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Project and Program Management

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Certified ScrumMaster release 1.0.0

PARTICIPANT HANDBOOK


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Acknowledgements

We would like to sincerely thank the expert who has contributed to and shaped ITpreneurs Certified ScrumMaster Course.

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Kiran Thakkar

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Kiran has over 21 years of IT experience in a wide variety of global industries. He is a Certified Scrum Trainer (CST) and PMP, with a MBA (Master of Business Administration) and MS Master of Science in Computer Science. Kiran was trained by Ken Schwaber, co-founder of Scrum.

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He was working at Siemens Medical Solutions as Release/Program Manager role involving a very large-scale agile initiative (40+ teams, over 500 employees). He spent last eight years as a Director of IT, release manager, scrum master, scrum team mentor, and overall program release manager. He also pioneered implementation of the agile practices and mentored scrum masters within Siemens. He is a true champion and laid the groundwork for agile practices still in use and highly effective in Siemens today.

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He demonstrates deep passion and enhanced knowledge of agile principles and practices. Finally, he is very instrumental in shepherding the organization, executives, and engineers alike, to a successful scrum implementation. He is also an adjunct faculty at Penn State Great Valley, DeVry/Keller University, and University of Phoenix teaching in online and traditional 'on-ground' environment.

www.ITpreneurs.com

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Certified ScrumMaster

Copyright Š 2013, ITpreneurs Nederland B.V. All rights reserved.

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Certified ScrumMaster

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Certified ScrumMaster Course

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Kiran Thakkar Certified Scrum Trainer kthakkar@yahoo.com

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Copyright © 2005-2013 – Kiran Thakkar – Portions used with reference and citations. All Rights Reserved.

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22+ years of IT experience with seven plus years of Agile Experience Started my career as a programmer; worked as Director of Engineering Currently working as an Independent Agile Coach and Trainer Leading and helping large-scale Agile projects transitions Worked and traveled to over 19 countries Started using Agile in 2004 Helped document and implement best practices for enterprise Scrum Part-time faculty/Instructor at leading Universities such as

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– – – – – – – –

MBA,MS,PMP, CST

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Kiran Thakkar,

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ƒ Penn-State Great Valley, Malvern, PA ƒ DeVry University, Valley Forge, PA ƒ University of Phoenix, Philahiphia, PA

Copyright © 2005-2013 – Kiran Thakkar – Portions used with reference and citations. All Rights Reserved.

Copyright © 2013, ITpreneurs Nederland B.V. All rights reserved.


Participant | Certified ScrumMaster

Attributions

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• This course and deck derive from:

Ken Schwaber, Mike Cohn Jeff Sutherland, Alistair Cockburn Mary and Tom Poppendieck Henrik Kniberg – (Scrum and XP from the Trenches How we do Scrum)

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http://infoq.com/minibooks/ scrum-xpfrom-the-trenches http://www.infoq.com/minibooks/kanban-scrum-minibook

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ƒ Jim Schiel, CST ƒ Roman Pichler, CST ƒ Ronica Roth, CST (Rally Dev) ƒ Many Others This course, coupled with exercises, will consume the full two days. As appropriate, content may be replaced or skipped based on class composition. When of interest to most of the class, student questions will be answered by having the class devise solutions within the framework and principles of Scrum – just as you will have to do at work!

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Copyright © 2005-2013 – Kiran Thakkar – Portions used with reference and citations. All Rights Reserved.

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CSM - Topics for 2-days • Sprints

• Overview of Agile Methods and Definition of Scrum • Foundational Support

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– Process Dynamics, Modeling, and Control – Empirical Process Control • Visibility • Inspection • Adaptation

– – – – –

Four Meetings Three Roles Scrum Master Product Owner Team

• Scrum Process Flow – Short-cycles – Iterations – Increments

– Agile Principles – Exercise

• History of Scrum – – – –

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Need Origination Early Work Current Success Stories

• Scrum Artifacts • Testers in Sprint and application testing in agile • Scrum Values • Exercise

Copyright © 2005-2013 – Kiran Thakkar – Portions used with reference and citations. All Rights Reserved.

Copyright © 2013, ITpreneurs Nederland B.V. All rights reserved.

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Certified ScrumMaster

– – – –

– – – – – – –

Sprint Planning Daily Scrum Sprint Review Sprint Retrospective

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• Backlog Creation and Estimation

• Four Meetings

PO role and Business Analyst’s Role User Stories & User Stories Workshop Acceptance Criteria Workshop Estimation Techniques Estimation Workshop Prioritization Workshop Planning Poker exercise

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• Simulation in the Class • Agile Release Planning & Product • Definition Of Done Owner • Day in the Life of a ScrumMaster – Five levels of Planning • Agile Project Reporting – Agile Project Lifecycle • Scaling Scrum – Creation of Planning Team • Scrum in Global Distributed – Activities in Agile Project Lifecycle Teams – Managing offshore teams – Release Planning Deliverables • Scrum and CMM, Scrum and XP – Optional Topics / Sidebar , Q&A – Closing Activities Evaluation

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– Architecture and Scrum

Ken Schwaber’s books • Agile Software Development with Scrum • Agile Project Management with Scrum • The Enterprise and Scrum Mike Cohn’s books 1. User Stories Applied, Mike Cohn, Pearson Education, 2004 2. Succeeding with Agile: Software Development Using Scrum 3. Agile Estimating and Planning Collaboration Explained: Jean Tabaka (RallyDev) Extreme Programming Explained, Kent Beck, Addison Wesley, 2000 Lean Software Development, Poppendieck and Poppendieck, Addison Wesley, 2003 Agile & Iterative Development, Craig Larman, Pearson Education, 2004 Practices for Scaling Lean & Agile Development: Large, Multisite, and Offshore Product Development with Large-Scale Scrum http://www.versionone.com/Resources/?type=whit epaper

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Copyright © 2005-2013 – Kiran Thakkar – Portions used with reference and citations. All Rights Reserved.

Recommended Readings

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7. 8.

Copyright © 2005-2013 – Kiran Thakkar – Portions used with reference and citations. All Rights Reserved.

Copyright © 2013, ITpreneurs Nederland B.V. All rights reserved.

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CSM - Topics for 2-Days


Participant | Certified ScrumMaster

Scrum Resources and Join Online Social Networks

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Scrum Alliance, Inc Certified ScrumMasters Certified Scrum Product Agile PA Owners Find or Create • Certified Scrum Professionals – www.agilepa.com Local Scrum User • ScrumU - an online community Agile Alliance Group www.agilealliance.org for University people who are doing Scrum ( not teachers, Yahoo! Groups practitioners) ScrumDevelopment and PMIAgile • Google Groups Jeff Sutherland’s Scrum Log • Scrum Alliance discussion www.jeffsutherland.com/scrum group Mike Cohn’s site • Attend upcoming Scrum Gatherings

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www.mountaingoatsoftware.com/scrum

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www.scrumalliance.org http://www.scrumalliance.org/community http://www.scrumalliance.org/events

• Home of Rally: www.rallydev.com • LinkedIn Groups

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• The Scrum Alliance

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Copyright © 2005-2013 – Kiran Thakkar – Portions used with reference and citations. All Rights Reserved.

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Basic Rules & Course Expectations

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1. We will do lots of exercises or activities that involves reading, writing, talking or simulating 2. The Post Its: while waiting to start (and any time during the course) please post key questions and concerns about Scrum and Agile on the “sidebar” 3. Sometime before the end of the class, please get your information into the spreadsheet I have up here… 4. You must attend entire 2 day CSM class to qualify for Scrum Alliance Certification and PDUs. 5. When you are certified, you probably will know more than when you started the course. 6. Get to know as many of your teammates as you can… – so, let’s introduce ourselves… 7. Advanced topics such as Globally distributed scrum implementation, Agile Release Planning, Agile Estimation, and User Story Writing workshop, and scaling scrum are covered 8. For certification evaluation, Scrum guide, re-certification, and renew policy please visit: http://www.scrumalliance.org/scrum_certification Copyright © 2005-2013 – Kiran Thakkar – Portions used with reference and citations. All Rights Reserved.

Copyright © 2013, ITpreneurs Nederland B.V. All rights reserved.

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Certified ScrumMaster

4: I think it’s a great idea. I wish I would have thought of it. 3: I can live with that and support it. 2: I have some reservations that I’d like to talk about.

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1: I am very opposed and we shouldn’t move forward.

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5: Unlimited support.

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Fist of Five

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Agile Methods

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DSDM - Dynamic System Development Method

Agile Unified Process

Copyright © 2005-2013 – Kiran Thakkar – Portions used with reference and citations. All Rights Reserved.

Copyright © 2013, ITpreneurs Nederland B.V. All rights reserved.


Participant | Certified ScrumMaster

What is Agile Software Development?

Design

Code

Test

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Requirements

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• Framework for undertaking software engineering projects that embraces and promotes evolutionary change throughout the entire life-cycle of the project • Promotes industry best practices that emphasize teamwork, customer involvement and the frequent creation of small, working pieces of the total system

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Rather than doing all of one thing at a time...

Agile teams do a little of everything all the time…

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Source: rce: “The New New Product l tG b T k hi Development Game”” by Takeuchi and Nonaka. Harvard Business Review, January 1986.

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Development in Waterfall and Agile

Waterfall

Analysis

Design

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Waterfall methodology can create silos, lack of transparency, and slower cycle times

Code Test

Most of the risk and difficult work is pushed toward end of the project

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Agile

Agile uses interdisciplinary teams in iterative cycles, reduces waste and increases productivity

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We will discuss Release Planning

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Certified ScrumMaster

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• Visualize the workflow – Split the work into pieces, Write each item on a card and put on the wall – Use named columns to illustrate where each item is in the workflow

• Limit Work In Progress (WIP) – – assign explicit limits to how many items may be in progress at each workflow state.

• Kanban limits WIP per workflow state • Scrum limits WIP per iteration

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Kanban in a Nutshell

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So what’s the difference between these two sample boards then? Yep - the little 2 in the middle column on the kanban board. That’s all. That 2 means “there may be no more than 2 items in this column at any given moment”.

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Source: http://www.infoq.com/minibooks/kanban- scrum-minibook

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The Agile Manifesto

We are uncovering better ways of developing software by doing it and helping others do it. Through this work we have come to value:

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WE VALUE

Individuals and interactions

Processes and tools

Working software

Comprehensive documentation

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OVER…

Customer collaboration

Customer negotiation

Responding to change

Following a plan Play

• There’s value in all of the above items, but… • When push comes to shove, we value the ones on the left more.

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Source: Manifesto for Agile Software Development http://agilemanifesto.org/)

Copyright © 2005-2013 – Kiran Thakkar – Portions used with reference and citations. All Rights Reserved.

Copyright © 2013, ITpreneurs Nederland B.V. All rights reserved.


Participant | Certified ScrumMaster

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7. Working software is the primary measure of progress. 8. Agile processes promote sustainable development. The sponsors, developers, and users should be able to maintain a constant pace indefinitely. 9. Continuous attention to technical excellence and good design enhances agility. 10. Simplicity--the art of maximizing the amount of work not done--is essential. 11. The best architectures, requirements, and designs emerge from self-organizing teams. 12. At regular intervals, the team reflects on how to become more effective, then tunes and adjusts its behavior accordingly.

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1. Our highest priority is to satisfy the customer through early and continuous delivery of valuable software. 2. Welcome changing requirements, even late in development. Agile processes harness change for the customer's competitive advantage. 3. Deliver working software frequently, from a couple of weeks to a couple of months, with a preference to the shorter timescale. 4. Business people and developers must work together daily throughout the project. 5. Build projects around motivated individuals. Give them the environment and support they need, and trust them to get the job done. 6. The most efficient and effective method of conveying information to and within a development team is face-to-face conversation.

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12 Principles of Agile Manifesto

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Exercise â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Why Agile?

Identify 5 reasons for considering Agile.

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1. ____________________________________

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2. ____________________________________ 3. ____________________________________ 4. ____________________________________ 5. ____________________________________

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Certified ScrumMaster

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93% increased productivity1 88% increased quality1 83% improved stakeholder satisfaction1 49% reduced costs1 66% three-year, risk-adjusted return on investment2

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Going Agile brings GREAT Rewards!

• Reasons for Agile adoption include:

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– 47% to better manage project scope3 – 45% to creating clear business requirements3 – 40% to speed or better predict time to market3

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1 “Agile Methodologies: Survey Results,”by Shine Technologies, 2003; 2 Forrester Research, 2004; 3 “Agile 2006 Survey Results and Analysis,”by Digital Focus, October 2005

Key Benefits – Why Agile?

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9 Accelerate Time to Market

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9 Early and Continuous Customer Validation

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9 Greater Visibility into Project Progress 9 Early Defect Detection and Prevention

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9 Risk Reduction and Quality Improvements

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9 Improve Team Morale The Best-Kept Management Secret On The Planet: Agile – Read at: http://ow.ly/ak4cC

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Participant | Certified ScrumMaster

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Reality

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Myth

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Agile Myths Vs Reality Light weight and just enough documentation

Undisciplined

Requires greater discipline

No Planning

Requires various levels of and continuous planning

Not Predictable

Provides greater predictability and visibility

Cannot Scale

Implemented at enterprise level with 1000 plus members

Is a Fad

Becoming a norm

Silver Bullet and Do It Yourself

Requires education, agile coach and trainer, and practice

Not for fixed price project

Provides greater control over budget, scope, and time

Not for distributed environment

Works with right tools, process, and models

Not for regulatory environment

Works with right amount of process and discipline

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No Documentation

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Copyright © 2005-2013 – Kiran Thakkar – Portions used with reference and citations. All Rights Reserved.

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Scrum and XP

Copyright © 2005-2013 – Kiran Thakkar – Portions used with reference and citations. All Rights Reserved.

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Certified ScrumMaster

Exercise – Scrum Familiarity Why is software development so hard? • IT project success rate 1994: 15% • IT project success rate 2004: 34%

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What made it improve?

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http://www.infoq.com/articles/Interview-Johnson-Standish-CHAOS The Standish Group has studied over 40,000 projects in 10 years to reach the findings. http://www.softwaremag.com/L.cfm?Doc=newsletter/2004-01-15/Standish

Source: Henrik Kniberg

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Copyright © 2005-2013 – Kiran Thakkar – Portions used with reference and citations. All Rights Reserved.

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Project Success / Failure

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• What made your projects succeed? • What made your projects fail?

Failure Factors

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Success Factors

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What Are the Common Challenges of Adopting Agile at your organization? Copyright © 2005-2013 – Kiran Thakkar – Portions used with reference and citations. All Rights Reserved.

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Participant | Certified ScrumMaster

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2/3 of the features we build is rarely or never used!

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This Does Not Happen At All!

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Only 1/5 of the features we build is used often or always

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7 Waste of Software Dvlp 1. Partially done work 2. Extra features 3. Lost knowledge 4. Handoffs 5. Task switching 6. Delays 7. Defects

Source: Standish Group Study Reported at XP2002 by Jim Johnson, Chairman

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Copyright © 2005-2013 – Kiran Thakkar – Portions used with reference and citations. All Rights Reserved.

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What is Scrum?

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Scrum: A framework within which people can address complex adaptive problems, while productivity and creatively delivering products of the highest possible value.

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Scrum is a way of harnessing creativity, the joy of work, the pleasure of teamwork into extraordinary productivity in building complex products.

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The… ‘relay race’ approach to product development…may conflict with the goals of maximum speed and flexibility. Instead a holistic or ‘rugby’ approach—where a team tries to go the distance as a unit, passing the ball back and forth—may better serve today’s competitive requirements.”

Source: Scrum Guide – www.scrum.org October 2011 Hirotaka Takeuchi and Ikujiro Nonaka, “The New New Product Development Game”, Harvard Business Review, January 1986 Copyright © 2005-2013 – Kiran Thakkar – Portions used with reference and citations. All Rights Reserved.

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Certified ScrumMaster

• • • • •

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a team-based approach to iteratively, incrementally development a way to maximize productivity A simple framework An approach to managing complex problems A collaborative effort involving developers and customers in an ongoing dialog • A management wrapper around existing engineering practices, driving incremental improvements. • Scalable to distributed, large, and long projects • CMMi level 3 and ISO 9001 compliant

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• Empirical management & control process

– 3 legs - “Transparency, Inspect, and adapt” feedback loops

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• Delivers business functionality in 30 calendar days

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Copyright © 2005-2013 – Kiran Thakkar – Portions used with reference and citations. All Rights Reserved.

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Scrum Terms • Product Backlog

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– The product backlog (or "backlog") is the requirements for a system, expressed as a prioritized list of product backlog Items.

• Product Burndown Chart

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– In Scrum, the product burn down chart is a "big picture" view of a project's progress. It shows how much work was left to do at the beginning of each sprint. The scope of this chart spans releases; however, a release burn down chart is limited to a single release. Release level burn down chart is updated at every sprint.

- “An iteration of work during which an increment of product functionality is implemented.

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• Sprint

Maximum sprint length is 30 calendar days.

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• Sprint Backlog

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Scrum is…

– Defines the work for a sprint, represented by the set of tasks that must be completed to realize the sprint's goals, and selected set of product backlog items.

• Sprint Burndown Chart – A sprint burn down chart (or "sprint burn down graph") depicts the total task hours remaining per day.

More Scrum Terms later…

Source: http://www.scrumalliance.org/articles/39-glossary-of-scrum-terms

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Participant | Certified ScrumMaster

Scrum Flow ScrumMaster

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What did you do since last meeting? What will you do today? What impediments do you have in your way?

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1. 2. 3.

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24 hours

Burn Chart

Backlog tasks expanded by team Features

Product Roadmap

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Product Backlog

30 days

Sprint Planning

1. Sprint Review 2. Retrospective

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Release Planning

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Daily Scrum Meeting (15 Min)

Potentially Shippable Product Increment

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Release Backlog As prioritized by Product Owner

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Copyright © 2005-2013 – Kiran Thakkar – Portions used with reference and citations. All Rights Reserved.

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Scrum is a Simple Framework

Product Backlog

Product Owner

Scrum

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Sprint Backlog

Artifacts

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Burn down Charts

1. Working Product 2. Impediment nt List

Release Planning

Roles

Daily Scrum

ScrumMaster

Team

Events or Meetings or Ceremonies

Sprint Planning

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Sprint Review

Retrospective

Backlog Refinement Copyright © 2005-2013 – Kiran Thakkar – Portions used with reference and citations. All Rights Reserved.

Copyright © 2013, ITpreneurs Nederland B.V. All rights reserved.

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Certified ScrumMaster Participant Handbook