ISO Magazine #11: TRACES

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ISSUE 11: TRACES

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LETTER FROM THE EDITORS Each issue of ISO begins with a conversation, a show and tell of sorts. We share work that excites us, questions that nag at us, and topics that fascinate us. We talk our way toward an intersection of all of these things and at this intersection we find our theme. At the root of our discussion was the idea that photographs almost always act as traces of the past. (As Mitch Hedberg aptly joked, “One time, this guy handed me a picture of him, he said, ’Here’s a picture of me when I was younger.’ Every picture is of you when you were younger.”) Aware of the fact that “Traces” could encompass nearly any photograph, we sought to explore work that emphasized this theme or that expanded our understanding of it. We were interested not only in traces themselves but also in their suggestive potential and the act of tracing a path. In his featured essay, Paul Funkhouser considers how images influence the current moment, what Roland Barthes

called “co-presence” and “countermemory,” to grapple with Ahlam Shibli’s Death images. In Down These Mean Streets, Will Steacy crafts a web of visual and textual detritus along with his own photographs to trace the fading of the American dream. Juan Madrid’s Welcome to Flint picks up where Steacy leaves off, with a humanizing look into a post-industrial American city. Complicating our theme, we included Hiroshi Sugimoto’s Seascapes which assert the preeminence of the timeless and the universal. In contrast, the images compiled on the blog “CamGirlBRB” reveal the vestiges of transient online performances, leaving us to construct our own imagined narratives. We hope that collected in a single, printed container, these seemingly disparate parts will offer insight into the way images signify the greater processes and forces that surround them. -Perri Hofmann & Jonah Rosenberg

ISO is a biannual publication conceived and created by a group of New York University undergraduate students based in the Tisch School of the Arts’ Department of Photography & Imaging. Since 2008, we have worked to explore contemporary themes in photography. We place the work of emerging photographers in conversation with that of established artists, as well as write critically and creatively on photography. Copyright © 2014 ISO Magazine. All rights reserved.

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Cover: Russell Barsanti, Cape Breton Inside Cover: Untitled by Acacia Johnson, Alaska, acaciajohnson.com


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PO RT FO LI O

“AND THAT’S THE TRUTH.” RS A PORTRAIT OF IRISH TRAVELLE CIARA CROCKER

FE AT U RE D ARTI ST

PRINTED

ERSAL IM HIROSHI SUGIMOTO: THE UNIV ES SAY

LI’S DEATH

IN AHLAM SHIB CO-PRESENCEUS ER PAUL FUNKHO

.C OM

N EI TH ER H ER E N O R TH ER E OLIVIA MANNO

FE AT U RE D ARTI ST

JUAN MADRID’S WELCOME TO

FLINT

DU ET

A “HARTSFIELD-JACKSON ATLANT INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT” NAT MARCUS

FE AT U RE D BO OK

N STREETS

EA WILL STEACY: DOWN THESE M

TR AC ES

TH E GA LL ER Y 5


“AND THAT’S THE TRUTH.”

A PORTRAIT OF IRISH TRAVELLERS Text & Images by CIARA CROCKER

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P O RTF O LI O

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ooted in a lifestyle of nomadism dating back at least 1,000 years, Irish Travellers today do not travel anymore. Originating in Ireland, Travellers consist of about 40,000 with large communities in the UK and US as well. Defined by their history of living on the road as well as a tradition of familial community, a particular attention to the Catholic Church, and their language “Cant,” Irish Travellers thrive within their own distinguished culture. Though England recognizes Irish Travellers as a cultural minority within the law, Ireland does not formally acknowledge the ethnic distinction between Irish Travellers and “settled” Irish. During the 1960’s, in an effort to remove Travellers from the road, the Irish government built “halting sites” that Traveller families were to be relocated to. Though many still live in sites today, the economic prosperity during the era of the Celtic Tiger in the 1990’s gave some Travellers enough upward mobility to move into independent houses. A seemingly positive change, the transition away from the road, away from the communal environment, and assimilation into “settled” Ireland, now presents many new challenges for Irish Travellers. Combined with the longstanding external oppression that Travellers face, this newly isolated lifestyle has lead to a dangerous degree of internal oppression within Traveller individuals. Constituting less than 1% of the Irish population, the suicide rate among Travellers in

Ireland is now seven times higher than that of non-Traveller Irish citizens. In attempt to escape these struggles, many “assimilated” travellers today choose to not identify with their culture in hopes of avoiding prejudice and remaining in the competition for jobs. Despite the rapid changes in lifestyle for Travellers recently, they remain rich with their own history and character. It is a captivating community that leaves every thought and emotion out on the line in their everyday fast-talking, quick-witted banter. They have a passion and loyalty to one another that is unparalleled in my eyes. Frequently tacked on at the end of a thought or statement in conversation, the title of this project comes from a colloquial phrase used by Irish Travellers to reverberate ideas, experiences, and their pride in the assured manner that defines them. •

www.ciaracrocker.com

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All images Š Ciara Crocker

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THE UNIVERSAL IMPRINTED Hiroshi Sugimoto

Text by HALEY WEISS

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H

iroshi Sugimoto’s photographs are hypnotic. Each one envelops you in a trance, inviting a surreal process of examination. Sugimoto’s diligent framing and masterly use of light allows each image to be taken for its content; that of a trace, and of a vision. Using a minimalist aesthetic, Sugimoto images the universal in his Seascapes. Each image in the series is an indistinct body of water, tied to a location only by a caption. This decoupling contributes to the image rendering like a memory, inducing a feeling of familiarity despite the obscure nature of the scenes depicted. These seascapes describe the boundless within the enclosure of a frame. They present the surface of a subject shrouded in mystery and depth, and in doing so suggest a world existing beneath. The components of each image—water and air— exist as independent entities that meet to produce a horizon, or a blurred amalgam. The sea’s appearance may vary, but its reach is constant. It crosses and inhabits distance, serving as both a connection and a gap. Sugimoto’s images take on this ability, addressing the sea’s comprehensiveness while suggesting its mutability. Using the same systematic, straight framing as in his Seascapes, Sugimoto looks towards the man-made in his Theaters. These images occupy a space of delicate contemplation; the scenes are understated and minimalist, yet each screen’s surroundings are articulated with precision. The images are devoid of human presence, emphasizing the environment of the theater. While the intended use of a screen is to be a visual transmitter of content, Sugimoto allows the passing of time to leave each screen glowing and blank. The screens, overrun with content to the point of erasure, become a light by which to view their context. Ambient light slithers through each theater’s edges, exposing each scene to a penetrating glow. Even in the outdoors at a drive-in, the light of the screen duels with that of the sky, rivaling the window into the past that always surrounds us. By encapsulating time these images allow us to disconnect from the screen, and in doing so consider the act of seeing. Both Seascapes and Theaters present subjects that unify. Our connection to air and water is primal, and the act of seeing and imaging is cross-cultural. While each view of the sea may vary, and each theater differ in style, the experiences and environments each creates are universal. Through his images, Sugimoto reveals the possibility of vastness coexisting with a finite, calculable singularity. •

Union City Drive-In, Union City, 1993 © Hiroshi Sugimoto, courtesy Pace Gallery

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Radio City Music Hall, New York, 1978 Š Hiroshi Sugimoto, courtesy Pace Gallery

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Cinerama Dome, Hollywood, 1993 Š Hiroshi Sugimoto, courtesy Pace Gallery

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North Atlantic Ocean, Cape Breton Island, 1996 Š Hiroshi Sugimoto, courtesy Pace Gallery

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Baltic Sea, Rugen, 1996 Š Hiroshi Sugimoto, courtesy Pace Gallery

www.sugimotohiroshi.com

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CO-PRESENCE IN AHLAM SHIBLI’S DEATH Text by PAUL FUNKHOUSER

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The subversive, “counter-memory” power of photographs functions on several levels of Ahlam Shibli’s Death series. The series depicts the commemorative portraits of young

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Untitled (Death no. 3), Nablus, Palestine, 2011-12 © Ahlam Shibli, courtesy the artist.

lthough the authority of images has been eroded by the proliferation of digital photography on the Internet, they retain a remarkable capacity to fabricate reality. Roland Barthes theorized that the physical process of photography easily overpowers human memory, as “counter-memory.” The political power of photographs to construct history depends on temporal identification with images, placing one’s self within the timebased frame of an image, a process which Barthes calls “co-presence.” Anything photographed surely and undeniably “was there,” it is not the chemical process of the camera which obfuscates reality but the select vantage point of the photographer. Subversive art in the contemporary era can challenge viewers to place themselves in a disorienting or even hostile context.


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Palestinians killed by the IDF during the Second Intifada. Shibli’s work reflects upon photographic imaging in social practice, including the cult value of images of the dead as well as the temporal processes of photography that Barthes describes in Camera Lucida. Death examines how Palestinians relate to images of the martyred, and how those images are encoded with meaning. In the text accompanying her work, Shibli carefully defines her subject, including both militants and civilians: “the representations designate any person who lost his or her life as a result of the Israeli occupation of Palestine: a martyr.” Barthes develops the idea of “copresence” as the phenomenon of locating oneself in relation to a photographed moment in time: “I am the reference of every photograph, and this is what generates my astonishment in addressing myself to the fundamental question: why is it that I am alive here and now?” Based on visual indicies of time, we place ourselves in time, space and history when we are confronted with images of the past. Barthes finds that his childhood memories become subordinated to the photograph that represent them. Our power to recall is easily corrupted or overtaken entirely by photographic representation. It becomes impossible to deny the authenticity of a photograph due to the subjectivity of our memory versus the supposedly objective eye of the camera. Photographs constitute the fundamental building blocks of the construction of truth in the media. In contemporary society, news has become increasingly defined by

images alone, in clear contrast to prior language-based modes of communication (newspapers and radio). The selection and narration of important global events in the news is primarily mediated through photographs. When viewing photographs we easily perceive the indicators of time, they invite us to locate ourselves in the past, and to experience time in a commodified form. When not captioned, we mentally date a photograph based on cues like styles of clothing and hair, as well as the format and condition of the print itself. Through such signs, co-presence appears as a key theme in Death and forcefully asserts itself as one of the series’ most subversive elements. Unconsciously, the viewer translates the temporal signs of Death and identifies it as the present. Shibli distills the unthinkable Palestinian death toll into an unmistakeably contemporary experience of the present. Shibli states in her text accompanying Death that the series examines how the dead become present again through representation. Several photographs in Death show a martyr image sharing space with the living, demonstrating Barthes’ idea of co-presence enacted and imaged to create an additional layer of meaning. Three photos from Death show domestic interiors with Palestinians coexisting beside images of the martyred. Untitled (Death no. 33) embodies this idea of co-presence with the dead in Palestinian society, and imbues the viewer with the intense contradiction of life and death underlying the imagecult of martyrdom. The photograph

SA Y

depicts a woman reaching up to dust a framed martyr portrait of her brother mounted on the wall, beside another even more elaborate portrait of the same man. The latter portrait is enshrined by a fitted alcove in the wall, and is collaged to show important symbols. Her brother appears holding an automatic weapon, framed by script and accompanied by an image of the Dome of the Rock, as well as the semi-transparent portrait of an older man in the background. Clearly the image has artificial, collaged content that was deliberately included to elevate the portrait’s subject to the status of martyrdom. The script names him as “General Secretary of the al-Aqsa Martyrs’ Brigades of Balata,” and the man pictured behind him could be a martyred relative, or a political figure in the Palestinian liberation movement. Beyond these signs of martyrdom, he is connected to the historic religious mandate to recover the Dome of the Rock in Jerusalem. Despite the grand decorations of martyrdom that enshrine the martyr, his surviving sister is truly the subject of no. 33—she brings movement and ambiguity into an otherwise static image. Her back is turned, hiding her face, so that she is defined by the gesture of reaching to tend to the portrait high on the wall. Shibli’s composition of no. 33 evokes the political-military narrative of martyrdom but frames it in the banal, everyday experience of a woman maintaining the portrait of her brother. Furthermore, Untitled (Death no. 33) plays on the tension between two layers of copresence: the immediate relation within the image, and the abstract suggestion of contemporaneity.

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Ahlam Shibli, Untitled (Death no. 15), Nablus, Palestine, 2011-12. Chromogenic colour print, 38 x 57 cm. Courtesy the artist.

Other images from Death illustrate the visual culture of martyrdom through its signs and contexts. Military fatigues and weapons evoke the war and create an impression of heroism, and the deceased are connected to the historic dimension of struggle by the symbol of the Dome of the Rock, the flag of Palestine, and relation to other martyrs. Many of the portraits are on display in public places, mounted on walls or outside businesses. In one image, a framed martyr portrait is held up behind a young man holding a megaphone—it appears to be a scene of a street demonstration. Like Untitled (Death no. 33), this photograph shows how the living co-exist with the dead. The gesture of holding up the portrait at a demonstration brings a sense of urgency to the crowded confusion of bodies that dominate the rest of the space. The face of the man with the megaphone expresses the weight of memory, and the megaphone highlights his silence in the moment captured. Shibli’s jumble of bodies at a street demonstration speaks to the collective memory represented by

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the practice of making and displaying martyr portraits. This image invites comparison with another photograph in the series—a miniature martyr portrait worn as a necklace, held in the fingers of its owner whose face is cut off by the frame. This photograph is compositionally distinct from the others, with a single anonymous figure filling the picture plane. The gesture of holding up the icon communicates intimacy, and despite the body’s extreme proximity, we can easily identify signs of the contemporary era. He wears a zipper sweatshirt, a sports t-shirt, and a large ring—traces of globalization and the contemporary lumpenproletariat aesthetic. These symbols provide identification and create the aura of co-presence. Despite the widely acknowledged capacity to manipulate photographs (technically or contextually), they continue to command unparalleled truth and authority. Images are constantly produced and circulated to fabricate causation and sow public sentiment on global issues. Shibli’s

Death series evokes the sense of copresence articulated by Barthes in Camera Lucida. The embellished and collaged aspect of Palestinian martyr portraits does not undermine their authority as documents and power as icons of the dead. Death shows the broad presence of martyr portraits in Palestinian society, as a popular mediation of the collective trauma of Israeli oppression. Death is subversive “because it thinks,” and mobilizes elements of co-presence and memory that strike at the essential social functions of photography. The media representation of Palestinians has been largely obfuscated by the racist conflation of Palestinians with violent extremists, along with the generalized degradation of Islam and de-humanization of Arab bodies. For this reason, Shibli’s visually and psychologically compelling The Death series marks an important intervention in the politicized field of representation of Palestine: “Death exhibits some of the ways in which the ones who are absent become present again— ’represented.’” •


www.ahlamshibli.com

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Ahlam Shibli, Untitled (Death no. 37), Balata Refugee Camp, Palestine, 2011-12. Chromogenic colour print, 100 x 66.7 cm. Courtesy the artist.


.C O M

Text by OLIVIA MANNO

A

lot exists on the Internet. There are bustling communities, an infinite number of outlets for anything, everything. There is an incomprehensible

The stills, which come from “Streamates,” a live-stream

amount of buzzing pixels, glowing usernames that at once

sex chat website, depict the backdrops “when cam girls

identify and hide the human beings they depict.

leave the frame.” The rooms are left in their most isolated and innocent moments, allowing the bedding, the stuffed

A lot of people exist behind what exists on the Internet.

animals, and the pixilated family photos to speak for their

They have homes, they have friends (or not), family (or

person. Sheets are tousled and pillows are depressed,

not), things that fill their medicine cabinets, their fridges,

while objects hinting at what has just taken place sit

their closets. But, often most telling, are the rooms in which

quietly, unassumingly, in the corners of the frame. It is very

they sleep. They hold the tangible, real elements of their

easy to associate the erotic (and only the erotic) elements

character—unlike online personas, which are so carefully

of these rooms with their absent CamGirls. But soon

crafted and calculated, bedrooms often present the rawest,

enough, the inherent remoteness of this world begins to

most intimate portraits of a person; however, they prove to

reveal itself. The rooms didn’t always look that way. It took

be all the more telling when their inhabitants aren’t there

a trip to the department store to buy the zebra pillowcases,

to speak for them.

to the pharmacy to buy the scented candles, the loofa. It took a team of deliverymen to wheel in the mattress and

This is one of the many narratives that evolves from

box spring, to make sure they were assembled correctly.

“CamGirlBRB,” a Tumblr consisting of 119 (and counting)

But, above all, it took the CamGirls. They woke up. They

pages of screen caps of unoccupied bedrooms. Initially,

got ready for their day. Maybe they were heartbroken.

it seems innocent enough—just another Tumblr, another

Maybe they were excited, depressed. Maybe they hadn’t

unexplained facet of the Internet that exists for whatever

spoken to their family in years, or were just offered a

audience it exists for. But when the images are given

new job. But they were all—and are all—human beings,

another look, the quirks and nuances of this anonymous

all feeling things, planning things, dreading things. Their

artist’s practice begin to unravel.

“Streamates” personas make up only the slightest shred of their identity, and are abandoned the minute they leave the frame. It is only then that these traces enter the conversation. They humanize, if only for a moment—but it is a moment nonetheless. •

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www.camgirlbrb.tumblr.com


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R TU A E

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Three young men on the east side. Right: A man sits near the Flint River. Many people often fish in spots like this during the warmer seasons.

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JUAN MADRID’S WELCOME TO FLINT Text by JONAH ROSENBERG

A

ll too often, photography about struggling American cities devolves into—or, perhaps begins as nothing more than—ruin porn. Such work reduces complex

The history of documentary photography representing

issues, major problems we must collectively grapple with,

poverty is long and storied but also intensely problematic.

to the deterioration of buildings. Decontextualized images

Some of the most iconic and impactful images of the 20th

of crumbling schools and rusting factories serve simply to

century emerged from the WPA photographers working

distract from the human impact: the students transferred

during the Great Depression. Many of their subjects

into another crowded classroom, the auto worker left

however, were granted little agency in the way they or their

without a job. Rather than communicating the nature of

families were represented. More recently, the efficacy of

life in these cities, work like this implies that there is no

photography as a means to prompt social change has

longer any life to be found. Out of sight, out of mind.

been called into question and even dismissed outright. This is a history Juan Madrid is acutely aware of and one

Juan Madrid takes a different tact. The boarded-up

whose pitfalls he works to avoid.

businesses, the lots overgrown with weeds, the visual hallmarks of the ailing American city, are certainly there

The

to be found but, they are not the ultimate goal. Madrid

own writing as well as interviews with people from

newsprint

publication

presents us with such elements not for the sake of

Flint.

aesthetics but for the symbolism and context they can

photojournalistic narrative that simply tells viewers a

provide. These signs of blight are not arbitrary traces of

story, Madrid seems more interested in pushing his

destruction but thoughtful allusions to the larger forces

audience to think critically about broader issues. “I

at work in contemporary America and to the future

want people to think for themselves when they see the

prospects of places like Flint, Michigan.

photos,” he says, “to really think about what this country

Deliberately

straying

will away

include from

Madrid’s traditional

is all about and how it functions.” Madrid is clear in his Madrid has been photographing in Flint since 2012 when

intentions but has no illusions about the limitations of

he first visited his friend and fellow photographer Brett

the medium. He is forthright about his own uncertainty

Carlsen. Madrid and Carlsen have been collaborating ever

but appears committed to continuing his work in Flint.

since, each approaching Flint with his own photographic

A conversation he had with a man named Flint offers

voice but editing together and producing a combined

insight into Madrid’s aims. “After I took this portrait,”

Welcome to Flint color newsprint publication, set to be

Madrid says, “Flint explained his lost soul tattoo. He

released in August 2014. There’s a certain matter of

wanted to make it clear that he’s not a lost soul, but that

factness to the title, a tone that is reflected in the work

‘we’re all lost souls if we don’t try to change what’s wrong

itself. Madrid’s depiction is unflinching but does not

in the world. We’re better off dead if we don’t care.’” •

lean on shock value. His images are smart and nuanced without feeling inaccessible. They are undramatic in their color and composition but avoid the cold, dispassionate tone that so frequently accompanies this style. Madrid’s photographs of memorial murals or of howling pitbulls establish a compelling context but it is his portraits that make us care about this context and motivate us to investigate further. Imbued with humanity, these portraits emerge as the true heart of Welcome to Flint. Madrid’s portraiture suggests a genuine compassion toward his subjects. The portraits appear neither callous nor patronizing. Madrid allows those he depicts to live within the frame, to address the camera directly and on their own terms, or not at all.

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John John and his dogs hanging out at his usual spot on the east side. John John is homeless but makes sure his dogs get fed before he does.

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A mural depicting Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X on an abandoned building on the north side.

The imprint of a hanger on the floor of where a building once stood on the east side. Right: Teri raised 6 kids as a single mother. “I just do what I have to to survive.�

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Nubbz and his son. Nubbz lost hand and forearm saving his daughter from a firework.

Renee enjoys taking a leisurely nap in her car on warm days at one of the local parks.

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An abandoned building on the north side.


Flint spent 10+ years in prison for a gang-related murder he committed at the age of 18. After spending further time in various incarceration programs, he decided to get out of that lifestyle and now works at a corner store and tries to be a role model in his neighborhood.

www.juanmadridphoto.com

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E DU

T

Perri Hofmann, Triangle, Virginia, 2013 from Surface Tensions

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“HARTSFIELD-JACKSON ATLANTA INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT” Text by NAT MARCUS

So many young soldiers on the plane, with patches of crossed swords, the edges furled off their shoulders by the tiny intents of patches, the fringe they can muster to pull past glue, along the stitch border. And the sky is like pink meat and the sun bows itself like locusts: red drone. Ramada Inn’s windows a grid of gold tinsel or napalm and the brakes moan Georgia.

Pralines, dustings, I find myself in a candy store, with a sweet air held under florescents and I wonder why I’m here while looking for something, a caramel to steal. A woman at C7 tells someone it’s , “prah-lines” spells out “geaux” --The French flair still twists Atlanta, and I am a pale Northerner: with dark eyebrows never have I so distinctly felt it. There are more soldiers, in camo like pixels of desert or others in those deep blue suits, reminiscent of early night and order.

Southern hospitality, or comfort--I can’t remember what it is or what it means, really. But something like it wraps me like a mist, when I ask for it politely.

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O BO

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K

www.willsteacy.com


DOWN THESE MEAN STREETS Collages and text by

Will Steacy

The past 30 years have been devastating for the American worker, leaving a once vibrant middle class financially paralyzed, as the majority of Americans today no longer believe the American Dream is attainable. Down These Mean Streets is a 175 foot long collage that tells the story of the American Dream through the eyes of the forgotten, those who have been left behind in the ashes of the Great Recession—those who played by the rules all their lives only to be told they were no longer needed, their job could be done cheaper somewhere else, those who have been left without any options, those who have watched the promise of the American Dream disappear right before their eyes. This visual narrative offers a close examination of the American journey within the past 4 years and the events from the past century that led us here: the post-WWII manufacturing prosperity from 1947-1974, the economic policies of the Reagan administration and the impact of business deregulation, privatization and massive cuts in non-military domestic discretionary spending, and, finally, how September 11th shattered the notion of American invincibility and instilled fear throughout the nation. •

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Karlis Bergs, Untitled, from Between the Lake and the Sea


THE

GALLERY The Gallery is a curation of images submitted by young photographers from the United States and beyond in response to the theme: TRACES We are interested in hints of the past visible in the present. A trace can be an outline of a place or its people. Photographs provide us with the surface and coax us to explore the layers beneath, be they real or imagined. 39


Russell Barsanti, Figure Ground

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Sandy Honig, Untitled

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Juncong Mo, Father and Son

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Jolie Maya Altshuler, Untitled

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Jackson Krule, Untitled Right: Nikki Woloshyn, All Of Our Plants In My Mother’s Room


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Ruiseco, Erika Norell backstage at Off The Hookah Upper Left: Denny, Untitled (Woods Hole, MA) Lower Left: Edelman Brier, Wet Feet

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Jake Lindeman, Hease, Marfa, TX

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Jake Lindeman, Ninth Ward, New Orleans Left: Aaron Breetwor, Surface No. 2

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Nikki Woloshyn, Wisconsin House (Green Room)



Elena Kendall, Moon Echoes

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Elena Kendall, To Devour Mariannene

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Soleil Garneau, Untitled Right: Alexandra Jordana, Untitled

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Jake Lindeman, Forest Previous: Qiren Hu, from The Emperor Arrives


Leah Edleman-Brier, Holding Right: Soleil Garneau, Untitled

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Jenny Regan, Family Room

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EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Perri Hofmann perrihofmann@gmail.com MANAGING EDITOR Haley Weiss hweiss@nyu.edu PUBLISHER Aaron Breetwor aaron.breetwor@gmail.com DESIGN Bobbie Richardson bobbieprichardson@gmail.com Nate Davis Perri Hofmann COPY EDITOR Olivia Manno oam228@nyu.edu COMMUNICATIONS Tess Mayer tm1640@nyu.edu Elisabeth Berezansky Carolyn Pankin Morgan Russell

ONLINE EDITOR James Huang jlh486@nyu.edu WRITERS Paul Funkhouser prf232@nyu.edu Nat Marcus nathanielmarcus@gmail.com Olivia Manno Jonah Rosenberg Haley Weiss

PHOTO EDITORS Jonah Rosenberg jonaharosenberg@gmail.com

PRINTED AT OFFSET IMPRESSIONS IN READING, PENNSYLVANIA ON 70 LB LYNX OPAQUE EDITION OF 1000

Mark Davis mtd322@nyu.edu Nate Davis Soleil Garneau James Huang Bella Parisot Morgan Russell GALLERY CONTRIBUTORS (In order of appearance) Karlis Bergs, Chicago, IL, karlisbergs.com Russell Barsanti, Brooklyn, NY, russellbarsanti.com Sandy Honig, Brooklyn, NY, sandy-honig.com Juncong Mo, Phoenix, AZ, moportfolio.lofter.com Jolie Maya Altshuler, Brooklyn, NY, joliemayaaltshuler.tumblr.com Jackson Krule, New York, NY, krule.tumblr.com Nikki Woloshyn, Chicago, IL, nikkiwoloshyn.com Frances F. Denny, Providence, RI, francesfdenny.com Leah Edelman-Brier, Syracuse, NY, leahedelmanbrier.com Alexis Ruiseco, New York, NY, alexisruiseco.com Jake Lindeman, Salt Lake City, UT, jakelindeman.com Aaron Breetwor, San Francisco, CA, aaronbreetworphoto.com Elena Kendall, Madrid, Spain, elenakendall.com Soleil Garneau, Brooklyn, NY Alexandra Jordana, Barcelona, Spain, alexandrajordana.tumblr.com Qiren Hu, Singapore, visualgarden.sg Jenny Regan, New York, NY, jennyreganphotography.com GENEROUS SUPPORT FROM Sue & David Apfelberg Andrea Brooks Matt Duke Cheryl & Eric Evans Diane Evans Gina Falsetto & Warren Brown Mary Gates & Gary Hermansen Barry & Jackie Posner Mark Vorsatz New York University Tisch School of the Arts, Photography & Imaging Tisch Undergraduate Student Council SPECIAL THANKS Jodi Bailey Irene Cho Jackie Danziger Sonia Davis Editha Mesina Caroline Wolfe Papocchia Akaylah Reed Fred Ritchin Shelly Smith Julia Wang


Smears by Christian Nam, Chicago, IL, christiannam.com Back Cover: Juan Madrid, Discarded shirt on the south side from Welcome to Flint.


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