feels an instant levity and sense of joy in the most important room of a house. Some designs are vintage or retro, like those from Stark, a manufacturer of washable vinyl wallpaper for sophisticated tastes. Other kitchen wallpaper choices are markedly traditional, like toile in black or blue, or hand-painted florals and vegetal designs that aren’t reminiscent of Victorian dining rooms. And for the wilder designconscious owner, animal print lends a dramatic punch, especially when added to Lucite furniture, bright accent colors, and contemporary artwork. Again, be sure that the paper chosen is sealed so that grease, stains, and scents do not adhere. Corrugated metal used to be a functional choice for farm roofing and industrial storage bins, but these days, a shiny, corrugated metal wall covering in the kitchen is a direct homage to country kitchens throughout America. The metal comes in sheets and is impervious to splashed liquid or food. Despite the look, corrugated metal is very lightweight, and if interested in using recycled materials, corrugated metal is a unique choice for someone unafraid to make a design statement. 26 GREATER PITTSBURGH’S NEW HOME

A Cook’s Burning Desire President of National Kitchen & Bath Association, John Petrie, CKD, is particular when it comes to splurging on the newest appliance trends. According to Petrie, the most money should be spent on appliances that will be used the most often. For some people, this means concentrating on ranges or cooktops; for others, this means paying to hide appliances behind beautifullydesigned, subtle cabinetry. Sometimes, it makes the most sense to spend more on cooling and refrigeration, whether it is for food or beverages, and other times it’s about designing a layout that’s better for entertaining than it is actual cooking. Ranges Petrie suggests that for die hard cooks who spend the majority of their time making foods from scratch (versus steam-in-thebag frozen veggies), trying new recipes, or making their grandmother’s sauce, the budget should first include a top of the line range. If, however, this is not an entire kitchen overhaul and it’s just an upgrade or “face lift,” measure, measure, and measure once more to make sure that a six-burner range will fit into the space of the old range. Most six-burners are wider than traditional ranges, and will inevitably cost $2,000 or more than its conventional 30inch counterpart. If money poses a problem but a good range is vital, opt for a 30-inch range with a power burner that will quickly produce intense heat. If gas isn’t an option, an induction cooktop is worth the money because it gives

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All of that cooking on state-of-the-art residential ranges will require a wonderfully efficient ventilation hood to direct steam, smoke, and smells. Luckily, Zephyr has the answer to a cook’s prayers: the Siena Pro chimney hood. Zephyr is a respected manufacturer of range hoods that bring professional-grade quality into a residential kitchen. Typically, industrial hoods cost more than a homeowner can spend, but for those who need professional performance on a budget, the San Francisco-based company produced the Siena Pro to bring great style, modern technology and a 1,200 CFM blower at a reasonable price. The steel hood canopy holds two halogen lights and dishwasher-safe, industrial-grade baffle filters (a clean filter indicator light will let owners know when the filters are ready to be washed). For those entertaining or who have to walk away from the range to tend to other matters, there is a five-minute automatic shut-off option, too. If linear, sleek hoods are too modern for a kitchen space, there are a plethora of other decorative options that will either hide hoods, or accentuate their unique features. Recycled oak floorboards can be used to panel the entire front of a steel hood, which brings an organic feel to a neutral kitchen with dramatic white tiling. Zinc hoods give a very rustic feel to an industrial kitchen with oversized appliances, and if a hood is not to be a focal point, it’s becoming common to hide them behind aestheticallypleasing archways. If plaster hoods or plain hood paneling is leaving much to be desired, custom-made iron designs or intricate tile work can make them art, versus an eye sore. Regardless of whether they stand alone or attached to a kitchen wall, hoods have come a long way from clunky necessities (and they are necessities if a range has an integral grill, burners, or a griddle).


They’re now designed with a focus on beauty and lend unprecedented functionality and professional-grade quality to the typical residential kitchen. Cool Off Whether it’s a major kitchen renovation, a new home, or a simple swap of old appliances for new, refrigerators pose a variety of options for every family’s needs, whether it be capacity, style, or system control. Before getting swept away with the oddly luxurious design of modern refrigerators—they bear absolutely no resemblance to the clunky, Parcheesi board colored fridges of the 70’s—make a list of what your needs are. The “general thoughts” about refrigerator capacity needs are pretty logical: a family of four will most likely need more storage capacity than a singleton who eats out

based on size, whereas a family who is on the go and never home to cook would probably need less capacity than families who stayed in to eat.

three times a week. But! With the advent of a cooking Renaissance, including the slow cooking revolution and the exhaustive list of seasonal chef competitions and cooking shows that specialize in everything from cooking for homegrown exotic rices to freerange, country French fowl on a budget, be forewarned that old generalizations might not apply. It’s much more common these days to find a couple or a single professional who entertains a lot and who requires lots of space for beverages, specialty foods, and catering leftovers. In that case, it would make more sense to purchase

An integrated refrigerator is becoming the norm d’rigeur for new kitchens. Wood paneling handsomely disguises double refrigerator doors, and helps cooling units blend with surrounding cabinets. For those in love with the resurgence of retro-style appliances, Northstar makes double-door and single door refrigerators in splashy, retro colors and authentic hardware that is unmistakably chic. For ranges that coordinate, try La Cornue, Bertazzoni, or Aga. It’s possible, however, that the most important thing for a buyer to consider is the placement of the refrigeration and freezing units. For someone who rarely uses the freezer, keeping refrigeration space

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If purchasing only a range oven (36” ranges make popular choices because they provide more baking space than a 30”), consider a microwave-oven hybrid. Miele makes a speed oven which serves as a microwave and a convection oven. at trunk height and the freezer below is a more efficient use of space. For the typical, French door, 22-cubic-foot model, buyers can expect to spend around $2,000. If this doesn’t work within budget, major manufacturers make bottom-mount refrigerators that have a single refrigerator door and the freezer compartment still located below. These models usually run for $1,100. Cost will inevitably be higher when bells and whistles are involved, such as on-door controls, dual refrigeration or energy efficiency standards. Remember, however, that it may not be worth the expenditure if those areas aren’t where a buyer’s needs lie. Refrigeration needs might not always center around one refrigeration unit, either. It’s possible that wine refrigeration storage and refrigerated drawers will be necessary as well. “Beverage centers” aren’t just for wine storage anymore. It’s common for sodas, mixers, and beer to be as meticulously cooled and organized as other spirits. Refrigeration drawers for easy access to veggies and fruits while cooking is definitely a custom accoutrement, but it will make a cook with a broad budget very happy indeed. As refrigerated drawers become more popular, their warming drawer counterparts are becoming less so. With all of the steaming and warming options on modern ovens and microwaves, it’s becoming an obsolete need to devote space in the kitchen to keeping food hot. Ovens Again, the first thing to consider when purchasing an oven is if it’s for an experienced cook or not. It seems the obvious answer to buy the most expensive oven that the budget allows, but remember that it’s not just about the price tag. Utilities also play a part in the overall cost of using an appliance over time. Convection ovens require more heat, but they distribute heat evenly

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the appliances, cutting down on cleaning time. Two appliances that probably won’t pose a problem anymore are trash compactors and instant hot water components: both were left by the wayside during the advent of neighborhood recycling collection and energy costs (instant hot water is an energy drain). These are two items which also have a bad reputation for breaking often.

throughout the food item. Whether vertically aligned or horizontally, the more ovens, the more convenient for those who often bake, broil, or roast. It’s very common to find cookware that goes from stove to oven, so side by side ovens may be the easiest on the body: once at a certain height, the chef need only to move horizontally back and forth, versus stand up and bend down repeatedly to check on both ovens while cooking. If purchasing only a range oven (36” ranges make popular choices because they provide more baking space than a 30”), consider a microwave-oven hybrid. Miele makes a speed oven which serves as a microwave and a convection oven. Steam ovens are also fabulous options in addition to a range oven: they steam food and also cook using convection heat, if preferred. Perhaps the most sought after appliance these days might be a little surprising: built-in-coffee machines. They save space by fitting into the wall, and are easily hooked up to the existing water supply. If there are smaller appliances that cause an aesthetic distraction, bi-fold doors on tracks open to hide appliances behind their panels, and keep the kitchen looking more like a room instead of a preparatory table. It’s also a wonderful way to keep cords out of the way and flying food and liquid off of

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Lastly, what to do with a kitchen that has been well-used? Clean it as quickly as possible with as little effort as possible, of course. Most owners choose noise reduction options, and though it may add cost, it makes a world of difference when the living space is nearby and a loud dishwasher masks the television or sound system. Lower end models most likely won’t have the noise reduction options, nor will they have energy efficiency options, or hidden buttons. If washing multiple loads of dishes at once, consider two dishwashers or a dishwasher and a dishwasher drawer: they’re perfect for entertaining and dismiss the need to bend over to place dishes and stemware. They also use less water, so utilities are saved when only a small load needs to be washed. All new kitchen trends focus on one thing: making life easier for the cook in the kitchen, whether that cook calls in takeout, throws parties, or cooks for a family of six on a regular basis. Manufacturers have created options for every lifestyle, budget, and kitchen style. The future of kitchen renovation and trend seems to be the intersection of taste and ease of use, with a lot of personality thrown into the mix, in whatever proportion the recipe calls for. NH


Builder Profile

KACIN COMPANIES

Success in building new homes depends on an almost obsessive attention to detail. Perhaps that is why it is difficult for homebuilders to look to the horizon

One of Pittsburgh’s more enduring

and keep ahead of trends that may be

contractors, Kacin Companies, got its start by

developing in the marketplace. During the past

taking advantage of an opportunity to detour from

half century, the economy of Western PA has given

the founder’s plan. A. Richard Kacin was planning

the residential construction markets plenty of

a career in architecture and says that good fortune

curveballs that have scuttled many a homebuilding

turned a slight detour into a successful business.

business. Richard Kacin has thrived over the years

Of course, like most success stories, Kacin’s also

by adapting his company to changes he and his

included a good measure of vision and flexibility

management team have foreseen, and by sticking to

along the way

his basic principles throughout.

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Builder Profile “It’s instilled from the top to the bottom, the kind of quality we expect in our homes. When Richard walks through a home he’s not looking at what’s done right,” jokes Bruce Corna, vice president and long-time associate of Kacin’s. “If our people see a guy doing something the wrong way on a site they say ‘you know that’s not right – straighten it out’.”

just sort of shook hands and they agreed to pay the bills.” Construction started on Good Friday of 1960, just a couple months shy of Kacin’s 20th birthday. He performed the general labor on the project and managed the subcontractors. The experience didn’t bring him a handsome profit but Kacin noted that the money he made on his first home wasn’t much less than the salary a degreed architect could expect to command for the same period of time. As the project was wrapping up, he put a sign out in front that announced the home was built by A. R. Kacin Jr. To his delight, he started four more new homes before the year was out.

Providing quality craftsmanship and authentic architecture is the way Richard Kacin believes he can differentiate his company from other builders. Kacin believes that buyers are looking for something in a home that they can’t find in just any home. They look for something distinctive. That’s not a surprising attitude for a builder whose roots are in design.

Kacin ran the operations for a few years with help from his wife until he began building a staff. The company now employs 28 people – including the first person he ever hired – and has become quite diversified in its business but during that first decade or so, A. R. Kacin stuck fairly close to home, in the east suburbs. The large industrial employers at the time – U. S. Steel, Westinghouse, ALCOA and the like – built research centers in the east area and were regularly moving employees in and out of Pittsburgh. That provided a steady stream of ‘move-up’ prospects for new construction in the Monroeville, Plum and Murrysville area and Kacin thrived in that market. “The majority of our customers were mid-level management from U. S. Steel, Westinghouse or ALCOA,” Kacin recalls. “We did a lot of homes for people where we did their entry-level home, their second and their third home. Westinghouse would move [our customers] out-oftown and we would build a second home for them when they moved back.”

“I had been accepted to Penn State’s school of architecture [in 1960]. I was working part-time to get ready to go off to school and was doing drafting and site engineering – plotting home sites and designing the homes as well,” Kacin recalls. “We had a neighbor who wanted to build a new home who came to my dad – he would occasionally help friends build their homes. My dad wasn’t interested but said ‘why don’t you get Richard to help you?’ I went about the business of drawing their plans – which we still have here – and then I got bids on everything. We never did have a contract. We 30 GREATER PITTSBURGH’S NEW HOME

ing relationships. Very few builders – or business people of all kinds – are going to say that they don’t care about relationships with customers or that they are not focused on service. In the case of Kacin Companies, the proof is in the decisions that have been made over the years that demonstrate that Richard Kacin and his team are willing to make customers happy first rather than worrying about his business.

“There were prospects for new homes that knew the family and it was a trust situation; they trusted that I knew what I was doing or had the support to do what was needed to build people’s homes,” he explains. “There were suppliers who knew my family and were willing to provide the materials I needed. That was key. We’ve maintained that over the years.”

During that period of expansion in 1976, Bruce Corna approached Kacin about working with him. Corna was a lender for a small community bank at the time and had worked with A. R. Kacin. He had inspected homes under construction for progress payment approvals and liked what he saw in Kacin’s team. Although Richard Kacin questioned his sanity (“I said you have a good job. Why do you want to go into construction?”), Corna felt that the fit was perfect.

That formative experience made Kacin a believer in the value of building long-last-

“I told Richard, you guys make it look like it’s a lot of fun,” he says.

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Builder Profile

Left to Right:  Bruce Corna, Richard Kacin, Jason Corna, and Jeff Ferris

The addition of a professional with a different background and perspective was probably helpful as the 1970’s wound down and the economy took a decided turn for the worse. Rust Belt manufacturers were about to face a keen challenge to their survival, a test not all would pass. The corporate relocations dwindled and middle management was hit hard by the recession in 1979. The impact on Richard Kacin’s business was significant. “In 1979 we built several custom homes and got rid of all our specs,” recalls Corna. “That’s when the interest rates shot up to 20 percent in no time at all,” Kacin adds. “We had three spec homes and we bailed out of them because we thought this could be bad.” Instead of hunkering down to survive the storm, Kacin Companies chose to look for an advantage in the troubled markets and found opportunities in the government’s response to the suppressed demand

Providing quality craftsmanship and authentic architecture is the way Richard Kacin believes he can differentiate his company from other builders.

for new homes. While little could be done to combat the job losses, there were programs implemented to combat the high interest rates that killed the mortgage business. The Pennsylvania Housing Finance Agency (PHFA) sought to stimulate the housing market and banking by selling below-market rate bonds, which allowed developers and builders to offer mortgage rates to buyers that were three or four percent below the prevailing lending rates. Kacin Companies seized that opportunity and retooled its designs to offer a more affordable style of home to a different kind of buyer. “We started Delwood Homes in 1979 and built more of an entry-level home,” says Corna. “Then we secured a lot of the bond money the state was selling through PHFA. We were the second largest bond buyer in Pennsylvania after Ryan Homes in 1980. The bond rate was 14.5 percent and people thought that was a deal.” Corna explains that they maximized the value of the materials used in the homes www.greaterpittsburghnewhome.com

31


Builder Profile and built them in roughly one month, including full basements. They also worked to squeeze as much as possible from the layout. “Richard designed a really beautiful but efficient home for that entry-level buyer,” he says. Kacin branded the designs as Optimum Value Engineered homes. Delwood Homes sold the homes for $40,000 to $50,000 and while they made less money on a given home, the approach they took created a big surge in demand. The number of homes Kacin Companies built tripled, peaking at 108 homes per year until economic conditions stabilized. Another opportunity that presented itself for diversification was commercial construction. Many of Kacin’s customers over the years were business owners who began to ask him to help with their business’s projects. At the same time the industrial parks in Westmoreland County began to attract new companies. While Kacin Commercial Construction has built as large as 500,000 square foot buildings, the company prospered from building 20,000 to 100,000 square foot industrial buildings. Later, Kacin developed a niche in the car dealership re-branding and new dealership sector, building for Watson, Smail, Cochran, Shorkey and Day. And over the years they built many King’s Restaurants, churches, banks, office, and specialty structures.Having worked with Kacin Companies while attending high school and college, Jeff Ferris, Vice President of Kacin Commercial, directs all of the commercial construction projects, moving the projects from conceptual stages through finished construction.

As that market returned when Western PA began to recover from the steel industry’s exodus in the 1990’s, the competition for buyers had increased.

Richard Kacin’s first love remained the design and construction of custom homes. As that market returned when Western PA began to recover from the steel industry’s exodus in the 1990’s, the competition for buyers had increased. The depressed market of the 1980’s opened the door for production-oriented builders to get a stronger foothold in the Pittsburgh market and even in Kacin’s backyard, profits were smaller on the typical suburban new home. Again, the team at Kacin Companies felt that a shift in focus was needed. As they searched for an underserved niche in residential construction, Kacin 32 GREATER PITTSBURGH’S NEW HOME

| Winter 2014

and Corna took note that there was a quiet but growing trend of people moving back into the city. This ‘New Urbanism’ had sparked major development in many big cities. Pittsburgh wasn’t being seen as a city attracting new residents but there were developments being planned. Kacin Companies had the chance to be involved in one such project, the massive Summerset at Frick Park being developed on a former mill waste site above Nine Mile Run east of the Squirrel Hill Tunnels. Kacin saw a need for new products to be offered to this new urban buyer and felt that the Summerset community could be the niche that his company could fill. While Summerset was a few years ahead of the curve on the new urban movement that would be obvious in Pittsburgh by 2007, the project caught the wave at the right moment. Kacin worked with architect Bradley Shapiro (then with Looney Ricks Kiss Architecture) to come up with traditional designs that would suit the lifestyle


Builder Profile

The response to the concept had validated the planning that went into the project. During one of the worst housing environments in decades, Edgewater has experienced brisk sales and the project is on a pace to finish a couple years ahead of schedule. needs of the new urban buyer, focusing on the mid-market cottage home style. Kacin Companies had more than 30 lots as one of

three builders working in the community. The first phase of Summerset was set up as a lottery and everything sold out in less than two hours. Summerset’s later phases have been equally successful. The lifestyle community focus has become the niche that Kacin looked for to diversify and serve an underserved customer. Over the last half decade, Kacin built communities that meet the lifestyle needs of another growing demographic group, the empty nester. They developed communities of condominium-attached homes in Jefferson Hills in Allegheny County and in Hempfield Township in Greensburg. Kacin’s main project over the past few years is something of a culmination of their lifestyle focus. In 2010, the company kicked off its most ambitious work, the development of a former brownfield steel mill into the Edgewater at Oakmont community. The $125 million project involves 241 units of single-family attached and detached homes for sale, apartments and about 35,000 square feet of commercial space, which is designed to replicate the existing office and retail of Oakmont’s Allegheny River Boulevard.

When the opportunity arose to pursue the project, Kacin Companies approached the project in the same manner that has characterized its business model over the years. When the RIDC issued the request for proposal, Kacin teamed up with EQA Landmark Properties – one of the developers of Summerset – and created a plan that focused on market demands and the surrounding community. Kacin’s proposal was one of nine and it was ultimately successful even though they offered neither the highest bid nor the most units of housing. Instead, Kacin Companies focused on making the project work as an extension of Oakmont’s existing neighborhoods and the borough’s mixed-use plan. In the end, it was the best concept for the property “It will look like it was always there. We sort of worked backwards from [Oakmont’s] mixed-use ordinance,” explains Kacin. “We looked at the land and with the experience we had from Summerset, were sensitive to what the customers wanted for an urban community.” www.greaterpittsburghnewhome.com

33


Builder Profile The response to the concept had validated the planning that went into the project. During one of the worst housing environments in decades, Edgewater has experienced brisk sales and the project is on a pace to finish a couple years ahead of schedule. Sales have been so brisk, in fact, that appraisers have been excluding them from comparable home research as an anomaly. From a suburban scattered lot custom builder, to a tract builder for first-time buyers, to one of Pittsburgh’s premier urban lifestyle builders, Kacin Companies has changed its approach to construction as the market has dictated. The desire to diversify their business – which has helped them ride out the cycles – pushed them to build commercial projects, invest in commercial real estate and in 2012, to launch their own brokerage business called Edgewater Realty. Richard Kacin says that they listen to customers and do as much research as possible but often their instincts have been the compass for the company. “A lot of it is just guts,” he jokes. “We look at this as a business and we anticipate what

800.382.9967

the market wants. There have been some things we’ve missed but fortunately not too many.” Some 53 years into a career detour, Richard Kacin is showing no signs of riding off into the sunset. He says the company is actively planning for the transition in management but it’s clear the founder is still very engaged day-to-day. “We’ve all been here a long time together. We’re evolving now because we have some really good young people,” Kacin says. “This is a transition but the things we value are still the same.” Value is woven throughout the fabric of the business at Kacin Companies. From the outset in 1960, Kacin has put a high value on the relationships he’s had with suppliers and subcontractors; and he’s also relied on the many relationships he’s built through the years as sources of repeat clients. The company also works to add value to every home they build; in fact, one of their mottos is ‘Value Today… Value Tomorrow.’

412.621.4700

34 GREATER PITTSBURGH’S NEW HOME

| Winter 2014

SHADYSIDE, PA

“It’s always been about the relationships and being a one-stop, single source of responsibility for our customers,” says Kacin. “Western Pennsylvania buyers expect a lot of value when they buy and whenever they sell their home they expect that value to still be there.” Jason Corna – Bruce’s son – is one of the talented younger people of which Richard Kacin speaks. He’s grown up in the business and sees the benefit from taking a long-term value approach. “A lot of our customers know they won’t have much work to do when they come to us. Our buyers know what they want and that’s quality,” he says. “Our standards start about three levels up from the production builders and then we go up from there. You can go on Multi-List today in the eastern suburbs to a home we built 25 years ago and it’s listed as a Kacinbuilt home. That’s going to sell the home faster and it generally brings a bit better price.” NH

SHOPATFEATHERS.COM


Project Profile If it’s maintenance-free living you want without sacrificing space and style, The Village at Stonegate may just be the answer. This new development from builder Ray Snoznik, R.A. Snoznik Construction, Inc., lies amid the verdant hills of Penn Township, Westmoreland County. Here, luxury meets laid back lifestyle where

down-sized maintenance responsibilities exist without downsized living space. Located just off Route 130 in Harrison City with easy access to major roadways such as Routes 30, 22 and the Pennsylvania Turnpike, The Village at Stonegate boasts geographic desirability, but that’s just the tip of the proverbial iceberg.

The Village at

Stonegate

Building A Dream Through Quality and Customer Service www.greaterpittsburghnewhome.com

35


Project Profile

R.A. Snoznik Construction, Inc., Murrysville, Pa., established in 1980 by its president, Ray Snoznik, has long built custom homes primarily in Allegheny, Butler and Westmoreland counties in such plans as The Estates at Timbercrest in Unity Township and Northpointe in Hempfield Township, Westmoreland County, and townhouses in Sarver, Butler County, among many others. Begun in 2007, the Stonegate project was unique in that Snoznik served as not only the builder but also the developer. “We were approached by the landowners with whom we had a good working relationship in the past,” explained Snoznik. “They didn’t want to develop the land, so we proceeded as a joint venture, paying them as we sold the lots.” The 42-condominium ownership plan features “row” or vertical homes, some as duplexes and triplexes

36 GREATER PITTSBURGH’S NEW HOME

while others are quads with the properties listed through Prudential Preferred Realty, Helene Nseir, plan coordinator. Having worked with Snoznik in other construction communities, Nseir was again tapped to market the Village at Stonegate properties due to their past professional relationship. What attracts clients to the plan, according to Snoznik, is the homeowner’s desire to eliminate outdoor care and upkeep of a large, single family home. “In essence, we’re downsizing the maintenance without

| Winter 2014

downsizing the living space.” With 50 percent of the condos sold, all evidence points to the demand for this stress-free living. “Clients are also attracted to the plan because the location is ideal,” Nseir added. “For those who work, there is easy access to points east and west.” She is quick to note, too, that Stonegate is not an over-55 community. Typical clients range from singles to retired couples, empty nesters, and some families; all affluent buyers. “The condos are spacious enough to raise a family,” she continued. “There are no limitations here.” Some of those conveniences include close proximity to primary and secondary schools, colleges and universities, recreational areas, shopping, churches, restaurants and more. The luxury condos range in size with the smallest at 2,500 to 2,800 square feet, all above grade. Others feature below grade


Project Profile basements with greater space, some up to 4,000 square feet. “Initially, four pre-priced floor plans are offered starting at a range of $324,900 to $356,000 with the ability for customization such as enlarging a dining room or eliminating it altogether,” Snoznik continued. “We started with a traditional design incorporating European flair featuring maple cabinetry, granite countertops, custom built-ins, walk-in pantries, crown molding and even wine cellars,” he said. “Now, we opt for a more transitional look with the ability to customize even further with amenities such as oversized showers, unique outdoor living areas with courtyards, outdoor fireplaces, media rooms and more.” Nseir elaborated that the homes are also energy efficient, with radiant heat and/or forced air furnace heat, making it “very efficient, reducing utility bills.” Home Ownership Association fees of $150 include maintenance from the

outside walls of the condo in this quiet, lantern community, a touch that “makes the whole neighborhood shine.” Financing for the project was done through Enterprise Bank out of Allison Park, with total costs for the Stonegate project, including the land, tallying upward to $2 million. Dallas Leonard, Director of Community Development for Penn Township, views the Village at Stonegate project as yet another boon for the area. “We offer reasonable taxes, top public safety and boast a school district rated in the top 5 percent in Pennsylvania along with being one of the most cost effective school districts.” He added that Stonegate is certainly an asset to the area as “the only upscale plan that’s in a zoning scheme that allows multiple dwellings in one building, but there is open space for yards and walking paths.” In fact, the township has just completed a draft of a new zoning scheme to provide similar development opportunities.

“We started with a traditional design incorporating European flair featuring maple cabinetry, granite countertops, custom built-ins, walk-in pantries, crown molding and even wine cellars,” he said. “Now, we opt for a more transitional look with the ability to customize even further with amenities such as oversized showers, unique outdoor living areas with courtyards, outdoor fireplaces, media rooms and more.”

www.greaterpittsburghnewhome.com

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Project Profile “It’s a concept we welcome,” Leonard said. “Stonegate brought this kind of opportunity to our attention.” Nseir believes that Snoznik has done a great job. “Stonegate opened in one of the worst times for new construction, but (interest) never really slowed down.” Now, with ‘cheap money’ prompting sales, the pent-up desire for new construction has spurred action, “so we keep taking lot deposits for the Stonegate project.” Among the first to purchase a condo home at Stonegate was consultant and retired business executive, Paul Steiman and his wife, Mary. “We were looking to find a new home that offered reduced maintenance in terms of the outside element,” Steiman noted. “That was key in our decision making.” Early in their discussions with Snoznik, they felt very positive about the work he had done elsewhere along with the quality of the product. “He was easy to work with and very forthcoming with ideas,” Steiman added. “As the second folks to move into the development, there was no model, our home was built from blue prints. He had the design for what he was starting to build and was very accommodating in terms of providing a way to tailor our home to our needs and interests.” The Steimans selected their lot and location, one that overlooked the Penn Township Municipal Park making for “quite a nice view, one that is enjoyable.” And while downsizing space was also in their initial thoughts as they were leaving their 3,300 square foot Monroeville home, the new condo came close to 4,000 square feet with its finished basement used for entertaining friends and family. Today, Steiman sees their growing neighborhood as a compatible community and a ‘great place to be.’ “Not only are we still very impressed and satisfied, visitors to our home are equally impressed. We can’t say enough about the positive experience and how everyone was oriented toward quality. What he (Ray) has built is what he stands behind.” Nseir also views the Village at Stonegate as a very comfortable community, one that’s “built by the clients, many of whom have developed friendships. For as young as the community is, it’s a tight-knit community with a nice mix (of people).”

38 GREATER PITTSBURGH’S NEW HOME

Ray Snoznik at his Village at Stonegate development.

Values That Matter™

S

noznik has teamed with three area builders to join “Values That Matter™, a program focusing on today’s considerations in home building. R.A. Snoznik Construction, Inc., along with Paragon Homes, Eddy Homes and Signature Homes came together through a national group of like builders to address the desires and values of contemporary home buyers. As a benefit, these home builders enjoy exclusive access to the premium home plan collection for southwestern Pennsylvania. The designs, prepared by renowned architect Knudson Gloss, meet the needs of current home buyers and can be further customized to the customer’s liking. Snoznik sees this as an advantage in competing against what are termed the “big box builders.” Those issues identified through the program include increased emphasis on individuality, energy efficiency, and the economics of owning a home, which have become the basis of the Values building program along with the core values that include family lifestyle, functionality, curb appeal, sustainability and affordability that aid in addressing the needs of buyers through value, originality and quality. In short, the bull’s eye is how the new home can make the client’s life better.

| Winter 2014

Stonegate has the added advantage of nestling in close proximity to the Penn Township Municipal Park, comprised of walking and jogging trails; baseball/football/soccer fields; batting cages; basketball courts; picnic pavilions, permanent restrooms and much more. An additional 17 acres adjacent to the park is under development to include more walking trails, a new dog park with a pavilion, and an enlarged pond. With the park serving as a backdrop for Stonegate, Snoznik is donating a bridge to link the access trail from the plan to the park so residents can easily pursue recreational and fitness activities.

It’s All About Customer Service Snoznik describes himself as being “introduced into construction” at the tender age of 21. Eventually, he established his construction company, saying the business is in his blood, “otherwise, you couldn’t enjoy it [the construction business] and I continue to do so.” According to his staff, that fact is self-evident. “We have a great team with the added value of a great builder,” said Kelly Gondosh, customer service manager for the company. “Everyone wants to be Ray’s friend. He strives to help customers build a stress-free home and he is talented at getting the best product for the best price.” Which explains Snoznik’s passion for customer service and his inclusion in a program known nationally as Values That Matter™. (See sidebar) Gondosh, who has been with the company for eight years, oversees the customer service program, one that is very detailed thanks to extensive market research and commitment to quality. After a pre-settlement walk-through (a 45-day home review), the client is contacted to ensure that all is going as planned. A 12-month home review ensues, but contact may come sooner as emergencies arise on a case-bycase basis. There is also the opportunity to communicate on-line. “Additionally, our clients can simply call us,” Gondosh stated. “I do answer my phone and make return calls. There are a lot of people with particular needs, so we tend to those needs and address them.” At the closing, the warranty program is reviewed with a


Project Profile detailed binder given to the client. A letter is sent about the warranty to reinforce information found in the binder, explaining how the warranty is handled. “We’re here for the client, even after a 12-month period,” she added. The primary concern, according to Gondosh, is staying within budget despite more expensive tastes. Helping with those concerns is team member Vanessa DeLucia, office manager and 19-year veteran with R.A. Snoznik Construction. “We have vendors and subcontractors who offer a variety of products,” she said. “We can guide a client toward the best match in price range and style.” Getting the clients the best products in their price range “is the best thing we know of to keep them on budget.”

Making It All Work Overarching Snoznik’s work ethic is a simple premise ‒ The desire to build a home and a friendship. DeLucia teased out that premise further, sharing that the

key to Snoznik’s success is a hands on, face-to-face builder-to-customer relationship. “Clients work directly with the builder and myself,” she said. “And, after we close, we don’t go away. Even after the first year warranty, we keep in touch with many clients.” She believes that building a home “is very personal. It brings out a client’s personality, since things are tailored to each person. You get to know the clients, how they live and what kind of people they are. You feel like you’ve created a bond.” In addition to his staff, Snoznik employs three carpenters and works with a group of subcontractors and vendors he has used over time who “know my system to achieve a house on time and on budget.” Nseir noted that among the long list of standard items at Stonegate is the “unbelievable trim package” with its higher baseboards and more. “The carpentry is his hallmark.” Other standard features

not often seen in other new construction are hard surface countertops, hardwood flooring, nice appliance packages, and fireplaces. One of the more popular upgrades, however, has been the oversized five-foot shower that Nseir finds to be a “very forward thinking amenity.” Further, Snoznik utilizes local vendors generally, including O.C. Cluss (lumber, Greensburg); Cassady Pierce (roofing, Greensburg); Excel Glass and Granite (Jeannette); the Lighting Gallery (Greensburg) and Hummel Brothers (lighting, Jeannette), and J.G. Drywall (Carnegie). DeLucia also sees the longstanding vendor /subcontractor relationships as a positive, viewing it as “something we are in together because we want to be.” Beyond the professional relationships, Snoznik embraces the ideal that “you’ve got to be honest and up-front with buyers. We give them a fair shake and stay in front of them to answer questions.” NH

www.greaterpittsburghnewhome.com

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Custom single-family homes, carriage homes, townhomes or condominiums … new locations and new homesites.

RESIDENTIAL

NEW CONSTRUCTION

NewHome can help you discover a home to match your lifestyle. 41 City of Pittsburgh 41 Allegheny County 44 Beaver County 44 Butler County 46 Washington County 47 Westmoreland County

40 GREATER PITTSBURGH’S NEW HOME

| Winter 2014


CITY OF PITTSBURGH

Angel’s Arms Southside Condominiums Priced from: $199,900 School district: City of Pittsburgh Agency: Northwood Realty Services 412-367-3200 Bedford Hill City of Pittsburgh, Homewood Single-family homes Priced from: $130,000 School district: City of Pittsburgh Agency: Northwood Realty 412-367-3200 northwood.com Columbus Square North Side Single family Priced from: $179,000 to $289,000 School district: City of Pittsburgh Agency: Fourth River Development LLC 412-231-4444 ColumbusSquarePittsburgh.com Federal Hill City of Pittsburgh/ Northside Townhomes Priced from: $140,000 School district: City of Pittsburgh Agency: S & A Realty 412-364-2626 Hatfield + Home Lawrenceville Single-family homes Priced from: $300,000 to $420,000 School district: City of Pittsburgh Agency: RE/MAX Select Realty Christa Ross 724-779-1437 www.hatfieldandhome.com

Market House Shadyside Condominiums Priced from: $350,000 School district: City of Pittsburgh Agency: Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 412-683-1980 howardhanna.com The Residences Pittsburgh Downtown Pittsburgh Skyhomes Priced from: $554,500 Agency: Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 412-355-0777

Sweetbriar Village City of Pittsburgh/Mt. Washington Townhomes Priced from: $240,000 School district: City of Pittsburgh Agency: Coldwell Banker Real Estate 412-521-2222 liveatsweetbriarvillage.com Washington’s Landing City of Pittsburgh Contemporary Townhouses Priced from: $345,000 School district: Pittsburgh Agency: RE/MAX Select Shadyside 724-933-6300 X110 Windom Hill Place City of Pittsburgh/South Side Contemporary townhomes - condo Priced from: $699,000 School district: City of Pittsburgh Agency: One80 Real Estate Services LLC 412-318-4139 one80res.com Wylie Ave. Homes East Allegheny /Hill District Single-family homes Priced from: $140,000 School district: City of Pittsburgh Agency: Northwood Realty 412-367-3200 northwood.com

ALLEGHENY COUNTY Autumn Woods Moon Township Custom single-family homes Priced from: $330,000 School district: Moon Area Agency: S&A Realty 412-276-0422 sahomebuilder.com Avonworth Heights Ohio Township Custom single-family homes Priced from: $425,000 School district: Avonworth Agency: Prudential Preferred Realty 724-776-3686 prudentialpreferredrealty.com

Berkley Ridge South Fayette Township Single-family homes Priced from: $370,000 School district: South Fayette Agency: Heartland Homes 724-871-1734 HeartlandLuxuryHomes.com The Berkshires South Fayette Township Single-family homes and townhomes Priced from: $220,000 single-family, $180,000 townhomes School district: South Fayette Agency: Ryan Homes 412-914-2031 ryanhomes.com Berringer Court at Sonoma Ridge Moon Township Carriage homes Priced from: $220,000 School district: Moon Area Agency: Heartland Homes 724-871-1724 HeartlandCustomHomes.com Breckenridge Highlands Baldwin Borough Single-family homes Priced from: $190,000 School district: Baldwin-Whitehall Agency: Ryan Homes 724-218-1328 ryanhomes.com Brandywine Elizabeth Township Single-family homes Priced from: $170,000 School district: Elizabeth Forward Agency: Maronda Homes, Inc 412-896-1845 www.marondahomes.com Brookfield Manor South Park Single-family homes Priced from: $260,000 School district: South Park Agency: Heartland Homes 724-871-1704 HeartlandCustomHomes.com Burwood Acres Robinson Township Custom single-family homes Priced from: $340,000 School district: Montour Agency: S&A Realty 724-272-9716 sahomebuilder.com Castletown Franklin Park Custom single-family homes Priced from: $650,000 School district: North Allegheny Agency: Prudential Preferred Realty 412-367-8000 prudentialpreferredrealty.com

Robinson Township Classic Custom Homes from $500,000 On 2+ Acres Each Call Today

412-787-8807

VisitParagonHomes.com

Castletown Franklin Township Single-family estate homes Priced from: $650,000 School district: North Allegheny Agency: Brennan Builders Real Estate Services 724-865-2929 Brennanbuilders.com Centennial Point Collier Township Townhomes and single-family homes Priced from: $180,000 townhomes, $240,000 single-family Chartiers Valley Agency: S&A Realty 412-276-0422 sahomebuilder.com Chapel Harbor Fox Chapel Carriage homes, townhomes and single-family homes Priced from: $249,900 School district: Fox Chapel Area Agency: Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 412-963-7655 liveinchapelharbor.com Chartiers Landing Robinson Township Single-family homes Priced from: $375,000 School district: Montour Agency: Prudential Preferred Realty 412-262-4630 prudentialpreferredrealty.com

Cimarron Moon Township Single-family homes Priced from: $240,000 School district: Moon Area Agency: Ryan Homes 412-264-5029 ryanhomes.com Cobblestone Ohio Township Single-family homes New Phase Fall 2013 School district: Avonworth Agency: Ryan Homes 412-367-1927 ryanhomes.com Cobblestone Ohio Township Single-family homes Priced from: $270,000 School district: Avonworth Agency: S&A Realty 724-538-5001 sahomebuilder.com Copper Creek Marshall Township Luxury estate custom homes Priced from: $1,200,000 School district: North Allegheny Agency: Eddy Homes 412-221-0400 EddyHomes.com Courtyards at The Preserves North Fayette Township Detached carriage, patio homes Priced from: $237,900 School district: West Allegheny Agency: Epcon Homes and Communities 412-548-3298 www.epconcommunities.com

Chavelle Estates Plum Borough Single-family homes Priced from: Mid-$200,000 School district: Plum Borough www.signaturehomesadvantage.com Agency: Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 724-327-5161 howardhanna.com ricciuticonstruction.com

ALLEGHENY COUNTY

Hilltop Housing Initiative Beltzhoover Single-family homes Priced from: $89,900 School district: City of Pittsburgh Agency: Northwood Realty 412-367-3200 northwood.com

Summerset at Frick Park City of Pittsburgh/ Squirrel Hill Traditional Neighborhood Development Single-family homes, duplexes, townhomes, condominiums, apartments Priced from: $300,000 School district: City of Pittsburgh Agency: Summerset Land Development Associates 412-420-0120 summersetatfrickpark.com

Barrington Manor Franklin Park Custom single-family homes Priced from: $500,000 School district: North Allegheny Agency: Prudential Preferred Realty 412-367-8000 prudentialpreferredrealty.com

CITY OF PITTSBURGH

151 First Side Downtown Pittsburgh Condominiums Priced from: $500,000 School district: City of Pittsburgh Agency: 151 First Side 412-586-5970 151firstside.com

Riverside Mews City of Pittsburgh/South Side Contemporary townhomes Priced from: $449,000 School district: City of Pittsburgh Agency: One80 Real Estate Services LLC 412-318-4139 one80res.com

FIELDS OF NICHOLSON www.signaturehomesadvantage.com www.greaterpittsburghnewhome.com

41


Deerfield Ridge South Fayette Township Custom single-family homes Priced from: $375,000 Agency: Paragon Homes 412-787-8807 VisitParagonHomes.com Della Strada South Park Single-family homes Priced from: $280,000 School district: South Park Agency: Ryan Homes 724-249-6835 Ryanhomes.com

ALLEGHENY COUNTY

E lane @ Carnegie Carnegie Garden style condominiums Priced from: $194,900 School district: Carlton Agency: RE/MAX Select Realty 412-633-9300 ext. 214 724-309-1758 elane.biz

Fairwinds Richland Township Single-family homes Priced from: $280,000 School district: Pine-Richland Agency: Ryan Homes 724-444-3177 ryanhomes.com

Field Brook Farms Richland Township Single-family homes Priced from: $500,000 School district: Pine-Richland Agency: Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 724-772-8822 howardhanna.com

Falconhurst Forest O’Hara Township Single-family homes Priced from: $750,000 School district: Fox Chapel Agency: Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 412-963-6300 howardhanna.com

Fields of Nicholson Franklin Park Borough Custom carriage-homes from $573,900, Custom villas from $459,900 School district: North Allegheny Agency: Prudential Preferred Realty 724-776-3686 prudentialpreferredrealty.com

Foxwood Knolls Moon Township Single-family homes Priced from: $250,000 School district: Moon Area Agency: Ryan Homes 412-264-5029 ryanhomes.com Foxwood Knolls Moon Township Single-family homes Priced from: $220,000 School district: Moon Area Agency: Maronda Homes, Inc 412-287-6256 www.marondahomes.com

homes across all western Pa Communities from $300,000

Grace Manor Robinson Township Townhomes Priced from: $170,000 School district: Montour Agency: Maronda Homes, Inc 412-329-7017 www.marondahomes.com Granite Ridge South Fayette Township Townhomes and single-family homes Priced from: $150,000 School district: South Fayette Agency: Maronda Homes, Inc 412-523-1547 and 724-307-3079 www.marondahomes.com The Heights of North Park Pine Township Custom single-family Priced from: $900,000 School district: Pine-Richland Agency: RE/MAX Select 724-779-7072 The HeightsofNorth Park.com

Edgewater Oakmont Townhomes and courtyard homes Priced from: $300,000 School district: Riverview Agency: Heartland Homes 724-871-1722 HeartlandCustomHomes.com

The Highlands Plum Borough Single-family homes Priced from: $230,000 School district: Plum Borough Agency: Ryan Homes 412-793-4797 ryanhomes.com

Emerald Fields Pine township Single-family homes Priced from: $650,000 School district: Pine Richland Agency: Prudential Preferred Realty 724-776-3686 prudentialpreferredrealty.com

Hunters Fields Jefferson Hills Borough Single-family homes Priced from: $200,000 School district: West Jefferson Hills Agency: Maronda Homes, Inc 412-405-9470 www.marondahomes.com

The Enclave Fox Chapel Single-family homes Priced from: $950,000 School district: Fox Chapel Area Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 412-963-7655 pittsburghmoves.com/TheEnclave

Picky People PICK Paragon

M

any home buyers think that custom equals expensive, but at Paragon we would love to make your dream home a reality whether your budget is $300,000 or over $2,000,000 At Paragon, we have a simple philosophy: build a great home designed around the customer’s needs and dreams. Contact us today and put our buyer-friendly process to work for you, after all, they are Your Dreams, Your Home, and should be built Your Way.

English Farms Pine Township Custon single-family homes Priced from: $400,000 School district: Pine-Richland Agency: S&A Realty 724-778-3322 sahomebuilder.com

C a l l T o d ay :

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HyTyre Farms West Deer Township Carriage Homes Priced from: $224,000 School district: Deer Lakes Agency: Richland Holdings, LLC 724-443-4800 The Isles at The Highlands Plum Borough Patio and townhomes Priced from: $199,900s School district: Plum Agency: Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 724-327-5161 howardhanna.com

SSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS

The Estates at Jefferson Jefferson Borough Single-family homes Priced from: $275,000 Agency: Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 412-655-0400 pittsburghmoves.com /estatesatjefferson

Fairacres Upper St. Clair Custom single-family homes Priced from: $600,000 School district: Upper St. Clair Agency: Prudential Preferred Reality 412- 833-7700 www.fairacresusc.com

Fayette Farms North Fayette Single-family homes and townhomes Priced from: $210,000 single-family, $190,000 townhomes School district: West Allegheny Agency: Ryan Homes 724-218-1328 ryanhomes.com

Forest Oaks at Wexford Wexford Single-family Priced from: $199,900 School district: North Allegheny Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 412-366-1600 pittsburghmoves.com /forestoaksatwexford

Fayette Farms Estates North Fayette Township Custom Homes Priced from: $400,000 School district: West Allegheny Agency: Keller Williams 412-787-0888

Forest View Indiana Township Single-family homes Priced from: $500,000 School district: Fox Chapel Agency: Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 724-772-8822 ricciuticonstruction.com howardhanna.com

42 GREATER PITTSBURGH’S NEW HOME

| Winter 2014

The Gardens at Fox Hall O’Hara Township Single-family homes and condos Priced from: $900,000 School district: Fox Chapel Agency: Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 724-963-7655 www.pittsburghmoves.com/TheGardens Georgetowne Pine Township Luxury townhomes Priced from: $529,000 School district: Pine-Richland Agency: Prudential Preferred Realty 412-367-8000 prudentialpreferredrealty.com

Jefferson Estates Jefferson Borough Carriage homes Priced from: $199,000 Agency: Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 412-655-0400 pittsburghmoves.com/jeffersonestates Lake MacLeod Pine Township Single-family homes Priced from: $750,000 School district: Pine-Richland Agency: Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 412-487-0500 or 724-625-1277 lakemacleod.com


Langdon Farms Pine Township Single-family homes Priced from: $600,000 School district: Pine-Richland Agency: Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 412-366-1600 or 724-776-2900 pittsburghmoves.com/langdonfarms Lenox Place Finley Township Villas and townhomes Priced from: $211,900 School district: West Allegheny Agency: Prudential Preferred Realty 412-262-4630 prudentialpreferredrealty.com The Links at Deer Run West Deer Golf course community, carriage homes Priced from: $199,900 School district: Deer Lakes Agency: Prudential Preferred Realty 724-776-3686 prudentialpreferredrealty.com

Long Ridge Kennedy Township Single-family homes Priced from: $202,000 School district: Montour Agency: Maronda Homes, Inc 412-458-0678 www.marondahomes.com Madison Woods Moon/Crescent Township Custom single-family homes Priced from: $350,000 School district: Moon Area Agency: Prudential Preferred Realty 412-262-4630 prudentialpreferredrealty.com The Manor McCandless Custom single-family Priced from: $575,000 School district: North Allegheny Agency: RE/MAX Select Realty 724-779-7072 ManorCustomHomes.com The Manor at Hartwood Indiana Township Single-family homes Priced from: $900,000 School district: Fox Chapel Agency: Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 412-963-6300 howardhanna.com McCaslin Ridge Hampton Township Single-family homes Priced from: $500,000 School district: Hampton Agency: Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 412-366-1600 pittsburghmoves.com/ mccaslinfarms

McCormick Farms Robinson Township Single-family homes Priced from: $240,000 School district: Montour Agency: Maronda Homes, Inc 412-788-3646 www.marondahomes.com The Meadows at Hampton Hampton Township First floor living homes Priced from: $399,000 School district: Hampton Agency: RE/MAX Select Realty 724-779-7070 MeadowsAtHampton.com

Nevilleside

Collier Township Carriage homes Priced from: $290,000 School district: Chartiers Valley Agency: Ryan Homes 412-276-0644 ryanhomes.com Newbury South Fayette Carriage homes and single-family homes Priced from: $300,000 carriage, $370,000 single-family School district: South Fayette Agency: S&A Realty 724-272-9716 sahomebuilder.com

Oakwood Heights West Deer Township Single-family homes Priced from: $219,900 School district: Deer Lakes Agency: Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 724-776-2900 pittsburghmoves.com/ oakwoodheights Oakwood Heights West Deer Township Single-family homes Priced from: $280,000 School district: Deer Lakes Agency: S&A Realty 724-352-5006 sahomebuilder.com Paragon Place Robinson Township Custom estate homes Priced from: $500,000 School district: Montour Agency: Paragon Homes 412-787-8807 VisitParagonHomes.com Park Place Indiana Township Single-family homes Priced from: $750,000 School district: Fox Chapel Agency: Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 412-963-6300 howardhanna.com Pinecrest Pine Township Single-family homes Priced from: $430,000 School district: Pine-Richland Agency: Heartland Homes 724-871-1702 HeartlandCustomHomes.com

Newbury South Fayette Single-family homes and townhomes Priced from: $210,000 School district: South Fayette Agency: Heartland Homes 724-871-0175 HeartlandCustomHomes.com

Private Acreage South Fayette Single-family homes Priced from: $300,000 School district: South Fayette Agency: Paragon Homes 412-787-8807 VisitParagonHomes.com

Noble Woods Moon Township Townhomes Coming Soon! School district: Moon Area Agency: Ryan Homes 724-249-6835 ryanhomes.com

Raintree Manor Hampton Township Townhomes Priced from: $225,000 School district: Hampton Agency: Minnock Construction Company 412-366-4770

North Park Manor Pine Township Single-family Homes Priced from: $600,000 School district: Pine Richland Agency: Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 412-366-1600 pittsburghmoves.com/ northparkmanor

Raintree Manor Hampton Township Townhomes Priced from: $210,000 School district: Hampton Agency: Heartland Homes 724-871-1710 HeartlandLuxuryHomes.com

Oakridge Estates Harrison Township Townhomes and single-family homes Priced from: $140,000, $170,000 single-family School district: Highland Agency: Maronda Homes, Inc 724-895-3876 www.marondahomes.com

GRaND oPeNING! Deerfield Ridge

South Fayette Lots Now Selling Large 1/3 to 1/2 acre lots Unique Home Designs • Custom Builder Quality Voice: 412-787-8807 email: BestService@VisitParagonHomes.com

The Reserve at Fox Chase Fox Chapel Area Patio and carriage homes Priced from: $299,900 School district: Allegheny Valley Agency: Dennis Associates 412-828-7606 Ridge Forest Franklin Park Single-family homes and townhomes Priced from: $310,000 single-family, $220,000 townhomes School district: North Allegheny Agency: Ryan Homes 724-933-3162 singles 412-522-3590 townhouses ryanhomes.com Riverwatch at O’Hara Woods Fox Chapel Single-family homes Priced from: $400,000 School district: Fox Chapel Area Agency: Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 412-963-7655 pittsburghmoves.com/ riverwatch Saddlebrook Farms Bethel Park Custom single-family homes Priced from: $321,900 School district: Bethel Park Agency: Prudential Preferred Realty 412-833-7700 prudentialpreferredrealty.com Sangree Farms Ross Township Custom single-family homes Priced from: $500,000 School district: North Hills Agency: Minnock Real Estate Services 412-369-7253

Seabright North Fayette Township Single-family homes Priced from: $190,000 School district: West Allegheny Agency: Maronda Homes, Inc 412-874-9764 www.marondahomes.com Sewickley Heights Manor Aleppo Township Custom single-family homes Priced from: $300,000 School district: Quaker Valley Agency: Minnock Construction Company 412-366-4770

ALLEGHENY COUNTY

Long Ridge Kennedy Township Single-family homes Priced from: $220,000 School district: Montour Agency: Ryan Homes 412-771-1456 ryanhomes.com

McCormick Farms Moon/Crescent Township Custom single-family homes Priced from: High $400’s School district: Moon Area Agency: Prudential Preferred Realty 412-262-4630 prudentialpreferredrealty.com

Silver Pines Pine Richland Townships Single-family homes Priced from: $850,000 School district: Pine Richland Agency: Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 412-934-3400 Sonoma Ridge Moon Township Village single-family homes and estate homes Priced from: $410,000 School district: Moon Area Agency: Heartland Homes 724-871-1724 HeartlandCustomHomes.com Stafford Park Robinson Township Single-family homes Priced from: $360,000 School district: Montour Agency: Heartland Homes 724-871-1734 HeartlandCustomHomes.com Sterling Ridge South Fayette Single-family homes Priced from: $320,000 School district: South Fayette Agency: Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 412-344-0500 pittsburghmoves.com/ sterlingridge

www.signaturehomesadvantage.com

Reddington Place Pine Township Single-family homes Priced from: $600,000 School district: Pine-Richland Agency: Prudential Preferred Realty 412-367-8000 prudentialpreferredrealty.com

Avonworth Heights • Ohio Township • Custom single-family homes

www.signaturehomesadvantage.com

www.greaterpittsburghnewhome.com

43


ALLEGHENY COUNTY

Stonebridge Hampton Township Single-family and estate homes Priced from: $520,000 School district: Hampton Agency: Heartland Homes 724-871-1708 HeartlandLuxuryHomes.com

Venango Trails Marshall Township Single-family homes Priced from: $430,000 School district: North Allegheny Agency: Brennan Builders 724-865-2929 Brennanbuilders.com

Wiltshire Estates Moon Township Townhomes Priced from: $150,000 School district: Moon Area Agency: Maronda Homes, Inc 412-474-3529 www.marondahomes.com

Stonebridge Hampton Township Single-family homes, carriage homes Priced from: $500,000 single-family homes; $289,000 Custom carriage homes School district: Hampton Agency: Century 21 Town & Country Real Estate Services 724-779-2101 PghPropertyOnline.com

Village at Camp Trees Pine Township Single-family and estate homes Priced from: $520,000 School district: Pine Richland Agency: Heartland Homes 724-949-0079 HeartlandLuxuryHomes.com

Wood Creek Manor Findlay Township Townhomes and carriage homes Priced from: $160,000 School district: West Allegheny Agency: Maronda Homes, Inc 412-474-3529 www.marondahomes.com

Village At Marshall Ridge Marshall Township Townhomes Priced from: $220,000 School district: North Allegheny Agency: Ryan Homes 724-933-4030 ryanhomes.com

Woods of Sewickley Sewickley Hills Custom single-family homes Priced from: $420,000 School district: Quaker Valley Agency: S&A Realty 724-538-5001 sahomebuilder.com

Village at Pine Pine Township Townhomes and single-family homes $240,000 townhomes and $260,000 single-family homes School district: Pine-Richland Agency: Ryan Homes 724-940-4051 ryanhomes.com

Woods of Sewickley Hills Sewickley Hills Single-family estate homes Priced from: $370,000 School district: Quaker Valley Agency: Ryan Homes 724-933-3162 ryanhomes.com

BEAVER COUNTY

Sturbridge Court Wexford/Franklin Park Single-family homes Priced from: $550,000 School district: North Allegheny Agency: Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 412-772-8822 howardhanna.com Summerfield at North Park Pine Township Single-family homes Priced from: $950,000 School district: Pine-Richland Agency: Achieve Realty, Inc. 724-933-1980 X667 The Summit Marshall Township Single-family homes Priced from: $800,000 School district: North Allegheny Agency: Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 412-366-1600 pittsburghmoves.com/ thesummit Traditions of America at Sewickley Ridge Ohio Township Single-family homes, 55+ Priced from: mid $200,000 School district: Avonworth Agency: Traditions of America 412-534-4232 SewickleyLiving.com

BUTLER COUNTY

Tuscany Ridge Collier Township Single-family homes Priced from: $215,000 School district: Chartiers Valley Agency: Maronda Homes, Inc 412-200-2781 www.marondahomes.com Venango Trails Marshall Township Townhomes Priced from: $260,000 School district: North Allegheny Agency: Heartland Homes 724-871-1720 HeartlandCustomHomes.com Venango Trails Marshall Township Carriage Homes and single-family homes $330,000 carriage homes, $370,000 single-family School district: North Allegheny Agency: S & A Realty 724-778-3322 sahomebuilder.com

Villages at Neville Park Collier Township Townhomes Priced from: $210,000 School district: Chartiers Valley Agency: Ryan Homes 412-595-8292 ryanhomes.com Vineseian Place Wilkins Township Single-family, single level living, quite cul-de-sac neighborhood Priced from: $375,000 School district: Woodland Hills Agency: One80 Real Estate Services 412-318-4139 one80res.com Walkers Ridge Collier Township Single-family homes Priced from: $270,000 School district: Chartiers Valley Agency: Paragon Homes 412-787-8807 VisitParagonHomes.com Washington Square Jefferson Hills Borough Single-family homes Coming Soon! School district: West Jefferson Hills Agency: Ryan Homes 724-249-6835 ryanhomes.com Waterford Place McCandless Township Single-family homes Priced from: $370,000 Agency: Ryan Homes 724-444-3177 Whispering Creek Hampton Township Custom single-family homes Priced from: $450,000 School district: Hampton Agency: Century 21 Town & Country Real Estate Services 724-779-2101 PghPropertyOnline.com

44 GREATER PITTSBURGH’S NEW HOME

| Winter 2014

BEAVER COUNTY Ashley Ridge Brighton Township Single-family homes Priced from: $220,000 School district: Beaver Area Agency: Ryan Homes 724-495-6795 ryanhomes.com Aspen Field Brighton Township Single-family homes Priced from: $200,000 School district: Beaver Agency: Maronda Homes, Inc 412-287-6256 www.marondahomes.com Barclay Hill Estates Brighton Township Villas Priced from: $226,900 School district: Beaver Area Agency: Prudential Preferred Realty prudentialpreferredrealty.com Goldenrod Meadows North Sewickley Township Single-family homes Priced from: $250,000 School district: Riverside Agency: Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 7224-775-5700 howardhanna.com Hickory Woods Chippewa Township Single-family homes Priced from: $270,000 School district: Blackhawk Agency: Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 724-776-2900 www.pittsburghmoves.com/HickoryWoods

Seven Oaks Brighton Township Golf-course community with single-family custom homes and triplex carriage homes Priced from: $249,900 School district: Beaver Area Agency: Prudential Preferred Realty 724-776-3686 prudentialpreferredrealty.com Shenango Woods Chippewa Township Single-family homes Priced from: $210,000 School district: Blackhawk Agency: Ryan Homes 724-495-6795 ryanhomes.com Sweet Brier Hopewell Township Single-family homes Priced from: $180,000 School district: Hopewell Agency: Maronda Homes, Inc 412-287-6256 www.marondahomes.com Traditions of America at Liberty Hills New Sewickley Township/ Economy Borough 55+ Lifestyle Living/ Single-family and garden homes/ Maintenance Free Priced from: $200,000s Agency: Traditions of America 724-869-5595 TraditionsofAmerica.com The Village at Timberwood Trace Chippewa Township Carriage homes Priced from: $155,900 School district: Blackhawk Agency: Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 724-775-5700 howardhanna.com Villas of Economy Economy Borough Condos, Townhomes and Single-family homes Priced from: $249,900 School district: Ambridge Area Agency: Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 412-366-1600 pittsburghmoves.com/villasofeconomy Whispering Pines Economy Borough Single-family homes Priced from: $190,000 School district: Ambridge Area Agency: Maronda Homes, Inc 412-287-6256 www.marondahomes.com Woodbridge Villas Center Township Townhomes or condos Priced from: $175,900 School district: Center Area Agency: Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 724-775-5700 howardhanna.com

BUTLER COUNTY Amherst Village Adams Township Single-family homes Priced from: $290,000 School district: Mars Area Agency: Heartland Homes 412-945-1367 HeartlandCustomHomes.com Belle Vue Park Cranberry Township Traditional and estate single family homes Priced from: $300,000 School district: Seneca Valley Agency: Prudential Preferred Realty 724-776-3686 Blackberry Heights Adams Township Single-family homes Priced from: $270,000 School district: Mars Area Agency: Ryan Homes 724-898-1800 ryanhomes.com Blackthorn Penn Township Single-family home sites/Singlefamily homes Priced from: $66,000/$379,900 School district: South Butler Agency: Northwood Realty 724-282-1313 northwood.com Blossom Ridge Butler Township Single-family homes Priced from: $300,000 School district: Butler Agency: Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 724-776-2900 www.pittsburghmoves.com/BlossomRidge Brookstone Adams Township Single-family homes Priced from: $280,000 School district: Mars Area Agency: S&A Realty 724-778-3322 sahomebuilder.com Carriage Manor Cranberry Township Single-family homes Priced from: $700,000 School district: Seneca Valley Agency: Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 724-776-2900 pittsburghmoves.com/ carriagemanor Chatham Court Adams Township Luxury paired villas Priced from: $599,900 School district: Mars Area Agency: Prudential Preferred Realty 724-776-3686 prudentialpreferredrealty.com Cherrywood Springs Center Township Single-family home sites Priced from: $39,900 School district: Butler Area Agency: Northwood Realty 724-282-1313 northwood.com


Ehrman Farms Cranberry Township Single-family homes Priced from: $550,000 School district: Seneca Valley Agency: Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 724-452-1150 Foxmoor Cranberry Township Townhomes Priced from: $220,000 School district: Seneca Valley Agency: S & A Realty 724-538-5001 sahomebuilder.com Foxwood Estates Cranberry Township Single-family homes Priced from: $850,000 School district: Seneca Valley Agency: Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 412-366-1600 pittsburghmoves.com/foxwoodestates Franklin Crossing Cranberry Township Single-family homes Priced from: $520,000 School district: Seneca Valley Agency: Heartland Homes 724-949-0079 HeartlandLuxuryHomes.com

The Gables at Brickyard Hill Adams Township Custom carriage homes Priced from: $300,000 School district: Mars Area Agency: Century 21 Town & Country Real Estate Services 724-779-2101 PghPropertyOnline.com Georgetown Square Cranberry Township Townhomes and carriage homes Priced from: $250,000 School district: Seneca Valley Agency: Georgetown Square Associates 412-366-4770 Indian Meadow Adams Township Custom single-family homes Priced from: $600,000 School district: Mars Area Agency: Century 21 Town & Country Real Estate Services 724-779-2101 PghPropertyOnline.com Leslie Farms Connoquenessing Borough Single-family Priced from $200,000 School District: Butler Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 724-776-2900 Pittsburghmoves.com/ LeslieFarms

The Oaks Buffalo Township Single-family homes Priced from: $299,900 School district: Freeport Area Agency: Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 412-366-1600 homesattheoaks.com

Madison Heights Cranberry Township Custom single-family homes Priced from: $700,000 School district: Seneca Valley Agency: Century 21 Town & Country Real Estate Services 724-779-2101 PghPropertyOnline.com

Park Place Cranberry Township Traditional neighborhood development Single-family homes and townhomes Priced from: $280,000 single-family, $220,000 townhomes School district: Seneca Valley Agency: Ryan Homes 412-639-4980

Marshall Heights Cranberry Township Single-family homes Priced from: $250,000 School district: Seneca Valley Agency: Maronda Homes, Inc 724-538-3911 www.marondahomes.com Meadow Ridge Forward Township Single-family homes Priced from: $250,000 School district: Seneca Valley Agency: S&A Realty 724-538-5001 sahomebuilder.com Meadow Ridge Forward Township Single-family homes Priced from: $250,000 School district: Seneca Valley Agency: Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 724-776-2900 pittsburghmoves.com/meadowridge Meredith Glen Estates Adams Township Custom single-family homes Priced from: $850,000 School district: Mars Area Agency: Prudential Preferred Realty 724-776-3686 prudentialpreferredrealty.com Myoma Woods Adams Township Single-family homes Priced from: $410,000 School district: Mars Area Agency: Heartland Homes 724-871-1700 HeartlandCustomHomes.com Mystic Ridge Cranberry Township Single-family homes Priced from: $450,000 School district: Seneca Valley Agency: Heartland Homes 724-871-1716 HeartlandCustomHomes.com Oak Trace Penn and Butler Townships Single-family homes Priced from: $350,000 School district: South Butler Agency: Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 724-776-2900 www.pittsburghmoves.com/OakTrace

Park Place

Traditional Neighborhood Development www.cranberryparkplace.com Northwood Realty Services

724-776-1863

Seaton Crest Adams1 Township Park Place.indd Single-family homes Park Place Priced from: $350,000 Cranberry Township School district: Mars Area Traditional neighborhood development Agency: S&A Realty single-family homes, townhomes, 724-625-0050 condos, rentals, retail sahomebuilder.com Priced from: $350,000 School district: Seneca Valley Shadow Creek Agency: Northwood Realty Cranberry Township 724-776-1863 Custom single-family homes Plantation at Saxonburg Priced from: $500,000 Clinton Township School district: Seneca Valley Single-family and Agency: Century 21 Town carriage homes & Country Real Estate Services Carriage homes priced 724-779-2101 from $180,000’s PghPropertyOnline.com School district: South Butler Agency: S&A Realty Shady Lane Farms 724-352-5006 Center Township sahomebuilder.com Custom single-family homes Priced from: $300,000 The Pointe At Adams Ridge School district: Butler Area Adams Township Agency: Prudential Preferred Realty Townhomes 724-283-0005 Priced from: $220,000 prudentialpreferredrealty.com School district: Mars Area Agency: Ryan Homes Shannon Mills 724-776-5610 Connoquenessing Township ryanhomes.com Single-family homes Priced from: $299,000 The Preserve West School district: Butler Area Cranberry Township Agency: Howard Hanna Custom single-family Real Estate Services homes 724-282-7903 Priced from: $550,000 howardhanna.com School district: Seneca Valley Agency: Century 21 Town Taylor Ridge & Country Real Estate Adams Township Services Single-family estate homes 724-779-2101 Priced from: $420,000 PghPropertyOnline.com School district: Mars Area Agency: Ryan Homes Redmond Place 724-625-2073 Cranberry Township ryanhomes.com Custom carriage homes Priced from: $370,000 Timber Ridge School district: Seneca Valley Lancaster Township Agency: Century 21 Town Custom single-family homes & Country Real Estate Services Priced from: $450,000 724-779-2101 School district: Seneca Valley PghPropertyOnline.com Agency: Howard Hanna Real Estate Services Sarvers Mill 412-687-9097 howardhanna.com Buffalo Township Single-family homes Timber Ridge Priced from: $230,000 Lancaster Township School district: Freeport Area Single-family-homes Agency: S&A Realty Priced from: $450,000 724-352-5006 School district: Seneca Valley sahomebuilder.com Agency: Brennan Builders 724-865-2929 Brennanbuilders.com

Timberlee Connoquenessing Township Single-family-homes 2/15/10 12:31:09 PM Priced from: $300,000 School district: Butler Area Agency: Brennan Builders 724-865-2929 Brennanbuilders.com.com Timberlee Butler Area Single-family-homes Priced from: $300,000 School district: Butler Area Agency: Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 724-687-0157 howardhanna.com Village at Camp Trees Adams Township Single-family and estate homes Priced from: $520,000 School district: Mars Area Agency: Heartland Homes 724-949-0079 HeartlandLuxuryHomes.com The Village at Treesdale Adams Township Custom carriage homes Priced from: Mid-$300’s School district: Mars Area Agency: Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 412-687-0157 howardhanna.com

BUTLER COUNTY

Fulton Criossing Adams Township Single-family homes Priced from: $520,000 School district: Hampton Agency: Mars Area 724-949-0079 HeartlandLuxuryHomes.com

Leslie Farms Connoquenessing Borough Single-family homes Priced from: $190,000 School district: Butler Area Agency: S & A Realty 724-538-5001 sahomebuilder.com

The Village at Treesdale Adams Township Carriage Homes Priced from: $350,000 School district: Mars Area Agency: Brennan Builders 724-865-2929 Brennanbuilders.com The Vineyards at Brandywine Connoquenessing Township Custom single-family homes Priced from: $240,000 School district: Butler Area Agency: S&A Realty 724-538-5001 sahomebuilder.com Village of Harmony Junction Jackson Township Townhomes Priced from: $150,000 School district: Seneca Valley Agency: Maronda Homes, Inc 724-538-3911 www.marondahomes.com

www.greaterpittsburghnewhome.com

45


BUTLER COUNTY

Vista Ridge Adams Township Custom Single-family homes Priced from: $350,000 School district: Mars Area Agency: S&A Realty 724-625-0050 sahomebuilder.com Wakefield Estates Cranberry Township Custom single-family homes Priced from: $525,000 School district: Seneca Valley Agency: Prudential Preferred Realty 724-776-3686 prudentialpreferredrealty.com Walkers Ridge Worth Township Farmlettes Priced from: $74,900 School district: Slippery Rock Agency: Northwood Realty 724-458-8800 northwood.com Weatherburn Heights Middlesex Township Single-family homes Priced from: $310,000 School district: Mars Area Agency: Ryan Homes 724-898-0010 ryanhomes.com Wilsons Ridge Single-family homes Priced from: $210,000 School district: Seneca Valley Agency: Maronda Homes, Inc 724-538-3911 www.marondahomes.com

Alto Piano Cecil Township Single-family homes Priced from: $500,000 School district: Canon-McMillan Agency: Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 412-302-2304 howardhanna.com Alto Piano Cecil Township Custom single-family homes Priced from: $500,000 School district: Canon-McMillan Agency: Prudential Preferred Realty 724-941-3000 prudentialpreferredrealty.com Anthony Farms Peters Township Single-family homes Priced from: $600,000 Agency: Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 412-276-5000 howardhanna.com Apple Hill Canonsburg Single-family homes Priced from: $190,000 School district: Canon-McMillan Agency: Maronda Homes, Inc 724-873-7455 www.marondahomes.com Brookwood Manor Peters Township Luxury custom estate homes Priced from: $900,000 School district: Peters Township Agency: Century 21 Frontier Realty 724-941-8680 EddyHomes.com

WASHINGTON COUNTY

Wyncrest Estates Butler Township Single-family homes Priced from: $250,000 Butler Area Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 412-366-1600 pittsburghmoves.com/wyncrestestates

WASHINGTON COUNTY

46 GREATER PITTSBURGH’S NEW HOME

| Winter 2014

Brookview Peters Township Carriage homes Priced from: $349,900 School district: Peters Township Agency: Keller Williams 412-831-3800

Fair Acres Upper St. Clair Custom single-family homes Priced from: Lots, $650,000 School district: Upper St Clair Agency: Prudential Preferred Realty 724-833-7700 prudentialpreferredrealty.com

Majestic Hills North Strabane Township Single-family homes Priced from: $250,000 School district: Canon-McMillan Agency: Ryan Homes 724-745-6410 ryanhomes.com

The Brookview Villas Peters Township Custom villa homes Priced from: $350,000 School district: Peters Township Agency: Paragon Homes 412-787-8807 visitparagonhomes.com

Great Meadows Peters Township Single-family homes Priced from: $290,000 School district: Peters Township Agency: Ryan Homes 412-835-1869 ryanhomes.com

Maple Ridge Cecil Township Townhomes Priced from: $190,000 School district: Canon-McMillan Agency: Ryan Homes 724-745-3680 ryanhomes.com

Cameron Estates South Strabane Township Single-family and carriage homes Priced from: $260,000 School district: Trinity Agency: Heartland Homes 724-871-0179 HeartlandCustomHomes.com Chadwick Estates Peters Township Single-family homes Priced from: $400,000 School district: Peters Township Agency: Heartland Homes 724-871-1736 HeartlandCustomHomes.com The Crossings Peters Township Luxury custom villa homes Priced from: $300,000 School district: Peters Township Agency: Century 21 Frontier Realty 724-941-8680 EddyHomes.com

Hamlet of Springdale Peters Township Single-family homes Priced from: $699,000 School district: Peters Township Agency: Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 724-941-8800

McMurray Highlands Peters Township Custom single-family homes Priced from: $575,000 School district: Peters Township Agency: Prudential Preferred Realty 412-833-7700 prudentialpreferredrealty.com

Highcroft Cecil Township Single-family homes Coming Soon! Agency: Ryan Homes 724-249-6835 ryanhomes.com

Meadow Ridge Peters Township Single-family homes Priced from: $685,900 School district: PetersTownship Agency: Prudential Preferred Realty 412-833-7700 prudentialpreferredrealty.com

Hill Station Manor Cecil Township Townhomes or condos Priced from: $259,900 School district: Canon-McMillan Agency: Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 724-873-7355 howardhanna.com

Mission Hills Cecil Township Carriage and villa homes Priced from: $228,500 School district: Canon-McMillan Agency: Epcon Homes and Communities 724-223-1844 epconcarriagehomes.com Oakbrook Estates Cecil Township Single-family homes Coming Soon! Agency: Ryan Homes 724-249-6835 ryanhomes.com


Strabane Manor South Strabane Township Townhomes Priced from: $160,000 School district: Trinity Agency: Maronda Homes, Inc 724-229-1470 www.marondahomes.com

Orchard Hill Peters Township Single-family homes Priced from: $290,000 School district: Peters Township Agency: Ryan Homes 412-835-1869 ryanhomes.com

Summerbrooke

The Overlook at Peters Peters Township Single-family homes Priced from: $450,000 School district: Peters Township Agency: Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 724-941-8800 howardhanna.com

The Summit Chartiers Township Single-family homes Priced from: $190,000 School district: Chartiers-Houston Agency: Maronda Homes, Inc 724-873-7455 www.marondahomes.com

The Overlook At Southpointe Cecil Township Single-family homes townhomes and carriage home coming soon School district: Canon-McMillan Agency: Ryan Homes 724-249-6835 ryanhomes.com Overlook at Southpointe Cecil Township Single-family homes Priced from: $400,000 School district: Canon McMillan Agency: Heartland Homes 724-949-0079 HeartlandLuxuryHomes.com Paxton Grove Chartiers Township Single-family-homes School district: Chartiers-Houston Agency: Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 724-222-6040 howardhanna.com

North Strabane Township Single-family homes Priced from: $340,000 School district: Canon-McMillan Agency: Heartland Homes 724-871-1719 HeartlandCustomHomes.com

Sycamore Reserve North Franklin Township Single-family homes Priced from: $250,000 School district:Trinity Agency:Keith Homes 724-223-0285 keithhomes.net Timber Run Cecil Township Single-family homes Priced from: $230,000 School district: Canon-McMillan Agency: Ryan Homes 724-745-6410 ryanhomes.com Tuscany Estates Union Township Townhomes, single-family and patiohomes Priced from: $130,000 $180,000 single-family School district: Ringgold Agency: Maronda Homes, Inc 724-348-6472 www.marondahomes.com Walnut Ridge South Fayette Township Single-family homes Coming Soon! School district: South Fayette Agency: Ryan Homes 724-249-6835 ryanhomes.com

Sandy Brae Meadows North Strabane Township Townhomes Priced from: $190,000 School district: Canon-McMillan Agency: Maronda Homes, Inc 724-873-7455 www.marondahomes.com

Waterdam Farms North Strabane Township Carriage homes Priced from: $300,000 School district: Canon-McMillan Agency: Coldwell Banker Real Estate Services 412-833-5404 pittsburghmoves.com/ waterdamfarms

Siena at the Hamlet Peters Township Single-family homes Priced from: $475,000 School district: Peters Township Agency: Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 724-941-8800 howardhanna.com

Weavertown Cecil Township Townhomes Coming Soon! Agency: Ryan Homes 412-249-6835 ryanhomes.com

Weavertown Woodlands North Strabane Township Carriage homes Priced from: $300,000 School district: Canon-McMillan Agency:Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 724-222-6040 howardhanna.com

WESTMORELAND COUNTY Acropolis Heights Unity Township Custom single-family homes Priced from: $620,000 School district: Greater Latrobe Agency: Prudential Preferred Realty 724-838-3660 prudentialpreferredrealty.com Allegheny Woodlands Allegheny Township Custom single-family and cottage villas Priced from: low $200,000 single-family and $180,000 cottage villas School district: Kiski Area Agency: Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 724-339-4000 howardhanna.com The Armory at Ligonier Ligonier Townhouses Priced from: $275,000 School district: Ligonier Valley Agency: Prudential Preferred Realty 724-238-7600 prudentialpreferredrealty.com Augusta Penn Township Single-family homes Priced from: Lots, $53,900 School district: Penn-Trafford Agency: Prudential Preferred Realty 724-327-0444 prudentialpreferredrealty.com Bianca Rose Murrysville Single-family homes Priced from: $395,000 School district: Franklin Regional Agency: Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 724-327-5161 howardhanna.com Blackthorne Estates Penn Township Single-family homes Priced from: $320,000 School district: Penn Trafford Agency: Ryan Homes 724-863-3506 ryanhomes.com

Carriage Homes at Stonegate Rostraver Patio homes Priced from: $219,900 School district: Belle Vernon Area Agency: Prudential Preferred Realty 724-838-3660 prudentialpreferredrealty.com

Grandview Estates Hempfield Township Single-family homes Priced from: $190,000 School district: Hempfield Area Agency: Ryan Homes 724-836-1804 ryanhomes.com

Cedar Hills Rostraver Township Condominiums and villas Priced from: $197,500 School district: Belle Vernon Area Agency: Prudential Preferred Realty 724-929-7228 prudentialpreferredrealty.com

Greenfield Estates Unity Township Custom single-family homes Priced from: $250,000 School district: Greater Latrobe Agency: Scalise Real Estate 724-539-3525

Cherry Knoll Delmont Single-family homes Priced from: $225.000 School district: Greensburg Salem Agency: ReMax Realty 412-856-2000 rasnoznik.net

Hampton Heights (Formerly Carradam Golf Course) North Huntingdon Township One acre homesites Priced from: $400,000 School district: Norwin Agency: RWS Custom Homes 724-861-0571 rwscustomhomes.com

Cherry Wood Estates Mt. Pleasant Township Custom single-family homes Priced from: $225,000 School district: Mount Pleasant Agency: Prudential Preferred Realty 724-838-3660 prudentialpreferredrealty.com

Harrington Way at Wendover Hempfield Township Single-family homes Priced from: $249,900 School district: Hempfield Area Agency: Northwood Realty 724-327-5600 northwood.com

Chestnut Hill North Huntingdon Township Single-family homes Priced from: $240,000 School district: Norwin Agency: Ryan Homes 724-863-3506 ryanhomes.com

Hawk Valley Allegheny Township Townhomes Priced from: $120,000 School district: Kiski Area Agency: Maronda Homes, Inc 724-895-3876 www.marondahomes.com

Everview Estates Ligonier Township Single-family homes Priced from: $299,900 School district: Ligonier Valley Angency: Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 724-832-2300

Laurel View Place Derry Township Single-family lots Priced from: $49,900 School district: Derry Area Agency: Northwood Realty Services 724-537-0110 northwood.com

Foxfield Knoll Unity Township Single-family homes Priced from: $300,000 School district: Greater Latrobe Agency: Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 724-327-5161 howardhanna.com

The Legends North Huntingdon Single-family homes Priced from: $450,000 School district: Norwin Agency: Scalise Homes 724-864-5500 www.scalisehomes.com

Foxtail Court at Rolling Ridge Murrysville Single-family homes Priced from: $600,000 School district: Franklin Regional Agency: Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 724-327-5161 howardhanna.com Glenn Aire Unity Township Custom single-family homes Priced from: $350,000 School district: Greater Latrobe Agency: Prudential Preferred Realty 724-838-3660 prudentialpreferredrealty.com

Lincoln Hills North Huntington Township Single-family homes, townhomes and grand villas Priced from: mid-$300,000 Single-family, $239,900 townhomes and $289,900 grand villas School district: Norwin Agency: RWS Custom Homes 724-861-0571 rwscustomhomes.com Lindwood Crest Hempfield Township Patio homes Priced from: $189,900 School district: Hempfield Area Agency: Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 724-832-2300 howardhanna.com

www.greaterpittsburghnewhome.com

WESTMORELAND COUNTY

Piatt Estates Chartiers Township Single-family homes Priced from: $270,000 School district: Chartiers/ Houston Agency: S&A Realty 724-272-9716 sahomebuilder.com

Weavertown Village North Strabane Township Carriage homes and luxury townhomes Priced from: $180,000 School district: Canon-McMillan Agency: Heartland Homes 724-871-1732 HeartlandCustomHomes.com

WASHINGTON COUNTY

Old Trail Peters Township Single-family homes Priced from: $420,000 School district: Peters Township Agency: Heartland Homes 724-949-0079 HeartlandLuxuryHomes.com

47


Mallard Landing Murrysville Single-family homes Priced from: $470,000 School district: Franklin Regional Agency: Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 724-327-5161 howardhanna.com

Palmer Place Unity Township Custom single-family Priced from: $430,000 School district: Greater Latrobe Agency: Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 724-832-2300 howardhanna.com

Siena Ridge Murrysville Single-family homes Priced from : $600,000 School district: Franklin Regional Agency: Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 724-327-5161 howardhanna.com

Marquis Place Murrysville Luxury condominiums Priced from: $275,000 School district: Franklin Regional Agency: Kacin Companies, Inc. 724-327-7700

Palmer Place Unity Township Custom single-family Priced from: $650,000 School district: Greater Latrobe Agency: Prudential Preferred Realty 724-838-3660 prudentialpreferredrealty.com

Summerhill Murrysville Patio townhomes, stacked flats School district: Franklin Regional Priced from: $249,900 Agency: Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 724-327-5161 howardhanna.com

Meadowlane Farm Estates Hempfield Township Single-family homes Priced from: $220,000 School district: Hempfield Area Agency: Ryan Homes 724-836-1804 ryanhomes.com

WESTMORELAND COUNTY

Meadowlane Heights Hempfield Township Single-family homes Priced from: $180,000’s School district: Hempfield Area Agency: S & A Realty 724-872-8403 sahomebuilder.com Moreland Manor Allegheny Township Single-family homes Priced from: $200,000 School district: Kiski Area Agency: Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 412-478-1002 ricciuticonstruction.com howardhanna.com Northpointe Hempfield Township Custom single-family homes Priced from: $270,000 School district: Hempfield Area Agency: Prudential Preferred Realty 724-838-3660 prudentialpreferredrealty.com Oak Farm Estates Penn Township Single-family homes Priced from: $250,000 School district: Penn-Trafford Agency: Prudential Preferred Realty 724-838-3660 prudentialpreferredrealty.com

Renaissance Heights Rostraver Township Single-family homes Priced from: low $200,000 School district: Belle Vernon Area Agency: Maronda Homes, Inc 724-872-7017 www.marondahomes.com Rivendell Penn Township Single-family homes Priced from: $290,000 School district: Penn-Trafford Agency: S & A Realty 724-872-8403 sahomebuilder.com Rolling Hill Farm Rostraver Township Single-family homes Priced from: $180,000 School district: Belle Vernon Area Agency: S & A Realty 724-872-8403 sahomebuilder.com Rolling Ridge Murrysville Single-family homes Priced from: $390,000 School district: Franklin Regional Agency: Ryan Homes 724-793-4797 ryanhomes.com Salem Ridge Village Rostraver Township Single-family Priced from: $225,000 School district: Belle Vernon Area Agency: Prudential Preferred Realty 724-838-3660 prudentialpreferredrealty.com

48 GREATER PITTSBURGH’S NEW HOME

| Winter 2014

Victoria Highlands Unity Township Single-family homes Priced from: $290,000 School district: Latrobe Agency: Bob Shuster Realty 724-864-8884 rwscustomhomes.com Village at Foxfield Unity Township Single-family homes Priced from: $210,000’s School district: Greater Latrobe Agency: S & A Realty 724-872-8403 sahomebuilder.com The Village of Foxfield Unity Township Single-family homes Priced from: $250,000 School district: Greater Latrobe Agency: Howard Hanna Real Estate Services 724-327-5161 howardhanna.com The Village at Ligonier Ligonier Borough Villas Priced from: $208,900 School district: Ligonier Valley Agency: Prudential Preferred Realty 724-238-7600 prudentialpreferredrealty.com The Village at Stonegate Penn Township Villas Priced from: $324,900 School district: Penn-Trafford Agency: Prudential Preferred Realty 724-838-3660 or 724-327-0444 prudentialpreferredrealty.com

Villages At Totteridge Salem Township Single-family homes Priced from: $239,900 Agency: Prudential Preferred Realty 724-838-3660 prudentialpreferredrealty.com The Villas at Grayhawk Unity Township Villa style condominiums Priced from: $229,900 School district: Greater Latrobe Agency: Cedar Ridge Realty 724-832-3501 thevillasatgrayhawk.com The Villas of Willow Estates North Huntington Townhomes and grand villas Priced from: $239,900 and $289,900 School district: Norwin Agency: RWS Custom Homes 724-861-0571 rwscustomhomes.com Weatherton Farm Estates Unity Township Single-family haomes Priced from: $250,000 School district: Greater Latrobe Agency: ReMax 412-856-2000 rasnoznik.net Westmoreland Community Action Jeannette Single-family homes Priced from: $75,000 School district: Jeannette City Agency: Northwood Realty 724-838-9643 northwood.com Westmoreland Community Action Reed Avenue Jeannette Single-family homes Priced from: $63,000 School district: Jeannette City Agency: Northwood Realty 724-838-9643 northwood.com

Westmoreland Farms Murrysville Single-family homes and villas Priced from: $229,900 single-family; $176,900 villas School district: Franklin Regional Agency: Howard Hanna Real EstateServices 724-327-5161 howardhanna.com Westmoreland Human Opportunities Monessan Single-family homes Priced from: $70,000 School district: Monessen Agency: Northwood Realty 724-838-9643 northwood.com Westwind Estates Hempfield Township Single-family homes Priced from: $240,000 School district: Hempfield Area Agency: Ryan Homes 724-836-1804 ryanhomes.com Willow Estates North Huntington Single-family homes Priced from: $270,000 School district: Norwin Agency: S & A Realty 724-872-8403 sahomebuilder.com The Woods of Brandywine Penn Township Single-family homes Priced from: $240,000 School district: Penn Trafford Agency: Ryan Homes 412-793-4797 ryanhomes.com Yok Wood Ridge Unity Township Single-family homes Priced from: $190,000 School district: Greater Latrobe Agency: Prudential Preferred Realty 724-838-3660 prudentialpreferredrealty.com


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