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JACKSONIAN JAYNE JACKSON

ayne Jackson calls herself a community organizer: She brings people together with the help of food, wine, and—most recently—radio. She hosts a biweekly show on WLEZ-FM where she interviews other charismatic Jacksonians about goingson around town. “One thing that people who live in the metropolis say is that there’s nothing to do here, and yeah, if you aren’t connected with the JFP events calendar, you would think there’s nothing to do here!” she says. Jackson, 36, is also a self-described “Rainbow Brite.” This is a modest disguise, because in “real life” she does a million things, including being a mother to three little kids— Audrey, 2; Alex, 3; and Will, 4. After years in the restaurant business, Jackson cultivated an active love for people and organizing events. “I especially love restaurant people—we’re a different breed,” she says with a laugh. She was raised in Jackson, and her family moved to Little Rock, Ark., when she was a teenager. Jackson stayed and “did her growing up” there, then followed her parents back to Jackson to start a family. In order to spend time with her daughter during the day, she worked nights at The Parker House in Ridgeland on and off for about 10 years. While at a wine school at Table 100 in Flowood, Jackson met Nelene Ledford, who produced the WLEZ radio show before her; the rest is history.

CONTENTS

After Edward St. Pe’ established National Weather Networks, where he produces weather reports in nearly all 50 states, he founded WLEZ as a “just-for-fun” project. “That to me was the most appealing: starting with nothing and trying to expand our market and use this to reach more people. … We’re given complete license to do whatever we want to do. It’s really the way that Edward St. Pe’ gives back,” Jackson says. Jackson does the research to find guests and tries to balance the topics to keep the city’s diverse demographic interested. “I really look for somebody that’s making a difference. I want somebody to tell their story,” she says. “I really want to be a part of the racial-healing process in this area. I think it’s time. I think a lot of people in this area are ready to take that next step and look for some healing with our racial divides, because they still exist.” Jackson credits her positive outlook about the capital city and its people to a core gratefulness that she developed during high school. Her parents worked in ministry full-time, and her family of six had a hard time, financially. “It’s one of the things in life that has colored me,” she says. “I don’t see color in people. I don’t see financial differences in people. It’s made me a much more open creature.” Tune in to Jackson’s show on WLEZ 100.1 FM Wednesdays and Fridays at noon.

Cover photograph by Kathleen M. Mitchell

10 Budgeting Babies and Boats

“One of the things that I find ironic is that he wants to expand ports for boats but not health care for babies. Our people are more important than expanding ports for boats.” —Sen. Hillman Frazier, D-Jackson, at a recent luncheon sponsored by civic organization Jackson 2000, referring to Gov. Phil Bryant’s push to spend about $500 million in unused federal Hurricane Katrina housing grants to expand the Port of Gulfport.

28 Mr. Potter

Lee and Pup McCarty’s pottery business was honored this year for becoming an integral part of Mississippi’s arts landscape.

34 Cozy Yet Edgy

Grizzly Bear’s latest offering, “Shields,” is an album that offers smooth, haunting background music that still stretches musical appreciation.

jacksonfreepress.com

4 .......... BEST OF JACKSON BALLOT 6 ..............................EDITOR’S NOTE 8 ................................................ YOU 9 ............................................ TALKS 12 .................................. BUSINESS 14 .................................. EDITORIAL 14 ................. EDITORIAL CARTOON 15 .................................... OPINION 16 ............................ COVER STORY 28 .............................. DIVERSIONS 30 ....................................... 8 DAYS 32 .......................................... FILM 32 ............................... JFP EVENTS 34 ....................................... MUSIC 36 ....................... MUSIC LISTINGS 37 ......................................... FOOD 40 ................................. ORGANICS 41 ................... GIRL ABOUT TOWN 43 ..................................... SPORTS 45 .............................. ASTROLOGY 46 ............................................. FLY

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NOVEMBER 21 - 27, 2012 | VOL. 11 NO. 11

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EDITOR’S note

by Donna Ladd, Editor-in-Chief

Giving Thanks Where It’s Due

M

ost mornings, I write down seven things that I’m grateful for in a little purple “grateful book.” This practice puts me in the right frame of mind to take on the day. My list is typically a wild mix of blessings that are very me, from small domestic delights to societal issues I’m passionate about. Here’s a recent list: 1) Sweater+boots weather today 2) Saints won 3) My amazing staff 4) purring cats all around me 5) Todd’s goat-cheese enchiladas 6) Damn election is over 7) FOX News meltdown. Social issues and politics are not part of my grateful list every day, but things that matter to me show up there because, well, they matter to me. As a Buddhist-Baptist, which I labeled myself as recently, the state of the world matters greatly to me, especially violence, hunger, poverty, inequality. I take the role of the press in a strong democracy very seriously; thus, I care about how media help, and hurt, our community. I am concerned when I spot holes in coverage that, if filled, would make us a stronger and more compassionate city, state and nation. For instance, I read a report recently in The Clarion-Ledger about a budget meeting that Gov. Phil Bryant, Lt. Gov. Tate Reeves and House Speaker Philip Gunn held. From the news report, you wouldn’t know that the state economist had warned state leaders that increased federal budget cuts (especially with costly Bush tax cuts in place) could devastate Mississippi economically because we’re so dependent on federal resources. (The JFP did, however, report that vital part.) Could this kind of omission be responsible for the weird disconnect of the majority of Mississippians—most of whom are not helped by tax cuts for the wealthy—supporting budget and tax cuts that would raise costs for the state while lowering revenue? Would it explain people supposedly voting for smaller government while not understand-

ing that our state gets far more than its share of federal pork—with Republicans actively lobbying for most of that bacon? Sure, good citizens should seek out all the facts themselves, but we-the-media have the responsibility to tell people the whole truth, and it doesn’t matter where that falls on the political spectrum or which party it

You lose when media just tell you want you want to hear. makes looks good or bad at the moment. When the JFP reports facts other media ignore, many try to dismiss us as “liberal”—a word used very loosely in Mississippi—regardless of the truth of our reporting or the motives of the politicians they support. We’ve seen it happen repeatedly as we’ve reported facts about the lies and myths behind the Iraq War (that we reported the week it began); the real Frank Melton (ClarionLedger hid that he was lying under oath, and endorsed him anyway); the enormous problems with George W. Bush (Clarion-Ledger endorsed him for re-election); the conflicts of interest and unreported campaign donations of Two Lakes backers; the fact that voter ID is costly, frivolous legislation that doesn’t target actual voter fraud; and much more. This information blackout is a national problem. We’ve all watched 24-hour cable “news” turn into infotainment designed to tell certain views what they want to hear— without much regard for actual facts. Rupert

Murdoch’s FOX News, of course, has led the way on producing the most unfair and unbalanced and often inaccurate “news” coverage that becomes gospel for its choir. (Go read up on Murdoch’s war on Gov. Chris Christie because he worked with the president after Hurricane Sandy to see what “fair and balanced” really means over there.) I was grateful for a FOX News meltdown on and since election night because I want more Americans to start demanding real facts, not propaganda, and to learn to tell the difference before we end up with another Mayor Melton or an Iraq War we still haven’t paid for. It is one thing for a news outlet to do heavy-duty research and then take an informed position based on those facts (what we do) and another to decide a partisan position and say (or ignore) anything to please ideologues. That’s not real journalism. Americans too often allow ourselves to be divided into two distinct camps and told to support a position of one “side” with scant evidence to back it up. This is bad in any circumstance, but it is dangerous when one party swings as far to the extreme as the Republican Party has of late (and Democrats did in previous decades and could again some day). Media that feed extremism are not giving the public the information it needs to make informed decisions. One side or the other will always to media that report than their side. We’ve gotten hate mail over the years from the left and the right—and some of the strongest has come from people who think we’re supposed to be on their side (such as when we unendorsed Democrats because they were publicly pandering to extremists publicly to get votes). Years ago, I started saying that a good news outlet “tells the truth with style and lets the chips fall where they may.” And the chips will not always fall evenly on two sides of a line. Depending on which political party is being more of a stinker at the moment, tell-

ing the truth will likely make one look better than the other. It should. Reporting the truth shouldn’t be about taking two opposite opinions and giving each equal time—not when one of them is factual and the other isn’t. Dividing a story down the middle when one side is more honest or honorable than the other is anything but “objective.” It is journalism malpractice to pretend two sides are even when the facts don’t support it. Partisans will always slam media for not reporting their side as the best or equal one—and they hate factchecking, which should be part of every news report ever published. (It’s policy here.) People who dislike Mayor Harvey Johnson wanted us to go easy on Melton and not tell readers he was a devastating choice for mayor. Partisans want us to be “fair” about voter ID, thus concealing that it is costly, frivolous legislation that Republicans have openly admitted is done to help their party win office. Not reporting that, and making up good reasons for voter ID that do not exist, would be the most irresponsible kind of yellow journalism we could come up with. It would be similar to the Ledger’s history of biased tort-reform coverage—which left out facts its supporters didn’t want in there. (See jfp.ms/hoodwinked). Incomplete reporting ultimately leaves people feeling cheated as so many Republicans felt election night after their chosen media outlets assured them of a “landslide.” The data never indicated that; it was an irresponsible lie, although not as bad as some of the dangerous whoppers FOX et al hyped about a Benghazi conspiracy-that-wasn’t, welfare work rules and, yes, voter suppression. Regardless of your beliefs, you lose when media just tell you what you want to hear. The job of the Fourth Estate is precisely to give people needed if disconcerting information because, well, no one else is going to. Pandering never builds great societies. Let’s be thankful for that.

November 21 - 27, 2012

CONTRIBUTORS

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Whitney Gilchrist

R.L. Nave

Whitney has this Einstein quote stuck in her head: “We act as though comfort and luxury were the chief requirements of life, when all that we need to make us happy is something to be enthusiastic about.” She wrote the Jacksonian.

Reporter R.L. Nave grew up in St. Louis, graduated from Mizzou (the University of Missouri), and lived a bunch of other places before coming to Jackson. Call him at 601-3626121 ext. 12 or email rlnave@ jacksonfreepress.com.

Brittany Hickman Cain Kathleen M. Mitchell Brittany works in Washington, D.C., and lives in Connecticut, but her heart remains in Mississippi. Britt is an enthusiastic cook, craftswoman and a blogger at magnoliaandelm. blogspot.com. She wrote for the cover package.

Features Editor Kathleen owns more holiday socks than most people, and tends to wear them year-round. She loves to be surrounded by friends, food and funky sweaters. She coordinated and wrote for the cover package.

Bryan Flynn

Doc S

Latasha Willis

Stephanie Bowering

Sports writer Bryan Flynn is a lifelong Mississippi native who lives in north Jackson. He also writes a national blog, playtowinthegame.com. He lives with his wife, new baby and four cats. Follow him @jfpsports. He wrote the sports feature.

Doctor S is the JFP’s sports consultant. He is a graduate of Miskatonic U. in Arkham, Mass., where he majored in Cthulhu Studies and was a member of the varsity 43-man squamish team. He wrote the Slate for this week.

Events Editor Latasha Willis is a native Jacksonian, a freelance designer, and the mother of one cat. She shamelessly promotes her design skills at latashawillis.com. She runs the best events calendar in the state at jfpevents.com.

Account Executive Stephanie Bowering is from Mendenhall. She is the mommy to Jameson, the cutest 2-and-a-half-yearold-boy, and Duke, a 4-year-old boxer. She loves good food, red wine and music, and wants to travel the world.


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8

Send us a photo of you and your JFP somewhere interesting. You get a $20 gift certificate if we print it.

Mzprettyred Shanetta Crisler My family and life, health and strength. LaToria Lee My family, friends old and new, my life. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So many have gone before me, and wisdom, knowledge and understanding that He gives me daily. Tricia Johnson Day My family and my children and grandchildrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s good health. Marika Gunnels Cackett Getting out of debt, saving and buying my first house! Marie Jenkins My life. My family. My friends. Life with my partner Mississippi Books!

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Colendula Green I give thanks for my health, familyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s health, job & people I wake up to make a difference for each day!

Lauren Collins I give thanks for being alive and healthy as well as having an amazing family! Oh yeah and a great experience at JFP even though I was only there for a short spell.

Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m thankful for a President who cares about people, who puts the interests of those who are struggling in this economy first, not the millionaires and billionaires of the country.

Keisha Real Talk Varnell Family and health and also Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m thankful to be able to serve my community.

Amy Barnes My husband is home for Thanksgiving. Last year Chris was deployed to the Middle East. He had only seen our daughter through pictures and Skype as she was born a few months after he deployed. This Thanksgiving we will all be together for our first Thanksgiving as a family. My cup overfloweth.

Tommy Greer That because of President Obamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s re-election, I am thankful that I will not be placed in a liberal internment camp anytime soon. Carolyn Griffin Price Health and family. Bryan Flynn That I have a healthy wife and baby after child birth today.

Natalie Maynor The election results, my dogs, my friends, and being alive and healthy.

Caroline Crawford Only having 1 semester of school left! And of course the coolest, sweetest sons and an uncomparably compatible husband who still makes me laugh every day.

Michael Kennedy Music.

Richard Perry For the sun rising again and again.

Diann Irving Alford Loyal patrons/ friends, healthy family (and healthy me!), good friends.

Emma French Connolly That the election is over!

Tonja Robinson-Murphy Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m thankful for my children. The oldest is a mirror, the middle child is a counselor, and the youngest is definitely his own person.

Linda Albin McMurtrey Obamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reelection on a national level; getting a new knee on personal level; getting to have some of my family here on family level.

Jennifer West Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m thankful to be surrounded by Godâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s chosen ones for my journey. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m thankful for my family and the â&#x20AC;&#x153;villageâ&#x20AC;? that helps me raise my child.


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Friday, Nov. 16 The Mississippi Department of Human Services holds a second public hearing on the implementation of finger scanners at day-care centers. â&#x20AC;Ś BP pleads guilty to charges of manslaughter, environmental crimes and lying to Congress in connection with the 2010 Deepwater Horizon drilling rig explosion. Saturday, Nov. 17 The Jackson Free Clinic holds a reopening open house celebrating renovation and expansion of its new permanent facility. â&#x20AC;Ś After the announcement of Hostessâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; impending closing, Twinkies and other Hostess products sell online for hundreds of dollars per box. Sunday, Nov. 18 The state Department of Education and Jackson Public Schools choose recently retired Tennessee educator Joseph Fisher to oversee the districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s efforts to comply with federal special-education requirements. â&#x20AC;Ś An Israeli missile strike kills 11 civilians in Gaza, including four children and an 81-year-old woman. Monday, Nov. 19 Mississippi Sen. Roger Wicker says Republicans are willing to meet the presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s call for new revenue to stave off tax increases. â&#x20AC;Ś President Barack Obama pays the first visit by an American leader to Myanmar and Cambodia.

DHS Makes Its Case for Scanners by R.L. Nave

A

fter weeks of offering up generalities about why it instituted a controversial new program, the Mississippi Department of Human Services finally outlined its rationale for requiring some poor parents to submit to finger scanning when retrieving their children from day care. As part of a court order that stemmed from an ongoing disagreement between child-care providers that participate in the federal child-care voucher program and the DHS, the department published an economic-impact statement on the benefits of its $12.7 million biometric finger-scan program now in effect at about 20 locations in central Mississippi. Affiliated Computer Systems Inc., a division of Xerox Corp., holds the contract to run the program, which tracks child attendance and pays providers. According to the document, the scanners could â&#x20AC;&#x153;reduce improper payments, reduce fraud, improve overall efficiency and increase the number of children being served.â&#x20AC;? Specifically, the report states that the finger scanners could save between $1.6 million and $2.2 million in administrative costs, and $15 million to $18 million in false child-attendance claims. Until recently, DHS officials had only said that the finger-scanning program would increase efficiency in the federally funded program that subsidizes child care for low-

income families and help cut down on the programâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 8,000 child-long waiting list. DHSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; suggestion that as much as $20 million worth of fraud could be taking place

youth director, for saying the finger-scan system would not be connected to any other computer database even though the departmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s economic impact statement

Cassandra Welchlin, a representative of the Mississippi Low Income Child Care Initiative, believes a controversial finger-scanning program is harmful to children and families.

in the federal child-care assistance program incensed some providers. Jane Boykin of Delta Licensed Providers accused DHS of not acting in good faith by not providing any documentation of the alleged abuse. Boykin called out Jill Dent, DHSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; office for children and

touts the scanner softwareâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ability to work with the Electronic Benefits Transfer, or food stamp, system. Dent, speaking with reporters after the Nov. 16 public hearing at Mississippi Pubmore SCANNERS see page 10

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Tuesday, Nov. 20 The Jackson City Council holds a public hearing on Larita Cooper-Stokesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; yet-to-be submitted youth-curfew ordinance. â&#x20AC;Ś President Obama sends Secretary of State Hillary Clinton to the Middle East to help resolve the ongoing Gaza crisis. Get news updates at jfpdaily.com.

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Thursday, Nov. 15 The Center for Violence Prevention in Pearl announces the beginning of the centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sexual Assault Crisis program. â&#x20AC;Ś New Hope Baptist Church and Nissan team up to deliver relief to people suffering from the effects of Hurricane Sandy.

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jacksonfreepress.com

Wednesday, Nov. 14 The Mississippi Opera opens its 68th season with â&#x20AC;&#x153;A World of Opera.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;Ś Three pilots flying out of Hawkins Field Airport en route to a federal safety conference die when their plane falters in midair and crashes into a house.

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9


TALK | state

SCANNERS, from page 9

lic Broadcasting auditorium, responded to a question from the Jackson Free Press about the prevalence of fraud in the certificate program by referring to 2007 recommendation by the office of then-Auditor Phil Bryant to improve the program’s efficiency. “We just want to make sure we have accountability in our system,” Dent said. Dent also said the Division of Child Care and Development, which DHS oversees, has issued more than 1,000 new certificates since launching the pilot program in September and plans to send more letters to parents on the waiting list. In September, the Mississippi Department of Human Services, which oversees several programs for low-income families, launched a pilot program at about 20 child-

care centers in the Jackson metro area. DHS said the new system would increase efficiency and ultimately help enroll more children whose families can’t afford to pay the full cost of child-care out of their pockets. More centers were scheduled to go online Nov. 1, but a firestorm of complaints came in from child-care-center directors who said the system is prone to glitches and that the costs of having a staff member monitor the machines bit into revenues. They also had concerns about personal-information security and privacy with the system. In a statement, Xerox said its scanner program “uplifts the whole childcare ecosystem—with providers, taxpayers and children reaping some of the most significant benefits.” “In every state where we’ve put this pro-

gram into place, states have saved money by eliminating overpayments and cutting administrative costs from the processing of paper claims and ledgers. Oklahoma has saved more than $135 million since the system rolled out statewide in November 2003,” wrote Xerox spokeswoman Jennifer Wasmer in a statement to the JFP. In addition to the potential cost burden the scanners represent, many child-care-center operators have asked why DHS spent $12.7 million for new scanners and moved so quickly away from its previous e-Ledger tracking system, implemented in February 2012. Some centers have threatened to drop out of the certificate program if DHS widens the scanners to all day-care centers in the state who accept the subsidy.

Petra Kay, who owns Northtown Child Development Center in Jackson, and other providers have questioned the wisdom of spending millions of dollars on scanners, software and support instead of funneling the money toward early child care, an area in which Mississippi lags the rest of the country. “We are developing a child-care beef plant,” Kay said, referring to a failed meatprocessing plant that put taxpayers on the hook for millions of dollars in loans when the project went belly up. “We have spent millions of dollars (on scanners) that could go to the care of children.” Read R.L. Nave’s full investigation of DHS scanners at jfp.ms/scanners. Contact R.L. Nave at rlnave@jacksonfreepress.com.

Bryant Budget Steadfast in Health Care Opposition by R.L. Nave

10

TRIP BURNS

November 21 - 27, 2012

F

acts? Gov. Phil Bryant don’t need no IHL’s survey also estimates the price tag man Frazier, D-Jackson, at a recent luncheon stinking facts when it comes to ex- to Mississippi taxpayers would be approxi- sponsored by civic organization Jackson panding Medicaid. 2000, referring to Bryant’s push to In his executive budspend about $500 million in unused get recommendation, unveiled at federal housing grants to expand the Capitol last week, Bryant testhe Port of Gulfport. “Our people tily drew his umpteenth line in the are more important than expanding sand on the question of whether ports for boats.” Mississippi should expand eligibilBryant’s budget otherwise calls ity to the federal-state health-care for a mixture of budget cuts and tax program for the poor allowed unrelief for businesses. Overall, the govder the federal Affordable Care Act. ernor recommends spending $5.8 “Personal principles aside, billion and setting aside about $100 we just cannot afford to expand million for emergencies. On average, the Medicaid program. Regardless most state agencies will see their budof which reports you consult and gets shrink about 1.5 percent, a sum which actuaries make forecasts, the Bryant said is not insurmountable bottom line will be the same—exbased on his experience as a former panding Medicaid will cost the state-agency head. Sen. Hillman Frazier said the state would miss out on millions of dollars in economic activity if it declines to state of Mississippi money that it The governor also recommendexpand Medicaid under the federal health-care reform law. does not have,” Bryant’s budget ed funding the Mississippi Adequate recommendation states. Education Program, the formula by Bryant’s statement appears to be in re- mately $109.4 million, substantially less than which the Legislature is supposed to abide, sponse to a flurry of economic reports show- previous reports—including a report that to be level with the current fiscal year, ing that taking the extra Medicaid funds, Bryant often cites. In July, Bryant pointed which underfunds MAEP by $260 million. which would eventually require millions to a report that Brookfield, Wis.-based Mil- Meanwhile, Bryant wants overall publicworth of additional investment on the part liman Inc completed during Gov. Haley Bar- education funding to increase by just over of the state, could represent a net gain for bour’s administration that said increasing the $10 million or 0.5 percent more than the Mississippi in terms of improving health in Medicaid rolls by 400,000 would irreparably current budget year. the nation’s unhealthiest state and stimulat- damage the already stressed state budget. The While most agencies would see a reducing the state’s health-care economy. Milliman report found that adding nearly a tion in Bryant’s budget plan, some agencies An Institutions of Higher Learning half-million more people to Medicaid would got a reprieve from cuts or saw big increases. report released in October concludes that cost $1.6 billion over the next 10 years. The Mississippi Highway Patrol adopting the Medicaid expansion would In the three-ring circus that is the Mis- would be exempt from cuts and receive create more than 9,100 jobs by 2020, when sissippi Legislature, Medicaid expansion an $8.5 million increase for a new trooper Obamacare is fully implemented, and give is shaping up to be the main event in the school, raises for some troopers and to remore than 300,000 low-income Mississip- coming legislative session that begins in place old vehicles. The Mississippi Emerpians access to health-care services they do January. Democrats, who are in the minor- gency Management Agency, whose profile not currently have. The ACA would raise the ity in both legislative chambers, are poised former Barbour elevated after Hurricane eligible income-levels for the program to 133 to push forward the health-care expansion Katrina, would get a more than 300 perpercent of the federal poverty level. The fed- despite Bryant’s plans for more austere cent increase for disaster relief under Bryeral government would pick up 100 percent Medicaid expenditures. ant’s spending plan, up to $2.7 million of the expansion costs for three years and de“One of the things that I find ironic is next year from $663,780 in fiscal 2013. crease to 90 percent thereafter when the law that he wants to expand ports for boats but Bryant’s budget also increases the Missisis implemented fully. not health care for babies,” said Sen. Hill- sippi Department of Corrections budget

by $24.8 million, an 8 percent increase. “We must send a message to the lawless,” said Bryant, who justified the additional expenditure by saying the state’s inmate population is increasing. MDOC’s daily inmate population reflects that the state’s prison population has risen from 21,397 on Jan. 1 to 22,261 at the beginning of November but remains well under the system’s 25,691-bed capacity. Criminal justice experts argue that the health-care overhaul could further reduce the amount government agencies spend on prisons. The National Institute on Drug Abuse, estimates that for every dollar spent on substance abuse treatment programs, taxpayers save between $4 and $7 in incarceration costs. “Making treatment available to prisoners, ex-cons and those in danger of becoming either has been shown to have a marked impact on criminal behavior. Reports from around the country indicate that increased admissions to drug treatment are associated with fewer arrests, reduced incarceration and lower recidivism,” Rachel E. Barkow and David B. Edwards with the Center on the Administration of Criminal Law at NYU School of Law opined in a 2010 Wall Street Journal op-ed. Bryant’s budget wasn’t all slashing and burning. It also contained a gift to some 1,700 businesses in the form of changing the way taxes are collected. Current law requires some businesses to pay some taxes early, at the close of the fiscal year. Bryant wants to do away with the accelerated tax, which he said would provide relief to 67 percent of small businesses. The Legislature convenes from January to April in 2013 and must pass a budget before the start of the 2014 fiscal year next summer. Comment at www.jfp.ms. Contact R.L. Nave at rlnave@jacksonfreepres.com.


TALK | economy

Mississippi’s ‘Lost Decade’ by Ronni Mott

loss of good, middle-income jobs. Today, nearly a quarter of working Mississippians have low-wage jobs, frequently without benefits. With a half-million adults with a only a high-school diploma or less,

especially in government and leadership, the report states. It exacerbates crime problems and even undermines efforts to lift families out of poverty, when work doesn’t pay enough to live on. “When low-wage jobs do not pay enough to lift a family out of poverty and when the incomes of the poorest families grow only slowly or not at all, policies that encourage work cannot succeed,” the report states. Ed Sivak, director of the Mississippi Economic Policy Center, said one of problems in the state is that the number of jobs hasn’t increased since 1996. “Over the last 10 years, we’ve lost over 88,000 manufacturing jobs,” he said. “… These weren’t just goodpaying jobs; these were good-paying jobs that often offered health insurance.” Mississippi also lost 3,900 public-sector jobs since 2008, and union-membership workers have been cut almost in half since the OK, both of which factor into the

those workers are “often not going to have the skills to be monetized and move up the economic ladder,” Sivak said. Mississippi’s community colleges should provide new job skills to low-income, low-skilled workers, he said, and part of the solution to inequality is ensuring those schools have the resources they need. The two most important avenues to bring people up from poverty, however, are child care and health care. “When people have access to good child care, especially if they’re working mothers, they’re more likely to stay attached to the labor force,” Sivak said. “… Likewise, when someone has health insurance, they are likely to be healthier, more productive; they miss less work.” Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act may be the greatest opportunity to shrink the inequality gap. “First, it would create jobs,” he said—

about 9,000 a year by the MEPC’s estimation. It would also provide health insurance to more than 300,000 people. “If Mississippi doesn’t more forward with Medicaid expansion, not only do we miss out on that opportunity to create jobs, but our workforce will be less healthy, our private insurance premiums will increase, and that’s going to make us, overall, less competitive when trying to attract industry to the region. … It’s an immediate way for us to address income inequality in the state.” Sivak added that the state’s tax system is highly regressive. “A family earning $35,000 a year is in the same tax bracket as a family making a $1 million a year,” he said. In addition, Mississippi’s sales taxes on necessary items—food, for example—is much more of a hardship on the poor than on the wealthy. “We need to have a revenue system that is balanced,” he said, which would include adding at least one additional tax bracket on the high end of the income scale and closing corporate loopholes.” “Another thing you could do is broaden the sales tax base,” Sivak added. Mississippians don’t pay sales tax on most services—dog grooming, for example. Adjusting the base could generate more revenue and make the system fairer. “When you tax things that people can’t avoid purchasing, that makes the system, overall, more regressive,” he said. Mississippi also had the fastest-growing gap between the rich and those bringing home middle-income wages, around $46,000 a year. “What you will see is increased segregation by income,” he said. With that comes an erosion of support for the fundamentals of our educational system—public schools and affordable college tuition. “As support for those things erodes, then we all lose out,” Sivak said. “… It puts us in a place where we limit our potential.” Comment at www.jfp.ms. Email Ronni Mott at ronni@jacksonfreepress.com.

jacksonfreepress.com

it costs (in terms other than dollars) and provided a number of recommendations for state legislatures. Income inequality doesn’t just hurt the poor. It threatens social cohesion and trust,

COURTESY CENTER ON BUDGET AND POLICY PRIORITIES

T

he rich are getting richer, while the poor are getting poorer. That cliché has never been truer than in Mississippi during the past couple of decades. Nowhere in the U.S. has the inequality gap grown larger than in Mississippi. On Thursday, the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities released “Pulling Apart: A State-by-State Analysis of Income Trends,” a report that focused on the income gaps between each state’s poorest families, those in the middle and the richest. Not a single state in the union saw income inequality decrease by a statistically significant amount. Some saw no changes during the periods examined (1977 to 2010); however, most saw inequality rise. “It’s especially disturbing that the last decade was a ‘lost decade’ for low and moderate-income households,” said Elizabeth McNichol, one of the report’s co-authors, during a conference call Nov. 14. Nationally, between the late 1990s and the mid-2000s, income fell 6 percent for poor households and stagnated for middleincome households, growing only 1.2 percent on average, she said. In contrast, highincome households climbed 9 percent, and the richest 5 percent grew by 14 percent. The national numbers pale in comparison to Mississippi’s lost decade. Income for low-income Mississippians plummeted by 17.3 percent during the period, while middle-income households dropped 5.4 percent. The richest 20 percent grew by 19.1 percent. Mississippi’s poorest 20 percent of households make an average of $16,100.The top 5 percent? $224,700 a year—14 times that of the poorest 20 percent. “[S]tates like Mississippi have an opportunity to choose a different course,” McNichol said. CBPP is a Washington, D.C.-based think tank that researches policies affecting low- and moderate-income families. “Pulling Apart” outlined why the gaps exist, what

11


TALK | business

UMMC Working for NCI Designation by Jacob D. Fuller

S

JACOB D. FULLER

tatistics show Mississippi is suffer- rates—Kentucky, West Virginia, Mississippi, prehensive plan, the university has begun ing by not having a National Can- Louisiana, Tennessee and Arkansas—only work on a new entrance to its campus cer Institute-designated treatment Tennessee has a NCI-designated center. In from Lakeland Drive and a new heart cencenter, so the University of Missis- contrast, the six states with the lowest cancer ter. Once the entrance is complete, crews sippi Medical Center is working to change death rates—Utah, Hawaii, Arizona, Colo- will begin building a new, state-of-the-art that within the next five years. School of Medicine. The 67 NCI-designated “(Construction) should start, centers nationwide lead the way probably early 2013,” Jack Main developing new and more zurak, spokesman for UMMC, effective approaches to preventold the Jackson Free Press. “Foltion, diagnosis and treatment of lowing that, we’ll likely start on a cancer. The closest designated new research building.” centers to Jackson are St. Jude’s That building, the Cancer Children’s Research Hospital in and Biomedical Research Center, Memphis, Tenn., and Univerwhich will be a part of a larger resity of Alabama-Birmingham search park on the UMMC camComprehensive Cancer Center pus, is one of the two key elements in Birmingham, Ala. to NCI designation, Vijayakumar Dr. Srinivasan Vijayakusaid. The school has already begun mar (UMMC insiders call him securing the other key element. Dr. Vijay) is the chairman of “We have recruited eight Dr. Srinivasan Vijayakumar, deputy director of the UMMC the university’s Department of Ph.D. research people who do canCancer Institute, believes the university will get National Cancer Institute designation within the next five years. Radiation Oncology and the cer-related research,” Vijayakumar deputy director of the Cancer said. “So now what we are trying Institute. He completed his resito do is to bring in bench research dency at the University of Chicago, which rado, New Mexico and California—all have findings to the clinic, so that the treatments has an NCI-designated institute, The Uni- NCI-designated centers. are improved.” versity of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Those centers have access to funding Bench research is done in a laboratory Center. Vijayakumar wants to see UMMC for state-of-the-art equipment, and cancer on non-human subjects. UMMC is the only build such a center. patients in those states have access to doc- facility in the state that can do such transThe need here is undeniable. While tors who have done hands-on research with lational research at this time, turning findMississippi ranks 20th in the nation in oc- that equipment. It takes years to get NCI ings from basic scientific study into practical currences of cancer, with 477.1 per 100,000 designation. NCI has requirements the hos- applications in the field of cancer treatment people, it ranks third in cancer deaths with pitals must reach for the research center and and prevention. an average of 204.7 deaths per 100,000 over for the researchers. UMMC’s biggest step, Once UMMC builds and moves into the last five years. Vijayakumar said, is building a new cancer the Cancer and Biomedical Research Center, The state’s statistics are not an anomaly. research center. it will apply for NCI designation, VijayakuOf the six states with the highest cancer death As part of UMMC’s 15-year com- mar said.

Even with the center and researchers in place, UMMC will still have to undergo a rigorous review process by the NCI. Vijayakumar said it will take UMMC five years to get the designation, which includes building the center and the review process. The NCI designation is “an entrée to greater federal funding; just as much, it is recognition of scientific excellence and of outstanding leadership,” the NCI website states. Once UMMC applies, it could receive one of two NCI designations: NCI-designated cancer center or NCI-designated comprehensive cancer center. To receive the comprehensive label, UMMC will have to demonstrate substantial findings that link laboratory, clinical and population-based research, as well as professional and public education and outreach capabilities, all of which make up a large part of UMMC’s operations already because it is a public university with multiple locations. UMMC already has a big head start on NCI designation with many elements available nowhere else in the state. It boasts five on-staff physicists, who can focus radiation treatment machines to pinpoint cancerous tissues while minimizing harm to surrounding tissue and organs, and the state’s only HexzaPOD Evo table, which can adjust patients’ position and angle to the millimeter during treatment so that the radiation machine attacks only the correct spot in the body. Vijayakumar believes UMMC is well on its way to NCI designation. Comment at www.jfp.ms. Email Jacob D. Fuller at jacob@jacksonfreepress.com.

Support Small Business Saturday by Ron Aldridge

November 21 - 27, 2012

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12

ou know about Black Friday, the day after Thanksgiving when people line up outside the big department stores and discount stores to buy deeply discounted Christmas presents. Black Friday is a big day for retailers, but I don’t think it’s nearly as important as Small Business Saturday. That’s because small business is the foundation of our economy. Small Business Saturday is about Main Street, not Wall Street. It’s about the entrepreneurs and families who have put everything into stores that offer what the chains and e-commerce companies don’t—something different, something special, from handcrafted gifts to genuinely friendly service. It’s also about supporting the local economy. Big corporations based someplace else own the chain stores, but people who live in the community usually own small businesses. When you shop at a small busi-

ness, you’re supporting your hometown, your neighborhood and your neighbors. The mainstream media tend to focus on familiar Fortune 500 brands, but small businesses represent 99 percent of U.S. employers, and they employ about half of the nation’s private-sector work force, according to figures from the federal government. We can’t have a strong economy unless small businesses are doing well—and right now they’re not doing well. They’re hurting. According to the National Federation of Independent Business’ latest Small-Business Optimism Index, the outlook among small-business owners is still wary. The survey found that weak sales are the No. 1 issue facing small-business owners. Small Business Saturday is a good opportunity for people to support the establishments that mean so much to America’s economic wellbeing. The inaugural Small Business Saturday Insights Survey, released Nov. 8 by NFIB

and American Express, found that nearly half of all independent merchants plan to incorporate Small Business Saturday into their holiday marketing plans; 67 percent plan to offer special discounts Nov. 24. Small businesses generally offer better service than you’ll find at the chain stores. Small-business owners and their employees know their merchandise and understand their customers. When you shop at a small business, there’s a good chance you’ll be dealing directly with the owner or someone else who also not only knows something about the products or services offered, but will be there after the holidays to continue personally serving you. Small-business owners and their employees will do everything they can to keep you satisfied because their livelihoods depend on you coming back. Then there’s the traffic. Shopping-mall parking lots can be ugly this time of year, but

small businesses are usually in neighborhoods with smaller crowds and better parking, and that can go a long way toward making your day merry and bright. But beyond all this, there’s the value that small businesses bring to the community. Small businesses are usually owned by people who have a vested interest in the community, in its schools, in the quality of life. It’s no accident that small-business owners are among the most generous supporters of civic groups, local charities, youth sports, schools and virtually every other form of community activity. That’s why I urge you to support Small Business Saturday—and to shop at small, independent businesses other days of the year, too. Ron Aldridge is Mississippi state director of the National Federation of Independent Business. He lives in Jackson and can be reached at ron.aldridge@NFIB.org.


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Needed for Engineering and business support work related to the procurement and use of enriched uranium for nuclear power plants; fabrication and use of nuclear fuels for such plants; track spent fuel fee payments; communicate dry fuel storage cost data to ESI Accounting; assist in management of spent fuel disposal contracts; perform nuclear fuel accounting oversight; develop nuclear fuel amortization MWHR factors; review nuclear fuel expense and inventory documentation; perform nuclear fuel cost and cash flow forecasting; provide nuclear fuel financing and payment requirements to ESI financial organizations. REQ: BS Degree Nuclear or Electrical Engineering; expertise is nuclear fuel cycle planning; excellent communication skills; proficiency in PC use and applications and use of databases. Job Location: Jackson, MS. To apply mail resume & credentials to Lori Hendler, Entergy Services, Inc., 639 Loyola Ave., 22nd Floor New Orleans, LA 70113. Must refer to job # 11154 to be considered.

13


Holiday Disco and Fundraiser

M

r. Announcement: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ghetto Science Public Affairs Network presents a press conference by the Unemployed Deejays and Emcees Union number 6 and 2/3. Today, the union recognizes its one-year anniversary. The purpose of this press conference is to announce its upcoming holiday event: the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;We Still Need A Job Holiday Disco and Fundraiser.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? DJ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Loose Bootyâ&#x20AC;? McBride: â&#x20AC;&#x153;On behalf of all the deejays, emcees, artisans, technicians, engineers and practitioners who are unemployed, I want to congratulate President Barack Obama on his re-election and thank members of the Ghetto Science community who supported our â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Ghettocratic Party, Get Out and Voteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; drive. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The mainstream media reports that employment has increased, but what about us? Mitt Romney said that the president gave gifts to folks like us. What was he talking about? None of us received anything but job rejections and evasive employment recruiters. A lot of us are so frustrated that we might consider doing what Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five suggested in their rap song â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The Messageâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d think it would be cheaper / If I just get a job and learn to be a street sweeper.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x153;I understand that the government seems to be headed toward a financial cliff, but folk who are still jobless are right at the edge. I hope our elected officials will work together to save the economy from free falling into financial despair. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So, come party with us at our holiday disco and fundraiser during the Post Thanksgiving Hot Wing Happy Hour at Clubb Chicken Wing.â&#x20AC;?

â&#x20AC;&#x153;proctologyâ&#x20AC;?

November 21 - 27, 2012

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14

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Be a Job Creator This Holiday Season

W

ant to do your part to improve Mississippiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s economy and jumpstart job growth in the state? Then grab your wallet this week and Buy Local this holiday season. Yes, it sounds like a slogan. But it means a whole lot more than that. A recent study by Civic Economics in Louisville, Ky., found that only 13 percent of the dollars spent in big-box stores recirculated in that community; the other 87 percent left Louisville, headed for other states and countries. In contrast, 55.2 percent of the money spent in local retailers recirculated in that community, in the form of profits earned and spent by the business owners, money paid to local suppliers, services contracted from locals (couriers, accountants, attorneys) and charitable giving. Even betterâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;67 percent of money spent in local restaurants recirculated in the community. Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s say that of the 500,000 people in the Jackson metropolitan area, each spends $200 on holiday shopping. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s $100 million. If all that money is spent in big-box stores, roughly $13 million would stay in Jackson. If it were all spent locally, over $50 million would recirculate in the community. Do you think that $37 million might make a difference? Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one exampleâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;local businesses put

money in local banks. Big boxes tend to wire it back to a bank near their headquarters (or a bank they own). Without deposits, banks canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t lend. The more we shop with local businesses, the more money there is to support new businesses (and mortgages and car notes). Forget the â&#x20AC;&#x153;1 percentâ&#x20AC;? on Wall Street. Every dollar you spend this holiday season is a potential job creator. If you spend that dollar in Kroger or Best Buy, then youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be creating a job wherever Kroger or Best Buy decides to expand next. If you spend it at a McDadeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Market or at Cowboy Maloneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, then youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be creating a job in greater Jackson. (Even if McDadeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s or Cowboy Maloneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t expand their operations or locations, their dollars in the bank and their spending here on the ground in Mississippi creates jobs in Mississippi.) Please consider getting out on Small Business Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and throughout the holiday season in small, local shops in your neighborhood, whether thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fondren, Flowood, Highland Village, Ridgeland, south Jackson, Westland Plaza, Madison or beyond. Check out shiftyourshopping.org/2012/ on the Internet for even more encouragement. Your neighbors, schools, charitiesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;all of usâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;will benefit from your decision to be a job creator. Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s to a prosperous and happy holiday season. Locally!

Email letters to letters@jacksonfreepress.com, fax to 601-510-9019 or mail to P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, MS 39296. Include daytime phone number. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. Or write a 300-600-word â&#x20AC;&#x153;Your Turnâ&#x20AC;? and send it by email, fax or mail above with a daytime phone number. All submissions are subject to fact checks.


SUSAN GLISSON

Reclaiming Mississippi EDITORIAL News Editor Ronni Mott Features Editor Kathleen Morrison Mitchell Reporters Jacob Fuller, R.L. Nave Events Editor Latasha Willis Deputy Editor Briana Robinson Copy Editors Dustin Cardon, Molly Lehmuller Music Listings Editor Natalie Long Fashion Stylist Meredith Sullivan Writers Torsheta Bowen, Ross Cabell Marika Cackett, Richard Coupe, Scott Dennis Jim Pathfinder Ewing, Bryan Flynn, Garrad Lee Genevieve Legacy, Anita Modak-Truran, Larry Morrisey, Eddie Outlaw, Casey Purvis, Julie Skipper, Kelly Bryan Smith Editorial Interns Victoria Sherwood, Dylan Watson Consulting Editor JoAnne Prichard Morris ART AND PHOTOGRAPHY Art Director Kristin Brenemen Advertising Designer Andrea Thomas Production Designer Latasha Willis Staff Photographer/Videographer Trip Burns Editorial Cartoonist Mike Day Photographers William Patrick Butler, Tate K. Nations, Amile Wilson Graphic Design Interns Terrence Jones, Ariss King ADVERTISING SALES Sales Director Kimberly Griffin Advertising Coordinator Monique Davis Account Executive Stephanie Bowering BUSINESS AND OPERATIONS Executive Assistant Erica Crunkilton Bookkeeper Montroe Headd Distribution Manager Matt Heindl Distribution Raymond Carmeans, Jeff Cooper, Clint Dear, Robert Majors, Jody Windham ONLINE Web Developer Matt Heindl Web Editor Dustin Cardon Multimedia Editor Trip Burns Web Producer Korey Harrion CONTACT US: Letters Editorial Queries Listings Advertising Publisher News tips Fashion

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Jackson Free Press P.O. Box 5067, Jackson, Miss., 39296 Editorial (601) 362-6121 Sales (601) 362-6121 Fax (601) 510-9019 Daily updates at jacksonfreepress.com The Jackson Free Press is the city’s award-winning, locally owned newsweekly, with 17,000 copies distributed in and around the Jackson metropolitan area every Wednesday. The Jackson Free Press is free for pick-up by readers; one copy per person, please. First-class subscriptions are available for $100 per year for postage and handling. The Jackson Free Press welcomes thoughtful opinions. The views expressed in this newspaper are not necessarily those of the publisher or management of Jackson Free Press Inc. © Copyright 2012 Jackson Free Press Inc. All Rights Reserved

"TTPDJBUJPOPG "MUFSOBUJWF/FXTXFFLMJFT

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n Nov. 6, a growing crowd of young white people gathered in the Circle at Ole Miss to protest the re-election of the nation’s first black president. Evidence of their anger, captured on grainy cell-phone footage and broadcast via social media, quickly circulated across the country. And once again, with lightning quickness, the nation began to distance itself from Mississippi, to think of banishing again this “other,” this place that could not possibly be like the rest of the country. It is convenient timing. The vitriolic presidential campaign of the last year saw this president’s very citizenship questioned, saw mock lynchings of his effigy and heard spoken coded racial slurs—“the food stamp president” among the more polite ones. It stands to reason in the racially charged climate that such reactions would occur following the election. But it must be noted that these reactions did not occur only in Mississippi. It might be tempting now for many to fall back on back on old remedies, to tell ourselves that Mississippi is not us, that we do not all harbor these fears of those we deem the “other,” that we have not all inherited this tortured history, that we do not all need rigorous self-reflection and honest appraisals of our attitudes and policies that reinforce the cycle of white supremacy, is to tell ourselves a lie. We are all Mississippians. Fifty years ago, angry crowds gathered on the University of Mississippi campus, exploiting fear, bigotry and hatred to attempt to prevent one black student from enrolling in school there. Historian James Silver called Mississippi “the closed society,” and it was. The rest of the nation and the world agreed and, through subsequent actions, deemed Mississippi a country apart from the United States, because it was far easier to banish Mississippi than to acknowledge that we are all Mississippians in one way or another. It was easy for the nation to offer Mississippi and the rest of the South as the sacrificial lamb—the scapegoat—to bear its sins of bigotry. It could declare to the rest of the world, “See? It is not us; it’s them.” With this sacrifice, reinforced over the last 50 years, the rest of the country was quick to highlight continuing transgressions of bigotry and hatred in Mississippi. It was easier than acknowledging its own fears and bigotry. It is painful to face one’s flaws. But along side this catalog of discrimination is an American story of hope, redemption and freedom. It is the story of Mississippi. It has lines from Neshoba County, of Florence Mars and Rev. Clay Lee, whites who refused to acquiesce to the Klan and

who condemned the 1964 murders of Chaney, Goodman and Schwerner. It has chapters in Ruleville and Jackson, in the spirit and work of Fannie Lou Hamer and Medgar Evers, who fought the system of segregation under which they lived but refused to hate white people. Paragraphs of this story are being written in the lives of young Mississippians, black, white, Latino and Asian, nearly 700 of whom stood Nov. 7 on the campus of the University of Mississippi to affirm that love is greater than hate, justice is stronger than injustice, and who would not allow the fears of a few to return us to a past of inequality and hatred. We are all Mississippians. We are choosing to reclaim and redeem “Mississippi.” We are choosing, like poet Elizabeth Sewell, to “honor the gift outright,” given to us by James Chaney, Michael Schwerner and Andrew Goodman; James Meredith and Unita Blackwell; Duncan Gray and Will Campbell; Marge Baroni and Victoria Gray Adams, all of whom believed Mississippi can mean, must mean love and freedom and equality and hope. For if Mississippi doesn’t mean that, then our history tells us that “America” doesn’t mean those things either; that America remains an unfulfilled promise. As the writer Charles P. Pierce noted last week in his blog, “[U]ltimately, (our history) is a history of an ongoing demand to be included in the creative project of self-government. That was all the civil-rights movement ever was. That was what all the bloodshed and horror and death and glory were all about. It was a demand to be included in the great project simply because, if some Americans were not included in the project, it never was so great in the first place.” We cannot continue to proclaim ourselves “the greatest country on Earth” if we do not acknowledge our flaws and work to correct them. We are all Mississippians. Help us now make that word mean something different, something better. We can do it alone but it will grow stronger, last longer, as more of you join us as we take on the difficult task of being honest with ourselves, of rooting out disadvantage and privilege, of uplifting equity and justice, compassion and love. We are all Mississippians. We are one Mississippi, now. We are one America, now. And those who declare otherwise just need our support in recognizing this truth. Susan M. Glisson is executive director of the William Winter Institute For Racial Reconciliation at the University of Mississippi and an assistant professor of southern studies.

New Blue Plate Special

$8.99

1 Meat, 3 Veggies, Bread and Drink

live music nov 21 - 27

wed | november 21 Jesse “Guitar” Smith 5:30-9:30p thu | november 22 Thanksgiving fri | november 23 Richard, Shawn & Kenny 6:30-10:30p sat | november 24 Jason Turner 6:30-10:30p sun | november 25 Lizz Stroud Acoustic 4:00 - 8:00p mon | november 26 Karaoke tue | november 27 Jesse “Guitar” Smith 5:30-9:30p

1060
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Sun‐Thurs
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jacksonfreepress.com

Editor-in-Chief Donna Ladd Publisher Todd Stauffer

15


ENTE

RTAINING

A SPREAD TO SAVOR by Brittany Cain

I

tâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s that time of the year againâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;holiday music, sweaters and an endless stream of party invitations. By your third party, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve seen it all beforeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the chips, hummus, salami and vegetable trays. Leave the cheese balls and fruitcakes for those other parties and lay out a spread that will impress even your Saveur-reading, foodie friend.

Impressive spreads arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t as difficult or expensive as you might think. It just takes a bit of planning.

THE MENU PEARS AND BRIE Forget cubed cheddar cheese. This year, think creamy, tangy and aromatic. The pear adds a nice crunchy contrast to the creamy Brie. Fragrant rosemary lightens the flavor with fresh, piney notes. Balsamic vinegar and a bit of bourbon create a tangy-sweet sauce, and crisp watercress crackers provide a neutral foundation for each tasty bite. PARMESAN FLATBREAD WITH BRUSSELS SPROUTS AND BACON Brussels sprouts may not have been cool when we were kids, but as adults, they seem positively gourmet. Crispy phyllo dough plays the perfect host to the nutty, smoky goodness happening on top. Teaming brussels sprouts with bacon, caramelized onion and Parmesan will win over even your pickiest guest. CARAMELIZED ONION TARTLETS Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no need to offer Santa cookies when this sweet and savory bite is on hand. The buttery crust and sugary onions balance the smooth, tart crème fraiche and crisp, fresh chives. CHOCOLATE-DIPPED BACON Step aside vegetarians. Carnivores take heed. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re about to have a serious food-crush on the prettiest hors dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;oeuvres at the party. This glorious creation combines Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s two great loves into a bite that can only be described as divinely gluttonous.

November 21 - 27, 2012

ROOT CHIPS WITH THYME Swap that tired bowl of nuts for these vibrant, colorful chips. Fried or baked potato, beet and sweet-potato chips are given a perfumed makeover with sea salt and fresh thyme.

16

HOLIDAY TIP!

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CANDIED CITRUS No need to break out the M&Ms for this party. Candied citrus rinds are a refreshing, acidic element in this spread. Not only are they beautiful, they are positively yummy! WINTER CRUDITĂ&#x2030;S It is the store-bought vegetable tray re-imagined! Use chives as an edible ribbon holding together your crisp julienned vegetables. These pretty bundles are great for easy party handling and dipping.

TRUFFLE BAR Who says adults donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t like playing with our food? A truffle bar adds a fun, interactive element your guests will love. Offer basic bittersweet truffles accompanied by toppings like powered chocolate, sugar, or crushed peppermints. For an easy take-home favor, simply station small gift boxes nearby. This menuâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s use of seasonal ingredients keeps things surprisingly affordable. The total menu for eight to 10 people and handmade decorations will cost less than $50. Now thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a holiday miracle!


ENTERTAINING

THE PREPARATION Spreading the party prep across several days will allow you to greet your guests relaxed and ready, rather than frantic and frazzled.

MONDAY

Shop for groceries.

TUESDAY

Make pate brisee for caramelized onion tartlets. Slice citrus peels, blanch and cook in sugar. Let sit overnight.

WEDNESDAY

Make crème fraiche (Mix 1/2 cup heavy cream with two tablespoons of buttermilk; cover bowl and let sit at room temperature for 24 hours. Stir and store in refrigerator.) Drain citrus peels and cover in sugar.

THURSDAY

Cook pate brisee in muffin tins and store in airtight container. Make truffles and store in refrigerator. Caramelize onions for the tartlets.

FRIDAY

Slice potatoes and beets for root chips and store in refrigerator. Cook bacon for chocolatedipped bacon; store in an airtight container. Roast brussels sprouts and caramelize onions for the flatbread and store in refrigerator.

SATURDAY

Morning Dip bacon in chocolate and store in refrigerator. 2 hours before Slice vegetables and assemble cruditĂŠs. Assemble tartlets. Cook and assemble Brie.

1 hour before Cook chips. Assemble and cook flatbread.

HOLIDAY TIP! ,IVHUYLQJQLFHUHGZLQH GRQÂśWIRUJHWWRRSHQLWD ELWHDUO\WROHWLWEUHDWKH

FLATBREAD

THE RECIPES CHOCOLATE DIPPED BACON

PEAR AND BRIE

(serves eight to 10), adapted from Martha Stewartâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pear and Camembert recipe 1 8-ounce wheel of Brie 1 tablespoon butter 1 pear, peeled and diced 2 tablespoons bourbon 1 teaspoon fresh rosemary, chopped, plus more for garnish 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar 1 tablespoon honey 1/4 cup chopped walnuts

1. Put Brie in freezer for five to 10 minutes to make it easier to slice. Slice Brie in half horizontally and store in refrigerator. 2. Melt butter in skillet and cook pear until tender (about three minutes). Add bourbon and cook another minute. Turn off the burner and stir in rosemary. 3. In a small pan, simmer the balsamic vinegar and honey until it thickens (about three minutes). 4. To assemble, pour half of the pear mixture on half of the cheese. Drizzle with the balsamic mixture. Place second half of cheese on top and repeat with remaining ingredients. Garnish with chopped walnuts and rosemary and serve with crackers.

PARMESAN FLATBREAD WITH BRUSSELS SPROUTS AND BACON (serves eight to 10)

2 cups brussels sprouts, cut in half 2 tablespoons olive oil, plus 1 teaspoon 1/2 teaspoon black pepper 1 small onion chopped (about 1/2 cup) 3 slices of bacon, cooked and chopped 1 sheet puff pastry (thawed) 1/2 cup Parmesan cheese 1 egg

1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Toss sliced brussels sprouts with two tablespoons olive oil and 1/2 teaspoon of black pepper. Roast for 10 to 15 minutes, until the edges have browned. 2. Meanwhile, cook onion in skillet with one teaspoon olive oil.

CHOCOLATE DIPPED BACON (serves eight to 10)

10 slices thick-cut bacon 1/2 cup dark chocolate chips

1. Cook bacon in oven until crisp. Cool. 2. Heat chips on a plate in the microwave for one minute (on 50 percent power), or until melted. 3. Dip half the bacon lengthwise in the chocolate and place on a parchment-lined sheet. Let chocolate harden in the refrigerator and serve.

Cook until the onions have become translucent and edges brown (about five minutes). Using the same skillet, cook bacon until crisp and let cool. Once cool, chop bacon in half. 3. Lay thawed puff pastry sheet on a cookie sheet lined with parchment paper. 4. Top puff pastry with Parmesan cheese, caramelized onion, brussels sprouts and bacon. 5. Whisk an egg and brush on the edges of the puff pastry. Cook at 400 degrees for 20 minutes or until the puff pastry is a golden color. 6. Slice into 16 square, bite-size pieces. Serve warm or at room temperature.

TRUFFLE BAR HOW-TO

Truffles (serves eight to 10), based on Martha Stewartâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bittersweet Truffle recipe 1/2 cup heavy cream 8 ounces dark chocolate

1. Bring cream to a boil and pour over the chocolate. Let sit for several minutes before stirring to combine. Place in refrigerator until it is semi-firm (one hour). 2. Use a spoon or a melon baller to scrape the chocolate mixture (two teaspoons) and place on parchment-lined sheet. (If using a spoon, roll each chocolate mound into a ball.) Store in refrigerator until ready to serve. 3. Have guests create their own truffle by offering various toppings, such as chocolate powder, powdered sugar, coconut, cinnamon sugar, finely chopped nuts or candy.

jacksonfreepress.com

PEAR AND BRIE

17


E N T E RT AINING

FIND YOUR PERFECT PARTY T

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COURTESY UNIVERSAL PICTURES

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November 21 - 27, 2012

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18

BRUNCH PARTY

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ENTERTAINING

DECORATIONS POPSICLE STICK SNOWFLAKES

HIPSTER REINDEER ART

WINE CORK TREE

($3)

($1)

(the cost of lots of wine)

Canvas or cardboard cut into 18-by-24 inches 12-by-12-inch glitter scrapbook paper Various 12-by-12-inch pieces of scrapbook paper White tissue paper Brown and black paint Hot glue gun

Popsicle sticks Hot glue gun

1. Use hot glue gun to assemble popsicle sticks in a snowflake design.

38 wine corks 1 champagne cork 1 foot of twine Hot glue gun

1. Dyed tissue paper takes on a unique texture. Use at least three sheets of tissue paper at a time so the paper is heartier once it is dry. I mixed black and brown paint with water to create a neutral palette. Let dry overnight. 2. Cut scrapbook paper and tissue in large scalene triangles. 3. Starting at a point in the lower left corner of the canvas use the hot glue gun to glue the small end of the triangle. Work your way around the canvas until it is covered. Wrap the overlapped ends of triangles around the canvas and glue the ends. 4. Draw your reindeer silhouette or print a template from jfp.ms/reindeertemplate, and tape on the back of the glitter scrapbooking paper (Note, the neck of the reindeer will go over the 12-by12-inch paper. That’s OK; you’ll just use the scrap paper after you cut out the reindeer antlers). Using the template as a guide, cut out the reindeer. 5. Glue reindeer onto canvas covering the spot where all the paper joins.

WINTER CRUDITÉS

1. Using a hot-glue gun, create a base of four wine corks. Layer with rows of wine corks in the following combination: 4 (the base), 6, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, and 1. 2. Glue champagne cork to the base to create the stem. 3. Create a bow with the twine and glue it on top.

ONION TARTLETS

THE RECIPES CANDIED CITRUS

2 lemons 2 tangerines 2 cups sugar, plus more for dusting

1. Cut citrus in half then cut it again making four pieces. Scoop out citrus and reserve for another use. Scrape any fruit remnants from the skin with a spoon. 2. Put rinds in saucepan with enough water to cover them and bring to boil, then drain. Repeat twice. 3. Bring two cups of sugar and two cups of water to a boil and add rinds. Simmer for 45 minutes. 4. Remove from heat and let sit overnight. 5. Remove rinds from the mixture onto a wire rack (with something underneath to catch excess syrup). Roll strips in sugar and let dry for at least 30 minutes.

WINTER CRUDITÉS

ROOT CHIPSWITH THYME

(serves eight to 10)

1 carrot, peeled 6 green beans 3 celery 1 squash 12 chives

1. Julienne cut the vegetables. 2. To assemble, wrap vegetables and tie a knot with the chive sprig. Serve with ranch dressing.

(serves six to eight)

1 white potato, peeled 1 sweet potato, peeled 1 large beet, peeled

1 teaspoon kosher salt Fresh thyme for garnish

1. Preheat oven to 500 degrees. 2. Use a mandolin to slice potatoes and make sure the slices are dry before putting them in the oven. Cook for 15 to 20 minutes until brown. (Alternatively, you can fry them at oil heated to 375 degrees.) 3. Sprinkle with salt, and garnish with thyme.

CARAMELIZED ONION TARTLETS (serves eight to 10)

Pate brisee (pie dough) 3 tablespoons butter 6 tablespoons sugar 1 large onion, thinly sliced (about 1 cup) 1/2 cup crème fraiche 2 tablespoons fresh chives, finely chopped

1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees. 2. Roll pie dough on a floured surface until it’s 1/8-inch thick. Use a two-inch round cookie cutter to create 16 discs. Put disc

in a muffin tray pan and cook for 10 minutes or until crisp and golden brown. Cool. 3. Meanwhile, melt butter over medium heat and add sugar. Stir until dissolved and the butter turns an amber color. Add onions and cook until caramelized (about 15 minutes). Cool. 4. To assemble, top tartlet with a dollop of crème fraiche (about one teaspoon), a half teaspoon of caramelized onion and sprinkle with chopped chives. Tartlet can be stored in the refrigerator for several hours before serving.

jacksonfreepress.com

CANDIED CITRUS

(serves eight to 10), adapted from Martha Stewart’s Candied Citrus recipe

ROOT CHIPS

19


E N T E RT AINING FLICKR/NATHAN PECK

As an event planner,Thomas Roots knows the value of a well-stocked bar.

by Thomas Roots

20

I

n an age where couples invite guests to their wedding sonal is usually more appreciated than doing what is exvia Facebook events, the physical invitation has just pected or â&#x20AC;&#x153;correct.â&#x20AC;? (Just please, for goodness sake, forget about gone the way of the dinosaur. But when was the archaic rule that couples must be addressed as Mr. and the last time a digital notification made you as excited Mrs. Husbandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Name). as opening an envelope addressed to you, or the last time you put a socialmedia event on the refrigerator? You could turn to one of several local stores that offer personalized cards, invites and stationary, but as Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m a bit of a DIY-er, I like to make something totally my own. It takes a bit more time, but usually ends up saving money and adds a personal touch that your guests wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t forget. One of my favorite techniques is to layer up bits of patterned scrapbook paper with the party information on top, punch a hole and tie it all together with a ribbon. The papers move freely so you can see more of each layer. Another fun technique is to cut a shape out of cardstock and layer patterned or glittery paper behind. If you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t like your handwriting, just type up the details and print it out before busting out the scissors. And donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t forget the envelope! Mixing up colors and writing styles can make for an eye-catching bit of mail, especially for a tacky sweater party. Many so-called etiquette experts have big opinions on what is and isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t appropriate for mail correspondence Sending party invitations in the mail is a personal touch most overlook. and party invitations, but Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m of the opinion that making something per-

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Find more holiday and entertaining tips at jfp.ms/holiday.

NICE â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;NOG

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by Kathleen M. Mitchell

hen it comes to eggnog, people donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t tend to straddle the fence. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s either not Christmas without it, or the idea of drinking a warm egg-based beverage is unpleasant to say the least. Wherever you stand, file three bits of eggnog trivia away to impress your friends at the next holiday party. 1. Eggnog has been around for a long time. Captain John Smith reported that eggnog was consumed in 1607 in Jamestown, Va.

2. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nogâ&#x20AC;? is an English word for strong ale, and eggnog was originally made with ale. Eggnog is descended from the English drink â&#x20AC;&#x153;possetâ&#x20AC;? or â&#x20AC;&#x153;sack posset,â&#x20AC;? which was a hot drink made with sweetened milk and ale or a Spanish wine called â&#x20AC;&#x153;sack.â&#x20AC;? 3. Americans adapted it but used American liquors, like rum, or even cider. Early American cookbooks listed eggnog recipes in sections for the sick and infirm. FLICKR/IZIK

November 21 - 27, 2012

W

hen starting to plan your holiday event, be it big or small, lavish or subdued, start with tasteâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and of course, the budget. Always begin with your invitations and guest list (and, of course, your wardrobe). Invitations will set the tone for the event and allow your guests to know what to expect from your evening. It should let them know on how your evening will flow. Whether casual or tres chic, above all keep it simple so you are able to enjoy your party. You donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to be overwhelmed by the evening and forget to enjoy yourself and later wonder where the evening went. Your event should be visually appealing to your guests, and so should you. Florals should always be incorporated, whether itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just some small arrangements here and there or over-thetop lavish bouquets. They also help to set the tone of your soiree. Guests really do appreciate the extra effort in the dĂŠcor and ambiance. Your guest list is another important part of your evening. Always try to incorporate a diverse selection of guests because it always allows for great conversations. Your food and cocktails, whether on the high end or low end, should be presented lavishlyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;you want your guests to leave saying the food tasted and looked fabulous. For your cocktails, you should always have a great selection of topshelf liquor. A full bar is great, but if on a budget, a signature drink can be a hit. And it can also be a big conversation piece because your guests will want to know whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in it. Your food selection should be a various array of delights and not just the same old normâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; think about incorporating Italian, Lebanese or Japanese food. Really, how many meatballs can you eat during the holiday season? Letting your guests know what is expected in the line of attire is really a big deal because, after all, they are your backdrop to your photos, and who wants photos you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t show? And everybody knows or should know that it is proper to RSVP when requested, but some will fail to do soâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;leave a little wiggle room. If you following these tips, your holiday soiree should be a hit with all your partygoers and go off without a hitch, and your party will be the talk of the holiday social set. Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s to the start of a great holiday season in all its splendor.

by Kathleen M. Mitchell

KATHLEEN M. MITCHELL

PRO PLANS

A LOST ART

SOURCE: FOODREFERENCE.COM


ENTERTAINING

DECOR: KEEP IT REAL by Marilyn Trainor Storey

I

COURTESY MARILYN TRAINOR STOREY

have always loved decorating for the holidays, but dread going up and down the stairs with box after box of Christmas decorations and literally hours of unwrapping and sorting. By the time I have endured it, my creativity and holiday spirit are on the wane, and I am yet to even accomplish any real decorating. So call me lazy, but as a result I have developed two mantras for Christmas decorating: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Make It Realâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Holiday Up What You Have.â&#x20AC;? They work hand in mitten to create truly memorable and gorgeous holiday decorations. What is real? Bringing the outside in, and not just the Christmas tree, or even a few pine cones. Both mean great smells, textures and memories, but what about adding in the elements of flowers, leaves and greens, twigs, nests, bark, shells, feathers, horns, berries, sticks, fruits or nuts? Incorporate some or all of these elements, whatever real elements you have on hand, along with a few special pieces, with ornaments and candles to just about any surface in your home. Voila, you have a fabulous, personal, one-of-a-kind, show-stopping holiday vignette. You have â&#x20AC;&#x153;holidayed upâ&#x20AC;? what you have. You and your guests will enjoy the earthy elegance of your beautiful decorations, and you will be much more relaxed than if you had carted about all those boxes and felt downright Scroogey by the time you were finished. Try these ideas to holiday it up with the real thing:

Incorporating pine cones and fruit can take more summery flowers, such as pastel roses, into fall.

with a tiny Christmas ball in a the smallest of terra cotta pots makes a great holiday favor. A group of them can â&#x20AC;&#x153;holiday upâ&#x20AC;? any area. â&#x20AC;˘ Tuck a single fresh bloom and a strand or two of pine needle into a vintage silverplate vase, with tarnish and all (I love the patina) to add elegance anywhere, including but certainly not limited to the entry console, coffee table, powder room, each guestâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s place setting, and even the kitchen sink. (I picked up several of these vases last week for under $5 each.) â&#x20AC;˘ Place a variety of compotes and containers of different sizes and shapes in the center of your table. Fill some with nuts and some with special ornaments. Add candles and a bit of fabric or ribbon. â&#x20AC;˘ Use paper white narcissus to decorate your mantle or holiday table. No, donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t worry about planting

them, yet. Just use the bulbs. They are beautiful in their own right. Their earthiness is the perfect juxtaposition with glass balls. You can plant them after Christmas to enjoy in the New Year when you need a winter pick me up or let guests take the bulbs home as a favor. â&#x20AC;˘ They knew how to decorate with fruit back in colonial days, and you can do it, too. If you are really in a pinch at the last minute, simply line up a row of pears and votives on a scattered bed of Magnolia leaves. Tuck a Magnolia leaf with a metallic penned name in each napkin as a place card. Merry Christmas, and keep it real! Marilyn Trainor Storey runs the design website MSDesignMaven.com.

Lots of texture can spice up a simple tablescape.

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MEREDITH SULLIVAN

HOSTESS TIP!

jacksonfreepress.com

COURTESY MARILYN TRAINOR STOREY

â&#x20AC;˘ Do you love the idea of a huge, beautiful, glorioussmelling tree, but do not want to haul it and deal with mountains of needles? Buy a much smaller real tree and put it on a table. You will get the effect and pleasure of a large real tree without all the effort. I put mine on the living room coffee table last year and enjoyed it so much that I plan to do it again this year. â&#x20AC;˘ If you have sworn off fresh garland and wreaths because they are too messy, use preserved to bring the outside in without the mess of fresh. There are truly fabulous preserved florals and greens including roses, hydrangeas, lemon leaf, and boxwood. â&#x20AC;˘ A single, beautiful fresh, dried, or preserved rose

21


SET THE TONE

E N T E RT AINING

by Liz Lancaster

F

or the best Christmas party playlist, you must have songs from all generations and genres. Sometimes you want a little background music, and sometimes you want all your guests to simultaneously burst into song. There are beautiful little jewels of Christmas light in all holiday songsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;you just have to find the right ones! Here are my absolute favorite Christmas songs.

THE SPIRIT OF GIVING by Kathleen M. Mitchell

T

KATHLEEN M.

GIFTS TO BRING THE HOST OR HOSTESS: â&#x20AC;˘ A book by a favorite author. â&#x20AC;˘ An unusual ingredient, such edible glitter or a lesser-known spice, with a recipe that incorporates it. â&#x20AC;˘ A homemade trivetâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;try knitting one or making it out of wine corks. â&#x20AC;˘ Personalized stationary shows you thought ahead. â&#x20AC;˘ A quirky kitchen gadgetâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;something they wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t necessarily buy for themselves. â&#x20AC;˘ Fancy olive oil or vanilla. â&#x20AC;˘ A funky bottle opener or wine keyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;you can never have too many on hand at a party. HOLIDAY TIP!

MITCHEL L

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KDYHHQRXJKWRLOHWSDSHU GIFTS TO SEND YOUR GUESTS KDQGVRDSDQGQDSNLQV HOME WITH: EHIRUHJXHVWVDUULYH â&#x20AC;˘ A nicely packaged bit of food or dessert (see the do-it-yourself truffle bar on page 17). â&#x20AC;˘ A CD of the tunes playing during the party. â&#x20AC;˘ For a quirky option, give out holiday socksâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the cheesier, the better. â&#x20AC;˘ A picture frameâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;bonus points if you pass around an instant-print camera or sneak off to print photos from the party to put inside the frame. â&#x20AC;˘ A scented candle. â&#x20AC;˘ An ingredient used in the food, such as a flavored or compound butter. â&#x20AC;˘ Succulents. â&#x20AC;˘ Thick, creamy hot chocoHOLIDAY TIP! late in a to-go mug. *LYH\RXUKRPHDTXLFN â&#x20AC;˘ Koozies personalized for DQGGLUW\FOHDQLQJEHIRUH the partyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;perfect to use DQ\JXHVWVDUULYHEXW NHHSLQPLQGWKDWWKH\ while guests mingling, and DUHWKHUHWRHQMR\JRRG to take home. IRRGDQGIULHQGV²QRRQH â&#x20AC;˘ A small but meaningful orLVHYHQJRLQJWRQRWLFHLI \RXKDYHQÂśWZD[HG\RXU nament, especially one that is Ă&#x20AC;RRULQPRQWKV homemade.

HOLIDAY TIP! :ULWHGRZQDORFDO FDEFRPSDQ\ÂśV SKRQHQXPEHU LQFDVHDQ\RQH JHWVDOLWWOHWRRLQ WKHKROLGD\VSLULW 0DNHVXUHHYHU\ RQHKDVDGULYHU WRJHWKRPHDQG EHRSHQWRWKH LGHDRIVRPHRQH FUDVKLQJIRUWKH QLJKWUDWKHUWKDQ GDQJHURXVO\  GULYLQJKRPH

1. â&#x20AC;&#x153;White Christmasâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; The Drifters 2. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Let It Snow, Let It Snow, Let it Snowâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Harry Connick Jr. 3. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Christmas Song (Merry Christmas to You)â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Nat King Cole 4. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Baby Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cold Outsideâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Rosemary Clooney and Bing Crosby (The original and still the best!) 5. â&#x20AC;&#x153;All I Want For Christmas Is Youâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Mariah Carey 6. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Christmas Wrappingâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; The Waitresses 7. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Beginning to Look a lot Like Christmasâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Michael BublĂŠ 8. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wonderful Christmastimeâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Paul McCartney 9. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Santa Babyâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Eartha Kitt 10. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I Saw Mommy Kissing Santa Clausâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Jackson 5 11. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Christmas Waltzâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Peggy Lee 12. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmasâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Diana Krall 13. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Grown-Up Christmas Listâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Charice 14. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Christmas Songâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Dave Matthews Band 15. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Last Christmasâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Wham! 16. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Merry Christmas, Happy Holidaysâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; *NSYNC 17. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll Be Home for Christmasâ&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Bob Dylan 18. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mistletoeâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Justin Bieber 19. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Chipmunk Song (Christmas Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Be Late)â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Alvin and The Chipmunks 20. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This Christmasâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Straight No Chaser Add your favorite holiday tunes at jfp.ms/holidayplaylist. Spotify users, listen to this playlist at jfp.ms/spotifychristmas.

November 21 - 27, 2012

Winner of the 2011 Best of Jackson Chinese Food Category

22

Mr. Chenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

5465 Frontage Road I-55 North â&#x20AC;˘ Jackson, MS (Next to Cowboy Maloneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s) Sun. - Thurs.: 11:00am - 9:00pm â&#x20AC;˘ Fri. & Sat.:11:00am - 9:30pm â&#x20AC;˘ 601-978-1865/1866

COURTESY COLOMBIA RECORDS

he holidays are all about giving and showing appreciation for one another, but you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to spend a fortune to show that you care. Attending a party is the perfect time to get something interesting for the host or hostess and, likewise, sending your guests home with a small treat ends the soiree on a high note. You canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t go wrong with one of the two most classic hostess gifts: a bottle of wine or fresh flowers, but try one of these outsidethe-box gifts to ensure your present stands out.


Monday Nights: All-You-Can-Eat Boiled Shrimp Tues, Wed & Thur All-You-Can-Eat Snow Crab Legs

$-R\RXV -RLQXVWKLV7KDQNVJLYLQJDW:HOOLQJWRQV5HVWDXUDQW IRUDZDUPZHOFRPLQJIDPLO\KROLGD\H[SHULHQFH:H·OO KDQGOHHYHU\GHWDLOZKLOH\RXDQG\RXUVLQGXOJHLQRQH DQRWKHU·VFRPSDQ\DQGRXUVSHFWDFXODUGLQQHUEXIIHW« 7KDQNVJLYLQJ'LQQHUSOXVVHUYLFHIHHDQGWD[HV 0LPRVDV«&KDPSDJQH«&RIIHHDQG7HDLQFOXGHG

Blue Plate Lunch Specials 11am - 2pm â&#x20AC;¢ Mon - Fri Other Special Offers:

Come watch your favorite teams play and enjoy 99¢ beer & grilled $6 oysters 6954 Old Canton Rd. Ridgeland â&#x20AC;¢ 601-956-5040 Mon - Fri 11-2 & 5-10 â&#x20AC;¢ Sat & Sun 11 - 10

jacksonfreepress.com

6HDWLQJVIURPDPWRSP

23


PAID ADVERTISING

S H O P S M A L L B U S I N E S S S A T U R D AY

Style and Service

W

hen Coleen O’Brien set out to open The Rug Place in 1999, she wanted to give her customers the best shopping experience possible. So she hangs all of her rugs instead of forcing customers to rummage through rugs or lift them off the floor. She also offers a 48-hour in-home approval, so that you can make sure the run works in your room before you’re fully

committed. She shops the market personally for the best rugs and offers all shapes and sizes, from one-of-a-kind handmade rugs to affordable wool, synthetic and natural fiber styles. Rugs run the gamut from contemporary to classic, Chobi, Persian and transitional designs. For Small Business Saturday, O’Brien has an extremely aggressive offer— 40 percent off everything in the store. Whether you’re buying gifts for family and friends—or sprucing up a room in time for holiday festivities—hurry over to the Rug Place on Lakeland Drive this Saturday!

The Rug Place 2315 Lakeland Drive 601.420.0784

Fashionable Flair

O

wner Rhonie White says that the goal of the Paperdoll Boutique is “To be a ‘One Stop Chick Shop’ for the modern gal.” “To describe our style here at Paperdoll, it would be classy with a dash of Indie and a nod to Vintage Flair,” said White. “We understand that today’s women are looking for fashionable styles that serve a purpose. We wish to celebrate women as they are and can assure that you will be treated like the ‘Doll’ that you are!” Paperdoll Boutique will be offering sales and specials throughout the holidays, and they invite you to stop in during the “hustle and bustle” of the Christmas season! 180 Promenade Blvd Flowood MS 39232 601-919-2442

Called to Move

A

fter her second baby was born, Sylvia Blackwell fell in love with Pilates—and decided to learn more. In 2000, she received her first certification; in 2003, The Pilates Place of Mississippi was born. Blackwell says that after 18 years as a United Methodist minister, thanks to Pilates, she can combine her love of fitness and movement with her care and love for people of all ages. The Pilates Place focuses on individual training and small (4-6 person) classes, offering the full range of equipment originally created by Mr. Pilates. Blackwell’s goal is to help each individual achieve fitness readiness for longevity and quality of life. Located in Highland Village, they offer a great 30-minute “express” class every Monday, Wednesday and Friday during the noon hour. This holiday season, get 10% off their 10-week Winter Session if you register by Dec. 31st. Gift certificates for classes are available! Located In Highland Village 601.981.2987 • pilatesplacems.com

A Sweet Tradition

November 21 - 27, 2012

N

24

andy’s Candy’s handcrafted gourmet chocolate and confections are a Jackson tradition. Owner Nancy King’s first job in high school was at a gourmet candy shop. She loved it so much that eventually she opened her bright red doors in 1980 and never looked back. Made in small batches in copper pots in the kitchen of the cheerful store at Maywood Mart, Nandy’s Candy does more than satisfy a sweet tooth’s craving. It creates fond traditions and strong relationships.

Today, Nandy’s Candy is not just a candy store; it’s a part of the memories and special moments for all kinds of people. It’s a mustvisit place for kids in town staying with grandma. It’s a first stop for those who’ve moved away and missed their American truffles or fudge. It’s a bag of Jelly Belly®’s in every possible flavor, a Snoball® in July, chocolate-dipped strawberries from the one you love. It’s a unique corporate gift, wedding token, party favor, or a surprise happy just to say hello. On Small Business Saturday, there’s a special treat—Nandy’s is offering a container of Chocolate Popcorn to customers spending $100 or more.

1220 E Northside Dr., Jackson 601-362-9553 www.nandyscandy.com

Don’t shop until you drop... come get fueled up with us before AND after your holiday shopping at all the wonderful small businesses in Jackson. BRAVO!, Broad Street, and Sal & Mookie’s - where there is ALWAYS SMALL BUSINESS SINCERITY AND CARE EACH AND EVERY DAY! Let us serve you on Small Business Saturday!


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WISHING YOU A HAPPY THANKSGIVING!

Black Friday & Small Business Saturday 50% Off Everything Sale MAKE YOUR PILGRIMAGE TO YOUR NEW HOME IN TIME FOR THE HOLIDAYS! 105 BRIDGE PARK DR Bainbridge SUB priced @ $199,900 This beautiful home is located in Madison County this 3/2 has a fenced backyard and within walking distance to the neighborhood pool and clubhouse. Call TODAY toschedule your showing!

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Shop Bargain Boutique on Friday, November 23rd for extra special savings. Remember, every dollar you spend goes back to the Junior League of Jackson to help fund community projects. Shop, give-back and make a difference all at the same time!

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4949 Old Canton Road | 601-956-5108

www.briarwoodwineandspirits.com NATHAN S. M C HARDY & LESLEY M C HARDY 4949 Old Canton Road | 601-956-5108 OWNERS & SOMMELIERS

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*Sale excludes silver tags

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Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Get Noggy!

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FTS]TbSPh=XVWc Yazoo Beer â&#x20AC;˘ $10 pitcher â&#x20AC;˘ $2 pint

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November 21 - 27, 2012

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26

Always Drink Responsibly

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(Next door to McDades Market Extra) Mon. - Sat., 10 am - 9 pm â&#x20AC;˘ Maywood Mart Shopping Center 1220 E. Northside Dr. â&#x20AC;˘ 601-366-5676 â&#x20AC;˘ www.mcdadeswineandspirits.com

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Don��&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Let Uncle Al Be The Only Wild Turkey At The Table! Madison Cellars | 1038 Hwy 51 Madison, MS | 601.856.0931


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8 DAYS p 30 | FILM p 32 | MUSIC p 34 | SPORTS p 43|

McCarty’s Pottery Legacy VIRGINIA SCHREIBER

by Robyn Jackson

ist Church in Jackson. The Greenville Garden Club nominated McCarty Pottery for the award. “It’s a wonderful tribute to Uncle Lee and Aunt Pup for a lifetime of creativity,” said Smith, who is now a partner and business manager in the pottery company. His brother, Jamie, is also a partner who handles the artistic side of the business. Pup McCarty died in February 2009, and Lee is 89. Smith answered a few questions about the legacy of McCarty Pottery in a telephone interview. Why is McCarty Pottery unique? What has made us so unique over the years is the connection (Pup and Lee) had and continue to have to Merigold and the state of Mississippi. You can see it in the pieces as well as the squiggly black river, which is our registered trademark, and the Mississippi River.

28

REIBER

What was it like when Lee and Pup McCarty started making pottery? Uncle Lee developed the glazes and the formula for the glazes. They had one little kiln and one little wheel in their apartment in Oxford. They came back to Merigold, and Uncle Lee taught science at the high school. In the summer of 1954, they opened in an old mule barn that was my aunt Margaret’s. They remodeled the upstairs apartment IA SCH

November 21 - 27, 2012

L

ee McCarty was teaching chemistry at the University of Mississippi in the 1950s when his wife, Pup, decided to take a pottery class. “She was the only female in the class. It was filled with football players, so she asked Uncle Lee to take the class with her,” said Stephen Smith, the couple’s godson. The McCartys quickly fell in love with wheel-thrown pottery, and in 1954, they settled back home in the tiny Delta town of Merigold, where they began McCarty Pottery in a converted barn. Now, 58 years later, Lee and Pup McCarty are legendary in artistic circles. A piece of McCarty pottery is a traditional wedding gift in the Mississippi Delta, but pieces also have been included in the Smithsonian Institution’s collection. The McCarty studio attracts collectors from around the world who snatch up the inventive pieces, which often feature a curving black line that represents the Mississippi River. The Mississippi Arts Council presented the McCartys with the Governor’s Award for Excellence in the Arts in the Visual Arts category last February at Wells United Method-

VIRGIN

Above: Lee McCarty (left) is all smiles accepting the Governor’s Award from Deborah Bryant last February. Right: Birds are a frequent motif in McCarty pottery.

How did you feel about being named a recipient of the Governor’s Award? It’s been amazing and humbling. Of course we make wonderful pieces of art, but for (collectors) to make them part of their lives, it’s something that means more than art. A man was here and said that he and his wife used one of our chalices in their wedding ceremony. There was an elderly lady who came and brought her great-grandchild to help her pick out her first piece of McCarty. It’s part of their lives and memories. That girl will always remember that her great-grandmother helped her pick out that piece. That’s what really makes it wonderful.

and moved in. I don’t know how they did it, because the kilns were located right below where they lived. Do you think the McCartys envisioned how big their business would grow and the acclaim they would receive? It’s one of those things in life. The Lord moves in mysterious ways. It grew beyond their wildest dreams and expectations. When they first started out, they struggled. They stuck with it, and the business side of it just developed. When I go out in the parking lot and I look at car tags from all over the country, these are people who have made this their destination. That’s what’s amazing to me. We also have a little restaurant in Merigold that we opened in 1991; there was really a need for people coming from so far away to have lunch. It’s about two blocks from the studio. How did you and your brother, Jamie Smith, get involved in the business? He’s a potter in his own right. He came home (from Birmingham, Ala.) in 1998, and he realized pretty quickly that if he was going to focus on the creative side, he needed help with the business side. I returned in the summer of 1998. I had been practicing law in Athens, Ga. Is there one piece that’s the most popular? We make such a variety of pieces, from serving pieces and dinnerware to decorative pieces, so it depends on the customer. The bunnies are very popular, especially at Easter. The folks on the Gulf Coast love the blue and jade pieces that we do, because it reminds them of the water. In the northern part of the state, it’s the nutmegcolored pieces. Is McCarty Pottery available anywhere besides the studio in Merigold? We have several authorized dealers through the state of Mississippi. We do have an authorized dealer in Jackson—Inside Out in Highland Village (4500 Interstate 55 N., Suite 178, 601366-5577). McCarty’s Pottery (101 Saint Mary St., 662-748-2293) is open Tuesday-Saturday 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Visit mccartyspottery.com.


THURSDAY 11/22

Jason Turner (Acoustic Rock)

Pub Opens At 4pm FRIDAY 11/23

Baby Jan & All That Chaz (Piano Funtime)

SATURDAY 11/24

Scott Albert Johnson (Blues)

MONDAY 11/26

Karaoke w/ Matt TUESDAY 11/27

Open Mic hosted by A Guy Named George

Try our new

HAPPY HOUR MENU Available Monday - Friday 4pm - 7pm

jacksonfreepress.com

• Drink Specials • Limited Time Food Menu

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WEDNESDAY 11/21

THURSDAY 11/22

Food for the Soul 2 is at 9 p.m. at Soul Wired Cafe.

The Thanksgiving Family Jam is at 8 p.m. at Hal & Mal’s.

WEDNESDAY 11/28 The DOXA Fall Dance Concert is at 7:30 p.m. at Belhaven University.

BEST BETS

NOV. 21-28, 2012

The Third Thursday Art Reception is from 5-8 p.m. at View Gallery (Township at Colony Park, 1107 Highland Colony Parkway, Suite 105, Ridgeland). Free; call 601856-2001. … Moscow Ballet’s Great Russian Nutcracker is at 7:30 p.m. at Thalia Mara Hall. $27.50 and up; call 800745-3000. … Food for the Soul 2: Spoken Word and Music Edition is at 9 p.m. at Soul Wired Cafe; includes a soul-food buffet. Performers include Kerry, Soul Deep, Terueko, Lisa, Poet Williams, and the Bluesman Show and Band featuring Lady Q. $5 cover before 10 p.m.; call 601-863-6378. … Martin’s Thanksgiving Showcase with Cardinal Sons, Parallax and Rooster Blues is at 10 p.m.

THURSDAY 11/22

COURTESY DARBY KELLUM

The Turkey Day 8K kicks off at 7 a.m., at Fleet Feet Sports (Trace Station, 500 Highway 51 N., Ridgeland); includes a quarter-mile fun run. The event is a fundraiser for the Ridgeland Multi-use Trail System. Space limited; no race day registration. $25, free fun run; call 601-899-9696; fleetfeetjackson.com. … Howard Jones Jazz performs during the Thanksgiving Dinner at Old Capitol Inn (226 N. State St.) at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. $27, $13 children under 12; call 601-359-9000. … The Thanksgiving Affair is from 9 p.m.-2 a.m. at the Martini Room. Enjoy music from DJ Finesse.Forages21andup.…TheThanksgivingFamilyJamisat

truck and train rides, animated museums and light displays; runs through Dec. 23. $3 museum admission, $1 rides; call 601-859-5816; cantontourism.com. … The Molly Ringwalds and Webb Wilder perform at 8 p.m. at Hal & Mal’s. Cocktails at 7 p.m. For ages 18 and up. $15 in advance, $20 at the door; call 601-292-7121 or 800-745-3000.

SATURDAY 11/24

The Mississippi Track Club hosts the Lake Caroline 15K at Lake Caroline Golf Course (118 Caroline Club Circle, Madison). Check-in is at 6:30 a.m. at the clubhouse. Walkers begin at 7 a.m., and runners begin at 7:30 a.m. Awards and refreshments given. $30; call 601-853-4023; mstrackclub.com. … Today is Small Business Saturday, so buy holiday gifts and more from small businesses, and support your local economy. More at shopsmall.com.

SUNDAY 11/25

Laughter Is Good 4 the Soul featuring gospel comedian Sister Cantaloupe is from 5:30-7:30 p.m. at Christ Life Church of the Highlands (670 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland). $15; call 601853-5433; cantaloupeinjackson. BY LATASHA WILLIS eventbrite.com. … Gospel singer Laurie Walker performs at JACKSONFREEPRESS.COM 7 p.m. at The Penguin. Doors open at 6 p.m. $10 in advance, FAX: 601-510-9019 $12 at the door; call 601DAILY UPDATES AT 813-7282 or 601-339-6072; JFPEVENTS.COM lauriewalkermusic.com.

EVENTS@

MONDAY 11/26

Jackson Touchdown Club’s Most Valuable Senior Night is at 6 p.m. at River Hills Club (3600 Ridgewood Road) Top seniors in all 10 collegiate programs receive awards. $30 non-members; call 601-506-3186. November 21 - 27, 2012

Dylan LeBlanc performs at Hal & Mal’s Nov. 27 at 7:30 p.m.

8 p.m. at Hal & Mal’s; benefits Stewpot Community Services. $5. … Jason Turner is at Fenian’s.

FRIDAY 11/23

The Christmas in Canton Victorian Christmas Festival kicks off at 10 a.m. at Historic Canton Square (Courthouse 30 Square, Canton). The annual celebration includes vintage car,

KEN GORDON PHOTOGRAPHY

WEDNESDAY 11/21

TUESDAY 11/27

The opening reception for Jennifer Thomas and Bill Bannister’s art exhibit is from 5-7 p.m. at the Mississippi Library Commission (Education and Research Center, 3881 Eastwood Drive). See Thomas’ glasswork and mixed media art, and Bannister’s wooden toys. Open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays through Dec. 27. Free; call 601-432-4111. … Country/folk singer-songwriter Dylan LeBlanc performs at 7:30 p.m. at Hal & Mal’s. Cocktails at 6:30 p.m. For ages 18

Gospel singer Laurie Walker makes her debut at The Penguin Nov. 25 at 7 p.m.

and up. $5 in advance, $8 at the door; call 601-292-7121 or 800-745-3000. … Guaqueta Productions hosts Mississippi Happening from 7-9 p.m. at Pizza Shack, Colonial Mart (5046 Parkway Drive, Suite 6). Download podcasts at mississippihappening.com or iTunes. Free; call 601-497-7454. … An Evening of One Acts is at 8 p.m. at Belhaven University Center for the Arts in Blackbox Theatre. Encore show Nov. 28. Proceeds of dessert sales benefit the Iota Upsilon chapter of Alpha Psi Omega, the national theater honor society. Doors open at 7 p.m. Free; call 601-965-7026.

WEDNESDAY 11/28

The DOXA Fall Dance Concert is at 7:30 p.m. at Belhaven University, Bitsy Irby Visual Arts and Dance Center (1500 Peachtree St.). Doors open at 7 p.m. Encore show Nov. 29. $2, free for Belhaven faculty, staff and students, and children ages 12 and under; call 601-965-1414. … The Intellectual Bulimics Comedy Show is at Hal & Mal’s. More at jfpevents.com and jfp.ms/musicvenues.


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jacksonfreepress.com


DIVERSIONS | film by Anita Modak-Truran

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.â&#x20AC;? U.S. Constitution Amendment XIII.

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*&0 30/.3/2%$%6%.43 Midtown Holiday Studio Tours Nov. 29, 5-10 p.m., on Wilson Street from Keener Avenue to McTyere Avenue. Business owners and artists in the Midtown neighborhood give tours of their facilities to showcase their offerings. Spacewolf, 5th Child, the Southern Comfort Brass Band, DJ Young Venom, and Tyler Kemp and Hagan Curl perform. Parking at NUTS on Millsaps Ave. Free; call 601-506-9093. Southern Fried Karaoke: Holiday Edition Dec. 1, 9 p.m., at Hal & Malâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (200 Commerce St.). Todd Stauffer and Donna Ladd are the hosts. All singers welcome; great singers are hugged, kissed and sometimes make it into documentary films! Come sing along with all the bar room favorites. Every Southern Fried Karaoke is an experience. Free; call 601-362-6121, ext. 16.

(/,)$!9 Mississippi Heritage Commemoration Nov. 24, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., at Mississippi Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Museum (2145 Highland Drive). Visitors write what they are thankful for on the Thanksgiving Tree. $8, children under 12 months and members free; call 601-981-5469.

#/--5.)49 MMNS Foundation Fall Membership Celebration Nov. 27, 5-7 p.m., at Mississippi Museum of Natural Science (2148 Riverside Drive). The members-only event includes refreshments in the pavilion, and a meeting and volunteer recognition in Rotwein Theater. Outreach naturalist Jennifer Holcomb also gives a live animal presentation. Memberships sold on site and online. Free for members; call 601-576-6000. State District 71 Town Hall Meeting Nov. 27, 6-8 p.m., at New Horizon Church International (1770 Ellis Ave.). State Rep. Adrienne Wooten is the host. Speakers include Dr. Hank Bounds of the Institution of Higher Learning, State Economist Darren Webb and other officials. Refreshments served. Free; call 601-707-5705. Mississippi Black Leadership Summit Nov. 28-30, at Jackson Convention Complex

(105 E. Pascagoula St.). One Voice and the Mississippi State Conference NAACP are the hosts. Speakers include U.S. Congressman Bennie Thompson, and Primus Wheeler and Dr. Aaron Shirley of the Jackson Medical Mall. Registration required. Free; call 601-353-8452. Citizens Police Academy Registration. The Jackson Police Department seeks applicants for the program held Dec. 3-10. Learn the police departmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s public safety and crime prevention methods. Free; call 601-960-1389.

7%,,.%33 Sweet Expectations: Planning for Pregnancy and Parenthood Nov. 27, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m., at Baptist Health Systems, Madison Campus (401 Baptist Drive, Madison), in the Community Room. Ali Kellogg North of the International Maternity Institute is the speaker. Registration required. Free; call 601-948-6262 or 800-948-6262; mbhs.org. Art in Mind Art Program Nov. 28, 1011:45 a.m., at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). The Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Association of Mississippi offers the program for people with earlystage dementia and their caregivers. Registration required. Free; call 601-987-0020; alz.org/ms. Zumba Class Mondays, 6-7 p.m. through Dec. 17, at The Salvation Army Corps Community Center (570 E. Beasley Road). $5-$30; call 601-954-5395.

34!'%!.$3#2%%. Crossroads Film Festival Call for Film Submissions. Filmmakers may submit through Nov. 30 for the annual festival that takes place April 12-14, 2013. $45-$65; visit withoutabox.com. Sky Shows Saturdays, at Russell C. Davis Planetarium (201 E. Pascagoula St.). Options include â&#x20AC;&#x153;WSKY: Radio of the Starsâ&#x20AC;? at 1 p.m. and â&#x20AC;&#x153;2012: End of the World?â&#x20AC;? at 3 p.m. $5.50, $4.50 seniors, $3 children; call 601-960-1552.

,)4%2!29!.$3)'.).'3 Books for Tots Campaign through Dec. 19, at Jackson/Hinds Library System . The initia-

A Call for Local Produce

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November 21 - 27, 2012

T

COURTESY 20TH CENTURY FOX

freedom and equal opportunity, wants nothing short of racial equality. Many members of Lincolnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cabinet oppose the amendment, and the Democrats are positively vitriolic against it. Lincoln demands that his advisers procure the votes needed to pass the amendment. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am the he 13th Amendment is so morally president of the United States,â&#x20AC;? he tells them right that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hard to understand the with power in his voice. heated opposition to the amendTony Kushnerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s superb script, based in mentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ratpart on Doris ification. But it Kearns Goodtook skilled politiwinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2006 book cal maneuvering by â&#x20AC;&#x153;Team of Rivals: Abraham Lincoln The Political to pass the landGenius of Abramark amendment ham Lincoln,â&#x20AC;? in 1865. And there looks behind was a cost. closed politiSteven Spielcal doors into bergâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s latest film, kitchens, smoky â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lincoln,â&#x20AC;? opens offices, and paron the battlefield, lors where powhere soldiers in litical rivals barblue and gray enter deals, where gage in brutal patronage jobs hand-to-hand get traded for combat. These votes, and legal Daniel Day-Lewis takes full possession of an scenes are richly technicalities are iconic character in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lincoln.â&#x20AC;? detailed and unexploited to the speakably horrifyfrayed edges of ing as soldiers axe, good faith. But bludgeon and maim each other. Lincoln it also looks behind the pristine image of (Daniel Day-Lewis) meets with the Union Lincoln, the Great Emancipator who seems soldiers both black and white. He listens to to be indelibly sculpted from virtue. what they have to say. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a soft-spoken, Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an enormous pleasure to see a movie thoughtful man, fond of parables, weighed thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s really about something and that doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t down by the bloodshed. water down the subject to make it easier to Recently re-elected for his second term, ingest. Lincoln is no saint here. He was a Lincoln is plagued by a dream where he mixture of master strategist, used-car salesstands on top of a black locomotive, speed- man, maniac, pompous bore and messiahâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; ing to an unknown destination. He discusses in short, he was the consummate politician. the dream with his feisty wife (Sally Fields), We see the pressures of deal-making who lacks a filter appropriate for a first lady squeeze the juice out of the man, but despite of her time. She believes the dream is a sign the odds, Lincoln strives to turn the bloodthat he will abolish slavery. shed of the Civil War into something with Lincoln tells Secretary of State William enduring meaning. Seward (David Strathairn) that he wants to Day-Lewis channels Lincoln. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not move forward with the passage of the 13th just his uncanny physical likeness to the Amendment in the U.S. House of Repre- iconic figure he plays, but his gestures, voice sentatives. It has already passed the Senate. and reactions. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s anguished, and he pulls Seward questions the timing, but Lincoln you inside Lincolnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s frustration and his unis adamant that the amendment must be spoken rage. He takes possession of you. passed before the end of the war if it is to The scenes with Day-Lewis and Fields have a chance of succeeding. are intense, and Tommy Lee Jones spices up The process to secure the votes is as the film with his sarcasm and wit. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dibloody as the battlefield. Everybody wants vine as a man who thinks the thoughts of the something. Preston Blair (Hal Holbrook), masses in the century to come. who controls the conservative faction within Nearly everything goes right with this the Republican Party, asks Lincoln to engage movie, which is a testament to Spielbergâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in peace talks with a Confederate delegation. vision and his surrounding Day-Lewis with Thaddeus Stevens (Tommy Lee Jones), a just the right players. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lincolnâ&#x20AC;? is one of powerful Republican member of the U.S. Spielbergâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s finest achievements in a career House with an unyielding commitment to filled with exceptional accomplishments.

XXXX

The Consummate Politician


6A0=3E84F A M A LC O T H E AT R E

Scholastic Writing Awards Call for Submissions through Dec. 17, at Eudora Welty House (1119 Pinehurst Place), at the Eudora Welty Education and Visitors Center. Junior high and high school students in central Mississippi counties may submit works by Dec. 17 at 5 p.m. Visit artandwriting.org for a list of counties and guidelines. Free; call 601-353-7762; artandwriting.org. Events at Lemuria Books (Banner Hall, 4465 Interstate 55 N., Suite 202). 5 p.m. signings include readings. Call 601-366-7619. • “Moonshine Adventures” Nov. 23, 1 p.m. Al Saucier signs books. $20 book. • “8 Habits of Love: Open Your Heart, Open Your Mind” Nov. 24, 1 p.m. Ed Bacon signs books. $14 book. • “A Short Ride: Remembering Barry Hannah” Nov. 26, 5 p.m. Neil White and other contributors sign books. $19 book. • “Lead Me On, Let Me Stand: A Clergyman’s Story in White and Black” Nov. 27, 5 p.m. William Barnwell signs books. $18.95 book. • Lemuria Story Time. Saturdays at 11 a.m., children enjoy a story and make a related craft. Call for the book title. Free. “Small Town South” Nov. 27, 5 p.m., at Off Square Books (129 Courthouse Square, Oxford). David Wharton signs books. $50 book; call 662-236-2262; email books@squarebooks.com; squarebooks.com.

#2%!4)6%#,!33%3 Shut Up and Write! Reserve your spot for Donna Ladd’s popular creative non-fiction class series; six-class series begins Jan. 5 and meets every other Saturday, from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. (class decides 6th class date). Half $150 fee reserves slot; gift certificates available. Write class@jacksonfreepress.com or call 601-362-6121 ext. 15. Oil Painting Classes, at Pat Walker Gallery (133 W. Peace St., Canton). Pat Walker teaches the class Tuesdays from 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Call for price; call 601-855-0107; email ritsartist@aol. com; patwalker-fields.com. Events at Salsa Mississippi Studio and Club (605 Duling Ave.). Call 601-213-6355; salsams.com. • Dips, Lifts and Tricks Class Nov. 26, 7:30 p.m. Learn ways to incorporate advanced dance moves into a salsa or bachata routine. Dance partner required. $10 per person. • Dance Grooves and Hip-hop Party. Roger and Tena Long teach the dance class Thursdays at 6:30 p.m. and Saturdays at 5:30 p.m. $10; call 601-213-6355. Holiday Dinner Party Class Nov. 24, 5-8 p.m., at Viking Cooking School (1107 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland). Topics include working with crabmeat, preparing a crown roast and whipping egg whites. Registration required. For ages 16 and up. $99; call 601-898-8345; vikingcookingschool.com.

%8()")43!.$/0%.).'3 Events at Mississippi Museum of Art (380 S. Lamar St.). Free; call 601-960-1515; msmuseumart.org. • Mississippi Watercolor Society Grand National Watercolor Exhibition through Jan. 6. See watercolors from artists throughout

the United States. • “Visionaries: The Legacy of the Mississippi Art Association” through Jan. 27, in the William B. and Isabel R. McCarty Foundation Gallery. See works from William P. Silva, Caroline Compton, William Hollingsworth, Marie Hull, Helen Jay Lotterhos, Eudora Welty, Karl Wolfe and more. VSA Mississippi Annual Exhibit through Nov. 25, at Arts Center of Mississippi (201 E. Pascagoula St.). VSA Mississippi provides creative opportunities to people with disabilities. Open weekdays from 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Saturday from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sunday from noon-5 p.m. Free; call 601-960-1557. “New Works, New Discoveries” Art Exhibit through Dec. 5, at Hinds Community College, Raymond Campus (501 E. Main St., Raymond). See works from Melanie Atkinson, Randy Minton, Paula Duren and Sarah Teasley in Marie Hull Gallery through Dec. 5. Hours are 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Monday-Thursday and 8 a.m.-noon Friday. Free; call 800-HINDS-CC. “Vowing to Storm the Capital” Art Exhibit through Dec. 6, at Millsaps College, Ford Academic Complex (1701 N. State St.), at Lewis Art Gallery and The Emerging Space. See Jonathan McFadden’s prints and mixed-media installations. Open 9 a.m.-4 p.m. weekdays. Free; call 601-9741762 or 601-497-7454. “Portrait Phenomena: Portraits by Roger Leonard Long” through Dec. 31, at Cups on Capitol (Regions Plaza, 210 E. Capitol St.). The exhibition features Long’s photo-realistic portrait works. Free, prints available; call 601-853-7480. Visiting Artist: Chuck Galey through Nov. 30, at Mississippi Children’s Museum (2145 Highland Drive). This month’s artist-in-residence shares his illustrating skills. Call for specific dates and times. $8, children under 12 months and members free; call 601-981-5469. “Afro-Prism” Exhibit through Dec. 9, at Smith Robertson Museum and Cultural Center (528 Bloom St.). See Samuel “Cool Hand” McCain’s 29 paintings that depict AfricanAmerican rhythm and beats.. Open weekdays from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m.1 p.m. $4.50, $3 seniors 62 and up, $1.50 children under 18; call 601-960-1457.

ALL STADIUM SEATING

Listings 11/23 –

for Thur.

Fri. 11/29

3-D Life Of Pi PG

Lincoln

PG13

Life Of Pi (non 3-D)

Skyfall

PG13

PG

Red Dawn PG13 3-D Rise Of The Guardians PG Rise Of The Guardians (non 3-D)

PG

Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Pt.2 PG13

Flight

Wreck It Ralph (non 3-D) PG Argo Taken 2

$

R

3-D Wreck It Ralph PG

R PG13

Pitch Perfect PG13

GIFT CARDS AVAILABLE

9.99

Weekly Lunch Specials Open for dinner Sat. 4-10pm Thursday

November 22

LADIES NIGHT

w/ DJ Stache LADIES DRINK FREE Friday November 23

Gunboat

DAILY BARGAINS UNTIL 6PM Online Tickets, Birthday Parties, Group & Corporate Events @ www.malco.com

Movieline: 355-9311

Saturday

November 24

Sipsey

Fires with Waco Dead Monday

November 26

“Pieces of the Past: Mississippi’s Voice” through Dec. 16, at Old Capitol Museum (100 S. State St.). The rotating exhibit features artifacts relating to state and local campaigns, and the role citizens play in elections. Free; call 601-576-6920; email info@oldcapitolmuseum.com.

2-for-1 Drafts

"%4(%#(!.'%

2-for-1 Beer Specials Highlife, Highlife Lite, PBR, Schlitz, Fatty Natty

Turkey-busting Workout Nov. 23-24, 10-11 a.m., at Raising the Barr Fitness (103 W. Washington St., Suite B1, Ridgeland). The workout session benefits Pinelake Care Center’s efforts to collect canned goods for local food banks. One-can minimum, vegetables preferred; call 601-414-3536.

Tuesday

November 27

Open Mic w/ Jason Turner

Wednesday November 28

Toy Drive through Dec. 15, at Fleet Feet Sports (Trace Station, 500 Highway 51 N., Ridgeland). Bring new, unwrapped toys for needy children to receive on Christmas. Donations welcome; call 601-899-9696; fleetfeetjackson.com.

KARAOKE w/ DJ STACHE

Check jfpevents.com for updates and more listings. To add an event, email all details (phone number, start and end date, time, street address, cost, URL, etc.) to events@jacksonfreepress.com or fax to 601510-9019. The deadline is noon the Thursday prior to the week of publication. Or add the event online yourself; check out jfpevents.com for instructions.

Open Mon-Sat, Restaurant open Mon-Fri

FREE WiFi 11 am-10 pm & Sat 4-10 pm

601-960-2700

facebook.com/Ole Tavern

jacksonfreepress.com

tive promotes early literacy skills. Donate new and unwrapped books or money to any branch through Dec. 19. Free; call 601-968-5807.

South of Walmart in Madison

33


DIVERSIONS | music

Grizzly Bear Sharpens its Claws by Micah Smith

COURTESY WARP RECORDS

T

he newest album from Brooklyn, N.Y., indie quartet Grizzly Bear, “Shields,” proves that fame doesn’t have to be the end of innovation. Though the band received commercial success with singles like “Knife” in 2006 and the car ad-inhabiting song, “Two Weeks,” in 2009, Grizzly Bear sharpens its claws a bit, dumping a bit of the pop influence for the atmospheric while still remaining comfortably listenable. Grizzly Bear, which began almost a decade ago as a self-produced labor of love for the band’s Bostonian frontman Edward Droste, helped with the rise of experimental music in the wide-release music market. “Shields” represents another solid entry for the group, and while Droste and company might not create music for the masses, this release has some intriguing and truly beautiful moments that display that there is more than a little experience within the experimental. “Shields” may be another step further into the realm of psychedelics and from the cozy realm of folk rock, but that doesn’t mean that the earnest songwriting found on Grizzly Bear’s fifth full-length album is anything other than beautiful. In fact, though some songs on the album lack the vocal melody mayhem that Grizzly Bear is known for, they offer a fresh, haunting bliss. You might even have a

Grizzly Bear’s latest release, “Shields,” may not be for the mainstream crowd, but it is beautiful.

hard time pinning down why the whirring electronic bass of “Half Gate” or the slow, accordion-backed rumble of “What’s Wrong” were so engaging.

But Grizzly Bear has never been about figuring out. The opener “Sleeping Ute” gives an impressive new sheen to the signature semi-folk songs, managing to feel wholly original and smooth, yet edgy. Most importantly, though, it is just an incredibly entertaining listen. Those hoping for songs without a lot of the frill will find themselves at home with the single, “Yet Again.” It’s a rolling, lightly electronic tune reminiscent of classic psych-rockers The Doors. Admittedly, I felt that the short instrumental “Adelma” wasn’t interesting or engaging enough to earn its place on the album. The energetic tracks can also feel few and far between if you choose to listen to the listing in order, though for established fans of Grizzly Bear, that shouldn’t be entirely surprised by that fact. Overall, though, the discernibly different sounds from song to song keep the substance high and the atmosphere higher. At the very least, “Shields” is an impressive piece of relaxed background music with sufficient sharpness to test your musical comfort level and the common concept of beauty. For fans of experimental and alternative artists like As Tall As Lions, Beach House and Explosions in the Sky, “Shields” will make an excellent addition to any playlist—that is, if you haven’t already snatched it up.

natalie’s notes

by Natalie Long

Thankful for Jackson’s Music

I

November 21 - 27, 2012

TRIP BURNS

know, I know. I’m sure you’re think- map as a place where the music scene is while they are the city’s darlings of our music ing that I, Nat Long, have fallen into thriving. Other bands from all over this scene, are still sincerely humble about their the ever-so-trendy trend of “30 Days great land are making it a point to stop successes and leave their egos at the house (or of Thankfulness” started on Facebook here and perform. Hopefully, we’re just haven’t one at all). Mad props to you. and Twitter. It’s true. While I was posting my not the bathroom stop between Memphis u Thank you, Hal & Mal’s, for allowing thankful statuses daily at the beginning of and New Orleans anymore, or at least if me to host Singers/Songwriters Night. It has November, I began to think about the things we are, the bands will stick around to hear been an honor to get to listen to so many of I’m thankful for as the music listings editor some local live music. our state’s great acts, as well as help budding of the Jackson Free Press—such singers/songwriters to get their own as the staff for putting up with me Mississippi homemade music out (thanks, y’all, jewels in your crown to the masses. Again, thank you! when you get to heaven)—and u To all the music promotgetting to meet a lot of the great ers throughout the state who are bands and entertainers who have bringing an eclectic mix of music made their way to Jackson. to Jackson and to Mississippi, I So, after a brainstorm session can pretty much tell you that not on what I’m thankful for in the only am I thankful for you, slews of Jackson music scene, this is what I Mississippi music lovers are thankcame up with (and in no particuful for you, too! Hosting Singer/Songwriter Night at Hal & Mal’s is just one of lar order): u I’m very thankful for the many many musical things I am thankful for this year. u As the music listings editor, bars and venues here in Jackson I am thankful for bands that have (new and old) who support local names that are easy to spell and do not blow u I appreciate the bands and musicians and national acts on a weekly basis. my spell check all to pieces. who are grateful for the Jackson Free Press’ u To the North Midtown Arts Center, u To the singers and songwriters in this coverage of their work and accomplishments thank you for hosting not only arts events, town who continue to amaze me with their and new CD press releases. It makes every- but also 4 the Record, vinyl swaps and talent, thank you for the CDs. Keep ’em one’s jobs here easier when we work together many other events that bring surrounding coming! for the common good of music. communities together. u I’m thankful for the wonderful bands u I’m thankful for the wonderfully tal- u I’m thankful for Morningbell Records that are putting the City with Soul on the ented musicians, singers and bands who, for giving Jackson musicians a place to record

34

and collaborate with other artists, bringing in regional acts as well as sharing the talent we have here, and providing a place for music lovers to hang out who may not be into the bar scene. u I’m thankful for Brad “Kamikaze” Franklin (entrepreneur and Jackson Free Press columnist), who hosts GenerationNXT Indie concerts to showcase up-andcoming hip-hop artists in Jackson and throughout the South. u Thanks to the all the venues and the hosts and hostesses of open-mic nights in Jackson who help singers/songwriters get exposure in our city’s music scene. u I’m thankful for musicians who come together and play for free at benefits—not only for charitable causes, such as Wellsfest, Chick Ball or Operation Shoestring, but for other musicians who are sick, have ailing family members who need help with medical bills, and for honoring musicians who have lost their battles with whatever diseases they were afflicted with. u I’m truly thankful for all the music fans and supporters of the city’s music scene. Without you, this town would be dead for sure. There you have it, Jackson. Go out and support local live music!


DIVERSIONS | venue

Martin’s Moves into a New Era

THIS WEEK WEDNESDAY 11/21 TRIP BURNS

T.B Ledford & Friends (Dining Room)

THURSDAY 11/22 5th Annual Thanksgiving Family Jam (Red Room)

B TRIP BURNS

After serving lunch to downtown residents and workers during the day, Martin’s takes on a new vibe each night.

frequenting Martin’s on a regular basis and soon became close friends with Lassiter. In 1984, Martin’s made its final move to its current location on State Street. In the 1990s, Lassiter became ill with cancer and sold Martin’s to Stodghill. “They had a real special bond,” Joseph Stodghill. Calvin’s son and the current owner of Martin’s, told the JFP. “It was important to Martin that he left it somebody that was

going to kind of keep it going.” Calvin Stodghill ran Martin’s until he died Aug. 19 of this year. Since then, Joseph has taken the reins and is keeping Martin’s on the successful track his father passed down to him. Since 1998, Martin’s has been one of the city’s most popular music venues. Patrons will find live bands at Martin’s between one and three nights a week performing a variety of music from roots like blues and bluegrass, to rock and electronic dance music. It also hosts football-centered nights Mondays and Thursdays, ladies’ night on Thursday and a shrimp boil on Tuesdays. Joseph Stodghill said he runs the business during the day, leaving live music up to booking agent Chris Rybolt and the cooking to his aunt Nancy Sulser and former Army cook Tony Reynolds. Great workers like the employees at Martin’s are the key to running a successful restaurant and bar in Jackson, Stodghill said. “You better have good people, and we have that here.” Booking top acts like Unknown Hinson, who played Martin’s in September, and Lee Bains and The Glory Fires, who will perform Dec. 22, helps. “We have people from Texas, Louisiana, Tennessee (and) Alabama,” Stodghill said. “We sold a lot of advance tickets (for Unknown Hinson). It shocked me. I was down here with them until 4 in the morning by the time we got all that cleaned up.” This venue spotlight is part of an ongoing series of local music hotspots. To suggest your favorite venue, email kathleen@ jacksonfreepress.com.

Wednesday, November 21st & Thursday, November 22nd Friday, November 23rd

FEARLESS FOUR

(Funk & Rock n Roll) 9-1, $10 Cover

Molly Ringwalds with Web Wilder (Big Room)

Saturday, November 24th

SATURDAY 11/24 CLOSED ALL DAY

(Brass Funk) 9-1, $10 Cover

MS Blues Society’s Blue Mondays

etween State Street and Hal & Mal’s sits a staple in the city’s nightlife. Martin’s has been on the Jackson scene since 1953, when Martin Lassiter opened it as a breakfast and lunch restaurant at the corner of Silas Brown and State streets. In 1973, Lassiter moved the restaurant and added a bar, but not the typical late-night establishment. In those days, Martin’s closed at 8:30 p.m. In 1976, Calvin Stodghill began

Closed for Thanksgiving

FRIDAY 11/23 Closed For Lunch

MONDAY 11/26

Martin’s has focused on bringing live music to Jackson since 1998.

Now offering a full dinner menu. Now accepting reservations.

TUESDAY 11/27 Pub Quiz w Erin and Friends (Dining Room & Brew Pub)

SOUTHERN KOMFORT BRASS BAND

Tuesday, November 27th

ANDY HARDWICK

(Piano) 7-10, No Cover

HAPPY HOUR ALL NIGHT! -Tuesdays Only-

CLOSED

11/22 & 11/23 Restaurant Closed for Lunch 11/24 Closed All Day

Coming Soon 11/27: Dylan LeBlanc - Red Room $8 Cover 11/28: The Intellectual Bulimics Comedy Show - Red Room 11/30: Jarekus Singleton - Red Room

MONDAY - FRIDAY

Blue Plate Lunch with corn bread and tea or coffee

$8

25

As well as the usual favorites! Seafood Gumbo, Red Beans and Rice, Burgers, Fried Pickles, Onion Rings and Homemade Soups made daily. Fridays: Catfish Plates are $9.75

$4.00 Happy Hour Well Drinks! visit HalandMals.com for a full menu and concert schedule

601.948.0888

200 S. Commerce St. Downtown Jackson, Mississippi

COMING SOON NOVEMBER 30, 2012

Chris Gill & The Sole Shakers

HAPPY HOUR! TUESDAY ALL NIGHT LONG! Till 7 Wednesday -Friday

2-FOR-1 • DRAFT BEER • WELL DRINKS • APPETIZERS!

119 S. President Street 601.352.2322 www.Underground119.com

jacksonfreepress.com

by Jacob Fuller

35


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WEEKLY EVENT CALENDAR WEDNESDAYS

11/21

MARTINS THANKSGIVING SHOWCASE

CARDINAL SONS (member of E Company) PARALLAX ROOSTER BLUES THURSDAYS

11/22

Larry Waters Duo

FRIDAY

11/23

Kenny Brown Band

SATURDAY

MONDAY

Lord T & Eloise with DJ Young Venom

GUYS NIGHT & COLLEGE NIGHT

11/24

11/26

KICK IT OFF AT 7PM WITH $3.25 WELLS AND $2.25 DOMESTIC LONG NECKS â&#x20AC;¢ OPEN MIC 10 P.M. TUESDAY

SHRIMP BOIL 5PM

11/27

JUMBO SHRIMP, CORN, POTATOES, SAUSAGE 5 - 10PM LATE NIGHT DRINK SPECIALS START AT 10PM - 12AM $1 HIGH LIFE & PBRâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S, $2 MARGARITAS MATTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S LATE NIGHT KARAOKE 10 P.M.

November 21 - 27, 2012

UPCOMING SHOWS

36

DEC. 1 DJ LOGIC DEC. 7 GRAVITY A DEC. 8 - STOOGES BRASS BAND DEC. 29 - KEYS N KRATES

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MUSIC | live

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214 S. STATE ST. â&#x20AC;¢ 601.354.9712 DOWNTOWN JACKSON

      

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ORGANICS p 40 GIRL ABOUT TOWN p 41 ASTRO p 45 FLY STYLE p 46

Fondue: Merry Dish of Yesteryear by Lisa Sorg

PUBLIC DOMAIN

Failure to adhere to these social mores can result in your being ostracized, diseased and permanently uninvited. Cheese fondue Fonduebits.com lists this traditional cheese fondue. Full disclosure: I had planned to try it, but I can neither smell nor taste, so I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t. Proceed at your own risk, particularly if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re lactose-sensitive. 1/2 pound grated Gruyere (rind removed) 1/2 pound grated Emmentaler cheese (rind removed) 1 cup dry white wine (Riesling or Sauvignon Blanc) 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice 1 clove garlic 3-1/2 teaspoon cornstarch (for thickening) Pepper and nutmeg to taste 1. Rub the inside of a medium saucepan with the peeled garlic clove. Throw away the garlic. Add the wine and lemon juice and bring to a simmer over medium heat. 2. In a medium bowl, mix the Gruyere and Emmentaler cheese with the cornstarch and toss. Stir the cheese mixture into the wine using zig-zag or figure-eight motion, one small handful at a time. Make sure each handful is completely melted before adding another. The fondue can bubble a bit, but donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t let it boil. Season with the nutmeg and pepper. 3. Transfer to a cheese fondue pot and keep warm with burner. Serve right away. Cooking and serving tips Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t add water to the fondue. Add wine if the fondue is too thick; more cornstarch and cheese if itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s too thin. The hard crust on the bottom of the pot is called â&#x20AC;&#x153;la courteâ&#x20AC;? and is considered a delicacy. Serve it to your guests. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t double the recipe. Two pounds of cheese is a lot to melt. Make a separate pot. More holiday and entertaining tips are at jfp.ms/holiday. TRIP BURNS

#HEFS4RADE(AIRFOR4URKEYS E\.DWKOHHQ00LWFKHOO

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Patrick Kelly (left) and Tom Ramsey are local restaurateurs who put their hair on the line to raise money to feed families this holiday season.

jacksonfreepress.com

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or the past five days, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been laid out by the worst Since they didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have enough utensils, everyone had to eat head cold Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had this century, so the vision of fon- out of one pot. dueâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;yellow, viscous cheese bubbling in an avoModern fondue sets accommodate sixâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;additional peocado-colored potâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;feels familiar yet unappetizing. ple apparently present a fire hazardâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and consist of the slenBut back in the â&#x20AC;&#x2122;60s and â&#x20AC;&#x2122;70s, bay-bee, fondue was fab, der, color-coded forks so that everyone know which is his or like macrame and key hers; an earthenware or clubs. Fondue had an ceramic pot for cheese aura: Cookbooks from or chocolate (hot oil that eraâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;such as â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fonrequires a copper or due Is In,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dip Dunk enameled iron pot); and Be Merry,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Treaand a burner unit that sury of Flavorful Fonis fueled by gel, alcohol duesâ&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x201D;depicted fonor butane. You can also due parties as swinging use candles or an elecaffairs that took place in tric unit, but an open dark-paneled ski lodges. flame is ill-advised and These culinary free-fora cord is cumbersome. alls were decorated with Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll need plates hirsute men dressed in for the dippables: cable-knit sweaters, a cubed bread, apple two-tined fork in one slices, asparagus spears, Cheese fondue is the ultimate throwback dish. hand and a fireplace ham cubes and the like. poker in the otherâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; And wine, lots of wine. you know, to keep the embers burning. Fondue has its own arbitrary etiquette. Meanwhile, svelte women in wrap-around dresses sang 1. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t touch the fondue fork with your mouth. Tradialong to â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dancing in the Moonlightâ&#x20AC;? on the reel-to-reel, tional fondue manners say you can gently bite the bread with swigging Riunite red and daintily dabbing their bread in a your front teeth and then place the fork back into the pot. communal pot of cheese or, for dessert, a strawberry in meltNo offense, friends, but I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know where your teeth ed chocolate. have been. However, the history of fondue is not that sexy. InAlternately, bread and cheese fondue can be eaten simivented by the Swiss in the 18th century, fondue (it is derived larly to meat fondue, which is served with a dinner fork and a from â&#x20AC;&#x153;fondre,â&#x20AC;? the French word for â&#x20AC;&#x153;meltâ&#x20AC;?) was what passed fondue fork. The meat is skewered with a fondue fork, placed for food when no fresh fruits or vegetables were available in on a plate and eaten with the dinner fork. the winter. 2. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t double dip. Think of Seinfeld. Fonduebits.com, seemingly the authority on fondue, 3. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t dip with your fingers. Disgusting, and it could shares that villagers discovered that heating stale cheese made result in second-degree burns. it edible and that hard bread softened when dipped into it. 4. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t lose your food in the pot.

37


DINEJackson Paid listyour yourrestaurant.r restaurant.r Paid advertising advertising section. section. Call Call 601-362-6121 601-362-6121 x11 x1 totolist

Charity Taco Night

Supporting the Mississippi Children’s Museum November 29 • 5pm - 9pm

601-961-7001

318 South State Street | Jackson, MS | www.jacostacos.com

AMERICAN/SOUTHERN CUISINE

Another Broken Egg (1000 Highland Colony #1009 in Renaissance, 601.790.9170) Open Daily 7am-2pm for breakfast, brunch and lunch. Egg, benedict and omelet dishes, pancakes, waffles, specialties, burgers, salads and sandwiches. Two Sisters Kitchen (707 N. Congress St. 601-353-1180) Frequent Best of Jackson winner for fried chicken offers a buffet of great choices Lunch only. Mon-Fri, Sun. Koinonia (136 Adams St. 601-960-3008) You won’t want to mix the large yellow house just off Metro Parkway. Koinonia’s expanded lunch menu includes pizza, sandwiches and soups.

BAKERY

Broad Street Bakery (4465 Interstate 55 N. 601-362-2900) Hot breakfast,coffee espresso drinks, fresh breads and pastries, gourmet deli sandwiches, quiches, soups, pizzas and dessert. For Heaven’s Cakes (4950 Old Canton Road 601-991-2253) Cakes and cupcakes for all occasions including weddings, parties, catered events.

PIZZA

The Perfect Little Christmas Happy! The Original

Comeback Dressing Voted Number One by Delta magazine.

$6.99 per bottle + tax Available only at The Cherokee.

601-362-6388

1410 Old Square Road • Jackson

The Pizza Shack (925 E. Fortification 601-352-2001) The 2009-2012 winner of Best Pizza offers the perfect pizza-and-a-beer joint. New locations in Belhaven and a second spot in Colonial Mart on Old Canton Rd. in Northeast Jackson. Sal & Mookie’s (565 Taylor St. 601-368-1919) Pizzas of all kinds plus pasta, eggplant parmesan and the fried ravioli. Best Kid’s Menu & Best Ice Cream in the 2011 Best of Jackson. Plus, Pi(e) Lounge in front offers great drinks and a fun atmosphere for catching up with friends. Mellow Mushroom (275 Dogwood Blvd, Flowood, 601-992-7499) More than just great pizza. Offering choices such as hummus, magic mushroom soup, wings, stuffed portobello, meatball hoagies, local brews and more!! Open Monday - Friday 11-10 and Saturday 11-11.

ITALIAN

BRAVO! (4500 Interstate 55 N., Jackson, 601-982-8111) Wood-fired pizzas, vegetarian fare, plus creative pastas, beef, and seafood specials. Award-winning wine list, Jackson’s see-and-be-seen casual/upscale dining. Cerami’s (5417 Lakeland Drive, Flowood, 601-919-28298) Southern-style Italian cuisine features their signature Shrimp Cerami (white wine sauce, capers artichokes) along with veal, tilapia, crawfish, chicken and pasta dishes.

STEAK, SEAFOOD & FINE DINING

Islander Seafood and Oyster House (601-366-5441) Seafood, po’boys and oyster house. Casual fine dining that’s family-friendly with a beach vibe. Great steaks, burgers, raw bar, yellowfin tuna and more! Maywood Mart. Crab’s (6954 Old Canton Rd., Ridgeland, 601-956-5040) Crab’s Seafood Shack offers a wide variety of southern favorites such as fried catfish and boiled shrimp. Full bar & TVs for all of your favorite sporting events. Eslava’s Grille (2481 Lakeland Drive, 601-932-4070) Latin-influenced dishes like ceviche in addition to pastas, steaks, salads and other signature seafood dishes. Rocky’s (1046 Warrington Road, Vicksburg 601-634-0100) Enjoy choice steaks, fresh seafood, great salads, hearty sandwiches and much more in the “polished casual” dining room. Open 24/7 in the Riverwalk Casino. The Penguin (1100 John R Lynch Street, 769.251.5222) Fine dining at its best. Located in the historic West Jackson, the Penguin features an extensive lunch and dinner menu along with live music Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights. Try the famous hot dog special which uses 1960’s Penguin’s original recipe. November 21 - 27, 2012

SOUTH OF THE BORDER

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Babalu (622 Duling Ave., 601-366-5757) Fresh guacamole at the table, fish tacos, empanada, smoked pork sholders, Mexican street corn—Jackson’s “Best Mexican” & “Best of Jackson 2012” magaritas. Jaco’s Tacos (318 South State Street) Tacos, burritos and quesadillas. Tex-Mex at its finest and freshest. Tacos come with a side of butter-based mantequilla sauce for dipping. Enjoy the the patio and full bar. La Morena (6610 Old Canton Road Suite J, Ridgeland, 601-899-8821) Tortillas made fresh order. Authentic, Mexican Cuisine (not Tex-Mex). Mexican Cokes!


DINEJackson

5A44 FX5X

Paid advertising section.

Fernando’s Fajita Factory (5647 Hwy 80 E in Pearl, 601-932-8728 and 149 Old Fannin Rd in Brandon, 601-992-6686) A culinary treat of traditional Mexican food using the best meats, vegetables and spices.

Holiday Edition

MEDITERRANEAN/GREEK

Aladdin Mediterranean Grill (730 Lakeland Drive 601-366-6033) Delicious authentic dishes including lamb dishes, hummus, falafel, kababs, shwarma and much more. Consistent award winner, great for takeout or evenings with friends.

BARBEQUE

Hickory Pit Barbeque (1491 Canton Mart Rd. 601-956-7079) The “Best Butts in Town” features BBQ chicken, beef and pork along with burgers and po’boys. Haute Pig (1856 Main Street, 601-853-8538) A “very high class pig stand,” Haute Pig offers Madison diners BBQ plates, sandwiches, po-boys, salads, and their famous Hershey bar pie.

Friday, Dec. 1, 9 p.m., at Hal and Mal’s

CRAB CAKES No Filler

4654 McWillie Dr., Jackson|Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 10AM-9PM Friday & Saturday 10AM-10PM, Sunday CLOSED

COFFEE HOUSES

Cups Espresso Café (Multiple Locations, www.cupsespressocafe.com) Jackson’s local group of coffeehouses offer a wide variety of espresso drinks. Wi-fi.

BARS, PUBS & BURGERS

Burgers and Blues (1060 E. County Line Road, Ridgeland 601-899-0038) Best Burger of 2012! Check out their signature approach to burgers, chicken, wraps, seasoned fries and so much more. Plus live music and entertainment! Hal and Mal’s (200 S. Commerce St. 601-948-0888) Pub favorites meet Gulf Coast and Cajun specialties like red beans and rice, the Oyster Platter or each day’s blackboard special. Best of Jackson winner. Cherokee Inn (960 Briarfield Rd. 601-362-6388) Jackson’s “Best Hole in the Wall,” has a great jukebox, great bar and a great burger. Plate lunches, cheesy fries and more, including a full bar and friendly favorites. Cool Al’s (4654 McWillie, 601-713-3020) Cool Al’s signature stacked, messy, decadent, creative burgers defy adjectives. And don’t forget the fries! Fenian’s Pub (901 E. Fortification St. 601-948-0055) Classic Irish pub featuring a menu of traditional food, pub sandwiches and beers such as Guinness and Harp on tap. Multiple Best of Jackson awards. Martin’s Restaurant and Lounge (214 South State Street 601-354-9712) Lunch specials, pub appetizers (jalapeno poppers, cheezsticks, fried pickles) or order from the full menu of po-boys and entrees. Full bar, massive beer selection. Ole Tavern on George Street (416 George St. 601-960-2700) Pub food with a southern flair: beer-battered onion rings, chicken & sausage gumbo, salads, sandwiches and weekly lunch specials. Plus, happy hour 4-7p M-F. Underground 119 (119 South President St. 601-352-2322) Pan-seared crabcakes, shrimp and grits, chili-rubbed filet mignon, vegetarian sliders. Add a full bar and mix in great music. Opens 4 p.m.-until, Wed-Sat. Wing Stop (952 North State Street, 601-969-6400) Saucing and tossing in a choice of nine flavors, Wing Stop wings are made with care and served up piping hot. Every order is made fresh to order.

Come Try Our Dinner Specials 2481 Lakeland Dr Flowood, MS 39232

601-932-4070 tel 601-933-1077 fax

910 Lake Harbour Dr. Ridgeland, MS

601-956-2929

Now Open On Sundays Brunch 11:00 am - 2:00 pm Dinner 5:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Where Raul Knows Everyone’s Name Raul Sierra Manager Since 1996

VEGETARIAN

High Noon Café (2807 Old Canton Road in Rainbow Plaza 601-366-1513) Fresh, gourmet, tasty and healthy defines the lunch options at Jackson’s own strict vegetarian (and very-vegan-friendly) restaurant adjacent to Rainbow Whole Foods.

-Best Barbecue in Jackson- 2003 • 2006 • 2008 • 2009 • 2010 • 2011 • 2012 1491 Canton Mart Rd. • Jackson • 601.956.7079

jacksonfreepress.com

ASIAN AND INDIAN

Mr. Chen’s (5465 I 55 North, 601-978-1865) Fresh authentic Chinese Food, located within an actual grocery store with many unique produce offerings. Winner of 2011 and 2012 Best Chinese Food Category by the Jackson Free Press. Ruchi India (862 Avery Blvd @ County Line Rd. 601-991-3110) Classic Indian recipes, lost delicacies, alluring aromas and exotic ingredients. Fantastic Indian cuisine from multiple regions. Lamb, vegetarian, chicken, shrimp and more. Pan Asia (720 Harbor Pines Dr, Ridgeland 601-956-2958) Beautiful ambiance in this popular Ridgeland eatery accompanies signature asian fusion dishes and buildyour-own stir-frys using fresh ingredients and great sauces. Thai House (1405 Old Square, 601-982-9991) Voted one of Jackson’s best Asian 2003-2012,offers a variety of freshly made springrolls, pad thai, moo satay, curry, cashew chicken, pork and vegetarian dishes.

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LIFE&STYLE | organics

Plant An â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Edible Forestâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; in Your Yard

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hile Arbor Day in Mississippi is in the spring, Mississippi has an established resource with The Edmany experts contend that the best time for ible Forests of Mississippi, an orchard program developed planting trees may actually be in the fall. and administered though the Mississippi Urban Forest New roots can Council (full disclosure: I serve on develop when the soil temperathe board of directors of MUFC). ture is above 45 degrees FahrenIts teaching project is the Jesse Gates %XPERT!DVICE  )UXLWDQGYHJHWDEOHH[SHUWVZLOORI heit. Planting in the fall allows Edible Forest on Bailey Avenue at IHUWKHLUWLSVDQGDGYLFHDWWKH0LVVLVVLS the trees to develop roots before Wells United Methodist Church, SL)UXLW 9HJHWDEOH*URZHUV&RQIHUHQFH going dormant during the winter. providing a model for cities across 7UDGH6KRZLQFRQMXQFWLRQZLWKWKH Budding can stress trees with inadthe state, homeowners and commu0LVVLVVLSSL$JULWRXULVP$VVRFLDWLRQ 1RYDQGDWWKH+LOWRQ-DFNVRQRQ equate root systems, so, if you are nity garden groups. &RXQW\/LQH5RDG)RUPRUHLQIRUPDWLRQ going to plant a tree, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best to do And the Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s webpage YLVLWPVIUXLWDQGYHJFRP it soon, to allow plenty of time for offers a toolkit to follow, at msurroots to develop. banforest.com/edible_forest. But, Grist magazine reports that there is no reason to stay strictly to urban forests featuring heirloom and indigenous varieties the orchard model, as at Wells. Homeowners (and others) are the next wave of urban agriculture (jfp.ms/Grist). What can create smaller â&#x20AC;&#x153;savannaâ&#x20AC;? type food trees and shrubs to fit many Mississippians may not know is that the Magnolia in with their established gardens. Think small, understoryState is ahead of the curve on this, and Jackson foremost. type trees that can thrive in moderate shade. Groups might consider a permaculture model. True permaculture is planting a variety of natural plants that require minimal care with little or no soil disturbance to 3UGGESTED2EADING  $QH[FHOOHQWVRXUFHIRULGHDVLV(GLEOH)RUHVW*DU provide food. It would work well with establishing or esGHQV7KH(FRORJ\DQG'HVLJQRI+RPH6FDOH)RRG)RUHVWV tablished community gardens to provide a mixed variety of DZHEVLWHEDVHGRQWKHWZRYROXPHVHWÂł(GLEOH)RUHVW food sources. *DUGHQV´E\'DYLG-DFNH &KHOVHD*UHHQIRU Mississippi State University Extension experts say that VHW 9LVLWWKHVLWHDWHGLEOHIRUHVWJDUGHQVFRP the easiest fruits to grow are blueberry, fig, Oriental persim-

FLICKR/MAC IVAN

by Jim PathFinder Ewing

Blueberries are one of the easiest fruit trees to grow.

mon and blackberry. Pecan, strawberry and pear are considered moderately hard to grow; peach, apple and plum are the most difficult in regard to spraying, watering, pruning, etc. For more information, see: http://msucares.com. Jim PathFinder Ewingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new book, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Conscious Food: Sustainable Growing, Spiritual Eatingâ&#x20AC;? (Findhorn Press), is in bookstores now. Find Jim on Facebook, follow him @edibleprayers or visit blueskywaters.com.

GMO Food Battle Not Lost

November 21 - 27, 2012

40

Consumers Union, California Council of Churches IMPACT, Sierra Club, Whole Foods Market, Natural Resources Defense Council, Organic Consumers Association, Center for Food Safety, Consumer Federation of America, Pesticide Action Network,

Center for Food Safety, Environmental Working Group, Breast Cancer Fund, Mercola Health Resources, Public Citizen, MoveOn and Food Democracy Now! (For a full list, visit carighttoknow.org/ endorsements.)

SCREENSHOT VIA @UNHEALTHYTRUTH TWITPIC

T

he Big Ag and Big Food cartel may be chortling now that it â&#x20AC;&#x153;wonâ&#x20AC;? Nov. 6 by defeating Californiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Proposition 37 that would have mandated labeling of food containing genetically modified organisms (GMO), but that victory may be short-lived. Already, Connecticut, Vermont and Washington state are preparing 2013 initiatives, 23 states are working on legislation to require labeling, and Canada is considering legislation for a national ban on GMOs. Sixty-one countries already have mandatory labeling. A massive disinformation campaign that snowed even otherwise reputable voices killed Prop 37. A consortium of food giants funneled more than $46 million into defeating it; Monsanto alone spent $8.1 million. By comparison, the anti-GMO side only had $9.2 million to spend, despite more than 3,000 food safety, environmental, and consumer organizations endorsing them. The endorsers included most of the major health, faith, labor, environmental and consumer groups in California, including the California Nurses Association, California Democratic Party, California Labor Federation, United Farm Workers, American Public Health Association,

Although a GMO labeling bill was killed in California, the movement toward universal labeling continues, as seen in this graphic by nongmoproject.org.

So, how did it lose? The massive funding by Big Ag and Big Food raised so many questions about the proposed labeling law that those who were undecided or feared the scary, untrue claims that it would increase grocery prices voted â&#x20AC;&#x153;no.â&#x20AC;? Even so, 47 percent of California voters voted yes â&#x20AC;&#x201D; some 3.5 million families! That sends a powerful message: Despite fears about the specific legislation of Prop 37, a majority of Californians probably would vote for a mandatory GMO labeling law if the questions raised were honestly addressed. (National polls show up to 90 percent of Americans want GMO labeling, see: rodale.com/gmo-labeling) Moreover, because the publicity raised consciousness about the issue, now, millions of Californians and those who followed the Prop 37 debate around the nation are looking at the food products they buy to determine if they contain GMOs simply because Prop 37 was on the ballot. Bottom line? If food manufacturers want to stay in business, they will start labeling and switching over due to selfpreservation. Regardless of specific labeling requirements, or how long state or national governments drag their feet, consumers will win this food labeling battle by voting with their wallets!


LIFE&STYLE | girl about town by Julie Skipper

‘Tis the Season TRIP BURNS

Wednesday - November 21 Thanksgiving Eve Party with Snazz

Thursday - November 22

LADIES NIGHT with Snazz 2-for-1 Beer

Scott Sexton conducts kids from St. Andrew’s in a performance at Fondren Unwrapped.

I

On The Edge Saturday - November 24

On The Edge Sunday - November 25 National Recording Artist

Jamey Johnson LIVE!! Sat Dec 8th Tickets available at ticketmaster.com

Lacs

Tickets On Sale Now $10 Advance • $15 at the Door

601-961-4747

www.myspace.com/popsaroundthecorner

824 S. State St. Jackson, MS www.clubmagoos.com • 601.487.8710

jacksonfreepress.com

TRIP BURNS

hadn’t even eaten all of my ghost- ward Duling Hall, we ran into lots of shaped marshmallow Peeps from Hal- friends and stopped to chat along the way. loween before a friend posted a picture That friendly, fun atmosphere of people on Facebook of her fully decorated out and about enjoying a neighborhood Christmas tree. “Already??” I thought. and all things local that always gives me But sure enough, the calendar doesn’t lie; warm fuzzies and reminds me why I love November was here, and holiday season Jackson so much. was knocking at the door. That feeling, coupled with the wine I’m not one of those who gets stressed from the merchants, put me in the perfect and harried over holiday preparations and frame of mind to thoroughly enjoy the celebrations; twinkling lights and tacky SMoakys when we reached Duling Hall. decorations make me happy. Lots of par- SMoak Salon (622 Duling Ave., Suite ties with friends mean chances to dress up 206, 601-982-5313) owner Suzanne and socialize, and good cheer abounds. Moak had set up at table in her shop, at Thanksgiving to New Year’s is one of my which two incognito individuals dressed favorite times of the year once I get in the in black, their identities disguised by colproper spirit. orful bandanas covering their faces, hats, This year, I found that spirit at headphones and sunglasses, sat at electric Fondren Unwrapped, the hip neigh- typewriters as guests lined up to receive borhood’s annual holifrom them an “honest day open house. On a assessment” of their apclear, crisp November pearance—along with a evening, I met up with numeric score. Sounds some girlfriends, and intimidating, but it we wandered through was lots of fun and, it the galleries and stores. turned out, “honest asStarting at Fondren sessment” really meant Corner (2906 N. State a positive and sassy misSt., 601-362-8440, sive encouraging you 2906northstate.com), to be yourself and feel we first hit Blithe and Fondren Unwrapped feels confident. I may or may Vine (Suite 103B, like the official kickoff to not have gone through the holidays. 601-427-3322, blithe the line twice. andvine.com), where I To cap off the scoped out a great sparkly cocktail dress evening, we headed to Babalu Tacos that would be perfect for the annual and Tapas (622 Duling Ave., Suite 106, Krystal Ball New Year’s Eve celebration 601-366-5757, babalums.com) for some at Hal & Mal’s and made a mental note much-needed nourishment. Among the to return to try it on. Next, we stopped boisterous crowd, we managed to crowd by photographer (and soon-to-be new- around a bar table, where we were joined lywed) Christina Cannon’s gallery, One by a couple of late-comers to our evening. Blu Wall (Suite 107, 601-713-1224, obAs we laughed, ate and talked, I felt wgallery.com), where an exhibit showed incredibly grateful for the place I live and me some new artists, and I snagged a new the festivities to come this season of celT-shirt at Swell-o-Phonic (Suite 103, ebration. In fact, before leaving for the 601-981-3547, chane.com). Young peo- night, I not only made plans to return to ple from local schools performed Christ- Fondren to hit up the stores I didn’t make mas carols and played string-instrument it to that night, but also made plans for pieces in the lobby, adding to the family- a pre-Thanksgiving “Friendsgiving” gathfriendly atmosphere and festive mood. ering with the folks around that table. As we walked down State Street toAfter all … ’tis the season.

Friday - November 23

Harvey Johnson, Jr. - Mayor

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November 21 - 27, 2012


DIVERSIONS | jfp sports

the best in sports over the next seven days

SLATE

by Bryan Flynn

I

COURTESY MICHAEL CURRAN

COURTESY MICHAEL CURRAN

t had all the pomp and circumstance mostly it is like the kickball you played me of the failed XFL. Players got creative, of a regular season opening of a ma- in elementary school,â&#x20AC;? Curran says. using nicknames such as Kicki Minaj, jor professional league but with the Teams must be between a maximum of Coop, Savish or Baby Jean. tongue-in-cheek feel of a Monty Py- 16 players and a minimum of 10 players. Players wore just about anything from thon skit. The opening of the inaugural To be eligible, at knee-high socks to season of the JAKASSâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Jackson Adult least as many fecostumes to lighten Kickball and Social Servicesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;league at the male players as male the mood even Lakeland Drive baseball fields had it all to must be present at more. The league start things off. each game. felt like a way to There was a stirring rendition of the Men arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t alblow off steam each National Anthem complete with forgot- lowed to bat backMonday night durten words by Mandy Ferrington, much to-back, although ing the season. like Christina Aguilera at the Super Bowl, women can. To After nine but it only added to the cheeky feel of the keep players from highly entertaining night. The fireworks consisted of leftover staying on the weeks of action, bottle rockets that werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t all duds. bench all game, 10 Michael Curran (center) helped found six teams were left The only thing missing was someone team members play Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first adult kickball league. standing in the climbing to the top of the press box and on defense, but up leagueâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first-ever throwing a paper airplane in lieu of a real to 12 can kick on playoffs: Great Balls plane flyover. offense. Any disputes are solved with rock, of Fire, Red Balls and Vodka, Suckleballs, The league is the brainchild of Mi- paper, scissors. Kickballaaaaaaz, Spider Monkeys and chael Curran and Jennifer Breaux, who Players at bat are out if the ball they Kickalob Ultra. When the dust settled, played in a Clinton league and came up kick is caught in the air or they are struck Kickalob Ultra stood at the top of the Jackwith the idea for a with the ball run- son kickball world as the champions. Jackson adult kickball ning the base path. Throughout the season, the league league one night eating It is illegal to hit threw parties and, mostly, players rememtacos. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Michael came players from the neck bered the league motto: Be fun, be social, up with the idea of doup for safety reasons. be ridiculous â&#x20AC;Ś be a Jakass. ing a league in Jackson Each game lasts five Curran and Breaux are already workand with Facebook to innings with three outs ing to keep what was a hit this season and invite friends and get per inning. Of course, fix the rare misses by the first-year league. the word out it was the team that scores the The two hope to have an even bigger, beteasy to start a league,â&#x20AC;? most runs wins. ter, crazier second year of JAKASS. Breaux says. All players pay a If you are looking for a fun, athletic, Using Facebook to fee of $16 and sign an laid-back way to get into the sports scene in start the league helped insurance waiver, al- Jackson, the JAKASS league is a great place spread the word quickthough injuries arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t to find it. I wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t recommend this league ly, and the first season typically a problem. if you approach every sport like itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the SuTeam To Kick a Mockingbird had 14 teams and 196 In its first year, the per Bowl or game seven of the World Series, celebrates its first win. playersâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a pretty sucleague was met with en- but it is fun to watch even if you are not a cessful start for a new thusiastic glee by adults part of all the action during the game. league based around a in their 20s and 30s. If you are interested in playing in seagame most people havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t played since ju- Each team made up clever names and lo- son two of the JAKASS kickball league, nior high. gos for their squads such as Country Fried join the leagueâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Facebook page to keep â&#x20AC;&#x153;The rules are a tweak of the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;World Kickinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and To Kick a Mockingbird. The track of all the offseason news and to learn Adult Kickball Associationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; rulebook, but names on the back of the jerseys reminded when the next season starts.

JFP Top 25: Week 13

O

ne week after being knocked out of the top spot in the JFP College Football Top 25, upsets of Oregon and Kansas State have returned Alabama to No. 2. The Crimson Tide and Georgia are both headed for the SEC Championship game. Barring upsets this Saturday, the winner of the SEC title game figures to earn a spot in the BCS Championship. Right now, the SECâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s opponent will be Notre Dame, this weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new No. 1 team. But the Fighting Irish face a tough regularseason finale at USC on Saturday.

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Doctor S has often been called a â&#x20AC;&#x153;motherâ&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x201D;especially at the JFP offices, and you know who Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m talking about Tony Stark, er, Todd Staufferâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;but this is the first time heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s filled in because of the birth of a child. It beats six months on a polar ice cap.

THURSDAY, NOV. 22 NFL: Turkey Day brings a blessed bounty of football as God intended, with Houston at Detroit (11:30 a.m., CBS), Washington at Dallas (3:15 p.m., FOX) and New England at New York Jets (7:30 p.m. NBC). FRIDAY, NOV. 23 High school football: South Panola at Madison Central (7 p.m., 105.9 FM): The Class 6A powerhouses meet in the near-annual playoff game. â&#x20AC;Ś College football, LSU at Arkansas (1:30 p.m., CBS): The Tigers need a big win to keep their faint BCS hopes alive. SATURDAY, NOV. 24 College football: Mississippi State at Ole Miss (6 p.m., ESPNU, 105.9 FM and 97.3 FM). Oh hell, clear the decks. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Egg Bowl time, and the Bulldogs are looking for their fourth straight victory over The School Up North. â&#x20AC;Ś The two teams meeting in next weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s SEC Championship are in action, with Georgia Tech at Georgia (11 a.m., ESPN) and Auburn at Alabama (2:30 p.m., CBS). The Bulldogs and Crimson Tide are heavily favored, but you know how unpredictable rivalry games can be. Neither squad can afford a misstep. SUNDAY, NOV. 25 NFL: San Francisco at New Orleans (3:25 p.m., Fox). The Saints will be looking for playoff payback against the 49ers. Collecting will be difficult. MONDAY, NOV. 26 NFL: Carolina at Philadelphia (7:30 p.m., ESPN). The nation gets a look at two of the NFLâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s biggest underachievers in the sort of matchup that turned â&#x20AC;&#x153;Monday Night Footballâ&#x20AC;? into the dog itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s become. TUESDAY, NOV. 27 Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s college basketball: Alcorn State at Mississippi State (7 p.m., 105.9 FM). The Braves call on the Bulldogs in an intrastate matchup. WEDNESDAY, NOV. 28 Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s college basketball: Ohio State at Duke (8:30 p.m., ESPN). The Buckeyes and Blue Devils meet in the ACCBig Ten Challenge. The Slate is compiled by Doctor S, who was once called â&#x20AC;&#x153;the meanest man in America.â&#x20AC;? But that doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t give him credit for the things heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s done abroad. Follow JFP Sports at jfpsports.com, @jfpsports and at facebook.com/jfpsports. 43

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Be a JAKASS

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Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Forget to Vote Best of Jackson 2013 www.bestofjackson.com

November 21 - 27, 2012

Thank You for Voting Us Best Pizza 2009 - 2012

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Top it Off by Kathleen M. Mitchell

COURTESY BELINDA FIELDS

COURTESY BELINDA FIELDS

Corinne Anderson, Deborah Boyd and Maggie Harper don hats in years past.

H

ats have long been about more than just protecting your head, and nobody knows that more than the women behind the Holiday Top Hat Brunch. On the Saturday after Thanksgiving, the central Mississippi chapter of the National Coalition of 100 Black Women Inc., presents the 21st annual hat brunch, with the theme â&#x20AC;&#x153;Essence of Glamour & Vogue!â&#x20AC;? This year, the yearly parade of hats will be joined by a full fashion show, styled by J. Bolin. The brunch is at the Jackson Hilton hotel (1001 E. County Line Road, 601-9572800). Events kick off at 9 a.m., with the parade of hats starting at 11. Tickets are $40 each, or $400 for a table of 10. For tickets or additional information, please call 601362-1115.

The women of the Top Hat Brunch show off their headwear. Back row, left to right: Terryce Walker, Gloria Johnson, Sonia Carter, Rita Wray, Lenora Lewis, Katrina Myricks, Wauline Carter and Ethel Gibson; seated: Sharolyn Smith, 2012 Holiday Top Hat chairwoman, and Belinda Arnold Fields, President of the National Coalition of 100 Black Women, central Mississippi chapter.

The 2012 categories, as described by event organizers, are:

ENJOLI

Anything goes ... this hat designed for the woman who struts her own style, may be plain or bold. With a coordinated ensemble, it simply says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;My Style.â&#x20AC;?

DIVA

November 21 - 27, 2012

Worn bodaciously by the self-assured, styleconscious woman; this hat, small, medium, or large, is usually fashionably adorned with feathers, beads, coiled braids, or bows, and coordinated with a high fashion ensemble and accessories.

46

SAFARI

Designed for the tigress that adores animal print and dares to â&#x20AC;&#x153;walk on the wide sideâ&#x20AC;? with class. Whether leopard, zebra or giraffe, this hat adds â&#x20AC;&#x153;jungle feverâ&#x20AC;? with style and elegance to any ensemble.

FIRST LADY MICHELLE

Designed for the confident feminine lady who emits sophisticated elegance and exquisite taste in her apparel, this face-flattering hat accents and complements any unique, ultra chic and elegant ensemble.

Knock a few folks off the gift list at Urban Home, inside Garden Works. Our new shipment of Bed Head Pajamas is here just in time to cozy up in front of the fire. Never underestimate the power of a great pair of PJs. The ultimate Christmas gift.

650 Hwy 51, Ridgeland, MS 39157 | 60.856.3078 facebook.com/martinsonsms | www.martinsonsms.com mon - sat 9 am - 6 pm â&#x20AC;˘ sundays 12:30 - 4:30 pm

JAZMINE & JAMAAL

Designed for young ladies and young men, in grades K-12. Looking fabulously fierce and commanding attention, this hat may be dressy, casual, snappy, bold or daring; yet stylish, coordinated with dressy or casual attire. Coming or going, the hat has head-turning s-t-y-le.

SISTER CORETTA

Representing the fashionable church lady, decked out in hat, gloves, suit, or dress, this hat is the essence of conservative ladyship.

LSO 7EA R T CA E

LABELLE

Whether wild, tall or narrow, this hat is designed for the woman who adores bling, jewels and glitter. Coordinated with a bold dramatic ensemble, it simply says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Work It!â&#x20AC;?

SOPHISTICATED GENT

Designed for the distinguished, debonair man who knows how to don a hat to accessorize and complement the casual, dressy, conservative, flashy or ethnocentric apparel.

MEDITERRANEAN GRILL

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Lunch Buffet â&#x20AC;˘ 11-2 .ORTH3TATE3TREET *ACKSON -ISSISSIPPI -ON 3ATAM PM Z

Lunch Buffet: Mon - Fri â&#x20AC;˘ 11am - 2pm Sat & Sun â&#x20AC;˘ 11.30am - 2.30pm Dinner: Mon - Sun â&#x20AC;˘ 5 - 10pm

862 Avery Blvd â&#x20AC;˘ Ridgeland, MS 601-991-3110 â&#x20AC;˘ ruchiindia.com

Book Your Holiday Event With Us

Book your holiday event by 12/31 and receive $25 off. coffee â&#x20AC;˘ culture â&#x20AC;˘ community

Npoebz

â&#x20AC;˘ 12-1 pm Free Yoga Glo â&#x20AC;˘ 5:30-7 pm Level 2&3 â&#x20AC;˘ 7:15-8:30 pm Level 1 (through October) â&#x20AC;˘ 7:15-7:45 pm Yoga for Runners (November)

Uvftebz

â&#x20AC;˘ 12-1 pm Level 1 â&#x20AC;˘ 5:15-5:45 pm Tabatas (6 for $50/$10 drop in) â&#x20AC;˘ 6-7:15 pm Level 1

Xfeoftebz

601-960-3008

â&#x20AC;˘ 12-1 pm The Practice â&#x20AC;˘ 1-1:15 pm Meditation â&#x20AC;˘ 5:30-6:45 Yoga from the Core

Uivstebz

â&#x20AC;˘ 12-1 pm Level 1 â&#x20AC;˘ 6-7:15 pm Mixed Level Vinyasa

Gsjebz

â&#x20AC;˘ 11:30-12:30 pm Pilates (Oct 19-Nov 16, $60) â&#x20AC;˘ 5:30-6:45 pm Level 1

Tbuvsebz

â&#x20AC;˘ 9-10:15 am Level 1 â&#x20AC;˘ 10:30-11:45 am Yoga Over 50

Tvoebz

â&#x20AC;˘ 3-4 pm Guerilla Yoga â&#x20AC;˘ 5:30-7 pm Bellydancing

koinoniacoffee.net 136 S. Adams Street in Jackson (Adams & Metro Pkwy between Downtown & JSU)

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Happy 25th Anniversary Free Tea For The Entire Month Of November

Specials & Rewards text 71441

jacksonfreepress.com

1149 Old Fannin Road â&#x20AC;˘ Brandon, MS 39047 â&#x20AC;˘ 601-992-6686 5647 Highway 80 East â&#x20AC;˘ Pearl, MS 39208 â&#x20AC;˘ 601-932-8728 Both Locations Open 7 Days A Week

47


Over 36,000 sq ft of antiques, collectibles, jewelry, furniture, crafts, glassware, & architectural salvage. 1325 Flowood Dr. â&#x20AC;˘ www.ďŹ&#x201A;eamarketms.com Sat: 9am-5pm â&#x20AC;˘ Sun: 12pm-5pm â&#x20AC;˘ $1 Admission

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Yvette Brown Owner Stylist/Educator â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rejuventing the Mind, Body & Soul of Hair.â&#x20AC;? Cell: 601.624.0255 Salon: 769.233.8411

Coming Soon

FOR A GOOD TIME CALL 601.982.5313

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)N(ISTORIC&ONDREN $ULING!VE 3TE 4UE &RIAM PM 3ATAM PM FINDUSONFACEBOOK

Alterations and Custom Made Suits & Shirts 1000 Highland Colony Pkwy, Ridgeland | 601.607.3443 Monday - Saturday 9:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m.

Try Our New Bento Boxes Mon. - Thur. â&#x20AC;˘ 11am - 2pm

$6.95

Choose from Chicken, Steak, Shrimp & Gyoza. Comes with Soup, Salad & Rice.

Weekend 3 Roll Sushi Special $9.99 Friday - Sunday Not valid with any other offer. Not valid on to-go orders.

4325 Lakeland Dr. â&#x20AC;˘ Flowood, MS 39232 â&#x20AC;˘ 601.936.7000 (Behind Parkway Theatre)


v11n11 - Holiday Entertaining