Te Puna Pānui o Ngāti Tama ki Te Tauihu, Issue 11, Koanga 2022

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KŌANGA 2022 PĀNUI O NGĀTI TAMA KI TE TAUIHU TAMA KŌRERO DEVELOPMENT TAMA RINGA KUMU PUANGA IN MOHUA KA URUORA HUI-Ā-TAU AND WĀNANGA 2023 TE IPUKAREA WAIRAU 2022

WHAKAPĀ MAI | CONTACT US

NGĀTI TAMA KI TE WAIPOUNAMU TRUST

74 Waimea Road, Nelson 7010

MAILING ADDRESS

PO Box 914, Nelson 7040

TARI

03 458 1740 | 0800 8262 494 (TAMA IWI) whanau@ngati-tama.iwi.nz

HE MAIMAI AROHA

He aha te tohu o te ringaringa? He kawakawa!!

Ko te whakatau o te mate..auē hā! auē hā!

E te hunga wairua, koutou kua huri ki tua o te pae o maumahara, haere, oti atu rā.

E Koro Tahana, kia areare mai ō taringa ki ngā kōrero e hora ake nei.

Nāu anō te kākano i ruirui, arā ko ngā hua e putaputa mai nei.

Maranga mai rā, e ara e!

NGĀTI TAMA ONLINE ngatitama.nz | whanau@ngati-tama.iwi.nz

RĀRANGI ŪPOKO

THIS ISSUE OF TE PUNA ALSO CONTAINS ‘TE RAUTAKI REO 2050’ WHICH WAS INTRODUCED AND DISTRIBUTED AT THE HUI-Ā-TAU 2022

FLIP OVER TO BACK COVER TO READ

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He Kupu Whakataki 2 AHUREA | Development of Tama Kōrero 3 • Nuki Tākao 4 • Asher Kātene 6 • Te Ahu Rei 7 Tama Ringa Kumu 8 He Kōrero Tupuna - Rāmeka Te Ketu 10 Tā moko Wānanga 11 Puanga in Mohua 14 • Tamariki Update 16 AHUMAHI 18 • Ka Uruora 18 • Commercial Team Update 18 AHUWHENUA 19 • Te Mana o Te Wai 19 • Three Waters 19 • WCO Hearings 19 Hui-ā-Tau Whānau Wānanga 2022 20 Events and Updates 22 • Te Ipukarea 22 Hui-ā-Tau Whānau Wānanga 2023 23 Kōrerorero o Ngāti Tama 24 • Leanne Manson 24 • Appointments and Departures 25 Grants and Scholarships 26 4-5 14-16
8-9 11-13

HE KUPU WHAKATAKINĀ TE HEAMANA ME TE POUWHAKAHAERE

HAERE MAI

Welcome to the Kōanga edition of Te Puna. We hope everyone has been able to keep well over the winter months, it certainly has been an unnerving time for many of our whānau as we have navigated the cold and flu season. It is fair to say that this winter has been particularly tough! However, we are definitely past the worst with the longer days and warmer climate andso we can now look forward to the fruits of Kōanga (Spring).

Tangi te Wharauroa

Waiho kia tangi āna

Tangi te Kawekawea

Waiho kia tangi āna (au)

E tatari atu ana kia aroaromāhana

Ka taka mai te āhuru

Koia!

Pūpūwha manawa o Tama

Whakaeaea manawa o Tama, Tamaariki, Tamahoumoa, Tamateihorangi.

Hikitia ki te rangi, Ranginui, Rangiroa, Rangitahua, Tahua nuku, tahua rangi

E Tū e hōmai nei tō waiora ora, he ora

He ora ko tōu manawa, ko taku manawa

Tēnei hoki tōu manawa ka tina

Tēnei hoki tōu manwa ka toka

Tēnei hoki tōu manawa ka poutāikitia, ā ka noho tōu manawa,

He manawa ora e hai

In this Kōanga edition we have focussed a little on our Ngāti Tama Reo Strategy, Tama Kōrero 50/50, with comments from some of our reo champions about what has inspired them in their reo journey.

We also take a look back to our Puanga ceremony with whānau in June to mark the revival of this celebration as an iwi and its importance to us for future planning

As many of you will know, we have had some movements within the broader team and we wish them all the best in their new endeavours. Leanne Manson retired from the board during the AGM at the end of June, followed by our Pou Whakawhiti (Comms) lead, Christina Harris-Pākeho who crossed over to Oranga Tamariki, and most recently our Pouahurea, Johannah Kātene-Burge shifted back to the north with her whānau.

We have some exciting kaupapa happening over the next few months with our Ngāti Tama Kapa Haka, Te Ranga Kōrero and of course Ipukarea in Blenheim in November. The Board will also be having the FY22 AGM in January 2023 so please mark the date.

Finally, it was bought to our attention after the last edition of Te Puna that there were several spelling mistakes, particularly the names of some of our prominent whānau members, both past and present. For this we unreservedly apologise!

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BUTCH LITTLE TE HEAMANA, CHAIR NGĀTI TAMA KI TE WAIPOUNAMU TRUST HEMI SUNDGREN TE POUWHAKAHAERE, GM NGĀTI TAMA KI TE WAIPOUNAMU TRUST

AHUREA | STIMULATE LEARNERS OF TE REO, TIKANGA AND WHAKAPAPA

DEVELOPMENT OF TAMA KŌRERO

TAMA KŌRERO 50/50

“By 2050 te reo Māori will be one of the main languages in 50% of all Ngāti Tama homes.” Ngāti Tama have set a clear call to action for the uptake and return of our reo. To get us there, the launch of the Te Reo Māori Revitilastion Strategy, Tama Kōrero 2050, has brought to the fore, four priority areas for the next 5 years; Tama Ringa Kumu, Tama Tokopae, Tama Huānganui, and Tama Oho. Although the details of our Tama Kōrero 50/50 strategy and workplan are set out at the back of our magazine, we have also sought to get some insights of some of our current reo practitioners, as a way to inspire our whānau to learn a little more of the challenges and benefits of learning our reo.

NGĀTITAMA KI TETAUIHU

eRautaki Reo2050

THE STRATEGIC VISION FOR THE REVITALISATION OF NGĀTI TAMA KI TE TAUIHU LANGUAGE IS:

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BY 2050 TE REO MĀORI WILL BE ONE OF THE MAIN LANGUAGES IN 50% OF ALL NGĀTI TAMA KI TE TAUIHU HOMES
T

How did my learning journey begin?

My first memory of te reo has our grandfather in it. Tāmati Pawa Bailey of Te Ātiawa, came up from Motueka in the 1960’s to live with us and work in Wellington. I was two years old and I adored him. Every night after work, Papa would sit me on his knee and teach me to count, to name things and to read. Amazingly, he did this in both Māori and English. My love of te reo began way back then, for the magic of our language that opened invisible doors, and for the old ones who held the keys.

My next most vivid te reo memory was of our Dad’s mother, Te Wairaata Te Maipi Tākao. When our brother was born, a car full of Tūhoe arrived in the night to tono for him, to take him back to Te Waimana and raise him there. I remember peering out the bedroom window in the early hours before dawn. Our father had gone out to bring them in, but our grandmother wouldn’t come in until the sun rose. Nanny Rato, as they called her, didn’t speak English and we didn’t speak Māori. She could say our names and we could say hers, but no more. I was both utterly fascinated and intimidated by them. After every sentence they spoke, they laughed … all of them, every single time. That was the first time I felt wehi for te reo Māori. I was in awe of te reo and of the strange people who spoke it.

I knew then that I wanted in to that exclusive club, I just had no idea how to get there.

As a child living in Porirua in the sixties, te reo Māori was nowhere to be found.

Who has contributed most to my reo journey?

That’s a tough one, the list is very long. But I was lucky. The first one of my heroes I met when I was born.

Tiny Bailey-Tākao. Our mother was raised here in Motueka on the land beneath my wide Tūhoe feet. She didn’t grow up speaking te reo, although both her parents were fluent.

But the love of it, and of our tikanga ran deep like a river flowing through her. Our mother taught us how to BE Māori, how to stand proud in our Māori-ness. She supported unconditionally my lifelong endeavours to find my reo, to keep it, and to pass it on.

Going through her things recently, I found all her te reo books. She never became a speaker, but also never stopped trying to learn. Mum was my first and most constant reo hero.

E Mā, kia au tō moe x

Te Wairaata Tākao. My eldest daughter, born in the eighties, the times of cultural change and great upheaval. Her birth started a dream, of a world within and around her, where she could be as Māori as she wanted to. Te Wairaata was the first native speaker of our line since our father. We built one of the first kura and wharekura in Ōtaki to help realise that dream. In 1996, Te Wairaata was the youngest graduate of Te Wānanga o Raukawa at only 15 years old.

My next ‘who’ is a ‘what’. Whakatupuranga Rua Mano –Generation 2000. The 25 year vision of Whatarangi Winiata for his people of Ngāti Raukawa, Ngāti Toa and Te Ātiawa.

Hui Rangatahi, Hui Rūmaki, Te Wānanga o Raukawa, Te Kura

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NUKI TĀKAO TAKU ARA REO

Mai Raro, Patumākuku, Te Reo Maioha, Te Kura Kaupapa

Māori o Te Rito, Te Kura ā-Iwi o Whakatupuranga Rua Mano and many, many more movements grew out of his singular vision. Nearly 50 years later, the lives of thousands of us have been transformed. In Ōtaki I found my ‘tribe’, the ones who like me had a fire in their bellies for te reo me ngā tikanga. They continue to inspire me every day.

Hēmi Te Peeti nō Ngāti Raukawa, my partner in crime. We fell in love with each other in the spring of 1983. We couldn’t communicate with words, because it was my first ever Hui Rūmaki Reo and I couldn’t speak Māori. Our passion for the treasures of our old people is what attracted us, to the hui and to each other. We went on to marry, raise children and dedicate that time in our lives to the revitalisation of the language, taonga, culture and traditions of our old people. Mei kore ake koe e Hēmi.

I love my kids. In spite of how rocky their roads may have been, they still chose to raise our mokopuna to speak Māori. You are my heroes. Being a Nana to mokopuna who speak Māori is unbelievably heartwarming. My reo comes alive again every time I’m with them.

Kei aku tamariki, kei aku mokopuna. Ko koutou te toitūtanga o tō tātou reo, ki anamata.

What have been the most significant challenges in mine/ my whānau’s learning journey?

My name is Ruiha Maria Tākao. These are ancestral names, with histories and power.

And yet I can’t count how many abominations of my name I have experienced over the years. Reverting to using my nickname, Nuki, came from not being able to hear one more time, Pākehā telling me what my name is. I just couldn’t do it anymore. Whatever they are saying is not my name. But I realise I am grateful to them, to every one who still corrected me after I had said my name myself. This is our common lived experience, and the fact that it still happens every day somewhere to one of our children fuels my fire.

When Hēmi and I chose to raise our children with Māori as their first language we were an anomaly … unusual, strange and weird. We were too xtra, too hundy, too radical. Sometimes our fiercest critics were not the Pākehā we expected … but our own. Those times were toughest for our children who didn’t choose the path we did, but had to walk it anyway.

Like nearly every other Māori I know who doesn’t have the reo, I tried EVERYTHING … for years and years. It was frustrating as hell! And sometimes my progress felt glacial, but it all mattered, all counted, all contributed to what and who I am now. And I guess the only thing I want to say here is never stop looking for the way that works best for you. Nōu tō reo. It is yours and it’s waiting for you.

My biggest challenge now is isolation. Moving from Ōtaki to Motueka was like moving to another country! Coming here is like starting all over again which is both humbling and inspiring. I’m not gonna lie though, I get hella lonely for my peeps, and not speaking Māori has become easier somehow. Not for that inner light though, which I feel dimming more every day.

Why is the reo so important to me, to us?

Our language is a portal to the past and the messages from our old people. Being able to step throught that door again and again has been one of the greatest joys of my life.

Our pakeke are a bridge to that old knowledge and we are forever in their debt.

When I speak in Māori, I think as Māori. I am different. I am better. I am more like them.

This is the language of our souls, imprinted on our DNA. Our language is our birthright and the very essence of our mana as Māori.

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“Ko te reo te mauri o te mana Māori”

Kei ngā uri a Tama Ariki tēnā koutou, e tukuna atu aku mihi ki a koutou i roto i ngā āhuatanga o te wā, otirā ki a tātou, tēnā tātou.

I like many others of our iwi grew up disconnected from our language as a result of the past denigration of te reo Māori. I have recently began my journey to reclaim our reo and to reconnect with my Māoritanga, and while it has been difficult I can say with all surety that the benefits (ngā hua ā tinana, ā whānau, ā hinengaro, ā wairua hoki) have been immeasurable. As I look back, I feel that I always had a longing for our language as if there was something missing within me.

I have always been proud of being Māori however, it is not an easy feeling to swallow when going to different kaupapa and not being able to fully participate and ultimately feeling uncomfortable because I didn’t understand the protocols or what was being said.

Like many others despite my desire to learn te reo Māori with the business of life I could never seem to find the time to learn and so I keep putting it off and putting it off. Until Iast year I enrolled in poupou huia te reo through Te Wānanga o Raukawa.

I saw that it was offered online and could be worked through at my own pace. For me it was just what I needed to get going as it gave me a gentle introduction to learning te reo Māori that fit in with my schedule. What’s even better is that Ngāti Tama have partnered with Te Wānanga o Raukawa to offer this course (along with some other courses too) to all of us for free! Once I started learning te reo Māori my hunger

ASHER KĀTENE

continued to grow, and as a result, my wife and I decided to commit full-time to an immersion reo Māori program this year (Te Tohu Paetahi). Ultimately, what informed our decision was that we want our future children to be raised with te reo Māori as their first language. It was a major commitment for us to study te reo Māori full-time that involved us putting aside work, other study, and moving from Dunedin to Hamilton for a year. It was not an easy commitment to make but I can confidently say there is nothing else that can compare. Through learning te reo Māori it has opened my eyes to the depth and breadth of our culture, it has given me confidence to stand proud in my identity, and paved the pathway for us to pass along this taonga to our future children.

E tika ana te kōrero a tā Hēmi Hēnare “ko te reo te mauri o te mana Māori”. He tino rerekē te reo Māori i te reo paraoa i te mea he reo ā wairua tēnei mea te reo Māori. Ki ōku nei whakaaro, ki te akona te reo ka mōhiotia te hōhonutanga o te whakaaro Māori me te ao Māori anō hoki. Ehara i te mea he huarahi māmā ki te haere, he uaua kē. Heoi anō, he tino taonga tō tātou reo rangatira me pupuru e tātou te reo kia ora tonu ai. Nō reira mehemea, e hiakai ana koutou ki te ako i te reo, whāia te ara reo Māori kia whakatutuki ai i ō koutou wawata.

Mouri ora.

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TE AHU REI

Talk to us about how you began learning your reo?

The earliest memories of my exposure to the reo were from my childhood. I was the only one of fourteen children born at Waiokura Pā on the outskirts of Manaia in Taranaki and raised in the family homestead until we moved into our new Māori Affairs home in the Manaia township. Our pahake were still alive when we were young and while kui Te Hāwea and koro Tamanui never spoke to us directly, they conversed with our father on a regular basis. Te Hāwea and Tamanui adopted our Dad as a young boy. She was the sister of our paternal grandfather Te Ahu. Dad and his tuakana Niu Tīreni were the only one’s of fourteen children who retained the reo as they were both adopted. I believe my solo journey into the world of learning te reo me ōna tikanga was anticipated well before my birth and unfortunately that lonely journey continues today as my siblings have no real desire or interest in pursuing the language and customs. There is however, some light being shed with the next generation who are the kōhanga reo and kura kaupapa graduates. In saying that however, they form a very small percentage of reo speakers as the majority of Māori children today, still attend mainstream schools.

Tell us about those whom have contributed the most to your reo journey?

The pahake whom I most admired growing up are long gone but they left an indelible impression on my heart and mind. Our elders, many of whom were kuia, were very accepting, patient and tolerant. They seldom spoke about things like; ‘aroha, manaakitanga, whakaiti, kia pūmau ki te kaupapa’

but they were great role models and led by example. Their teachings still guide me in many of my decisions today.

What have been the most significant challenges in yours or your whānau learning journey?

A significant personal challenge came when we made the decision to raise our children speaking Māori. That was significant for many reasons, including keeping abreast of the children with our own progress and development in the reo . Therefore, as parents we needed to commit ourselves to learning the reo and being in an environment with other like-minded parents. And being involved in a supportive community of Māori speaking people, which was quite difficult in a place like Palmerston North.

Why is the reo important to you, to us?

The learning of ‘te reo me ōna tikanga’ forms the basis of one’s identity. In the words of the great statesman Sir James Hēnare, ‘Ko te reo te mauri o te mana Māori – The language is the life force of Māori existence’. For without it, one will struggle to gain an insight into the depth and breadth of the Māori worldview.

What does ‘Tama tū ki Te Tauihu, Tama ora ki te ao’ mean for you and/or your whānau?

For me and my whānau, the slogan above provides us with a connection to Ngāti Tama on all levels. It provides the basis for learning our language and customs and seeks to restore the imbalance that has been evident for many years.

‘Tama tū ki te Tauihu, Tama ora ki te ao’ is about the future of Ngāti Tama and securing our linguistic and cultural place in Te Tauihu and the wider community going forward.

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TAMA RINGA KUMU

“Tama Ringa Kumu, Ngāti Tama rangatahi stand proud in their identity,” is a key mechanism constructed to build pride in identity and to foster champions amongst our young people. Strengthening the cultural capability base of Tama rangatahi as language and leadership practitioners will be our greatest tool for succession as we build an engaged network across Ringa Kumu.

Instilling our identity as Ngāti Tama into our young people is no accident. In October 2022, a group of Ringa Kumu champions gathered in wānanga to discuss our people, places and destiny as it relates to the growth in cultural leadership and identity for the next generation of uri. Ngāti Tama Ringa Kumu is an expression associated with Ngāti Tama who have fiercely guarded the northern boundary,

in North Taranaki. With a clear pathway ahead, success for Ringa Kumu is for our rangatahi to be likened to the tūpuna of Ngāti Tama that have guarded our whakapapa through everchanging landscapes across the North and South Islands; to stand with collective confidence, to be risk-takers and visionaries, and to be narrators of our stories.

The purpose of bringing together our Ringa Kumu advisory group was indeed to identify the tools and resources needed to equip Tama rangatahi in their respective lives as active contributors to Ngāti Tama. Through wānanga, the group stretched the meaning of Tama’s organisational values to best encompass the tikanga that will guide this work stream. Although in draft, the whakaaro discussed which speak to these tikanga are:

• Te Reo | Ringa Kumu champions te reo as a tool for Ngāti Tamatanga

• Wānanga | Ringa kumu champions are intentionally curated

• Kāhui | Ringa kumu networks traverse time and space

this legacy.

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The rōpū also knuckled down into the “how” identifying the following strategic objectives to engage ringa kumu...
Empowering the voice of our rangatahi is essential. The next phase for the co-creation of the Tama Ringa Kumu Connection Strategy will be moved to an online platform, where we encourage Tama rangatahi from far and wide to contribute to
Tū Rangatira
strength,
Mana Kaitiaki Respect the taiao, expect the taniwha Arotahi ai tātou Think together, mahitahi Akona kia tupu Soil to turn, seeds to sow
Collective
collective confidence
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The Ringa Kumu wānanga

HE KŌRERO TUPUNA

Rāmeka Te Ketu

Rāmeka Te Ketu married Ngātaiau on 12 October 1847. Ngātaiau was also known as Meretaiawa and was the sister of Hēnare Te Ranga. Rāmeka Te Ketu, alongside Hēnare Te Ranga and other rangatira, were part of Ngā Hekenga, the great migrations south from Taranaki, settling in Te Tauihu.

Rāmeka signed three major Ngāti Tama deeds of 1855 (Motupipi and Tākaka land) and 1856 (Separation Point) as well as the 1863 agreement with Ngāti Rārua over boundaries at Te Tai Tapu. Rameka Te Ketu and his whānau settled in Tākaka, he was named an original owner in Nelson Tenths associated with Wakapuaka, Tākaka and Parapara. Rāmeka Te Ketu and Ngātaiau had six children named Mereana, Tiki, Rangimihia, Te Ketu, Ngataiau and Hineraka.

In 1874 the Rāmeka whānau returned to Taranaki and Rāmeka Te Ketu did not return to Tākaka. He passed away on 12 August 1877 leaving his five children and three grandchildren (the children of Tiki) who had pre-deceased him.

RĀMEKA TRACK

This track is located at the top of the Abel Tasman National Park and Golden Bay. The Rāmeka Creek also starts from the highest peaks of the Piki ki-runga Range and drains to the Tākaka river.

The track and creek were named after Rāmeka because he was named as an original owner of the Nelson Tenths associated with Wakapuaka and Tākaka, along with his uncles Manihera Te Whitu and Te Hāwera, his aunt Pewa, and his cousin Hēnare Te Ranga.

The Nelson Tenths was an agreement to reserve one-tenth of all land purchased by the New Zealand Company for the on-going and future prosperity of its Māori owners.

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Top left: Te Ketu Rāmeka (son of Rāmeka Te Ketu) and Materoa Ngāwharau Bottom left: Reference 5 NEMB 86 Minute Book

Tā moko

As a collaborative endeavour between Wakatū Incorporation, NRAIT and Ngāti Tama, bringing together the families of Te Tauihu to engage with Tāmoko was a real honour.

Que Bidois of Te Āti Awa and Ngāti Toa descendant alongside our Pouwhakahaere, Hēmi Sundgren, were able to share their mātauranga of tāmoko, its origin pūrākau, and an understanding of how moko has survived and flourished over time. (cont)

PHOTOGRAPHY BY NAOMI ĀPORO-MANIHERA Written by: Hēmi Sundgren

Amongst whānau in attendance, we had Tama whānau travel from across the motu to particpate, for many of which, it was their first time connecting to Te Tauihu. A special mihi to our huānga, Dayle, that was surrounded by the whānau in receiving his first moko in Te Āwhina, signifying the beginning of his reconnection journey.

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Participants at the Tā Moko Wānanga - Te Āwhina Marae, Motueka

Puanga IN MOHUA

KA ARA A PUANGA-NUI-A-RANGI KI MOHUA – JUNE 2022

Tākina mai te ara o Puanganui-o-te-rangi

Tū kau Māhutonga i te mātongatonga

Pūtongamarangai ko Atutahi te whetū tarake mai i te atapō

Whāia, whāia i te muri, he tau aha te tau

Whāia, whāia i te tonga, he tau aha te tau

Whāia, whāia i te matara mai o te rā, he tau aha te tau

Whāia, whāia i te ara o te rā, he tau aha te tau

Ka hua, ka pua!

Tohia rā ngā hua o te tau. Ue hā!

Tērā Matariki/Puanga

Tērā Matariki ka rewa i te pae

Nau mai, haramai te hua o te tau hou

Tākiri ko te ata;

ka pua te ata korihi te manu tino awatea

Tui , tui, tuituia ko te tangi mai o te kō, ko korimako

I te atatū, tū ka takatū

Koia rā e Rongo whakairihia ake ki runga

Tūturu whakamoua kia tina! Tina! Hui e ! Tāiki e! Dr Huirangi Waikerepuru

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PUANGA WHY DO SOME IWI LOOK FOR PUANGA?

Puanga is given prominence mainly because some iwi struggle to see Matariki clearly from their locality and therefore look to the next important star near Matariki. That star is Puanga.

The rising of Puanga and Matariki has been celebrated for centuries as the new year in the Māori Stellar/ lunar calendar and for the first time was also marked with a public holiday on 27th June 2022.

This year, our Trustees decided to align our Annual General Meeting and whānau wānanga in Mohua, with the rising of Puanga and Matariki and for those that were fortunate to attend the weekend saw the rising of Puanga and Matariki in the Eastern sky in a special ceremony heralding the new year. Its significance for Ngāti Tama however, was more about the coming together of whānau, to acknowledging those who had past on the year prior, while engaging in the revival of the ceremony after decades of loss. It was truly a beautiful (but cold) morning!

Puanga is the brightest star in the Orion constellation, and for many West Coast (North Island) and South Island communities, signalled the new year and the beginning of the annual Māori lunar/ stellar calendar system. It’s seen just before the Matariki star cluster appears in the night sky around the winter solstice and shares its name with the celebrations that take place around this time of the year.

General Manager for Ngāti Tama Hēmi Sundgren said the most important thing to him during Puanga was how people might reconnect and reflect on a whole range of things important to us, ‘Puanga is a significant time, not only is it a time to reflect on the past, to plan and prepare for the future, it is a time for whanaungatanga, to reconnect, to be with others, to share and to celebrate who we are’….it is critically important for us to also reflect on how people might give back to our environment…by ensuring the health and wellbeing for the environment, we ensure the wellbeing of us a community…’

Puanga is also a time to plan for new beginnings, a chance to develop new skills and to set new goals, something to look forward to especially considering recent trying times.

This is not a rejection of Matariki as many of these iwi will still refer to Matariki and the other names in the constellation in their tribal narratives, however Puanga is given preference.

WHICH IWI CELEBRATE PUANGA?

The tribes of Whanganui, Taranaki, parts of the Far North, and parts of the South Island recognise Puanga.

WHAT IS PUANGA?

Puanga is the star Rigel and is the brightest star in the Orion constellation. Matariki is seen below Puanga and to the left of Tautoru (the three stars of Orion’s Belt) in the late autumn and early winter night sky.

The most common whakataukī that recognises the importance of Puanga is:

‘Puanga kai rau’ – ‘The abundant harvest of Puanga.’

This whakataukī connects Puanga and Matariki celebrations to the result of hard work over a number of months. It recognises the efforts of growing, harvesting, and storing food for the long nights of takurua (winter).

WHEN IS PUANGA CELEBRATED?

Puanga isn’t celebrated over one or two days, instead it is a period of approximately a month or longer with at least two months of preparation followed by two months of wānanga (learning).

The first new moon in the month of Pipiri (June-July) is the period when stars like Puanga, Matariki and Whānui (Vega) set.

This time is a chance to reflect on the past year and to remember your loved ones.

Puanga and Matariki then rises again in a fortnight in the eastern sky, this is the time to acknowledge the rising of our loved ones that have passed so that their spirits become stars and to prepare for the celebrations of the New Year.

The appropriate time to commence celebrations is based on the nights of abundance for your locality and some will recognise the nights of Rākaunui (full moon) and others, and the nights of Tangaroa – one week after full moon. This is to ensure that any food available is in abundance so that the hākari feast dedicated and celebrated in the name of Puanga is recognised appropriately.

PUANGA AND GARDENING ACTIVITIES

Puanga is also a time to prepare the māra (garden) and ensure that winter frosts will help to kill anyweeds or soil infections.

This time is likened to, and re-enacts, the creation period of Te Kore (the void/potential) and once the land has been treated, it will then go through a period of Te Pō (the night – or a time to plant). Then as the shoots of the food sprout above the soil, the plants transition into Te Ao Mārama (the world of light).

TAMARIKI UPDATE

Scarlett Mitchell

Scarlett lives in London and has been lucky to visit New Zealand a number of times, the last was just before the March 2020 lockdown. I have made a point to keep her in touch with her Māori heritage and bought various books to help her learning as well as show her what I know.

Scarlett participated in a drawing/making challenge amongst family friends in which we used a what’s app group to participate. Scarlett won the ‘Up in the Air’ challenge with her ‘The Seven Kites of Matariki’. It is one of her favourite books and we spent a good few hours painting/drawing/ and constructing this. She was 4yrs at this point - you will soon be celebrating the first Matariki holiday in New Zealand. Unfortunately, we can’t make this but will be thinking of you all and doing our celebration here in the UK.

TE PUNA || PAGE 17
Ngā mihi, Angela Puanga celebration at the Ngāti Tama Hui-ā-Tau - Mohua June 2022

AHUMAHI | DEVELOP OPPORTUNITIES TO LIVE AND WORK IN TE TAUIHU

KA URUORA: FUTURE OPPORTUNITIES

Ngāti Tama in collaboration with other Te Tauihu iwi is leading the establishment of Ka Uruora Te Tauihu, a collective iwi programme to support Te Tauihu iwi members to achieve financial independence and improve their financial wellbeing.

“Ka Uruora”, which has its origins in classical karakia acknowledges our connection to place and community. An ‘uru’ is also a term used to describe a grove of trees. The oldest groves of trees in the forest were considered the noble leaders, providing shelter and support whilst empowering others within the forest to grow.

The programme will include a range of integrated services on financial education and opportunities for housing. These will also be carried out in partnership with the support of central and regional agencies. Future services might also include an iwi savings programme at a later date and be made available to iwi registered members, in partnership with a savings scheme provider.

Recently appointed Director for Ka Uruora, Hēmi Sundgren says that the programme will bring together iwi and financial experts to benefit whanau, who may not have had access to the types of education and services like this in the past and hope to bring future housing opportunities to the wider whānau as soon as practically possible.

Further details on the Ka Uruora Te Tauihu programme are expected to be announced in the coming months.

COMMERCIAL TEAM UPDATE

• Ngāti Tama has had a pleasing financial year (FY22) considering the impact of ongoing global issues impacting our managed funds outside of our control.

• Ngāti Tama remains well positioned and has offset this by our strong direct investment portfolio of Hāpai whānau (Commercial, Housing and Development Property) and Pūainuku whānau (Pastures, Vines and Tangaroa) which have performed extremely well and strengthened wider iwi partnerships. Further, Ngāti Tama has land leases (schools and forestry lands) that cover a large proportion of the distribution back to Ngāti Tama ki Te Waipounamu Trust providing security for cultural and social activities.

• Ngāti Tama is through its investments in Hāpai and Pūainuku is constantly scanning Te Tauihu for rohe based investment opportunities that will ultimately provide wider social and economic outcomes to whānau.

• Hāpai Housing LP which Ngāti Tama has a 10% investment in, is currently finalising a build to rent development in Tāmaki Makaurau. Hāpai has indicative funding from Ka Uruora which will enable the delivery of 15 affordable units to whānau members of Hāpai Housing as priority. Ka Uruora and our property partners will be releasing these rentals to the market in the coming months, and we will provide further detail to whānau in due course.

WORKING WITH OUR URI

In working with our investment partners there maybe be a number of procurement opportunities coming up in our commercial group activities. We are keen to contract businesses owned by our uri and employ our own where possible.

We encourage members who are Ngāti Tama business owners to register your company with Amotai.

Amotai connects clients (like Ngāti Tama) and buyers to Māori and Pasifika-owned businesses and promotes supplier diversity and development across Aotearoa.

By becoming an Amotai supplier member you are:

• gaining access to a large range of clients and buyers

• improve your chances of winning contracts

• connecting into a network of like-minded businesses

• able to get support to grow your business to be a success

REGISTER TODAY. IT IS FREE!

If you have any questions about our own future procurement opportunities, you can email our Pou PūteaRobert Hovenden at putea@ngāti-tama.iwi.nz

PAGE 18 || TE PUNA

AHUWHENUA | ENHANCE OUR SIGNIFICANT LANDS AND WATERWAYS

TE MANA O TE WAI

At its simplest, the principle of Te Mana o te Wai reflects the paramountcy of the health and wellbeing of wai.

Te Mana o te Wai represents a paradigm shift. It speaks to the need to re-balance and approach freshwater management as whānau Māori we hold an inherited responsibility through whakapapa to manage their ancestral taonga in a way that balances Rangatiratanga alongside Kaitiakitanga for the benefit of current and further generations.

Te Mana o te Wai requires people to think about the water as a living breathing taonga that needs to be looked after rather than a commodity to be taken until it is gone or pushed to its limits until it can no longer survive. It is about operating from a place of abundance, not abstraction.

Ngāti Tama whānau will have an opportunity to design and identify potential pathways for implementation on how freshwater is to be managed both now and in the future. Within the coming months, we will look to engage our whānau to what this will look like, stay tuned.

TE PUNA WAIORA O TE WAIKOROPUPŪ

Ngāti Tama ki Te Waipounamu Trust and the co-applicant Andrew Yuill continue to engage in the Environment Court process for a Water Conservation Order, to recognise and protect the outstanding values of waiora and wairua of Te Puna Waiora o Te Waikoropupū, the Wharepapa Arthur Marble Aquifer and Tākaka river and tributaries.

All parties agree to the WCO, however, outstanding matters of how to protect water quality and water availabilitycontaminant limits and water availability for future use are yet to be confirmed by the Court.

In accordance with Ngāti Tama tikanga, the protection of our kaitiaki responsibilities, the physical and spiritual essence of Te Puna Waiora o Te Waikoropupū, the Wharepapa Arthur Marble Aquifer and the Tākaka catchment, is central to Ngāti Tama advocacy in the Court. We also would like to acknowledge the contribution of external witnesses including: Kate McArthur (Freshwater), Professor Paul Williams (Karsts and Groundwater), Dr Graham Fenwick (Ecology), Friends of Golden Bay (freshwater monitoring).

The next hearing will be held on 27th and 28th October 2022 via the videoconferenceLivestream link below. A final hearing may be held in December 2022. At the conclusion of the December hearing, The Court will report to the Minister with recommendations for the Water Conservation Order and the Minister will make a decision. We look forward to a positive outcome.

THREE WATERS

Delivery of drinking water, wastewater and stormwater services (three waters) across Aotearoa is changing to ensure our future wellbeing. The Government have acknowledged they need to improve the ageing water infrastructure to ensuring all New Zealanders have safe, affordable and reliable drinking, waste and stormwater services – now and in the future. Government have agreed to recognise and provide for Iwi Māori rights and interests with a specific focus onservice-delivery.

Ngāti Tama whānau will have the opportunity to provide your expectations and insights into the new Three Waters system. As with Te Mana o te Wai we will be engaging with our whānau in the next months to what this will look like.

TE PUNA || PAGE 19

Te Ipukarea 2022

EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW!

MIHI WHAKATAU -This will be held on Saturday 26 November between 8:00am and 8:30am at Lansdowne Park – Mayfield, Blenheim 7201

THE VENUE - Te Ipukarea 2022 will be held at multiple locations. On Friday, golf will be at the Blenheim Golf Course and all basketball games will be played at Marlborough Lines Stadium 2000. Saturday games will be held at Lansdowne Park in Blenheim. We have access to the main field for final games, east field for touch and ki-o-rahi, the netball courts, the hub for Euchre and the changing facilities, wharepaku and carpark. The hub will also be available to kaumātua to use throughout the day.

PROGRAMME OF EVENTS

Friday 12:00pm Karakia Saturday From 7:30am Tent setup

12:30-1pm Registration

1:30pm Golf Tee off

6:00pm Basketball

8:00am Whakatau

8:30am Karakia

9:00am Netball (netball courts) and Ki-o-rahi (East fields)

12:00 BREAK: Kai poupoutanga o te rā

1:00pm Touch (East fields) & Euchre (Hub)

4:30pm Kai & Prizegiving

KAI AND PRIZEGIVING

All going to plan, games will wind up about 3:30pm to 4.00pm, and we will move to the Main Field for kai and prizegiving, from about 4:30pm. Kai will be more of an informal style – packed dinner and dessert. We expect things to finish up by about 6.30pm, so those travelling can get on their way and make it home safely. Please note that this is an alcoholfree evening. To conclude prize-giving, the opportunity will be presented to iwi to take the Te Ipukarea mauri for 2023

HEALTH AND SAFETY. As host, Ngāti Toa is keen to ensure everyone has a fun and memorable day without getting hurt.

EVENTS AND UPDATES IT’S NOT TOO LATE! YOU CAN STILL REGISTER AND PLAY FOR A NGĀTI TAMA IPUKAREA TEAM. Email or phone: whanau@ngati-tama.iwi.nz or phone 0800 8262 494 TRAVEL SUBSIDY AVAILABLE
WĀNANGA
• WAIKAWA MARAE
WHĀNAU
25-27 NOVEMBER 2022 WAIRAU

WANANGA: Saturday 28th January 2023 –Sunday 29th January 2023

TIME: 10am - site visits start

LOCATION: Motueka High School, Motueka

HUI-Ā-TAU: Sunday 29th January 2023

TIME: 10am - 1pm

LOCATION: Motueka High School, Motueka (Livestream available)

RSVP to: Pouawhina@ngati-tama.iwi.nz

Tekau Tau

Deed of Settlement

TRAVEL SUBSIDY

After feedback from our AGM earlier this year and recognising the barriers whānau face to participate in Tama kaupapa in Te Tauihu, Ngāti Tama ki Te Waipounamu Trustees have approved a travel subsidy for whānau to attend our wānanga or AGM.

The individual subsidy or whānau subsidy is available to all registered adult (18+) members. The subsidy amount will be based on where the whānau member is zoned. Information on how to apply will be sent to whanau in Nov 2022.

ZONE

ROHE A - TE TAUIHU

ROHE B - TE TAUIHU TO ASHBURTON AND WELLINGTON TO NEW PLYMOUTH

ROHE C - ASHBURTON SOUTH $150 AND NEW PLYMOUTH NORTH

A B C C B
- 2023 AnniversarY
2013

TRUSTEE DEPARTURE - LEANNE MANSON

Leanne Manson began her journey with the iwi in January 2014 as an Associate Trustee on the newly formed Ngāti Tama ki Te Tau Ihu Cultural Trust as part of an initiative by the Board to focus on succession planning. In 2014 the whānau voted Leanne onto the Ngāti Tama ki Te Waipounamu Trust (NTWT) Board as a General Trustee and in 2015 Leanne became the Chair of the Trust Board. Leanne continued to be a Trustee up until 2022 when exciting new adventures came calling in her mahi as a nurse and senior health policy adviser in the wider health sector. Across the years Leanne has contributed to many kaupapa including being an integral part of the Water Conservation Order on Te Waikoropupū Springs, Te Tai Tapu gold mining permits, and in 2015, as Chair of the NTWT Board, saw Ngāti Tama sign the aquaculture settlment in parliament. Leanne was also heavily involved in setting up operational processes for the Trust staff and appointing an inaugural Te Pouwhakahaere.

Leanne was also the Ngāti Tama representative on the Iwi Health Board of the Nelson Marlborough District Health Board (NMDHB). More recently Leanne was on our Komiti Grants and Komiti Audit and Risk. Leanne’s approach to reviewing grant applications was always well reasoned and always with the view that assisting whānau was paramount to the mahi we do in the grants space. At the Audit and Risk table, Leanne had a keen eye for detail and ensured cultural elements were a part of our operational policies and procedures.

While we farewell Leanne in her capacity as an NTWT Trustee, we are grateful to have Leanne’s wealth of knowledge as a health professional to continue as Ngāti Tama’s representative of the newly formed Iwi Māori Partnership Board under Te Aka Whai Ora – the Māori Health Authority.

Thank you for your immense contribution to the iwi as a long standing member of our governance team.

THOSE WHO LEAD GIVE SIGHT TO THOSE WHO FOLLOW, THOSE WHO FOLLOW GIVE LIFE TO THOSE WHO LEAD.

PAGE 22 || TE PUNA KŌRERORERO
TAMA
O NGĀTI
“Mā mua ka kite a muri, mā muri ka ora a mua”

AUDIT AND RISK KOMITI

In September the Trust welcomed two new external members to the Audit and Risk committee.

LUKE MITCHELL CASEY WEBSTER

In 2021 Luke returned to live in Aotearoa after 20 years in Melbourne and London with more than 22 years in banking and finance. He now lives in Mapua. Luke has considerable experience in Credit Risk functions across consumer, private banking and financial institutions sectors in international markets including Aotearoa, London, Europe and Asia, with a particular focus on hedge funds and asset managers.

Luke also worked full-time as a practising artist with solo and group exhibitions in London. He still paints part-time and is a member of Zappekin Artists and Allies studio collective by the Moutere Inlet, near Tasman.

Since April 2022 Luke has been with BNZ Head Office as Manager for Business Pricing in a role that encompasses setting pricing for business lending, reviewing pricing policies and working to balance risk and return for lending products and portfolios.

STAFF DEPARTURES

CHRISTINA HARRIS-PAKEHO

After over 3 years with Ngāti Tama, Christina has moved on to work in the Government sector with Oranga Tamariki. Christina came to Nelson in 2019 to be by her partner. Having previously studied communications at Unitec in Auckland, she found a place and passion working in Māori radio and other not-for-profit groups focused on media, marketing and communications.

Christina’s dedication to Ngāti Tama saw her build a strong communications strategy with a range of systems and platforms to ensure our messages reached whānau across the world.

Christina’s dedication and passion for iwi communications has been instrumental in establishing a stable foundation for Ngāti Tama and we wish her the very best for the future.

Casey was raised on a large back country sheep and beef station before moving home to Kapiti as a teenager. He is of Ngāti Toa, Ngāti Raukawa, Ngāti Koata and Te Ati Awa ki Whakarongotai descent. His whānau has strong connections to Kapiti Island, Paekakariki, Paraparaumu and Ōtaki.

Casey has a Batchelor of Commerce and Administration from Victoria University, majoring in Accounting, Commercial Law, Money and Finance and Econometrics and is a Chartered Accountant and member of Chartered Accountants of Australia and New Zealand. He is currently Associate Director for Assurance with Ernst & Young.

He comes to the committee after over 20 years as an auditor for with deep experience working alongside Iwi organisations, large scale not-for-profits, significant wealth management funds, central and local Government, education and forestry.

JOHANNAH KATENE-BURGE

Johannah joined Ngāti Tama in May 2022. After spending a short time with Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Toa as HR Co-ordinator.

During her time with us Johannah planned, led and implemented a range of cultural development initiatives to build Ngāti Tama’s cultural capacity and capability. This culminated in work with our rangatahi, Board Trustees and directors, Kapa Haka and building online learning programmes for uri (members) in association with Te Wānanga o Raukawa.

Johannah will be returning to Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Toa and we wish her all the best in her future endeavours.

NGĀTI TAMA GRANTS

The Ngāti Tama ki Te Waipounamu Trust Board (the Board) has recently undertaken a review of our current grants schedule. The framework behind our grants schedule is to create opportunities that:

· Assist our whānau with their education journeys.

· Uplift the wairua of our whānau by assisting with hauora costs.

Tautoko the iwi by contributing to costs associated with raising our whānau, household costs and removing barriers to connect with subsidising travel for Ngāti Tama events.

As part of this review the Board has created two new scholarships dedicated to John Ward-Holmes and John Mitchell for our tertiary learners. Further detail about these scholarships will be released in November 2022 when we open applications for these scholarships. As this will be the inaugural awarding of these scholarships, it is our intention to invite the recipients to receive the scholarships at the 2023 Hui-ā-tau.

We will also be doing the back to school packs this coming year as well as looking at options for a pēpi pack for our newest whānau members!

KOROWAI O PARA PARA SCHOLARSHIP

17/08/1946 – 17/04/2022

It symbolises the mighty maunga, Parapara, providing protection for John as he worked tirelessly to restore mātauranga to ensure tohora practices continue, the paepae at Onetahua Marae is maintained along with the mana of Te Waikoropupū Springs is upheld.

OUR EDUCATION GRANTS WILL BE COMING BACK IN JANUARY 2023

Education grants are provided for any whānau member enrolled from pre-school age up to those studying at tertiary level or undertaking a cadetship or apprenticeship.

The Board continues to support whānau in hākinakina with the sports grant which can be to cover costs for sports membership, club fees, uniforms, travel to tournaments etc. The Board also supports those undertaking cultural activities which can include kapahaka, manu kōrero, art exhibitions, performances, toi māori and the like.

As part of providing education, sports and cultural grants to our whānau we will also be asking recipients to provide pictures and videos that we can share with the rest of the iwi. We love to celebrate your achievements e te whānau!

We also continue to tautoko the iwi in myriad other ways including the Matariki (winter energy) grant, firewood in Te Tauihu, travel subsidy to attend Ngāti Tama events, pāhake koha at Christmas, tangi grants and manaaki grants.

JOHN MITCHELL SCHOLARSHIP

John Mitchell

26/05/1941 – 23/09/2021

John’s passion and talent for research resulted in the collated information of Ngāti Tama ki Te Tauihu tūpuna. John was the inaugural Chair of the Ngāti Tama Trust, and with his wife, Hilary, coordinated the Ngāti Tama Waitangi Tribunal hearing at Wakapuaka and Pōhara.

John’s research has been preserved in the beautiful series of pukapuka – Te Tau Ihu o Te Waka: A History of Māori of Nelson and Marlborough and He ringatoi o ngā tūpuna.

ELIGIBILITY

1. Maximum of one scholarship will be granted per financial year. 2. Applicant must be a registered member of NTWT or if under 18 the applicant’s parent(s) must be a registered member of NTWT. 3. If under 18 and the link into NTWT is through a non-registered deceased parent, the NTWT Trustees can pass a resolution to approve the application. 4. If applicants (or parent) are non-registered at the time of applying for a grant and are eligible to be a registered member, they can apply for registration at the same time. The grant will be held until registration is ratified by NTWT. 5. Applications must be received on or by the due date. 6. The applicant must provide proof of enrolment in full time study with an accredited tertiary institution within Aotearoa or abroad studying towards an undergraduate or post-graduate qualification majoring in an environmental field. 7. A culturally significant area in Te Tauihu should be included in the applicant(s) studies and written evidence provided to Ngāti Tama. 8. Application forms must be completed in full and all requested information supplied. Incomplete forms will not progress until all information has been provided or may be rejected. 9. The successful applicant(s) may have the opportunity to undertake work or an internship (paid) for the iwi (though this is not guaranteed). 10. The successful applicant(s) will be required to attend and present at the Ngāti Tama’s Hui-ā-tau in year one of receiving the scholarship (travel subsidy will be available). 11. The successful applicant(s) must make a commitment to engage with the iwi by participating in at least one iwi wānanga during their studies. 12. The successful recipient is not eligible for a tertiary grant during the term of this scholarship. 13. A successful applicant can reapply for the scholarship each of the subsequent years and may receive the scholarship up to a maximum of 3 years’ worth of study.

OF
THIS SCHOLARSHIP IS TO HONOUR THE MEMORY OF John Ward-Holmes THIS SCHOLARSHIP
IS TO HONOUR THE MEMORY
Māui

HE RINGATOI O NGĀ TŪPUNA

Isaac Coates was an Englishman who lived in Wellington and Nelson between 1841 and 1845. During that time he painted watercolour portraits of 58 Māori from Nelson, Marlborough, Wellington, Waikanae and Kāpiti. Some of these portraits have been well-known for nearly 180 years, although their creator was not definitively identified until 2000. The discovery in 2007 of a Coates book of portraits in the Pitt Rivers Museum at Oxford University added many previously unknown images to his body of work.

The portraits depict Māori men and women from chiefly whakapapa, as well as commoners and at least one slave. Coates’s meticulous records of each subject’s name, iwi and place of residence are invaluable, and his paintings are strong images of individuals, unlike the more stereotyped work of some of Coates’s contemporaries. Whānau, hapū and iwi treasure Coates’s works because they are the only images of some tūpuna, and they are reminders of those who risked their lives to bring their people to a better life in the Cook Strait regions of Kāpiti coast, Wellington, Nelson and Marlborough.

In ‘He Ringatoi O Ngā Tūpuna eminent Te Tauihu’ historians John and Hilary Mitchell unravel the previously unknown story of Isaac Coates, as well as providing biographical details and whakapapa of his subjects, where they can be reliably identified. As well, they discuss Coates’s work, and the many copies of his portraits held in collections in New Zealand, Australia, the US and UK.

TAMA MERCHANDISE

COST: $50.00

(including postage) Retail: $79.95

HOW TO BUY:

1. Email: pouawhina@ngati-tama.iwi.nz to confirm your purchase, include your postage information

2. Deposit monies to:

Ngāti Tama ki Te Waipounamu Trust

a. Bank account: 12-3193-0025098-00

b. Reference: Coates

c. Code: Your Name

3. Once payment is confirmed, the book will be posted.

Pages 7 and 8: Kerri Stephen’s should read Keri Stephens. Page 9: Caption at bottom of page reads Shannon Thomas, this should read Shannon Thompson. Page 10: HE RARANGA KORERO: WEAVING CONVERSATIONS - Mataaria is the niece of Huria Matenga and the daughter of Mere Makarini. Huria Matenga and Mere Makarini are half sisters whom share the same mother Wikitoria Te Amohau Te Keha.

TE PUNA || PAGE 25
RINGATOI
TŪPUNA
PURCHASE A COPY OF THIS TAONGA FROM NGĀTI TAMA HE
O NGĀ
SUMMER RANGE AVAILABLE Available in grey marle Available online at ngatitama.konstruct.com. All sizing on webstore. If you are not sure of size, go BIGGER! NEW TAMA KŌRERO RANGE ERRATUM

KI MOHUA

Ngāti Tama whānau at the Hui-ā-Tau and Wānanga - Mohua, June 2022.
TE PUNA || PAGE 27
Te Tauihu will be hosting Te Mana Kuratahi National Primary School Kapa Haka competitions in Whakatū 2023 as well as hosting Ngā Kapa Haka Kura Tuarua o Aotearoa in 2024! Melanie McGregor, Wirihana de Thierry-Lukitau and Dayveen Stephens welcome back the whānau onto Whakatū Marae. Te Tauihu whānau returning with Te Mana Kuratahi Mauri and the Mauri Kia whakakotahi ai Ngā Kapa Haka Kura Tuarua ā motu. Our Ngāti Tama whānau member Koru-Akei Wheki is holding the Mauri for Ngā Kapa Haka Kura Tuarua. Te Tauihu whānau outside the Whare Tūpuna o Kaakati. Also in attendance, Ngāti Tama General Manager Hēmi Sundgren.

NGĀTITAMA KI TETAUIHU TeRautaki Reo2050

Mai i Hawaiki rā anō ki Te Tauihu ō tātou

tūpuna

i heke mai ai, i hōrapa mai ai, i puawai mai ai

He aha ai? Kia tika ai te kī

Tama tū ki Te Tauihu, Tama ora ki te ao.

He Whakarāpopoto EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 3 He Wāhi Kōrero INTRODUCTION 8 Ko Te Reo Ka Pupū Anō OUR REO 10 Te Horopaki BACKGROUND 12 Te Tukanga PURPOSE 13 Te Tūāpapa OUR CONTEXT 14 Te Wawata VISION 16 Ngā Whāinga 5 YEAR GOALS 18 Te Mahere WORKPLAN 20 Te Tohu o Tama Kōrero BRANDING 22 Rārangi Ūpoko Rārangi Ūpuko | PAGE 1
Tama Kōrero

He Whakarāpopoto

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Te Waikoropupū wells up from under the ground. The waters that gurgle up are some of the purest and clearest waters in the world, filtered through caverns of sandstone buried deep in the land. Impressively Te Waikoropupū is the largest coldwater spring in the Southern Hemisphere and releases tens of thousands of litres of water a second, feeding the river systems around it. But more importantly, Te Waikoropupū is a taonga, it is a wāhi tapu, home of Huriawa and has been feeding Ngāti Tama spiritually and culturally for generations.

We want our language to be like Te Waikoropupū. We want it to be natural and grounded in our heritage, whakapapa and tikanga. We want it to be clear, to be heard. We want it to infiltrate our homes and communities.

We want it to nurture the cultural identity and confidence of all of our whānau. It is a taonga that we hope generations of Ngāti Tama will draw strength from.

This strategic document has been developed to help guide our efforts as Ngāti Tama ki Te Tauihu to revitalise our language as a spring, which feeds and fosters generations of iwi members to come.

In 2019-2020 Ngāti Tama ki Te Tauihu facilitated a number of initiatives to help get an understanding of the health and vitality of te reo me ōna tikanga amongst iwi members. On the back of this research, an iwi census was conducted to help Ngāti Tama governance and management understand key areas of need amongst tribal members to inform future strategic direction and activities. Overwhelmingly te reo me ōna tikanga was identified as the primary goal by the majority of census respondents.

In response to whānau feedback, Ngāti Tama ki Te Waipounamu Trust contracted language planner and facilitators, NAIA, to deliver language planning wānanga with key whānau champions and experts, who would make up the advisory group.

NAIA and the Advisory group produced a language strategy that will see Ngāti Tama set a 25-year vision that supports the aspirations of Tama 2050, and give insights into critical factors that may influence a Ngāti Tama language strategy, and provide guidance as to a practical approach through a short and long-term implementation plan.

Executive Summary | PAGE 5
“Ki te anga whakamua, me titiro whakamuri”

THE STRATEGIC VISION FOR THE REVITALISATION OF NGĀTI TAMA KI TE TAUIHU LANGUAGE IS:

ONE OF THE MAIN LANGUAGES IN 50% OF ALL NGĀTI TAMA KI TE TAUIHU HOMES

The Advisory Group and Trust staff took time through the wānanga to understand the history and state of te reo Māori, our individual and tribal journeys through language loss, and the fundamentals of language revitalisation and language planning.

THE RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE ADVISORY GROUP CAN BE SUMMARISED AS:

• There is urgent need to build succession plans and initiatives around the handful of Ngāti Tama speakers available to us now.

• Deliberate actions are required to reset the language loss amongst Ngāti Tama.

• For any tribal strategy to be successful, it requires building a sense of pride in being Ngāti Tama and directly linking te reo to that tribal identity.

• A group of like-minded champions and drivers who are well supported and resourced to drive the strategy’s implementation are key to the strategy’s long term success.

• The ultimate goal is there must be intergenerational transmission, that is supporting whānau to use te reo as the main language within their homes.

THERE ARE SIX KEY ENABLERS AS PART OF THE STRATEGY’S IMPLEMENTATION. THESE WILL INFORM OUR FUTURE DIRECTION AND EFFORTS:

Building pride in identity

Building an engaged/connected iwi

Fostering champions

Increasing the number of speakers

Strengthening Te Tauihu Reo

Supporting use of te reo at home

To this end, five-year goals have been set to help Ngāti Tama progress towards its 2050 goal.

These goals focus on addressing immediate needs, creating a ground swell amongst Ngāti Tama, building capacity and succession planning. These goals form the foundation for the short term and medium-term work plans.

It is important to acknowledge those who have been instrumental in developing this strategy, who have contributed to its thinking and who will be essential in driving it forward for the next 28 years.

Advisory Members:

Shannon Thompson, Moana du Feu, Jane du Feu, Te Ahu Rei, Johannah Kātene-Burge, Charisma Rangipunga (facilitator), Margie Little, Phil Sparks, Talia Lynch, Grant Joyce, Jaqui Ngawaka, Christina Harris-Pakeho (absent)

Strategic Vision | PAGE 7

He Wāhi Kōrero INTRODUCTION

Ngāti Tama has a rich history; full of courageous leaders who charted courses to new lands, leading the people through the unknown, through unrest, through discord in the hope of building a better future. Early accounts speak of our Polynesian ancestors Tamaariki and Rakeiora of the Tokomaru waka, setting sail from central Polynesia to Aotearoa in the 11th Century. The people finally landed at Mohakatino and Tongaporutu in Northern Taranaki and established permanent kainga.

After significant civil unrest in the late 1700’s and early 1800’s, Ngāti Tama leaders of the time set a new course and led (alongside other Tainui and Taranaki groups) the migration of a section of Ngāti Tama south to the Kāpiti and Wellington areas under Te Kaeaea and Te Pūoho ki te Rangi. Settlements were established, and Ngāti Tama built themselves a thriving economy in that region. It was not long after this that Te Pūoho ki te Rangi led another group of Ngāti Tama across Te Moana-oRaukawakawa, and established further settlements across Te Tauihu.

With the arrival of Pākehā and the increasing demand for land in Te Tauihu, Ngāti Tama families suffered much adversity and hardship, resulting in the displacement of many from their whenua. Disconnection from the whenua caused catastrophic loss of cultural identity, language, economic base, and social cohesion. The whakapapa of setting new pathways, of challenging the status quo and of seeking wellbeing for our people did not stop with Te Pūoho ki Te Rangi and those leaders of the time.

In 2003, Ngāti Tama ki Te Waipounamu leaders challenged the Crown through its Claim to the Waitangi Tribunal for these past injustices. In 2013, these wrongs were finally recognised with the signing of the Ngāti Tama Deed of Settlement. Ngāti Tama ki Te Tauihu Manawhenua Trust was formed to receive all Treaty of Waitangi settlement assets (new and existing) and represent the descendants of those who with Te Pūoho ki te Rangi had settled in Te Tauihu nearly two hundred years earlier.

Renamed Ngāti Tama ki Te Waipounamu Trust, leadership of the tribe followed the example of our predecessors and in 2020 the Trust released the Tama 2050 vision document – Tama Tū ki Te Tauihu, Tama Ora ki Te Ao. This is the navigational chart that once again seeks to set a new course for the iwi. Tama 2050

provides strategic direction and investment for the tribe and sets out key priorities for the future. It seeks to reinvigorate cultural pride, knowledge and understanding and includes te reo as a core pillar of the vision document. The Ngāti Tama language strategy serves to complement Tama 2050 in charting a new way forward to enrich the wellbeing of the iwi.

Tama Kōrero

KO TE WAI TAI

KO TE WAI MĀORI

KA PIPĪ AKE TE WAI

KO HINE TŪĀHŌANGA

KA PUPŪ AKE TE WAI

KO TE WAIKOROPUPŪ

TE ŪKAIPŌ O HURIAWA TANIWHA

KA HEKE KAU TE WAI

KO TĀKAKA, KO TE WAITAPU O URUAO

KA RERE KAU TE WAI

KA PIRI ATU KI MŌHUA, KI A TANGAROA

HEI ORANGA MŌ TE KATOA

Introduction | PAGE 9

Ko Te Reo Ka Pupū Anō

OUR REO, A SOURCE OF ONGOING INSPIRATION

The waters that rise from the ground, filtered through sandstone caverns, and bubbling forth at Te Waikoropupū are some of the clearest in the world. Te Waikoropupū is a site that has nourished Ngāti Tama spiritually, culturally, and physically since the arrival of Te Pūoho ki te Rangi and other Ngāti Tama leaders in the 1800s.

At that time, the land surrounding the springs was forest-covered, lush, and thick with birdlife, the rivers full-flowing and healthy, and the coastlines a great storehouse of different kaimoana, ideal as a settlement for the people at the time.

The reo amongst Ngāti Tama during this time was not under threat, but vibrant, and dynamic and a part of normal everyday life. Like the rivers free flowing, like the coastlines diverse and bountiful, like the land rich and nourishing, and like Te Waikoropupū, a taonga, which supported the cultural, spiritual, and physical needs of the iwi. With the settlement of Te Tauihu by non-Māori, land acquisitions by the Government of the time, a change in land use, and a disregard for care and protection of this natural system, our environment’s health deteriorated. Te Waikoropupū as a wāhi tapu was largely ignored and for years the spring was used as a recreational site, resulting in a

degradation of the water’s quality and damage to the surrounding environments.

Over this time, the displacement of Ngāti Tama from our traditional settlements and sites and the growing influence of a settler society that did not value our customs and traditions resulted in a decline in te reo Māori amongst Ngāti Tama.

Today, our natural, built and social landscape would be unrecognizable to those leaders such as Te Pūoho and others who established our place on the land. Equally so, the language used by them would likely be unfamiliar to many of us. Both of these changes have occurred due to a complex set of external influences and forces that have been beyond our control. We have seen in recent years however a growing recognition of manawhenua and Te Tiriti o Waitangi. This is helping to return some control mechanisms back to iwi. Consequently, Ngāti Tama has reinforced expectations as to how our taonga are treated and managed. It has allowed us to put protections mechanisms in place around taonga that are special to us, that are sacred to us.

IT IS TIME NOW FOR US TO TURN OUR ATTENTION TO OUR LANGUAGE, TE REO MĀORI. OUR DREAM IS FOR IT TO BE LIKE TE WAIKOROPUPŪ, PROTECTED, RECOGNISED AS A TAONGA, BUT FOREVER BUBBLING IN THE HOMES OF OUR PEOPLE, IN OUR COMMUNITIES AND ON OUR MARAE, FEEDING US SPIRITUALLY AND CULTURALLY, A SOURCE OF PRIDE FOR GENERATIONS TO COME.

FOR THAT WE ARE GOING TO NEED TO BE LIKE OUR TŪPUNA TAMAARIKI, TE PŪOHO AND OTHERS. WE WILL NEED TO BE COURAGEOUS, WE WILL NEED A WAKA TO HELP US GET THERE, WE WILL NEED TO CHART NEW PATHWAYS, AND WE WILL NEED TO TAKE FAMILIES WITH US.

Our Reo | PAGE 11

Te Horopaki BACKGROUND

As part of the implementation of Tama 2050, the Ngāti Tama ki Te Waipounamu Trust on behalf of and in conjunction with whānau members has been examining how best to approach each of its strategic priorities. Ahurea – the strategic priority concerned with the reinvigoration of culture and language - is no exception to this.

In 2019-2020 the Trust conducted a te reo me ōna tikanga scoping exercise to identify whānau experiences, aspirations and priorities. The scoping exercise included a literature review, a series of whānau engagement sessions held across the motu, followed by a Census of Ngāti Tama ki Te Tauihu registered iwi members. The scoping exercise was undertaken to build a better understanding of the current situation for Ngāti Tama iwi members. It has helped to identify aspirations iwi members have for themselves, their whānau and indeed for Ngāti Tama as a whole.

The purpose of these activities was to help the Trust make informed decisions about future investment areas and strategic direction. The results highlighted that te reo me ōna tikanga was overwhelmingly the top priority area for those whānau who participated in the engagement sessions and/or those who responded to the Census.

The scoping exercise made a number of recommendations to the Trust as next steps for consideration. The first of which was to develop a strategy to give clear guidance, workstreams and objectives to support the increased fluency of te reo in the home, workplace and in public domains such as the paepae.

TeTake PURPOSE

In July 2021 Ngāti Tama ki Te Waipounamu Trust contracted NAIA to facilitate two language planning wānanga with key tribal champions and experts [the advisory group], and produce a language strategy for the tribe that would:

• Support the aspirations of Tama 2050

• Give greater insights into those critical factors which might have an influence, either positively or negatively, on any language strategy for Ngāti Tama (environmental scan)

• Set a 25-year vision for te reo revitalisation amongst Ngāti Tama

• Provide guidance as to a practical approach through a short-term and medium-term implementation plan and budget.

Tama Kōrero

Te Tukanga OUR PROCESS

This project has been undertaken over an eightmonth period. Multiple touchpoints were created as part of the project to ensure that the advisory Group and staff of the Trust were kept up to date on the progress of the development of the strategy.

PHASE 1

UNDERSTANDING THE NGĀTI TAMA CONTEXT

Early conversations with the Pouwhakahaere (General Manager) and key staff regarding the scope, approach and desired outcomes. This included attendance at the Te Tai Tonga Reo Summit held in Whakatū from the 15-18 July 2021 as part of building an overall understanding of the reo landscape of Te Tauihu.

We conducted a desktop review of the documents sent to us regarding the Ngāti Tama te reo me ōna tikanga scoping exercise, literature review, Tama 2050 strategy document and the tribal Census findings. This also included a review of language strategies of other iwi whose demographic profile was similar to that of Ngāti Tama ki Te Tauihu, and/or who were based in the Te Tauihu region. Additional to this, analysis was done of the New Zealand Census data pertaining to Ngāti Tama with the hope of better understanding the tribal demographic makeup.

PHASE 2

BUILDING AN UNDERSTANDING OF LANGUAGE REVITALISATION

Language planning wānanga – Te Whare Taikura o Te Maatu (Motueka High School). A two-day language planning wānanga was facilitated on 13-15 August 2021. This wānanga focused on forging relationships with the Advisory Group of Ngāti Tama,

understanding the individual experiences of language learning, use and loss of the group, reflecting on the history of te reo Māori, building an understanding of the key principles of language revitalisation, exploring how others have approached language planning, and identifying the high-level goals and aspirations for te reo o Ngāti Tama. Three key areas of focus were identified as pillars for the Ngāti Tama reo strategy. Notes from wānanga one shared to Advisory Group and staff.

One-day lang uage planning wānanga – online. This language planning wānanga was facilitated on 11 September 2021. This wānanga focused on reflections and insights from the first wānanga, and presentations from guest speakers including language revitalisation experts Dr Ruakere Hond (Taranaki, Ngāti Ruanui) and Dr Hana O’Regan (Kāi Tahu). It included also a session with futurist Josh Hough. An update to the Pouwhakahaere on the progress and next steps towards the development of the strategy. This was particularly important with the COVID-19 alert level changes which have meant a pivot in how we approach the language planning sessions with the Advisory Group. Notes from wānanga two shared to Advisory Group

PHASE 3

SETTING OUR PATHWAY

Draft strategy document developed and draft shared with Advisory Group and key staff.

Hui in December 2021 to share the draft strategy document and discuss key inclusions. Amendments made to strategy document based on feedback from Advisory Group. There was discussion around the vision statement for the language strategy and a request to further refine this to better align with the Ngāti Tama 2050 strategic vision.

Hui in February 2022 to share renewed options for overarching vision and confirm changes to document are aligned and consistent with Advisory Group feedback. Final document shared with Advisory group, key staff and the Trust.

Due to covid-19 alert levels and travel restrictions at the time, Ngāti Tama whānau moved wānanga online to continue on their language planning journey.

13
Purpose: PAGE

Te Tūāpapa OUR CONTEXT

ENVIRONMENTAL SCAN

This environmental scan seeks to provide insights on key issues or opportunities that may impact on the success of the Ngāti Tama language strategy.

The scoping exercise, undertaken by Ngāti Tama “in 2019, provides good insights into the state of te reo Māori amongst tribal members and in the Ngāti Tama rohe.

This environmental scan seeks not to replicate this information but instead bring key elements of it to

Use

Status

The use of te reo in homes and communities, including immersion environments

Measures: no. of homes using te reo, number of immersion domains

The profile and value of te reo amongst Ngāti Tama

Measures: visibiliy of demand and appreciation for te reo

Corpus

Critical awareness

Unsure of number of Ngāti Tama homes where te reo is equally used with English or the main language of communication

Te Reo ranked as top priority for members in tribal census

the fore. For this strategy to succeed, it is critical that individuals entrusted with ensuring its success are aware of the factors that might possibly support or impede its advancement. For the purposes of this strategy, the environmental scan is grouped into the five critical areas of language planning.

Acquisition

The body of language available to support language goals

Measures: materials, lexicon and quality of language

Critical awareness understanding the state of te reo and what needs to happen to effect change

Measures: language planning, language planners and champions

Range of options available to support language learning

Measures: no. of learners, opportunities to learn, different levels of learning

Limited resources available to support the teaching of Ngāti Tama dialect

Low to no environments within Te Tauihu that are immersion domains

Reo o te paepae currently maintained by a small handful of Ngāti Tama

Reo Ōkawa currently held up by a handful of Ngāti Tama

Range of online and digital domains available to support immersion environments

Funding available to support reo Māori activities

Te Ahu o te Reo programme in place to raise value and quality of language in schools

Advisory group established to guide tribal efforts

Most iwi in Taranaki actively involved in language revitalisation efforts and have access to pool of speakers and resources pertaining to dialect

Two language planning hui have been held to date

Many resources available online and digitally to support language learning particularly so at beginners to intermediate

Research has been undertaken to understand the state of Ngāti Tama language

Immersion schooling options within the Ngāti Tama takiwā include:

4 kōhanga reo

1 kura kaupapa/ wharekura

Schooling options include: Māori medium options in the takiwā

There are limited options outside of Nelson for adults to learn te reo. Options available include:

NMIT

TWOA

Te Ataarangi Community courses

Tribal census stats 11% of members are currently learning te reo

Online and digital learning classes available

3/28
6/49 primary schools
intermediate schools 7/11 high schools offer te reo as a subject
Tama Kōrero

Ko Ngā Whakaaro Matua

KEY CONSIDERATIONS

Language

revitalisation requires intergenerational transmission, that is whānau who use te reo as the main language of communication in their day-to-day interactions.

There is a level of demand from Ngāti Tama iwi members for te reo Māori me ōna tikanga, so it is timely to capture this good intent and willingness to participate.

Ngāti Tama ki Te Waipounamu Trust is mandated to implement tribal strategy. Te reo and culture are but one part of this focus. Limited resourcing and staffing means that any activity must work towards progressing strategic goals.

Strong positive relationships will help enhance and accelerate strategic objectives. That is relationships internally with whānau, regionally with neighbouring iwi, educational providers, regional authorities, and further afield to Ngāti Tama whānau whānui and central Government.

To be successful, it is key that a core group of Ngāti Tama champions and drivers of the strategy be identified and engaged early to take ownership of and implement the strategy. This group needs to be appropriately resourced and mandated to progress strategic objectives on behalf of Ngāti Tama ki Te Tauihu.

The limited numbers of advanced to proficient speakers amongst Ngāti Tama ki Te Tauihu may require targeted initiatives and investment to regrow this capacity.

Proactive strategies that encourage whānau participation m ust be adopted to support whānau and to influence any change and uptake of te reo .

With any approach to language planning there are typically a number of common barriers that will need consideration. This includes but is not limited to:

a sense of WHAKAMĀ – a feeling of being embarrassed or of shame at not knowing the language or appropriate cultural protocols,

AVAILABILITY – language learning requires significant investments of time, DISTANCE – access to quality learning opportunities in your local environ are limited in some regions, COST – the ability to take time off work (usually without pay) or cover fees for programmes.

Te Wawata VISION

KEY ENABLERS TO ACHIEVING THIS:

• Building a sense of ‘pack’ amongst Ngāti Tama

• Building a strong sense of pride in Ngāti Tamatanga

• Selling the ‘why’ intergenerational transmission is important

• Supporting increased immersion/bilingual education options for tamariki

• Supporting immersion/bilingual learning opportunities for parents and adults

• Creating and fostering young and new talent

• Celebrating and protecting knowledge of pāhake

• Supporting whānau use and uptake of te reo in their homes

• Capturing opportunities to collaborate or partner with others

These enablers are mapped into six key areas of focus on the next page. It is important to remember that a ‘hidden workstream’ sits in the background of these areas. This is mapped out with a short term (12-month) and long term (5-year) workplan and provides a pathway for the first 5 years of the strategy and monitoring the impact of its delivery throughout to inform future decision making and direction.

2050 TE REO MĀORI
WILL BE ONE OF THE MAIN LANGUAGES IN 50% OF ALL NGĀTI TAMA KI TE TAUIHU HOMES
Tama Kōrero

Ngā Whāinga - 5 tau

5 YEAR GOALS

In order to achieve our 25-year vision there are three key areas of focus for the next 5 years that will help establish a base upon which to progress the wider goals of this strategy document. The final area identified below is related to the oversight and management required to drive this strategic plan.

TAMA HUĀNGA NUI

OUR WHĀNAU ARE PROUD, CONNECTED CHAMPIONS OF NGĀTI TAMATANGA

OBJECTIVES:

1.1 Regular opportunities for whānau engagement and connection

1.2 Sense of whanaungatanga and ‘oneness’ actively fostered amongst Ngāti Tama

1.3 Strategic alliances/partnership established to support wider engagement and sharing of information

TAMA RINGA KUMU

NGĀTI TAMA RANGATAHI STAND PROUD IN THEIR IDENTITY

OBJECTIVES:

2.1 Leadership programmes for rangatahi established

2.2 Tuakana/teina models established to grow talent

2.3 Reo championed as fundamental element of Ngāti Tama identity

TAMA TOKOPAE

NGĀTI TAMA ARE INUNDATED WITH PROFICIENT SPEAKERS FOR THE PAEPAE TĀNE, AND PAEPAE WĀHINE

OBJECTIVES:

3.1 There are multiple ‘te reo me ōna tikanga’ learning opportunities available for Ngāti Tama whānau of all ages and competencies

3.2 There is a core group of Ngāti Tama learners who are engaged in programmes to improve their proficiency in reo me ōna tikanga

3.3 Resource secured to support implementation of reo strategy

TAMA KŌRERO STRATEGY IS CAREFULLY IMPLEMENTED AND MONITORED FOR GREATEST IMPACT

OBJECTIVES:

4.1 Champions and drivers of the Tama Kōrero strategy are engaged and resourced to support all facets of the strategy’s implementation.

4.2 Establish key data sets to measure progress against strategic objectives. Data and insights gathered consistently to support and inform strategic direction

TAMA OHO

Te Ara Ka Takahia OUR APPROACH

Whānau supported to raise children in te reo

Whānau centered events for language learning and use established

Immersion opportunities created

Strategic relationships fostered to support increased access and improved quality of te reo delivery in Te Tauihu Relationships strengthened with Ngāti Tama whānui for sharing information, histories and mita

Ensuring Ngāti Tama presence on paepae it its takiwā

Increasing the visibility and presence of te reo Māori in the Ngāti Tama takiwā

Ngāti Tama mātanga indentified to support language programmes

Identifying key elements of ‘Ngati Tamatanga’

Strengthening the Ngāti Tama brand

Showcasing Ngāti Tama land, people, stories (resource development)

planning

Language at home Strength in identity

Strengthening Te Tauihu reo

Direct investment into a group of iwi members to build capacity quickly

Creating regular Ngāti Tama events for bulding awareness and knowledge of being Ngāti Tama

Creating opportunities for collective celebration and experience of being

whānau

Engaged and connected iwi Champions Speakers

monitor & measure

Ngāti Tama mātanga indentified to support language programmes

Barriers facing whānau to learn, actively addressed by Ngāti Tama

UNDERSTANDING THE DIAGRAM

Inner circle WHĀNAU (CORE)

Whānau are at the heart of our strategy approach

Second circle KEY ENABLERS (INNER RING) Areas of strategic focus

Capturing younger generations through social media

Sharing of ‘Ngāti Tama’ content

Capturing and sharing current iwi members and their connection moments

Rangatahi specific engagement strategies developed

Create avenues for building rangatahi capability to be language leaders, planners and champions

Establishing a cohort of rangatahi leadership in the reo space

Middle circle STRATEGY OVERSIGHT (CORE)

Keeping on track and monitoring our progress, pivoting approach if neccessary

Outer circle WORKSTREAMS (OUTSIDE RING) What we will do

revise
implement
Ngāti Tama
Our Approach | PAGE 19

Te Mahere

WORKPLAN (YEARS 1-5)

1. There is a sense of urgency around the low numbers of native/highly proficient speakers available in Te Tauihu. Getting this group involved and committed to supporting the strategy is essential. Beyond this, there is a real need to rebuild this capacity amongst Ngāti Tama as quickly as possible.

2. For the strategy to be successful it needs whānau to be engaged. Initially, this needs to be done in a way that socialises the aspiration and gets whānau buy-in. Beyond that, opportunities need to be created which encourage and support whānau participation.

3. Limited resources dictate that the first focus should be on those who are eager and keen to participate.

A work plan has been developed that is aligned to Ngāti Tama’s broader businesses objectives and budget allocations. This work plan is to support the delivery of the first five years of the strategy with key staff movements and resourcing to support the strategy’s implementation.

THERE ARE A NUMBER OF AREAS THAT SHOULD BE PRIORITISED EARLY IN THE STRATEGY’S IMPLEMENTATION TO ENSURE THAT MEDIUM-TERM OBJECTIVES ARE ACHIEVED.

Te Mahere Arotake WORKPLAN REVIEW

Upon completion of the five-year work plan, Ngāti Tama ki Te Waipounamu Trust should undertake a review of the its activities to determine if the focus area goals have been met. If the Trust is satisfied with the plan’s outcomes, steps should be taken to reengage the Advisory Group to set the next five-year focus areas and to progress the wider goals of Tama Kōrero, and work towards its vision that by 2050 Te Reo Māori will be one of the main languages in 50% of all Ngāti Tama ki Te Tauihu homes.

Workplan | PAGE 21

Te Tohu o Tama Kōrero

TAMA KŌRERO BRANDING

• The primary symbol represents the Huia feather.In traditional times the Huia feather was a high valued symbol of leadership.

• The central Manaia figure is a traditional Taranaki form which celebrates our unique Taranaki and Tokomaru identity. The full face symbolises ‘Tama Kōrero’ with the protruded tongue, inspiring our whanau to engage in speaking our reo.

• The manaia form is also made up of two sides, one side represents Te Pūoho ki Te Rangi, paramount chief of Ngāti Tama who, after 600 years in Taranaki set a new course and let the migration of a branch of his people to the Kāpiti and Wellington areas, then even further south. Another group crossed Te Moana-oRaukawakawa, the Cook Strait, to establish permanent settlements across western Te Tauihu. These people and their descendants eventually became known as Ngāti Tama ki Te Tauihu.

• The other side is Ngāti Tama tūpuna, Tamaariki, an illustrious navigator of the Tokomaru waka. Tamaariki first charted the way for his people to sail from central Polynesia to Aotearoa in the 11th Century. The vessel finally landed at Tongapōrutu in Northern Taranaki and it is here where they settled and became Ngāti Tama.

• The net symbol in the feather is also a unique Taranaki form called Mata Kupenga. Although it primarily references the importance of our connection to the sea, it also symbols the importance of our connections with each other, and that through collective action comes strength, unity and results.

It is time now for us to turn our attention to our language, te reo Māori. Our dream is for it to be like Te Waikoropupū Springs, protected, recognised as a taonga, but foreverbubbling in the homes of our people, in ourcommunities and on our marae, feeding us spiritually and culturally, a source of pride for generations to come.

For that we are going to need to be like our tīpuna Tamaariki and Te Pūoho ki te Rangi. We will need to be courageous, we will need a waka to help us get there, we will need to chart new pathways, and we will need to take families with us.

Take on the challenge to champion Te Reo for your whānau. Wear the Tama Kōrero Pin to show your commitment to the revitalisation of Te Reo me ōna Tikanga within Ngāti Tama ki Te Tauihu.

HE WERO Tama Kōrero

TAKAPOU HORANUI

Tama Huānganui – Our whānau are connection and supported through their language journey

PIKI RAUKURA, KOTORE HUIA

Tama Ringa Kumu – Inspiring our Rangatahi to stand proud in their Tama /Tauihu identity

TE ARA POU ‘TAMA’

Tama Tokopae – building pathways and opportunities to increase language competency

TE NIHO TANIWHA

Tama Oho – building proficient Tama champions to lead, build and inspire our communities

Branding | PAGE 23
Icon Designer: Hemi Sundgren

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Articles inside

Te Tohu o Tama Kōrero

1min
pages 54-55

Te Mahere

1min
page 52

Ngā Whāinga - 5 tau

1min
page 50

Te Wawata VISION

1min
pages 48-49

Ko Ngā Whakaaro Matua

1min
page 47

Te Tūāpapa OUR CONTEXT

1min
page 46

Te Tukanga OUR PROCESS

2min
page 45

TeTake PURPOSE

1min
page 44

Te Horopaki BACKGROUND

1min
page 44

Ko Te Reo Ka Pupū Anō

2min
pages 42-43

He Wāhi Kōrero INTRODUCTION

2min
pages 40-42

He Whakarāpopoto

3min
pages 35-39

TAMA MERCHANDISE

1min
page 27

NGĀTI TAMA GRANTS

4min
pages 26-27

Deed of Settlement

4min
pages 23-25

Te Ipukarea 2022

1min
pages 22-23

AHUWHENUA | ENHANCE OUR SIGNIFICANT LANDS AND WATERWAYS

2min
page 21

AHUMAHI | DEVELOP OPPORTUNITIES TO LIVE AND WORK IN TE TAUIHU

2min
page 20

TAMARIKI UPDATE

1min
page 19

Puanga IN MOHUA

4min
pages 16-18

Tā moko

1min
pages 13-15

Rāmeka Te Ketu

1min
page 12

TAMA RINGA KUMU

1min
pages 10-11

TE AHU REI

2min
page 9

ASHER KĀTENE

1min
page 8

NGĀTITAMA KI TETAUIHU eRautaki Reo2050

6min
pages 5-8

DEVELOPMENT OF TAMA KŌRERO

1min
page 5

HE KUPU WHAKATAKINĀ TE HEAMANA ME TE POUWHAKAHAERE

1min
pages 4-5
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