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Grade by Grade Guide

Overview of Materials

Family Media Management

Internet Safety

Tip sheet

Video

Discussion Guide

Grade range

Healthy Media Diet

Digital Life

PreK-8

Managing Multitasking

Media Multitasking

3-12

Setting Computer Limits

Rules of the Road for Parents in a Digital Age

K-8

Rules of the Road for Parents in a Digital Age

Rules of the Road for Parents in a Digital Age

PreK-12

Internet Safety for Elementary School Kids

Digital Life

Internet Safety

K-4

Internet Safety for Middle School Kids

Digital Life

Internet Safety

5-8

Internet Safety for High School Kids

Digital Life

Internet Safety

9-12

Internet Filters

Digital Life

Internet Safety

PreK-6

Online Security

Digital Life

Internet Safety

1-12

Safe Online Talk

Digital Life

Internet Safety

3-12

Cyberbullying

Cyberbullying

Cyberbullying

3-12

Video Chatting

Connected Culture

Internet Safety

7-12


Grade by Grade Guide

Overview of Materials

Social Networking and Online Worlds

Mobile and Communicating

Tip sheet

Video

Discussion Guide

Grade range

Connected Culture

Connected Culture

Social Networking

5-12

Facebook for Parents

Facebook for Parents

Social Networking

5-12

Online Worlds For Young Kids

Online Worlds For Young Kids

Online Worlds for Young Kids

K-6

Social Networking

Social Networking

Social Networking

5-12

Club Penguin

Online Worlds For Young Kids

Online Worlds for Young Kids

K-2

Cyberbullying

Cyberbullying

Cyberbullying

3-12

Money Lessons in Online Worlds

Online Worlds For Young Kids

Online Worlds for Young Kids

K-6

Cell Phones

Cell Phones

Cell phones

3-12

Responsible Text Messaging

Texting or Texting While Driving

Cell phones

3-12

Sexting

Sexting

Cell phones

3-12

Cyberbullying

Cyberbullying

Cyberbullying

3-12

Internet Safety

5-8

Instant Messaging


Grade by Grade Guide

Overview of Materials

Digital Citizenship

Creating Media

Physical Health

Tip sheet

Video

Discussion Guide

Grade range

Connected Culture

Connected Culture

Social Networking

5-12

Digital Life

Digital Life

Internet Safety

3-12

Privacy and Digital Footprints

Privacy and Digital Footprints

Privacy and Digital Footprints

5-12

Respecting Creative Work

Respecting Creative Work

Respecting Creative Work

5-12

Self-expression and identity

Self-expression and Identity

Self-Expression and Identity Online

3-12

Youtube and Your Kids

Youtube and Your Kids

—

1-12

Creating With Digital Media

Creating with Digital Media

Respecting Creative Work

3-12

Respecting Creative Work

Creating with Digital Media

Respecting Creative Work

5-12

Girls and Body Image

Girls and Body Image

Body Image

3-8

Boys and Body Image

Boys and Body Image

Body Image

3-12

Smoking in Media

Smoking in Media

Selling to Kids

5-12

Alcohol in Media

Alcohol in Media

Selling to Kids

5-12

Junk Food Ads

Junk Food Ads

Selling to Kids

PreK-8


Grade by Grade Guide

Overview of Materials

Tip sheet

Video

Discussion Guide

Grade range

Media Violence

Media Violence or TV Violence

Media Violence

PreK-6

Scary Movies

Scary Movies

Media Violence

PreK-4

Sex and Media

Sex and Media

Sex and Media

5-12

Money Lessons in Online Worlds

Online Worlds for Young Kids

Online Worlds for Young Kids

K-6

Selling to Kids

Selling to Kids

Selling to Kids

PreK-8

Junk Food Ads

Junk Food Ads

Selling to Kids

PreK-8

Digital Cheating

Respecting Creative Work

Respecting Creative Work

5-12

Media for Babies and Toddlers

Toddlers and TV

PreK

Wikipedia

Wikipedia

3-12

Smart Search Online

1-12

Gaming

Gaming

Video and Online Games or Online Gaming

Gaming

3-12

Music

Music and Your Kids

Music and Your Kids

3-12

Digital Piracy

7-12

Battling Stereotypes

Celebrity Role Models

3-12

Celebrity Role Models

Celebrity Role Models

1-12

Sex and Violence

Consumerism

Celebrities and Stereotypes


Grade by Grade Guide

Pre-kindergarten

The information included in this guide is a reference point for what most children are exposed to at each grade level. All children and families are different; therefore, this guide may not be accurate for some children.

Your PreK’s media life

Where kids are developmentally

»» Educational shows and cartoons on broadcast

»» Enjoy love songs, rhymes, and being entertained

and cable channels, such as PBS, Disney, and Nickelodeon Animated »» Live action G and some PG-rated movies »» Music that parents play and that kids hear on

the radio »» Early exposure to advertising on television shows

and from product tie-ins to fast food, toys, etc. »» Games played online (e.g., PBSKids), on handheld

devices (Leapfrog) and on consoles

Main media challenges for parents »» Establishing time limits »» Determining what media are age appropriate »» Children’s exposure to consumerism, in particular

licensed characters from favorite TV shows and movies being used to sell toys, junk food, etc. »» Children’s exposure to and imitation of fantasy

violence »» Children’s exposure to inappropriate media at

friends’ houses

»» Have trouble separating make-believe from reality »» Often imitate others’ behaviors »» Have mastery over their bodies and are able to point

and click »» Are learning to play and interact with other kids,

thus figuring out boundaries »» Are easily frightened, don’t understand sarcasm

or satire, are very gullible

Parent education topics »» Healthy Media Diet »» Internet Filters »» Junk Food Ads »» Media for Babies and Toddlers »» Media Violence »» Rules of the Road for Parents in a Digital Age »» Scary Movies »» Selling To Kids

»» Balancing media needs with older siblings

Common Sense Media, an independent nonprofit, is dedicated to improving the lives of kids and families by providing the trustworthy information, education, and independent voice they need to thrive in a world of media and technology. © 2010 www.commonsense.org


Grade by Grade Guide

Kindergarten

The information included in this guide is a reference point for what most children are exposed to at each grade level. All children and families are different; therefore, this guide may not be accurate for some children.

Your kindergartner’s media life

Where kids are developmentally

»» Cartoons on broadcast and cable channels such as

»» Know the alphabet and some basic literacy skills

PBS, Disney, and Nickelodeon »» Animated and live action G and some PG-rated movies »» Matching, coloring, educational, and fantasy online

games on Web sites such as Lego, PBSKids, Barbie, and Disney »» E-rated educational, sports, and fantasy games on

video consoles and handhelds

Main media challenges for parents »» Establishing time limits »» Deciding whether to allow computer/online use »» Setting up online safety, safe search, and parental

control features on computers and game consoles »» Children’s exposure to consumerism, in particular

licensed characters from favorite TV shows and movies being used to sell toys, junk food, etc. »» Children’s exposure to and imitation of “bathroom”

humor and language »» Children’s exposure to and imitation of fantasy

violence

»» Will use swear words and “potty humor” to

get attention »» Still afraid of the dark, loud noises, and strangers »» Love humor – especially slapstick »» Can’t distinguish between fantasy and reality »» Much play involves active make-believe and fantasy »» Do not understand that the intent of commercials

is to sell something

Parent education topics »» Club Penguin »» Healthy Media Diet »» Internet Filters »» Internet Safety for Elementary School Kids »» Junk Food Ads »» Media Violence »» Money Lessons in Online Worlds »» Online Worlds for Young Kids »» Rules of the Road for Parents in a Digital Age »» Scary Movies »» Selling To Kids »» Setting Computer Limits

Common Sense Media, an independent nonprofit, is dedicated to improving the lives of kids and families by providing the trustworthy information, education, and independent voice they need to thrive in a world of media and technology. © 2010 www.commonsense.org


Grade by Grade Guide

1st and 2nd grades

The information included in this guide is a reference point for what most children are exposed to at each grade level. All children and families are different; therefore, this guide may not be accurate for some children.

Your first and second grader’s media life

Where kids are developmentally

»» Cartoons and preteen sitcoms on broadcast and cable

»» Learning to type

channels such as PBS, Disney, and Nickelodeon »» Animated and live action G and PG-rated movies »» Matching, coloring, educational, and fantasy online

games on Web sites such as Stardolls, Cartoon Doll Emporium, and Line Rider »» Creating their own avatars online with site such as

Neopets, Club Penguin, and Webkinz »» Beginning online searches »» E-rated and E10+-rated educational, sports, and

fantasy games on video consoles and handhelds

Main media challenges for parents »» Establishing appropriate limits on time and access »» Setting up online safety, filtered search, safe chat,

and parental control features »» Establishing basic Internet safety rules and teaching

safe ways to search »» Children’s exposure to inappropriate content as they

begin to browse and search »» Children’s exposure to consumerism, in particular

licensed characters from favorite TV shows and movies being used to sell toys, junk food, etc., as well as advergames, advertisements, and product tie-ins to online worlds »» Helping kids manage hurt feelings if they are excluded

from groups or games in online virtual worlds

»» Improving reading ability »» Very literal »» Learning to make up their own minds »» Vocabulary increases ahead of comprehension »» Beginning of team sports and social groupings

Parent education topics »» Celebrity Role Models »» Club Penguin »» Healthy Media Diet »» Internet Filters »» Internet Safety for Elementary School Kids »» Junk Food Ads »» Media Violence »» Money Lessons in Online Worlds »» Online Security »» Online Worlds for Young Kids »» Rules of the Road for Parents in a Digital Age »» Scary Movies »» Selling To Kids »» Setting Computer Limits »» YouTube and Your Kids

»» Children’s exposure to and imitation of fantasy violence

Common Sense Media, an independent nonprofit, is dedicated to improving the lives of kids and families by providing the trustworthy information, education, and independent voice they need to thrive in a world of media and technology. © 2010 www.commonsense.org


Grade by Grade Guide

3rd and 4th grades

The information included in this guide is a reference point for what most children are exposed to at each grade level. All children and families are different; therefore, this guide may not be accurate for some children.

Your third- and fourth-grader’s media life

Main media challenges for parents

»» Cartoons, tween sitcoms, and reality shows

»» Loss of control of media selection

on broadcast and cable channels such as Disney, Nickelodeon, ABC Family, Fox, and the CW »» Live action PG and some PG-13 rated movies »» Creating their own avatars online with site such

as Neopets, Club Penguin, and Webkinz »» Multi-player online games such as Dizzywood »» Starts visiting video sharing sites like YouTube »» Email accounts »» Using the Internet for school work »» E10+ and some T-rated sports, action, and fantasy

games on video consoles and handhelds »» Cell phones

»» Setting time limits »» Setting up online safety and parental control features »» Balancing kids’ growing independence with safety

concerns, particularly as related to sharing personal information online »» Kids seeking or stumbling upon inappropriate online

content and sharing with others »» Some cheating, stealing, and mean chat in online

games and virtual worlds »» Credibility of information in news and online sources »» Self-directed communication online via email and

mobile phones »» Children’s exposure to consumerism, in particular

advergames, advertisements, and product tie-ins to online worlds »» Children’s exposure to violence in games »» Recognition of race and gender stereotypes »» Body image issues related to skinny models/celebrities

and toned athletes »» Inability for kids to know when to turn off handheld

gaming devices or exit multi-player online games »» Deciding whether to purchase a personal cell phone

Where kids are developmentally »» Body consciousness »» Idolizing older kids and trying to “age up” »» Can understand the difference between fantasy

and reality »» Can follow several story lines at once »» Peer pressure begins


Parent education topics »» Battling Stereotypes »» Boys and Body Image »» Celebrity Role Models »» Cell Phones »» Club Penguin »» Creating With Digital Media »» Cyberbullying »» Digital Life »» Gaming »» Girls and Body Image »» Healthy Media Diet »» Internet Filters »» Internet Safety for Elementary School Kids »» Junk Food Ads »» Managing Multitasking »» Media Violence »» Money Lessons in Online Worlds »» Music and Your Kids »» Online Security »» Online Worlds for Young Kids »» Research and Evaluation »» Rules of the Road for Parents in a Digital Age »» Safe Online Talk »» Scary Movies »» Selling To Kids »» Setting Computer Limits »» Smart Searching Online »» Text Messaging »» Wikipedia »» YouTube and Your Kids

© 2010 www.commonsense.org

Common Sense Media, an independent nonprofit, is dedicated to improving the lives of kids and families by providing the trustworthy information, education, and independent voice they need to thrive in a world of media and technology.


Grade by Grade Guide

5th and 6th grades

The information included in this guide is a reference point for what most children are exposed to at each grade level. All children and families are different; therefore, this guide may not be accurate for some children.

Your fifth- and sixth-grader’s media life

Main media challenges for parents

»» Preteen and teen sitcoms, reality shows, and some

»» Setting time limits

adult dramas on broadcast and cable channels such as the CW, Fox, NBC, and MTV »» Live action PG, PG-13, and some R-rated movies »» Online worlds with their own avatars and social

networking sites »» Fan sites like Harry Potter »» Multi-player online games such as Runescape »» Video sharing sites like YouTube »» Email accounts »» Instant messaging »» Adult music, music videos, and iPods with video »» Using the Internet for school work, including

search, blogging »» T and some M-rated sports, action, and fantasy

games on video consoles and handhelds »» Cell phones

»» Loss of control of media selection »» Setting up online safety and parental control features »» Balancing kids’ growing independence with safety

concerns, particularly as related to sharing personal information online »» Credibility of information in news and online sources »» Self-directed communication online via email and

mobile phones »» Establishing a code of ethics online related to

cyberbullying and cheating »» Children’s exposure to rampant consumerism, in

particular advergames, advertisements, and product tie-ins to online worlds »» Children’s exposure to violence in games »» Recognition of race and gender stereotypes »» Children’s exposure to glamorized adult behavior —

such as sex, smoking, and drinking — with few consequences »» Body image issues related to skinny models/celebrities

and toned athletes »» Deciding whether to purchase a personal cell phone

Where kids are developmentally »» Preadolescence hits, secondary sex characteristics

developing »» Moody, independent, breaking away from parents »» Peer relations and group dynamics very important »» Kids’ social interaction segregates into “types” »» Acute awareness of differences in race, sexual

preference, physical strength, ability, and/or beauty »» Early sexual posing »» Ability to understand abstract ideas


Parent education topics »» Alcohol in the Media

»» Respecting Creative Work

»» Battling Stereotypes

»» Rules of the Road for Parents in a Digital Age

»» Boys and Body Image

»» Safe Online Talk

»» Celebrity Role Models

»» Self-expression and identity

»» Cell Phones

»» Selling To Kids

»» Connected Culture

»» Setting Computer Limits

»» Creating With Digital Media

»» Sex and Media

»» Cyberbullying

»» Sexting

»» Digital Life

»» Smart Searching Online

»» Facebook

»» Smoking in the Media

»» Gaming

»» Social Networking

»» Girls and Body Image

»» Text Messaging

»» Healthy Media Diet

»» Wikipedia

»» High-Tech Cheating

»» YouTube and Your Kids

»» Instant Messaging »» Internet Filters »» Internet Safety for Middle School Kids »» Junk Food Ads »» Managing Multitasking »» Media Violence »» Money Lessons in Online Worlds »» Music and Your Kids »» Online Security »» Online Worlds for Young Kids »» Protecting and Respecting Online Privacy »» Research and Evaluation

© 2010 www.commonsense.org

Common Sense Media, an independent nonprofit, is dedicated to improving the lives of kids and families by providing the trustworthy information, education, and independent voice they need to thrive in a world of media and technology.


Grade by Grade Guide

7th and 8th grades

The information included in this guide is a reference point for what most children are exposed to at each grade level. All children and families are different; therefore, this guide may not be accurate for some children.

Your seventh and eighth grader’s media life

Main media challenges for parents

»» Reality shows and adult dramas on broadcast and

»» Temptation to cheat on school work using technology

cable channels such as the CW, Fox, NBC, and MTV »» Live action PG-13 and R-rated movies »» Online worlds with their own avatars and social

networking sites such as Facebook and MySpace »» Multi-player online games aimed at older kids such

as World of Warcraft and Halo 3

»» Cyberbullying and sexting

»» Communication and media consumption gets private

and portable »» Loss of control of media selection »» Balancing kids’ growing independence with safety

concerns, particularly as related to sharing personal information online

»» Video sharing sites such as YouTube

»» Credibility of information in news and online sources

»» Email accounts

»» Self-directed communication online via email and

»» Instant messaging »» Adult music, music videos, iPods with video »» Using the Internet for school work, including

search, blogging »» Creating and uploading photos, videos, music, games »» T and M-rated sports, action, and fantasy games

on video consoles and handhelds »» Cell phones, texting

mobile phones »» Establishing a code of ethics online related to

cyberbullying and cheating »» Children’s exposure to rampant consumerism, in

particular advergames, advertisements, and product tie-ins to online worlds »» Children’s exposure to violence in games »» Recognition of race and gender stereotypes »» Children’s exposure to glamorized adult behavior —

such as sex, smoking, and drinking — with few consequences »» Children’s exposure to glamorized adult behavior with

few consequences such as sex, smoking, and drinking »» Body image issues related to skinny models/celebrities

and toned athletes

Where kids are developmentally »» Sexual experimentation begins »» Intense peer relationships with outliers punished

socially »» Kids pulling away from family and shifting to friends »» Care about looks and appearance, and being accepted;

easily offended and sensitive to personal criticism »» At risk for developing anti-social tendencies,

depending on peer groups »» Can reflect, analyze, and confront moral and

ethical questions, but aren’t necessarily ready to deal with answers


Parent education topics »» Alcohol in the Media

»» Sexting

»» Battling Stereotypes

»» Smart Searching Online

»» Boys and Body Image

»» Smoking in the Media

»» Celebrity Role Models

»» Social Networking

»» Cell Phones

»» Text Messaging

»» Connected Culture

»» Video Chatting

»» Creating With Digital Media

»» Wikipedia

»» Cyberbullying

»» YouTube and Your Kids

»» Digital Life »» Digital Piracy »» Facebook »» Gaming »» Girls and Body Image »» Healthy Media Diet »» High-Tech Cheating »» Instant Messaging »» Internet Safety for Middle School Kids »» Junk Food Ads »» Managing Multitasking »» Music and Your Kids »» Online Security »» Protecting and Respecting Online Privacy »» Research and Evaluation »» Respecting Creative Work »» Rules of the Road for Parents in a Digital Age »» Safe Online Talk »» Self-expression and identity »» Selling To Kids »» Setting Computer Limits »» Sex and Media

© 2010 www.commonsense.org

Common Sense Media, an independent nonprofit, is dedicated to improving the lives of kids and families by providing the trustworthy information, education, and independent voice they need to thrive in a world of media and technology.


Grade by Grade Guide

High school

The information included in this guide is a reference point for what most children are exposed to at each grade level. All children and families are different; therefore, this guide may not be accurate for some children.

Your high schooler’s media life

Main media challenges for parents

»» Reality shows and adult dramas on broadcast and

»» Media is personal, private, portable

cable channels such as the CW, Fox, NBC, and MTV »» Live action PG-13 and R-rated movies »» Online worlds with their own avatars and social

networking sites such as Facebook and MySpace

»» Loss of control of media selection »» Balancing kids’ growing independence with safety

concerns, particularly as related to sharing personal information online

»» Multi-player online games such as World of Warcraft

»» Credibility of information in news and online sources

»» Video sharing sites such as YouTube

»» Self-directed communication online via email and

»» Email accounts »» Instant messaging »» iPods with video »» Using the Internet for school work, including search,

blogging »» T and M-rated sports, action, and fantasy games

on video consoles and handhelds »» Cell phones with texting »» Online pornography

mobile phones »» Establishing a code of ethics online related to

cyberbullying and cheating »» Children’s exposure to violence in games, »» Recognition of race and gender stereotypes »» Children’s exposure to glamorized adult behavior —

such as sex, smoking, and drinking — with few consequences »» Body image issues related to skinny models/celebrities

and toned athletes »» Sexual sites »» Social media sites’ effects on college admissions »» Social media sites’ effects on employment

Where kids are developmentally »» Sexual development leading to experimentation »» Identity development and experimentation »» Need for social reinforcement from peers »» Independence from parents and need for privacy »» Able to understand abstract concepts


Parent education topics »» Alcohol in the Media »» Battling Stereotypes »» Celebrity Role Models »» Cell Phones »» Connected Culture »» Creating With Digital Media »» Cyberbullying »» Digital Life »» Digital Piracy »» Facebook »» Gaming »» High-Tech Cheating »» Internet Safety for High School Kids »» Managing Multitasking »» Music and Your Kids »» Online Security »» Protecting and Respecting Online Privacy »» Research and Evaluation »» Respecting Creative Work »» Rules of the Road for Parents in a Digital Age »» Self-expression and identity »» Sex and Media »» Sexting »» Smoking in the Media »» Social Networking »» Text Messaging »» Video Chatting »» Wikipedia »» YouTube and Your Kids

© 2010 www.commonsense.org

Common Sense Media, an independent nonprofit, is dedicated to improving the lives of kids and families by providing the trustworthy information, education, and independent voice they need to thrive in a world of media and technology.

Grade by Grade Guide  

The Grade by Grade Guide serves as a reference point for the media most students are exposed to at each grade level. Please note that all ch...

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