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3RD/4TH Quarter 2018 • www.ipha.org

Meeting IPhA’s 138th President

Dr. Laura Licari, PharmD


In This Issue COLUMNS 4 President’s Viewpoint 6 Executive Director’s Viewpoint 26 Pharmacy Time Capsule 47 IPhA Foundation 48 Welcome Aboard to 2018 New Members 50 Pharmacy Time Capsule 52 10 Reasons to Join IPhA 54 Join + Support Your Local Associations 56 Illinois State Opioid Antagonist Training Program 59 PAC 

FEATURED THIS ISSUE 12 Rx and the Law — Marijuana Development 14 Rx and the Law — Documentation in the Modern World 16 PMG Financial Forum — Are Too Many Baby Boomers Too Indebted? 18 PMG Financial Forum — Comprehensive Financial Planning: What It Is, Why It Matters? 20 New Practitioner Network 21 From the Editor — On Being A Chain Drug Pharmacist 22 APhA — Certification 23 APhA — Health Information Technology 28 2018 Annual Conference Highlights

33 Annual Conference Exhibitors 36 2018 Annual Conference President’s Banquet 38 2018 Annual Conference Jeopardy 40 2018 Award Recipients

ADVERTISER’S INDEX 3 HD Smith 11 PACE Alliance 15 Pharmacy Quality Commitment 27 Health Mart.Pharmacy 51 Online Career Center 53 Pharmacists Mutual 55 Pharmacy Technician Certification Board 59 PAAS Back Cover PMPnow

Page 39 Annual Conference Jeopardy

IPhA Executive Committee

IPhA Staff

Chairman of the Board Jessica Kerr, PharmD, CDE jekerr@siue.edu

Executive Director Garth Reynolds, RPh greynolds@ipha.org

President Laura Licari, PharmD lauralicaripharmd@gmail.com

Accounting Manager Erica Pinkley ericab@ipha.org

Vice President Miranda Wilhelm, PharmD miwilhe@siue.edu

Member Services Manager Kimberly Condon kimc@ipha.org

President-Elect Beaux Cole, PharmD, FAARM, ABAAHP beaux.cole@me.com

Administrative & Communications Assistant Jamie Reynolds jamier@ipha.org

Treasurer David Mikus, RPh davetravel1@aol.com

Director of Clinical Programs Starlin Haydon-Greatting, RPh starlin@ipha.org

Secretary Harry Zollars, PharmD hmzollars@gmail.com

Illinois Pharmacists Association | 204 W Cook Street | Springfield, IL 62704 Phone: (217) 522-7300 | Fax: (217) 522-7349 Email: ipha@ipha.org | Website: www.ipha.org

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MISSION STATEMENT: The Illinois Pharmacists Association is dedicated to enhancing the professional competency of pharmacists, advancing the standards of pharmacy practice, improving pharmacists’ effectiveness in assuring rational drug use in society, and leading in the resolution of public policy issues affecting pharmacists. VOLUME 81, NUMBER 2 (3rd/4th Qtr 2018): The Illinois Pharmacist (ISSN 0195-2099) is published quarterly by the Illinois Pharmacists Association located at 204 W Cook, Springfield, IL 62704. Subscriptions are $200 per year. Periodical postage paid at Pontiac, IL and additional mailing offices. Postmaster: Send address changes to Illinois Pharmacist, 204 W Cook, Springfield, IL 62704 * Phone: (217) 522-7300 * Fax: (217) 522-7349. All contents ©2014 Illinois Pharmacists Association. STATEMENT OF PURPOSE: The Illinois Pharmacist is a forum for debate and new ideas regarding pharmacy in the State of Illinois. Its goals are to keep members informed on legislative and regulatory developments and pharmacy practice issues, to help members improve job performance by providing practical information and to inform members about Association activities. The opinions and positions expressed in articles contained in the Illinois Pharmacist are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the opinions and positions of the membership, officers, directors or staff of the Illinois Pharmacists Association. Illinois Pharmacist reserves the right to reject any advertising considered by management to be objectionable. Illinois Pharmacist also reserves the right to place the word “advertisement” on any ad it believes to resemble editorial material.

ILLINOIS PHARMACISTS ASSOCIATION • VOL. 82 - NO. 2 (3rd AND 4th QTR 2018)


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President’s Viewpoint

I

am honored to stand before you as the 138th President of the Illinois Pharmacists Association (IPhA). From the beginning of our association in 1880, we have been led by Presidents who each found personal meaning in the Association and its work to represent pharmacists in all practices settings to advance pharmacist delivered patientcentered care. As such, I am equally excited to have the opportunity to take on this role and to have a moment to share with you what IPhA means to me and the very important work that still needs to be done. And if you are newer in the room, or are my non-pharmacist friends and family, the last few years have been so exciting for IPhA.

And now, this is where my giant heart comes into play! It’s easy to think that perfect grades, the highest IQ, and dedication, are the most important pre-requisites to find and fill leadership roles. And the truth is, anyone and everyone is and can be a leader. IPhA has given me those leadership opportunities, but it’s really how much heart you put into it! That’s what I have, and it is a big part of what has gotten me here today. Along the way, the professors, mentors, colleagues and staff of IPhA have all had the most determined hearts I’ve ever seen. And pretty quickly I knew how important IPhA was going to be to me in my life, was how strongly I was going to feel about the work we do in our pharmacy association.

Our IPhA staff have worked so hard to get our membership revitalized, secure our financial future, and the whole time doing it with humor and enthusiasm. They are a small group that works with limited resources, and for their efforts I am forever grateful. And to embarrass our immediate past-president, I have learned SO much about how to be the leader that I want to be from Jess Kerr. Her dedication and patience are unmatched, and how to motivate people is her strong suit. I already look forward to long phone calls this year while she is coaching her sons’ soccer games while I pepper her with questions and ask for guidance. With the current task force in the state legislature that can affect the Pharmacy Practice Act, that is the type of leader I know I need to emulate.

The state of Illinois has a large amount of pharmacy practices with a very diverse group of practicing pharmacists. What’s more, each of these practices and pharmacists have interests and needs that can be specific to their individual practice sites. As a result, at times it can feel like it’s going to be hard to put all the pieces of the puzzle together. Still, I have seen great progress to represent all pharmacists in our state with mutual interests to improve patient care and the needs of pharmacists while I have been on the IPhA board.

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For example, achieving provider status has moved the furthest forward it ever has which recognizes pharmacists as healthcare providers with the ability to bill for our services. What’s more, our communities we

IPhA President Dr. Laura Licari, PharmD serve actually know what provider status means now, and our national associations continue to push forward aggressively and are right on target. In addition, the roles of pharmacy technicians continue to expand each year, and that provides an even better foundation for a team-based-patient-centered practice. There’s never been a bigger emphasis on interdisciplinary care, that no longer centers on the physician, but instead emphasizes that the patient is the center of the healthcare team. This change really creates an endless limit of opportunities for pharmacists. It also creates the need for unification in our profession to fight to be recognized as providers, and clear, strong, message that pharmacists do provide care! We already know pharmacists provide care here in IL and, indeed, we have always been progressive when it comes to the practice of pharmacy, both for pharmacists and technicians. In fact, current legislative initiatives include work to pass a

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bill that would allow pharmacists to prescribe and dispense oral contraceptives. This is an important public health initiative, and a multidisciplinary effort made not only by pharmacists but endorsed by the Illinois Medical Society and other stakeholders. If IPhA is successful in passing this bill, we will have achieved provider status in Illinois!! In the last year, we have also taken on the very important task of addressing

That’s really the best part of being a member of a professional organization, you feel that passion with your colleagues who are striving to achieve the same goals. Everyone wants the best outcomes for their patients, and that shared goal makes the work we do so important. It really is the most thrilling time to be part of the profession of pharmacy. But, it’s hard right now

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pharmacy reimbursement and successfully passed our bill in the House! Back in the spring, our Legislative and Regulatory Affairs committee would have phone calls every Monday during the legislative session that were so exciting I literally was pacing around on the phone at how exciting it was so see our bill get further and further. And the tide is turning as pharmacists, technicians, and the public see how pharmacy is changing, and more importantly it brings everyone together. Which builds enthusiasm!

too, and sometimes it doesn’t always feel like the best time. My very good friend recently said to me “Just how MANY full moons do we have this month?!” as so many things seemed to have happened in just one day at the pharmacy. But, I know in this room I am preaching to the choir. This is an amazing group of people who are ready to do just that. This is why I am so excited for the next year: I know that everyone has their own strong heart inside of them ready to lead our profession into the future! ILLINOIS PHARMACISTS ASSOCIATION • WWW.IPHA.ORG

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Executive Director’s Viewpoint

2018 in Review – Pharmacy Law and Policy IPhA Executive Director Garth K. Reynolds, BSPharm, RPh As we look back at 2018, Illinois Pharmacy has an active legislative year. Below we will review legislation that has passed that will be impacting your practice. Also, we had major, positive movement on Managed Medicaid and PBM reform legislation. HB3479 swiftly passed the House but unfortunately did not make it through the Senate by the May 31st deadline. We have continued to advocate and work on solutions for PBM reform to be introduced in the 2019 legislative session. REVIEW OF RECENT AND NEWLY ENACTED PHARMACY LAWS

Prescription Limit | Public Act 100-0804 | Effective January 1, 2019 – SB3170

Sponsor: Senator Steve Stadelman (D-Rockford) • Amends the Pharmacy Practice Act and the Illinois Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. • Provides that a prescription for medication other than controlled substances shall be valid for up to 15 months from the date issued for the purpose of refills, unless the prescription states otherwise.

Asthma Medication| Public Act 100-0726 | Effective January 1, 2019 – SB3015

Sponsor: Senator David Koehler (D-Peoria) • Amends the School Code. • Allows self-administration and self-carry of asthma 6

medication, provides that a school district, public school, charter school, or nonpublic school may authorize school nurse or trained personnel to provide undesignated asthma medication to a student for self-administration only or to any personnel authorized under a student’s Individual Health Care Action Plan or asthma action plan

Patient Rights - Transition | Public Act 100-1052 | Effective August 24, 2018 – HB4146

Sponsor: Representative Laura Fine (D-Glenview) • Amends the Managed Care Reform and Patient Rights Act. • During an enrollee’s plan year, prohibits a health care plan from removing a drug from its formulary or negatively changing its preferred or cost-tier sharing unless, at least 60 days before making the formulary change, the health care plan provides certain notifications to current and prospective enrollees and prescribing providers. For Plans starting January 1, 2019.

Telehealth Definition| Public Act 100-0644 | Effective January 1, 2019 - HB5070

Sponsor: Representative Patti Bellock (R-Westmont) • Amends the Telehealth Act. • Amends “health care professional” includes dentists, occupational therapists, pharmacists, physical therapists, clinical social workers, speech-language pathologists, audiologists, and hearing instrument

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Executive Director’s Viewpoint (continued) dispensers (rather than any clinician licensed to provided medical services under Illinois law).

Telehealth Diabetes| Public Act 100-1009 | Effective January 1, 2019 – HB5351

Sponsor: Representative Ryan Spain (R-Peoria) • Amends the Illinois Insurance Code. • Individual or group policy provides coverage for telehealth, provides that the individual or group policy must provide coverage for licensed dietitian nutritionists and certified diabetes educators (rather than licensed dietitians, nutritionists, and diabetes educators).

Hydrocodone Reclassification | Public Act 100-0989 | Effective August 20, 2018 - HB4707 Changed to Prescription Drug Task Force Sponsor: Representative Sue Scherer (D-Decatur) • Amends the Illinois Controlled Substances Act. • Changes the classification of Hydrocodone from a Schedule II controlled substance to a Schedule I controlled substance.

NOTE: House Amendment -#1 Replaced the entire bill and instead formed a Prescription Drug Task Force to review the issue.

Unused Antibiotics - Disposal | Public Act 100-0925 | Effective January 1, 2019 – SB2524 Changed to Pharmaceutical Disposal Task Force

Sponsor: Senator Chapin Rose (R-Champaign) • Amends the Department of Public Health Powers and Duties Law of the Civil Administrative Code of Illinois. • Requires the Department of Public Health and Illinois Emergency Management Agency to collaborate to review and recommend new State laws for the disposal of unused antibiotics.

Senate Amendment #1 – Replaces the entire bill: Creates the Pharmaceutical Disposal Task Force. (which IPhA will be a part). Epinephrine Administration | Public Act 1000799 | Effective January 1, 2019 – SB2889

Sponsor: Senator Chapin Rose (R-Champaign) • Creates the Epinephrine Administration Act. • Provides that a health care practitioner may prescribe epinephrine pre-filled syringes in the name of an authorized entity where allergens capable of causing anaphylaxis may be present. • Provides that an authorized entity may acquire and stock a supply of undesignated epinephrine pre-filled syringes provided the undesignated epinephrine prefilled syringes are stored in a specified location.

Prescription Monitoring Program | Public Act 100-1005 | Effective August 21, 2018 – HB4650

Sponsor: Representative Michael Zalewski (D-Riverside) • Amends the Illinois Controlled Substance Act. • Defines “pharmacist” to include, but be not limited to, a pharmacist associated with a health maintenance organization or a Medicaid managed care entity providing services under the Illinois Public Aid Code.

Prescription Monitoring Program | Public Act 100-0861 | Effective August 14, 2018 - HB4907

Sponsor: Representative Michael McAuliffe (D-Chicago) • Amends the Illinois Controlled Substance Act. • Allows prescribers or pharmacists to authorize a licensed or non-licensed designee (rather than any designee) employed in that licensed prescriber’s office or licensed pharmacist’s pharmacy and who has received training in the federal Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act to consult the Prescription Monitoring Program on their behalf. [Now Only Licensed Designee in Pharmacy - House Amendment #1] • Selection of 3 physicians, 2 pharmacists, and one dentist, of the Prescription Monitoring Program Advisory Committee to serve as members of the peer review subcommittee.

ILLINOIS PHARMACISTS ASSOCIATION • WWW.IPHA.ORG

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Executive Director’s Viewpoint (continued) Prescription Monitoring Program | Public Act 100-1093 | Effective August 26, 2018 – SB2952

Sponsor: Senator Melinda Bush (D-Grayslake) • Amends the Illinois Controlled Substance Act. • Selection of Prescription Monitoring Program Advisory Committee to serve as members of the peer review subcommittee. • Amended to 7 then 9 Members, one additional physician and pharmacist. IPHA HAS A MAJOR POLICY SHIFT THROUGH THE HOUSE OF DELEGATES. In December, Speaker Calcaterra called a special session of the IPhA House of Delegates. The first special session since 2003. After the November elections results, there was intense discussion to reexamine the Association’s policy on medical marijuana, since the incoming Administration is wanting to make Illinois the next adult-use recreational state. Medical and recreational marijuana and CBD oil laws have expanded significantly since our 2011 policy. The IPhA 2011 policy concerning Medical Marijuan a (III-28): MEDICAL MARIJUANA – 2011 • IPhA supports research by properly qualified investigators operating under the investigational new drug (IND) process to explore fully the potential medicinal uses of marijuana and its constituents or derivatives. • IPhA urges the DEA to change marijuana’s status as a federal Schedule I controlled substance to Schedule II; with the goal of facilitating the conduct of clinical research and development of cannabinoid-based medicines, and alternate delivery methods. • IPhA supports that when such evidence exists, pharmacists be the only mechanism in which this medication can be distributed to patients in the same legislative manner that they currently distribute controlled medications. • IPhA supports pharmacists’ involvement in dispensing standardized medical marijuana if 8

provided within the context of appropriately structured clinical trials or protocols and that medical marijuana should be regulated by good manufacturing practices to ensure quality, safety and standardizations of the drug. • This should not be viewed as an endorsement of state-based medical cannabis programs, the legalization of marijuana, or that scientific evidence on the therapeutic use of cannabis meets the current standards for a prescription drug product. The House of Delegates decided that the Association need to be positioned in a pro-active stance if Illinois would become an adult-use recreational state. Also, that the Association needed to consider the role and opportunities that pharmacists may consider. The House passed the following policy concerning Medical and Adult-use Recreational Cannabis (III-31): MEDICAL AND ADULT-USE RECREATIONAL CANNABIS – 2018 • IPhA supports that pharmacies be the only mechanism for medical and recreational cannabis to be distributed safely to the public utilizing the same legislative manner used currently to store, record, and distribute controlled substances. • IPhA supports pharmacist direct involvement in furnishing cannabis and its various components for medical and recreational use. • IPhA supports the development and promotion of healthcare provider education related to the clinical efficacy, safety, and management of patients using cannabis and its various components. • IPhA supports that pharmacists should provide cannabis-related pharmacist-delivered patient care services in accordance with the Joint Commission of Pharmacy Practitioners Pharmacists’ Patient Care Process. • IPhA supports legislative and regulatory changes to further facilitate clinical research related to the clinical efficacy and safety associated with the use of cannabis and its various components.

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Executive Director’s Viewpoint (continued) The House of Delegates also took the following action at its Annual Session during the 2018 Illinois Pharmacists Annual Conference held in Lombard. The Professional Affairs Committee presented their Policy Review Report.

1-A-12 Prescription Drug Sampling (1982)

The House of Delegates adopted as policy the resolution: to enhance the public health and control questionable distribution of prescription drugs, the Illinois Pharmacists Association urges the adoption of statutory provisions which will prohibit the “sampling” of prescription drugs by manufacturers and distributors in Illinois. Motion: The Professional Affairs Committee recommends to retain I-A-12. Motion Action: Retained.

1-B-16 Policy Statement on Drug Use Control (1988)

The Illinois Pharmacists Association supports the pharmacist’s active participation in the drug use control process as defined below. IPhA endeavors to effect affect an evolution in the interrelated roles of pharmacists, physicians, and other members of the health care team, in a manner which effectively utilizes the pharmacists’ clinical expertise in the drug control process. IPhA supports pharmacists engaging in prescribing and prescription adaptation services when acting in good faith and exercising reasonable care for conditions for which the pharmacist is educationally prepared and for which competence has been achieved and maintained does not support medication prescribing authority as an independent function of pharmacists.

Definition of Drug Use Control Drug use control is the sum total of knowledge, understanding, judgment, procedures, skills, and ethics that assures optimal safety in the distribution use of medication. Definition of prescription adaptation services The ability of a pharmacist to autonomously adapt an existing prescription when the action is intended to optimize the therapeutic outcome. Motion: The Professional Affairs Committee recommends to amend I-B-16 as presented. Motion Action: Passed as Presented.

III-8 Use of Tobacco-related Products (1990)

a) The Illinois Pharmacists Association opposes the use of tobacco or non-therapeutic nicotine-related products because of their apparent detrimental effects on public health. Furthermore, IPhA supports involvement of pharmacists in public education programs regarding the health hazards of tobacco and nicotine products of smoking. Particular attention should be given to educating young people on the health hazards of associated with smoking, smokeless tobacco, and the use of e-cigarettes or other vaporized nicotine products. b) It is the goal of tThe Illinois Pharmacists Association opposes the sale of tobacco and non-therapeutic nicotine products by pharmacies in the state of Illinois that no pharmacy in the State of Illinois offer tobacco products for sale by the year 2000. Motion: The Professional Affairs Committee moves to amend III-8 as presented. Motion Action: Motion Passed as Amended.

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Executive Director’s Viewpoint (continued) The following New Business items were presented for consideration.

2018-01 | Introduced By: Anthony Budde – Past President

Subject: Policy Review Committee Motion: I move that the House of Delegates Policy Review Committee meet a minimum of every 5 years beginning in 2020. Motion Action: Motion Passed as Presented.

2018-02 | Introduced By: Ben Calcaterra – Chairman of the Board

Subject: Pharmacy Workplace Environment and Patient Safety Motion: 1) IPhA supports staffing models that promote safe provision of patient care services and access to medications. 2) IPhA encourages the adoption of patient-centered quality and performance measures that align with safe delivery of patient care services and opposes the setting and use of operational quotas or time-oriented metrics that negatively impact patient care and safety. 3) IPhA denounces any policies or practices of thirdparty administrators, processors, and payers that contribute to a workplace environment that negatively impact patient safety. IPhA calls upon public and private policy makers to establish provider payment policies that support the safe provision of medications and delivery of effective patient care. 4) IPhA urges pharmacy practice employers to establish collaborative mechanisms that engage the pharmacist in charge of each practice, pharmacists, pharmacy technicians, and pharmacy staff in addressing workplace issues that may have an impact on patient safety. 5) IPhA urges employers to collaborate with the pharmacy staff to regularly and systematically examine and resolve workplace issues that may negatively have an impact on patient safety. 6) IPhA opposes retaliation against pharmacy staff for reporting workplace issues that may negatively impact patient safety. 10

Motion Action: Passed as Presented.

2018-03 | Introduced By: Harry Zollars – Region 7 Director

Subject: Pharmacy Support and Development for Enhanced Services Motion: IPhA supports implementation and expansion of enhanced services by pharmacies or pharmacists with the intent of improving the health outcomes of patients through an enhanced service network. Motion Actions: Motion Passes as Amended. The House appointed an ad-hoc committee to be chaired by Tony Budde to review the House Rules Procedure and make recommendations at the 2019 Annual Session. In 2018, the IPhA membership voted a Bylaws change to add a Vice Speaker to the officers of the House. Elections were held during the Annual Session and Glenna Hagan was elected as IPhA’s first Vice Speaker of the House. After serving and guiding the House for many illustrious years, Speaker of the House Garry Morel and decided to not seek re-elected during the 2018 Annual Session. Ben Calcaterra was elected as the House’s new Speaker. I would like to personally thank Garry for his many years of leadership and mentorship in guiding the Association through the policy process and advocating as the Voice of the members as part of the Board of Directors. Garry is one of fiercest defenders of the profession and I am glad to have served with him as a Delegate and as Executive Director. I am glad that Garry continues to serve IPhA as Chairman of the Legislative and Regulatory Affairs Committee. We have a busy year ahead of us in 2019. Be ready to raise your Voice to protect your practice and advocate for your patients.

ILLINOIS PHARMACISTS ASSOCIATION • VOL. 82 - NO. 2 (3rd AND 4th QTR 2018)


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Marijuana Development

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ack in 2014, this series explored the legality of marijuana, medical and otherwise, as state laws diverged from Federal law. This divergence started with California in 1996. Two concepts discussed in that article have not changed; the Supremacy Clause and Enforcement Discretion. The Supremacy Clause is a provision in the United States Constitution and it states that Federal law is supreme to state law.1 Generally, states may enact laws that are more stringent than Federal laws, but not more lenient. For example, a state can move a Schedule III up to a Schedule II or move a noncontrolled drug into Schedule IV within their borders. But a state is unable to move a Schedule II down to Schedule III. This is a basic tenet in the relationship between Federal and state laws. However, this tenet seems to have been forgotten as states moved to legalize marijuana and associated products within their borders. One reason that this has occurred is another concept known as Enforcement Discretion. This occurs when an agency responsible for the enforcement of a law decides to not enforce that law. An earlier

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example of this concept was the importation of prescription drugs from Canada. The Food & Drug Administration (FDA) stated that all importation was illegal, but they exercised their discretion and would not prosecute those bringing in these drugs for their own use. In essence, the activity is still illegal, but the agency chooses to do nothing about it. The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) has been following this course since at least the publication of the Ogden memo in 2009. The caveat here is that the agencies always have the ability to change their minds. Two recent developments have the potential to radically change the marijuana discussion. The first is the publication of a DEA internal directive on May 22, 2018.2 The clarification provided in this directive is that products and materials made from the parts of the marijuana plant that are not included in the definition of marijuana under the Controlled Substances Act (CSA) are not themselves controlled under the CSA. The directive goes on to say, “the mere presence of cannabinoids is not itself dispositive as to whether a substance is within the scope of the

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CSA . . .” This is a reversal from the position taken by DEA in a news release in 2001 that stated that any product that causes THC to enter the human body is a Schedule I substance. Essentially they were saying at that time was that any product that has any THC in it is a controlled substance. What this change in direction might mean for future enforcement actions by DEA is uncertain at this time. The second recent development was the introduction of a bill by Senator Charles Schumer of New York on June 28, 2018.3 This bill may render the previous discussions moot. The main objective of the bill is the removal of marijuana and THC from Schedule I of the CSA. The bill also amends a number of U. S. Code sections to remove marijuana and THC from them. Examples of these include removing them from the definition of felony drug offense and from the mandatory sentencing guidelines. If marijuana and THC are no longer Schedule I substances, there is no longer any disconnect between state and Federal law. The states would clearly be free to regulate marijuana as they see fit. The law also creates some other related funds and requirements. First, the bill creates a fund to provide small business loans to women and socially and

economically disadvantaged people who want to operate a marijuana business. It also directs the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration to study the impact of driving under the influence of THC on highway safety. The bill goes on to direct the Secretary of Health and Human Services to conduct research on various health issues involving marijuana, such as the effects of THC on the brain, efficacy of marijuana as treatment for specific conditions, and the identification of additional medical uses for marijuana. The bill would also restrict advertising of marijuana products if needed for the protection of the public health, especially for individuals who are 18 years old or younger. Lastly, the bill would provide funds for grants to states to allow them to set up programs to expunge previous marijuana convictions. If passed, this bill would completely change the conversation on marijuana in the United States. There has been a huge shift in public opinion on this issue, especially in the last 20 years or so. It is too early to tell if the bill has enough support in Congress to get passed. If anything gets in the way, it may be the additional requirements and studies that are created in the bill. Each of them comes with their own appropriations, so the fight may come down to the budget. Stay alert for new developments – there will almost assuredly be more coming!

© Don R. McGuire Jr., R.Ph., J.D., is General Counsel, Senior Vice President, Risk Management & Compliance at Pharmacists Mutual Insurance Company. This article discusses general principles of law and risk management. It is not intended as legal advice. Pharmacists should consult their own attorneys and insurance companies for specific advice. Pharmacists should be familiar with policies and procedures of their employers and insurance companies, and act accordingly. 1 Article 6 - This Constitution, and the Laws of the United States which shall be made in Pursuance thereof; and all Treaties made, or which shall be made, under the Authority of the United States, shall be the supreme Law of the Land; and the Judges in every State shall be bound thereby, any Thing in the Constitution or Laws of any State to the Contrary notwithstanding. 2 https://www.deadiversion.usdoj.gov/schedules/marijuana/dea_internal_directive_cannabinoids_05222018.html 3 Marijuana Freedom and Opportunity Act - https://www.congress.gov/bill/115th-congress/senate-bill/3174/text?q=%7B%22search%22%3A%5B% 22schumer+marijuana%22%5D%7D&r=1

ILLINOIS PHARMACISTS ASSOCIATION • WWW.IPHA.ORG

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Documentation In The Modern World

he world continues to change and the way that we communicate with each other continues to evolve. This includes communication between you and your patients, and you and the prescribers. Pharmacists need to be able to sufficiently document their communications to support the actions taken in the care of their patients. Early in my career, prescriptions were written on paper or called into the pharmacy. If clarification was needed after hours, it meant a call to the prescriber’s answering service. The response time was seldom fast. The next great improvement in communication was the introduction of pagers. The prescriber got a message to call the pharmacy directly, but didn’t know who the patient was or what the issue was. About this same time, faxing of prescriptions began to become more common. This included faxing refill requests to the prescriber’s office and the return fax of the authorization. This format created its own documentation. The next step forward was electronic transmission of prescriptions from the prescriber to the pharmacy. No paper copy is generated with this method, but significant electronic documentation is available.

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In today’s world, the speed of communication in the 1980s seems like the Stone Age. And as the speed of communication has increased, keeping a record or documenting these communications is not at the forefront of most people’s minds. Communications happen in the now. Keeping them for the future doesn’t seem important. But it is important in professional communications. Texting patients and prescribers has become more prevalent as a fast and efficient means of communication. While nothing is ever truly deleted from cyberspace, trying to recover texts from two years ago should not be your documentation plan. Approach the documentation of texting as you would a phone call. Documentation should be readily retrievable. In the past, documentation on the prescription itself was the favored location. That is still a good place for it, but we do not always have a paper prescription today. Computer systems have expanded documentation functionality today. You can also use a log book (paper or electronic) to document all communications. Documentation for texts is analogous to that for phone calls. The typical entry for a phone call includes date, time, person talked to, the question at hand,

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and the resolution. Documentation created out of a pattern of consistent behavior is every bit as admissible as a document itself. Documentation of texts should include date, time, the number texted, the question, and the resolution. Pharmacists should also take HIPAA into consideration when using texts to communicate about prescriptions. What protected health information (PHI), if any, is being transmitted? If PHI is being transmitted, is the PHI protected from disclosure? The pharmacist should be careful that correct phone number is used for this type of communication. If the pharmacist is using their personal phone for such communications, is the information protected so that family members don’t accidentally have access to

the PHI? This is another good reason to not let your children play with your phone. In the fast pace of today’s world, documenting texts can be forgotten, but it is as important as documenting phone calls. Most pharmacists have developed a habit for documenting phone calls. This habit needs to be expanded to include the information that is being communicated by text. While those with Luddite tendencies might say that it would be better to eliminate the use of texting in this situation, I doubt that we will be able to stem the tide. Texting is becoming the preferred method of communication with many people. Proper documentation of those transactions is essential to complete your patient care records.

© Don R. McGuire Jr., R.Ph., J.D., is General Counsel, Senior Vice President, Risk Management & Compliance at Pharmacists Mutual Insurance Company. This article discusses general principles of law and risk management. It is not intended as legal advice. Pharmacists should consult their own attorneys and insurance companies for specific advice. Pharmacists should be familiar with policies and procedures of their employers and insurance companies, and act accordingly.

“I’M ALWAYS WATCHING OUT FOR MY PATIENTS, BUT WHO’S WATCHING OUT FOR ME?”

WE ARE. We are the Alliance for Patient Medication Safety (APMS), a federally listed Patient Safety Organization. Our Pharmacy Quality Commitment (PQC) program helps you implement and maintain a continuous quality improvement program that offers strong federal protection for your patient safety data and your quality improvement work. PQC also helps you comply with quality assurance requirements found in network contracts, Medicare Part D, and state regulations. We offer flexible and powerful tools, ongoing training and support to keep your pharmacy running efficiently, and most importantly, to keep your patients safe.

Call toll free (866) 365-7472 or visit www.pqc.net PQC IS BROUGHT TO YOU BY YOUR STATE PHARMACY ASSOCIATION

ILLINOIS PHARMACISTS ASSOCIATION • WWW.IPHA.ORG

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FINANCIAL FORUM PHARMACY MARKETING GROUP, INC

This series, Financial Forum, is presented by PRISM Wealth Advisors, LLC and your State Pharmacy Association through Pharmacy Marketing Group, Inc., a company dedicated to providing quality products and services to the pharmacy community.

Are Too Many Baby Boomers Too Indebted?

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Financial burdens could alter their retirement prospects.

magine retiring with $50,000 of debt. Some new retirees owe more than that. Outstanding home loans, education debt, small business loans, and lingering credit card balances threaten to compromise their retirement plans. How serious is the problem? A study from the University of Michigan’s Retirement Research Center illustrates how bad it has become. Back in 1998, 37% of Americans aged 56-61 shouldered recurring debt; the average such household owed $3,634 each month (in 2012 dollars). Today, 42% of such households do — and the mean debt load is now $17,623.1 Are increased mortgage costs to blame? Partly, but not fully. Quite a few homeowners do trade up or refinance after age 50. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau notes that between 2001-2011, the percentage of homeowners 65 and older carrying a mortgage went from 22% to 30%. The data for homeowners 75 and older was more alarming. While 8.4% of this demographic had outstanding home loans in 2001, 21.2% did by 2011.2 Education debt is weighing on boomer households. According to the Motley Fool, the average recent

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college graduate has $30,000-$35,000 in outstanding student loans. It would take monthly payments of $300-$400 over a decade to eradicate that kind of debt.3 As good debts have risen, bad debts have also grown. MagnifyMoney, a financial analytics website, pored over the most recent round of UMRRC data and determined that 32% of older consumers now contend with revolving debt each month. The average recurring non-mortgage debt for these seniors: $12,490, of which $4,786 is attributed to credit cards. A staggering 22% of older Americans have more than $10,000 in revolving credit card debt – pretty painful when you consider that the average credit card carries 14% interest.1 One school of thought says that retiring with a mortgage is okay. Interest rates on home loans are rising, but they are still not far from historic lows, and homeowners who have bought or refinanced recently could be carrying loans at less than 4% interest. While carrying mortgage debt into retirement may be bearable, owning a home free and clear is better. How about you? Can you retire debt-free? It may seem improbable, but if small steps are taken, that

ILLINOIS PHARMACISTS ASSOCIATION • VOL. 82 - NO. 2 (3rd AND 4th QTR 2018)


goal may come within reach. Every year you delay retirement is another year you have full financial power to attack debt. Working longer may not be ideal, but it can give you the potential to start retirement owing less. Cutting off financial support for young adult children can also free up money to pay down debt. They have many more years to pay off what they owe than you do. You could also think

about moving to a cheaper home, driving a cheaper car, or living in a cheaper state; any linked shortterm financial expenses might pale in comparison to the potential savings. Whether you pay off your smallest debts first or your highest-interest ones, you are subtracting burdens from your financial life. The fewer financial burdens you have in retirement, the better.

Pat Reding and Bo Schnurr may be reached toll-free at 800-288-6669 or pbh@berthelrep.com. Registered Representative of and securities and investment advisory services offered through Berthel Fisher & Company Financial Services, Inc. Member FINRA/SIPC. PRISM Wealth Advisors LLC is independent of Berthel Fisher & Company Financial Services Inc. This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note - investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment. forbes.com/sites/nextavenue/2017/09/20/how-debt-is-threatening-retirement-dreams/ [9/20/17] cbsnews.com/news/mortgage-tips-for-retirees-and-near-retirees/ [10/20/17] 3 tinyurl.com/ybgvt7po [9/29/17] 1 2

ILLINOIS PHARMACISTS ASSOCIATION • WWW.IPHA.ORG

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FINANCIAL FORUM PHARMACY MARKETING GROUP, INC

This series, Financial Forum, is presented by PRISM Wealth Advisors, LLC and your State Pharmacy Association through Pharmacy Marketing Group, Inc., a company dedicated to providing quality products and services to the pharmacy community.

Comprehensive Financial Planning: What It Is, Why It Matters?

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Your approach to building wealth should be built around your goals & values.

ust what is comprehensive financial planning? As you invest and save for retirement, you may hear or read about it — but what does that phrase really mean? Just what does comprehensive financial planning entail, and why do knowledgeable investors request this kind of approach? While the phrase may seem ambiguous to some, it can be simply defined. Comprehensive financial planning is about building wealth through a process, not a product. Financial products are everywhere, and simply putting money into an investment is not a gateway to getting rich, nor a solution to your financial issues. Comprehensive financial planning is holistic. It is about more than “money.” A comprehensive financial plan is not only built around your goals, but also around your core values. What matters most to you in life? How does your wealth relate to that? What should your wealth help you accomplish? What could it accomplish for others? Comprehensive financial planning considers the entirety of your financial life. Your assets, your liabilities, your taxes, your income, your business – these aspects of your financial life are never isolated from each other. Occasionally or frequently, they interrelate. Comprehensive financial planning recognizes this interrelation and takes a systematic, integrated approach toward improving your financial situation.

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Comprehensive financial planning is long range. It presents a strategy for the accumulation, maintenance, and eventual distribution of your wealth, in a written plan to be implemented and finetuned over time. What makes this kind of planning so necessary? If you aim to build and preserve wealth, you must play “defense” as well as “offense.” Too many people see building wealth only in terms of investing — you invest, you “make money,” and that is how you become rich. That is only a small part of the story. The rich carefully plan to minimize their taxes and debts as well as adjust their wealth accumulation and wealth preservation tactics in accordance with their personal risk tolerance and changing market climates. Basing decisions on a plan prevents destructive behaviors when markets turn unstable. Quick decision-making may lead investors to buy high and sell low – and overall, investors lose ground by buying and selling too actively. Openfolio, a website which lets tens of thousands of investors compare the performance of their portfolios against portfolios of other investors, found that its average investor earned 5% in 2016. In contrast, the total return of the S&P 500 was nearly 12%. Why the difference? As CNBC noted, most of it could be chalked up to poor market timing and faulty stock picking. A comprehensive financial plan – and its long-range vision — helps to discourage this sort of behavior. At the same time, the plan — and the financial

ILLINOIS PHARMACISTS ASSOCIATION • VOL. 82 - NO. 2 (3rd AND 4th QTR 2018)


professional(s) who helped create it — can encourage the investor to stay the course.1 A comprehensive financial plan is a collaboration & results in an ongoing relationship. Since the plan is goal-based and values-rooted, both the investor and the financial professional involved have spent considerable time on its articulation. There are shared responsibilities between them. Trust strengthens as they live up to and follow through on those responsibilities. That continuing engagement promotes commitment and a view of success.

Think of a comprehensive financial plan as your compass. Accordingly, the financial professional who works with you to craft and refine the plan can serve as your navigator on the journey toward your goals. The plan provides not only direction, but also an integrated strategy to try and better your overall financial life over time. As the years go by, this approach may do more than “make money” for you – it may help you to build and retain lifelong wealth.

Pat Reding and Bo Schnurr may be reached toll-free at 800-288-6669 or pbh@berthelrep.com. Registered Representative of and securities and investment advisory services offered through Berthel Fisher & Company Financial Services, Inc. Member FINRA/SIPC. PRISM Wealth Advisors LLC is independent of Berthel Fisher & Company Financial Services Inc. This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note - investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment. 1 cnbc.com/2017/01/04/most-investors-didnt-come-close-to-beating-the-sp-500.html [1/4/17]

ILLINOIS PHARMACISTS ASSOCIATION • WWW.IPHA.ORG

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Dear New Practitioners, As we come closer to the end of the year, you are either another step closer to becoming a full-fledged pharmacist or finishing up your first year of your career. These exciting times are ahead of you! We are writing to you today to encourage you to continue your connection/membership with IPhA by joining the New Practitioner Network (NPN) as a licensed pharmacist. IPhA strives for its members to think of new ways to evolve and make the pharmacy profession better for patients and pharmacists in Illinois. In short, IPhA aims to be the Voice of Illinois Pharmacy! One of the best ways to make sure your voice is heard especially as you join the profession is to join IPhA’s NPN. NPN is designed specifically for new graduates — like you! — to aid the beginning of your career as a practicing pharmacist. We can offer help with job searching, expanding professional networks, and advocating for opportunities in your community just to name a few. NPN is just one aspect of the IPhA, and the association overall offers even more chances for you to grow in the newest chapter of your life. We hope once you begin your journey as a newly licensed pharmacist that you will continue to be an active member of IPhA! We have a lot in store for 2019 and we want you to be there with us. Also, consider joining us at our Annual Meeting in Springfield, IL early October 2019! Happy Holidays, Catherine Zollars, PharmD Co-Chair, New Practitioner Network

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save the date

Mark Your Calendar for the Following 2019 IPhA Events: February 22: Pharmacy-Based Travel Health Services February 23: Pharmacy-Based Immunization Delivery April 3: The Illinois Pharmacy Legislative Day October 3–6: Annual Conference, Crowne Plaza, Springfield

Tentative 2019 IPhA Event Dates to Note: March 9: Delivering Medication Therapy Management Services April 12: Pharmacy-Based Cardiovascular Disease Risk Management April 13: The Pharmacist and Patient-Centered Diabetes Care

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ILLINOIS PHARMACISTS ASSOCIATION • VOL. 82 - NO. 2 (3rd AND 4th QTR 2018)


From The Editor

On Being A Chain Drug Pharmacist Things that bug us. Well, me.

IPhA Editor

Jeffery Ellis, RPh 1. Waiting on hold for other Chain Drug pharmacists to answer the phone. Especially when they are from the same chain. I understand it is because a single word in the Pharmacy Practice Act. Lawyers strike again! I don’t think it was the intent of the writers of the PPA to disallow computer transfers of controlled drugs via computers of the same chain while allowing non-controlled prescriptions. At least that is my interpretation. How does this protect pharmacists, patients or society? The chance of error goes up exponentially when humans talk to humans. Or, in this case, rewriting prescriptions from the computer screen while on hold. I really don’t understand this one. It is good enough for non controlled prescriptions! What’s the difference? 2. Blocking out the name, rx number and bar code on bottles that were returned to stock. What is that all about? They are returned to stock on shelves that are not accessible to the public. Who are we protecting? And from what? Everyone who has access to the bottles are HIPPA trained. 3. We are in the 21st century. When people take the test to become a pharmacist, I am positive the computer knows virtually immediately whether the person passed or not. ISSUE THE DAMN LICENSE! Or not, if they failed. There is no reason for delay.

4. Lastly (for now) what is the deal with issuing 3 separate CII rxs at the same time for different fill dates? What is the intent of the policy of not allowing refills on CII medications? I assume it is to control very addictive medications. Somehow. What is the intent of allowing patients to get three separate prescriptions with the same date with 3 different dispensing dates. Again, I assume it is to save the patients trips to the doctors office every month. Isn’t that the point of not allowing refills? To control highly addictive drugs by making the patients go to the office every month? Then, the next absurd consequence of the above absurd policy (3rxs each visit) is now we get 3 escribe rxs each visit with different dispensing dates below the written dates sent at the same time! Maybe you haven’t noticed we have a computer sending these rxs. Program it to send it when it is to be filled! I am getting extremely tired of examining each prescription with a magnifying glass to see if there is a hidden Easter egg about a new rule that I have to follow to fill the prescription. The DEA/Federal/State regulations (not sure which applies here) are being circumvented. If we want to allow refills on CII’s ALLOW REFILLS. If we don’t, DON’T. This policy is effectively allowing refills.

ILLINOIS PHARMACISTS ASSOCIATION • WWW.IPHA.ORG

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PHARMACISTSPROVIDECARE.COM

Recognizing pharmacists’ specialized knowledge and skills with certification

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s pharmacy practice evolves, it’s becoming more specialized. Pharmacists taking on greater roles in patient care are being asked to resolve more complicated medication-related issues, and that drives a need for pharmacists with specialized knowledge and skills. A broad range of credentialing processes available to pharmacists recognize such knowledge and skills, while privileging processes—a closely related concept—allow employers and other stakeholders to verify that the pharmacist has appropriate qualifications for their patient care role.

One type of postlicensure credentialing is certification, “a voluntary process by which a nongovernmental agency or an association grants recognition to an individual who has met certain predetermined qualifications specified by that organization,” according to a 2014 white paper from the Council on Credentialing in Pharmacy (CCP). Certification programs open to pharmacists may be pharmacist-only certifications or multidisciplinary certifications, according to a 2012 resource document from CCP. Board certification essentially is “the highest patient care credential in the profession,” said William M. Ellis, MS, RPh, executive director of the Board of Pharmacy Specialties (BPS), an autonomous arm of APhA. BPS specialty areas

Board certification through BPS currently exists in 12 specialty areas. More than 36,500 pharmacists in upwards of 40 countries now hold BPS board certification in at least one specialty area, according to Ellis. Of these 12 specialty areas, pharmacotherapy is by far the largest specialty and among the longest standing. It deals with a wide range of therapeutic areas in multiple practice settings. The second largest specialty is geriatrics, where patients may be in independent living environments, skilled nursing facilities, or hospitalized. The oldest specialty is nuclear pharmacy. “We see a lot of people who are board certified in academic medical settings, but one of the fastest growing areas has been ambulatory care—

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“We have a number of people sitting for this exam in their 40s, 50s. This validates this experience and the knowledge that comes along with it,” added Ellis. “They’re really practicing in this space.”

Pharmacists choose which specialty certification examination to sit for depending on their previously acquired knowledge, skills, and experi-

More than 36,500 pharmacists in upwards of 40 countries now hold BPS board certification in at least one specialty area. Board certification is valid for 7 years. During that time, practitioners must maintain their certification through various continuing education activities from BPS-approved providers or successfully pass the BPS recertification examination.

ence with specific patient populations. Pharmacists practicing in chain or independent community pharmacy are generally eligible to sit for BPS board certification in ambulatory care if they graduated from an accredited school of pharmacy, have an active license to practice, and have one of the following: 4 years of practice experience with 50% of time spent in ambulatory care activities, completion of a postgraduate year (PGY)1 residency plus 1 additional year of practice experience with 50% of time spent in ambulatory care activities, or completion of a PGY2 residency, according to BPS. “The final hurdle is passing the rigorous examination to validate your knowledge and skills,” Ellis said. In other words, the general construct for eligibility for board certification is a pathway of 2, 3, or 4 years. Eligibility pathways vary by specialty. But the fact is, he said, there’s an eligibility pathway that does not require a residency.

Team-based care

Credentialing and privileging processes have long existed in medicine. A physician who is board certified will recognize the time and effort of the pharmacist to obtain and maintain board certification as well as the commitment to lifelong learning, said Brian Lawson, PharmD, BPS director of professional affairs. “Patients increasingly will recognize and expect the critical role of the boardcertified pharmacist specialist in optimal drug therapy” as part of the health care team, according to BPS. Diana Yap, editorial director www.pharmacytoday.org

PharmacyToday • JULY 2018 ILLINOIS PHARMACISTS ASSOCIATION • VOL. 82 - NO. 2 (3 AND 4 QTR 2018) rd

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Making sure pharmacy HIT is integrated into the national infrastructure

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hen pharmacists think of technology in the community pharmacy, they might picture the traditional use of technology for dispensing: pharmacy management systems, electronic prescribing, maybe automation, the claims process and adjudicating claims in real time, prescription drug monitoring programs. But as more care is provided in the community, pharmacists need more use of technology for their patient care services—technology that fits into the same workflow as the dispensing process, captures clinical information, and shares that information among all health care providers. Across the U.S. health care system, physicians and hospitals have been driven by government to standardize and adopt electronic health record (EHR) use. “If pharmacy doesn’t adopt a similar process, we will not be able to communicate,” said Shelly Spiro, RPh, FASCP, executive director at the Pharmacy Health Information Technology (HIT) Collaborative, which focuses on ensuring the pharmacist’s role of providing patient care services is integrated into the national HIT infrastructure as health care moves toward team-based care and value-based payment. Years ago, as the process of dispensing the prescription was standardized, it became more efficient, which enabled increased reimbursement to the pharmacist for the product. Currently, a similar evolution is taking place on the clinical side for pharmacists’ services, such as immunizations, diabetes management, hypertension management, and population health. From an economic standpoint, pharmacists’ services are becoming simultaneously less efficient to provide, yet more important for valuebased payment, according to Spiro. “Because of that, we’re now on the verge of standardizing the workflow and processes and enabling technology” for pharmacists’ services, she said. “It’s not just how many millions of prescriptions can I fill,” Spiro added. “Now, it’s how are those prescriptions going to be best for our patients.” Connecting with the rest of health care

Why does pharmacy HIT need to be integrated into the national HIT infra46

structure, and what would that integration look like? An elucidating analogy is good old e-mail. “I can download it, I can save it, I can reply, I can [receive] or add an attachment, I can copy and paste information into it,” Spiro said. Despite the differences between a Microsoft operating system and an Apple operating system, or whether the language used is English or Klingon, she explained that when using e-mail, “we’re still able to communicate.” Not so with EHRs—yet. “This is where we are with the national HIT initiatives that are taking place,” Spiro said. To extend the analogy, here are some basic concepts. E-mail is an interoperable process. Interoperability is the ability to exchange data in a way that is shareable between one computer system and another. E-mail is also bidirectional, which means the ability to both send and receive information (unlike with e-prescribing, which pushes information from the physician to the pharmacy, but necessitates a pharmacist with a query to pick up the phone and call the physician: not bidirectional). E-mail is coded so that different computer systems can communicate. Standardized codes long have been used in pharmacy, such as products’ NDC numbers on a drop-down menu or a pick list. But codes now also are being used for clinical information, including lab findings, for patient safety. This health information needs to be exchanged in a standard way. “As a pharmacist, if I have to do diabetes education or MTM [medication therapy management], I have to have

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the information. I have to know what the A1C is. I have to know what their diet is,” she added. “We can’t do this in the dark.” Now starring: Pharmacist eCare Plan

Widely adopted, the electronic pharmacy care plan (Pharmacist eCare Plan) is sweeping across the United States. It started with Community Care of North Carolina, which evolved into Community Pharmacy Enhanced Services Network—a network of independent community pharmacies using the Pharmacist eCare Plan to work with physician offices to be paid for patient care services, according to Spiro. As vendors program their systems for pharmacists’ services, they’re able to present the information as the familiar-seeming drop-down menu or pick list to make it more usable for customers to document the clinical care being provided. The pharmacist documents the patient care service in the Pharmacist eCare Plan—an internet-based form—and also can document quality measures that are used for outcome measures. “All of that can be captured in the [Pharmacist eCare Plan] that can’t be captured in the claim,” Spiro said. “Payers notice because we’re moving toward value-based payment.” Diana Yap, editorial director www.pharmacytoday.org

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Pharmacists can help care teams meet quality measures

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s the U.S. health care system moves toward value-based payment and delivery models, clinical measures continue to be developed to assess whether patients are meeting certain specified care goals and outcomes. “To achieve value, these models focus both on measuring the quality of care delivered using specific quality measures and on reducing unnecessary costs of care,” said Anne Burns, RPh, vice president of professional affairs at APhA. Pharmacists’ medication expertise can positively affect metrics focused on conditions treated by medications, as well as metrics for wellness and prevention, according to Burns. 1.

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CMS ratings

Health insurance plans have used certain quality measures—many revolving around medication use—to connect community pharmacists to pay for performance, value-based contracts, and more. Quality measures in CMS’s star rating program set the foundation. The program began when provisions in the Affordable Care Act called for quality bonus payments within the Medicare Advantage program to be awarded on the basis of how well health plans execute on a set of performance measures. For years, community pharma-

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cists have been acutely aware of this program. Increasingly, they are being asked to improve the metrics or risk being eliminated from the plan. “Pharmacists are much more keenly aware of what’s inside the star ratings program because the measures are being used in value-based networks, and pharmacists are being held accountable for them,” said Laura Cranston, BSPharm, CEO of the Pharmacy Quality Alliance (PQA). The nonprofit got its start developing measures for the Medicare Part D prescription drug program, and many of those measures are being used in Medicare, Medicaid, state-based, and private-sector value-based programs. “We have started work on pharmacy-level measures, which evaluate performance of the pharmacy holistically—across all payer types,” said Cranston. Right now, she explained, health plans are only concerned about their select Medicare patients at a particular pharmacy. PQA wants to develop the metrics for the whole pharmacy, taking into account patients with Medicaid, commercial insurance, and those who are uninsured. “There are lots of different opportunities to use a measure like this [for the whole pharmacy] in the valuebased landscape,” said Cranston. Some of those opportunities could even provide room for pharmacists to work with other providers to improve patient outcomes.  Team-based care

Pharmacists should be informed about quality measures affecting physicians across the country because it creates an opportunity to work more closely on a patient’s care team. Beginning in 2017, CMS implemented the Quality Payment Program

PharmacyToday • SEPTEMBER 2018 ILLINOIS PHARMACISTS ASSOCIATION

(QPP), authorized through the Medicare Access and Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) Reauthorization Act (MACRA). Essentially, QPP represents new opportunities for pharmacists to help physicians meet quality measures. MACRA changed the feefor-service formula Medicare uses to pay eligible clinicians in Part B. Under MACRA, physicians and other eligible clinicians choose one of two quality payment pathways: the Merit-Based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) or an APM (Advanced Payment Model). According to CMS, roughly 600,000 Medicare Part B–eligible clinicians are subject to MIPS in 2018, and only under certain conditions will clinicians be exempted from the program. MIPS can also serve as a stepping stone for providers and organizations to move into an APM. For pharmacists, there is opportunity to enter into partnerships with physicians to help them meet certain quality measures. Many of the roughly 300 measures in the quality category

Pharmacists’ medication expertise can positively affect metrics focused on conditions treated by medications, and more. for MIPS can be affected by pharmacists. Two measures specifically mention pharmacists. They are medication reconciliation after discharge in the quality category, and population management of medications in the clinical improvement category. “Value-based models use a teambased approach to care, where health care practitioners, working in a coordinated manner, deliver care and are held accountable for quality metrics and costs of care,” said Burns. “To be valued and included in these models, pharmacists need to understand quality measures, how a pharmacist can impact them, and have the skills to contribute to team-based care.” Loren Bonner, senior editor

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Pharmacists make a difference through team-based care

I

t’s often hard to articulate why an individual student might be influenced by one teacher over another. All qualified in their own right, some teachers seem to resonate more—or less—with certain students. Perhaps that is what it’s like when patients are cared for by a team of health care providers. As Michelle Thomas, PharmD, CDE, BCACP, put it: patients respond to different team members and sometimes need to hear messages in more than one way before implementing their care plan. “Team-based care is all about involving the patient, but we have to meet the patient where they are,” said Thomas, who works with a team of health care providers at a small family practice in Virginia. “We all have different styles, and sometimes patients just connect better with someone.”

mation with the patient’s provider and involve the case manager to make sure the patient kept her appointment with her behavioral health provider. “The care manager, who talked with the patient monthly, was surprised with the amount of information the patient was willing to share with me as a pharmacist,” said Abode. “Through this partnership, I was able to inform the primary care provider of an issue and help resolve the issue by engaging other members of the patient’s health care team to ensure there was adequate follow-up.” In another example that came about through a different partnership Realo Discount Drugs has in the home health arena, Abode identified a drug interaction between a patient’s chemotherapy agent and a proton pump inhibitor (PPI). “This was a category X interaction

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“My team counts on me to bring up the quirky, less common things [known] about drugs,” Thomas added. For example, if she sees a patient with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), the first thing she thinks of are the drugs that are contraindicated with the condition. “Recently, when our patient with chronic refractory ITP developed a urinary tract infection, I was the one who

“My team counts on me to bring up the quirky, less common things known about drugs.”

For some patients, that someone could be the pharmacist who is working on the care team. Notes from the field

Ashely Abode, PharmD, clinical service coordinator for Realo Discount Drugs in North Carolina, meets with patients under the partnership the community pharmacy has established with an accountable care organization (ACO). She’s formed relationships with several patients over the years, but one case stands out to her. Abode met with a patient who was being treated for depression and learned that the patient was still struggling to control her symptoms. Abode was able to share this inforwww.pharmacist.com

because the PPI decreases the concentration of her chemo agent,” said Abode. “I was able to contact her oncologist and get the PPI discontinued.” Abode noted that pharmacists are not generally on home health teams and that it’s usually the job of software to identify drug interactions. However, in this case, the drug was not picked up by the software. The medication expert

Team-based care can make providers more comprehensive in their approach since each provider comes to the group with a unique view. Naturally, pharmacists think first about medicationrelated issues. Thomas said pharmacists can make the most difference when they focus on their specific area of expertise.

ILLINOIS PHARMACISTS ASSOCIATION • WWW.IPHA.ORG

suggested we avoid nitrofurantoin for that reason,” said Thomas. Thomas and her colleagues are also part of an ACO and are held to a very high standard of quality. “It would be overwhelming for one provider to try to meet all 18 of our quality measures,” said Thomas. “It takes all of us and a division of labor to keep track of it all.” Abode believes a multispecialty team, where each provider brings something different to the table, is the most effective for patient care. “This helps to ensure that each aspect of the patient’s care is managed in the best possible way,” said Abode. “When the team works together and communicates efficiently, the patient has a positive experience, and adverse events are avoided.” Loren Bonner, senior editor OCTOBER 2018 •

PharmacyToday 47 25


Time Capsule

Pharmacy 

Dennis B. Worthen, PhD, Cincinnati, OH | Posted on July 6, 2018

1993

• ACPE released proposed standards and guidelines for the PharmD as the professional entry-level degree. • New Mexico passed legislation to address a shortage of primary care providers making it the first state to let specially trained pharmacists provide primary patient care.

One of a series contributed by the American Institute of the History of Pharmacy, a unique non-profit society dedicated to assuring that the contributions of your profession endure as a part of America’s history. Membership offers the satisfaction of helping continue this work on behalf of pharmacy, and brings five or more historical publications to your door each year. To learn more, check out: www.aihp.org

1968

• F entanyl, developed by Janssen and marketed by McNeil, was approved as an IV analgesic

1918

• Beginning of the Spanish flu pandemic.

1943

• Bulletin of the American Society of Hospital Pharmacists first published. Later renamed American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy.

1893

• New Mexico formed state pharmacy association

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ILLINOIS PHARMACISTS ASSOCIATION • VOL. 82 - NO. 2 (3rd AND 4th QTR 2018)


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2018 ANNUAL CONFERENCE

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ANNUAL CONFERENCE

A Special Thank You to the Following 2018 Annual Conference Exhibitors:

Exhibitors

AbbVie Women’s Health Alfasigma USA AmerisourceBergen Drug Company Amgen Astra Zeneca Pharmaceuticals BestRx Cardinal Health Chicago State University College of Pharmacy Feel Good, Inc. GlaxoSmithKline H.D. Smith Heartland Payment Systems I-CPEN IL Public Health Association / Illinois HIV Care Connect Illinois Pharmacists Association Independent Pharmacy Cooperative IPhA Foundation McKesson Pharmaceutical NABP-National Association of Boards of Pharmacy Novo Nordisk Omeros, Inc. Pharmacists Mutual Companies Pioneer Rx Real Value Rx Roosevelt University College of Pharmacy Rosalind Franklin University SIUE School of Pharmacy Smith Drug Company St. Louis College of Pharmacy Sterling 340B TRC Healthcare UNITED Pharmacy Staffing University of Illinois Chicago College of Pharmacy Virgo Health / Lilly Diabetes

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Jeopardy

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2018

Award RECIPIENTS

2018 AWARD BOWL OF HYGEIA

Starlin Haydon-Greatting, MS, BSPharm, CDM, FAPhA The “Bowl of Hygeia” Award is presented annually by participating pharmacy associations in each of the fifty states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the selected by their respective associations for their outstanding record of community service. In addition to service through their local, state, and national pharmacy associations, the Bowl of Hygeia Award recognizes pharmacists who possess outstanding records of civic leadership and devote their time, talent, and resources to a wide variety of causes and community service. The Bowl of Hygeia is the most widely recognized international symbol for the pharmacy profession and considered one of the profession’s most prestigious awards. These pharmacists have distinguished themselves through their activities and good works in their hometowns. This year’s recipient is Starlin Haydon-Greatting. Starlin is an Ambulatory Care Pharmacist, who has been a member of IPhA for over 35 years and is a past member of the IPhA Foundation Board of Directors. She serves IPhA as your Director of Clinical Programs and Population Health, working primarily to create and establish ambulatory care chronic disease and medication management programs to improve patient centered care and medication optimization. She is also the IPhA Patient Self-Management Program (PSMP) Pharmacy Network Coordinator, which includes programs for diabetes, diabetes prevention, and cardiovascular health for self-insured employers. Starlin is a St. Louis College of Pharmacy 1981 graduate and has revealed herself as a selfless and 40

dedicated individual to her family and community. Her pharmacy family as well benefits from her mentoring and guidance—fighting the fight to advance the standards of pharmacy practice forward with us and for our patients. In addition to her work in advancing the practice of pharmacy, Starlin is extremely active in the diabetes community working with the Central IL American Diabetes Association, the IL Diabetes Policy Coalition and the IL Prairie Diabetes Alliance. She also generously supports a number of organizations throughout Central Illinois through a variety of community service projects.

PHARMACIST OF THE YEAR

Laura Licari, PharmD

The Pharmacist of the Year Award is IPhA’s oldest continuing honor. Initially presented in 1950, this award recognizes an Illinois pharmacist who has made outstanding contributions to pharmacy practice, the profession, and the Illinois Pharmacists Association. Dr. Laura Licari is this year’s recipient. Dr. Licari graduated from Midwestern University Chicago College of Pharmacy in 2006. Her career started at Jewel Osco as a technician and advanced to Pharmacy Manager and MTM specialist. Her passion for pharmacy took her career to CVS where she was a clinical pharmacist and Clinical Advisor until just recently. She knows that being involved is important, not just on a national level. Dr. Licari is an active member of North Suburban Pharmacists Association and has served as Vice President since 2014. Our recipient has been an active member of IPhA since 2010, serving on various committees such as the New Practitioner Committee, Student Affairs Sub Committee, Legislative and Regulatory Affairs, Membership, and Conference and Education. Since 2011 she has been an active member

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of the Board of Directors. On a national level, she is a member of APhA, AMCP and AACP. Dr. Licari enthusiastically shares her excitement for pharmacy with those she comes in contact with, especially students. She has precepted and enjoys being a guest lecturer, especially when she is able to share how important it is to be involved with the direction of the profession in Illinois by being involved with IPhA. She has been a volunteer with Community Health Pharmacist Volunteer at West Town Clinic in Chicago since 2008. It speaks to her dedication to pharmacy that she was honored in 2008 with the Edmund Barcus Distinguished Young Pharmacist Award and recently awarded as Midwestern University Chicago College of Pharmacy Alumnus of the Year. Sharing the positive work of pharmacists also gave her the opportunity to be an adjunct assistant professor at Midwestern University and also be an MTM Chat supervisor at Bolingbrook Christian Health Center Clinic. Recently, she took her career in new direction in her new role as Assistant Professor of Clinical Sciences at Roosevelt University College of Pharmacy.

GENERATION RX CHAMPION

Catherine Zollars, PharmD Dr. Catherine Zollars is the 2018 recipient of the Cardinal Health Generation Rx Champions Award. This award recognizes a pharmacist for his or her outstanding work in preventing prescription drug misuse. Catherine has taken the initiative to help improve the clinical programs at Pharmacy Plus by implementing a medication synchronization program and completing more medication therapy management cases than done in previous years. She also provides different

community outreach programs to the public such as free health fair events. She has been involved with her alma mater by inviting students to learn more about community pharmacy in a rural setting. She is currently giving Generation Rx talks to the local schools, in partnership with the local DARE officer, to sixth and eighth graders and the local CEO programs that help promote entrepreneurship to high school seniors. She is proactive with legislations by informing the local community about current bills, and she contacts legislation herself about important topics relating to pharmacy. Currently, she is completing hours to become a certified diabetes educator to help the community’s disease state management program. In her close-knit community where pharmacies are the heart of the town, Catherine practices at the top of her game in all that she undertakes to demonstrate that pharmacists are knowledgeable healthcare professionals and are vital to the healthcare team.

EDUCATOR OF THE YEAR AWARD

Cara M. Brock, PharmD, BCGP, CPE Dr. Cara Brock is the 2018 recipient of the IPhA Educator of the Year award. This award is a prestigious honor bestowed upon the most deserving members of Academic Pharmacists who promote the growth of future leaders in pharmacy within both the classroom setting as well as through extracurricular activities. Dr. Brock is a 2003 graduate of University of Illinois Chicago College of Pharmacy. As she started her career in community pharmacy, it enabled her to teach students one on one as a preceptor and mentor. But truly, the start of her career in education began as a student when she would often tutor classmates who may be struggling to understand the material. Time and experience have (continued on next page)

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Award RECIPIENTS

not altered her teaching philosophy, but rather, strengthened it. That philosophy is: teach students to be the most competent pharmacists possible who will always put the well-being of their patients first. As she transitioned into academia, she was founding faculty at Roosevelt University College of Pharmacy in the Pharmacy Care Lab. During this time she developed and taught 5 of six skills based courses along with an elective course on palliative care. Today, she now oversees teaching in the College as Chair of Academic and Teaching excellence. While she may no longer have the same day to day contact with students, it is their experience at Roosevelt University that guides her as she is mentoring faculty. She firmly believes and shares with her students that to practice at the top of your license involves a life-time of learning. She continues to share her knowledge as she guides and mentors students and faculty. Quality life-time learning has led to her involvement with IPhA. She has been a member of the Conference and Education Committee in many capacities since 2011, including 3 years as Chair or Co-Chair of the Committee.

Award is Tim Lehan. Mr. Lehan is a community practice pharmacist and president of Lehan Drugs. He and his wife Ann are co-owners and are based in DeKalb, Illinois. Started by his grandfather in 1946, he has worked for the family business for over 40 years, becoming president in 1993. Lehan Drugs currently operates three locations in Northern Illinois featuring two independent retail pharmacies and a compounding pharmacy. Our awardee prides himself on remaining at the forefront of community pharmacy services and has spearheaded the implementation of pharmacy adherence programs, medication therapy management, immunizations, and most recently a specialty care program. Lehan Drugs also offers an expansive selection of durable medical equipment, respiratory therapy services, a woman’s health department, and a mommy and baby department to help new mothers obtain breast pumps and breastfeeding-related supplies and services. Despite the rigors of owning a small business and raising a large family, he believes strongly in the importance of being involved in local and state organizations. Mr. Lehan has served on the DeKalb Chamber of Commerce Finally, she also gives back to the community thru board of directors and was their president in 1988. He education and leadership by supervising student was on the local YMCA board of directors for 4 years patient education and clinical services at the American and has been active on church and school committees. Diabetes Association Expo in the Spring since 2012 He is a member of the Knights of Columbus and has and as a Team Captain for the MS Walk each year with served as Grand Knight for 3 years. State involvement the National MS Society Greater Illinois Chapter. It is includes serving on the Board of Directors for the my pleasure to present this year’s Educator of the Year Illinois Pharmacists Association (IPHA) for over 6 to Dr. Cara Brock. years; he is currently a delegate for his region. He also has been active with the Illinois Retail Merchants Association (IRMA) and currently serves as chairman HONORARY PRESIDENT AWARD of the board. In addition, he takes his responsibilities Tim Lehan as a pharmacy preceptor very seriously and has The Honorary President mentored countless pharmacy students over the years. Award recognizes a His leadership has helped encourage pharmacy lengthy and sustained students to become involved with IPhA and the commitment of service National Community Pharmacist Association (NCPA) to the profession of and allowed them to see how a community pharmacy Pharmacy and to the can impact the lives of their patients. Lehan Drugs has Association. IPhA’s been honored to receive several awards that have 2018 recipient of the highlighted not only the business, but also his Honorary President leadership skills. These include the National 42

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Association of Boards of Pharmacy (NABP) Innovative Pharmacy Practice Award for Illinois in 2009, and the IRMA Business of the Year award in 2012. They have twice been featured in the NCPA magazine and the business was highlighted as the cover story in 2011. Both our recipient and his wife Ann graduated from the University of Iowa College of Pharmacy in 1976. Together they raised 6 children; their sons Jon and Jim are actively involved in the family business and will soon take over the ownership of Lehan Drugs. Their four daughters, Katie, Kristy, Patty and Karen, have all gained valuable experience working for the family business throughout high school and college. His brother, sister, daughter-in-law, and multiple nieces and nephews also hold integral positions within the company. Tim and the staff of Lehan Drugs remain focused on providing quality care to all their patients and customers in an ever-changing healthcare environment. The ability to change, adapt, and grow has kept his family pharmacy in business for over 70 years. It is truly a family taking care of their community. And as Tim said: “Be Active, Be Involved!”

OUTSTANDING PHARMACIST-COACH AWARD

Chunkit So, Pharm D, BCPS

Chunkit (KIT) So, PharmD was awarded the 2019 Outstanding Pharmacist-Coach Achievement Award. This award recognizes the achievements of an individual who has made significant contributions or sustained contributions to the provision of patient-centered care within the practice areas represented by the Illinois Pharmacists Network through the Patient SelfManagement Programs.

Dr. So, a Clinical Pharmacist at the University of Illinois at Chicago, works as pharmacist-coach and administrative assistant for the Taking Control of Your Health Diabetes Patient Self-Management Program. He is very dedicated to the TCOYH IPhAPSMP Diabetes program and coaching patients as well as supporting the Illinois CPESN initiative. Kit volunteers and assists the Ms. Haydon-Greatting in reviewing the pharmacist-coaches’ documentation paperwork associated with the IPhA Diabetes Patient Self-Management Program. and is very dedicated to our program supporting our Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) and QA processes. As a network coordinator that is stretched from the Illinois-Wisconsin border to the Illinois-Missouri border and the Illinois-Indiana border, Ms. HaydonGreatting stated she values Kit’s ability to work with her to manage the continual patient flow and the processing of the large amount of documentation. He is “OUTSTANDING!” Kit truly demonstrates all of the requirements and criteria that we have set forth for this award. He also does a great deal of voluntary work with DSME and the Chinese-Americans in the Chinatown Community and provides support for the Midwestern University’s COP MTM/CHAT program.

DISTINGUISHED YOUNG PHARMACIST/ EDMOND P. BARCUS AWARD

Brittany Hoffman-Eubanks, PharmD, MBA

The Distinguished Young Pharmacist/ Edmund P. Barcus Award, sponsored by Pharmacists Mutual, recognizes and up-andcomer pharmacist. Brittany HoffmannEubanks is an individual who shows tremendous (continued on next page)

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(continued from page 43)

commitment to the profession and his/her community, leadership potential, professional aspirations and involvement in community service. A 2012 graduate of Drake University College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, she received both her Doctor of Pharmacy and her Masters of Business Administration. As a student, she was a member of APhA-ASP, Iowa Pharmacists Association, Lambda Kappa Sigma Professional Fraternity, and Phi Lambda Sigma. Dr. Hoffman-Eubanks took on leadership roles during that time such as Mini-Discussion Co-Chair, Teaching Assistant and Region 5 Mid Year Regional Meeting Coordinator. After graduation, our recipient returned to Illinois as a PGY-1 Resident with New Albertson’s Inc and Midwestern University Chicago College of Pharmacy. During this time, she also became a member of IPhA. She has maintained her membership with APhA and has served on APhA’s New Practitioner Committees in various roles. As she became more involved on the State level, she has actively served on IPhA’s New Practitioner Committee, Legislative and Regulatory Affairs Committee and is currently serving as lead co-chair of the Public Relations Committee, as well as Regional Director for Region 5.  Her active involvement with professional associations has not been slowed as she has taken on greater responsibilities with New Albertsons, including Pharmacy Manager, Summer Intern Trainer and a Patient Care Pharmacist, overseeing the patient care services for multiple pharmacy locations. In addition to her direct patient care and her involvement with state and national associations, she has carved out an opportunity to utilize her writing skills in producing continuing education, patient education and advocacy resources, including such works as a three-part series on pharmacy benefit managers that was published nationally in Pharmacy Times.

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ALAN GRANAT MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP AWARD

James D. Reimer, PharmD Candidate The Alan Granat Memorial Scholarship Award was established to serve as a memorial to Alan Granat. Serving as Executive Director of the Illinois Pharmacists Association from 1979 until his death in 1989, Alan Granat displayed commitment and dedication to the profession of pharmacy. James Reimer is this year’s recipient. James is currently enrolled in Southern Illinois University Edwardsville School of Pharmacy with an anticipated graduation in May 2020. Throughout his career, he has held several leadership positions in organizations spanning the silos of pharmacy including IPhA as a Student Director, 2017 Summer Intern and Legislative and Regulatory Affairs Committee member, Student Society of HealthSystems Pharmacists (SSHP), SIUE Chapter as the current President and former P1 Liaison. His commitment to community service is evident through is volunteering at Ronald McDonald House, involvement in the 2017 SIUE APhA-ASP Locked in to Stay Out Overnight Lock-In and contributions to several events including collaborating with Illinois Principals Association for the IPhA Opioid Overdose Management and Naloxone Training Module, Pharmacy Legislative Day and IDPH State of Illinois Diabetes Stakeholders Workgroup. For the last 17 years, James has served as a pharmacy technician in both hospital and community pharmacies and has been an advocate for pharmacy just as long. His commitment to the profession inspires us to strive for greatness and never stop pushing pharmacy forward.

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T

he IPhA Foundation Lifetime Service Award was established to honor pharmacists in all practice settings who, by example, display integrity and longevity, and serve as role models for others in the profession of pharmacy.

Gail Paul

Dennis Bryan

Being a pharmacist for nearly 60 years, Gail Paul, RPh, has demonstrated her passion, commitment, and dedication in MANY ways and continues to do so. At an age where most individuals are settling down into retirement, our winner still has a fire in her for the world of pharmacy and IPhA. Ms. Paul received her Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy in 1960 from St. Louis College of Pharmacy and in 1962, she went on to get a Masters of Science from Purdue University School of Pharmacy. Her pharmacy career started in academia as an instructor at Purdue, where she supervised fifth year students and gradually spread her talents throughout the various silos of pharmacy. After leaving Purdue, she held positions in both hospital and retail pharmacies in Belleville, IL. In 1977, she relocated to northern Illinois and began to make her mark there. She served as a consultant in a drug identification lab for Searle Laboratories and went on to become the pharmacist-in-charge at Gungler’s pharmacy and then Welton’s Village Market Pharmacy. In 1995 she transitioned to a staff position at Resurrection Apothecary in Chicago where she stayed until 2017. Since 2006 she has worked as a PRN staff pharmacist at United Pharmacy Staffing and to this day continues to do so.

Dennis Bryan, BS Pharm, MBA, FAPhA, has dedicated his life to serve his profession and his community, and has become a role model for the next generation of pharmacists. He received a Bachelor of Science from the University of Illinois Chicago College of Pharmacy in 1974. He later went on to obtain a Masters in Business Administration with an emphasis in Marketing and Strategic Planning from Keller Graduate School of Management in 1986. His career began at St. Anthony de Padua Hospital as the Assistant Director of Pharmacy in 1977 where for 6 years he managed and maintained the pharmacy in addition to offering clinical services. From 1983 to 1984 he stood as a consultant for Lab Safety Corporation where he implemented and developed training protocols and compliance programs for quality assurance needs. He then transitioned, in 1984, to become the Inpatient Supervisor at Resurrection Medical Center in Chicago, IL for whom he served as a drug information expert, developed and reviewed DUR studies. From 1997 to 2003, he served as the pharmacist in charge at Osco Drugs, during which time he obtained a certificate in Asthma Care from Purdue University and began participating in the Open Airway Program, and developed an English to Spanish translation guide. While At Osco Drugs his store was chosen to participate in a pharmaceutical care pilot program and conducted numerous immunization clinics where he personal vaccinated over 4,000 people. At the end of 2003, Mr. Bryan transitioned into a role as a staff pharmacist at Dominick’s Pharmacy (a division of Safeway). While in this role he served as an APhA certified OTC advisor and developed several

In addition to the dedication to her job, Ms. Paul served on the IPhA Board of Directors for Region 1, House of Delegates for Region 1, IPhA Foundation Board of Directors, IPhA Professional Affairs Committee, and IPhA By-laws Committee. She is a member of the North Shore Pharmacist Association and the DuPage Pharmacist Association. Even still she found time to give back to her community and serve within her church. She sang in the choir and taught Sunday school for several years, in addition to being a church council member.

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Award RECIPIENTS

logistical functions in order to assist in daily pharmacy needs. When the company downsized in 2007, our recipient transitioned his focus to advocacy for pharmacy where he has remained focused. His pharmacy career has spanned institutional, community, chain and independent pharmacies as well as some consulting as well. Over the years Mr. Bryan has been an active member of APhA, IPhA, and North Suburban Pharmacists Association. Within APhA he has participated in Academy of Pharmacy Practice and Management serving 3 terms in the Institutional Practice section. For 12 years he has served as a delegate for the House

of Delegates. While being a member of IPhA he has served as president, vice president, regional director, and on various committees in addition to serving as a delegate for over 20 years. In addition to all of the work he has done in pharmacy, Dennis still finds time to involve himself in his community. His service spreads farther than just pharmacy. Throughout his years of service, he has been a member of the Ukrainian Village Neighborhood Association and served as Chairman of the Western Avenue play lot Committee, who was responsible for renovation of a play lot. He participated in the Chicago Asthma Consortium Board of Directors as the secretary and treasurer.

ADVERTISE HERE ¼ page, ½ page, & full page ads available. Reach up to 15,000 pharmacists. Also ASK US about advertising on our website and in our monthly newsletter. Call Erica Pinkley at 217-522-7300

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ILLINOIS PHARMACISTS ASSOCIATION • VOL. 82 - NO. 2 (3rd AND 4th QTR 2018)


Name/Address

Pledge Form I wish to support the IPhA Foundation goal of providing support in the form of grants, scholarships, and professional expertise for pharmacist delivered patient care initiatives designed to optimize patient health outcomes, student participation in IPhA activities, and the preservation and promotion of the history of pharmacy in Illinois. q A single contribution of: $ __________

Contribution Details

q Please charge my credit card $___________ for 1 year.

q My check is enclosed (Payable to IPhA Foundation) q Please charge my: m Visa m MC m AmEx

q Please charge my credit card $___________ until I notify otherwise.

Name on card: _________________________________________

Total Pledge Amount: $ __________

Card #: _______________________________________________

(Used to determine donor level) Presidential Level: $5000+ Executive Level: $1000+ Director Level: $250 - $999 Sponsor Level: $100 - $249

First: _______________ MI: ___ Last: ______________________ Is this your: q Home q Business/Organization Bus/Org: ______________________________________________ Street: ________________________________________________ City: _____________________ State: ____ Zip: ____________ H-Phone: _______________ B-Phone: ______________________ Email: ________________________________________________

Signature: _____________________________________________

Donor Level: up to $99 Student Level: $10

Expiration Date: ____________________ CVV: _______________ Send To

Contributions to the IPhA Foundation, a tax-exempt organization under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code, are deductible for computing income and estate taxes.

IPhA Foundation 204 West Cook Street Springfield IL 62704-2526

Fax: (217) 522-7349

Thank you to the following 3rd/4th Quarter 2018 Foundation Donors Executive Level ($1,000+) Tony Budde Stephen Clement Preeteka Dhamrait Joyce Fogleman Starlin HaydonGreatting Randy Malan David Mikus Tom Rickey

Director Level ($250–$999) Robert Anselmo Eric Bandy Mickie Brunner Phillip Burgess Ben Calcaterra Beaux Cole Gary Frisch Tim Gleason

Laura Licari Jennifer Lipert Cindy Mende-Russell David Mikus Gloria Mizer Kristen & Kevin Niedbalski John Pieper Garth Reynolds Pam Reynolds Tom Rickey Cody Sandusky Terry Traster Warren Winston Bruce Wood Harry Zollars

Sponsor Level ($100–$249) Birute Apke Wayne Beekman Michael Bogdan Diann Brammeier

Sarah Brockhouse Fred Calcaterra Gary Ceretto Phillip DeWolf Om Dhingra Donald Doubek Janice Frueh Hank Gould Christine Herndon Carl Hudson Richard Izard Leola Jones Donna Kay Jessica Kerr Tim Lehan Dustin Melton Christine Osborne Richard Parker Patrick Potter Ellen Ritz Emily Wetherholt

Donor Level (up to $99) Sam An Garrett Andes Robert Bean Wayne Beekman Erin Beene Thomas Beverly Jeffery Bray Wesley Breeze Cara Brock Dennis Bryan Gene Carlson Carmen Catizone Byron Corzine Deepak Dattani Janice Douglas Michelle Dyer Scott Edgar A Samuel Enloe Erin Fehrenbacher Eugene Frank

ILLINOIS PHARMACISTS ASSOCIATION • WWW.IPHA.ORG

James Gable Howard Gerber Michelle Habbal Glenna Hagan Deborah Harper-Brown Norman Hoback Ann Hobel Andreas Iskos Bill Jerrels Terry Johnson Donald Johnston Bassel Joudeh ChungJa Jung Jenna Kalsow Ken Kinsinger Brant Kitto

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Welcome Aboard

to the following 3rd Quarter 2018 NEW MEMBERS Academic Dues Members Danielle Candelario Lisa Dyer Alvin Godina Deborah Harper-Brown Alice Hemenway Amy Lullo Michelle Miller Katherine L Newman Ateequr Rahman Nancy Schmees Glen T. Schumock Michael Shuman New Practitioner Members NGOC PHAM Kevin Monahan

Regular Members Navneet Dhanjal Michael A. Dolan Sara M. Garcia Joy Jones Coartney Livingston Hetal Patel Marina Sagalovich Rebecca Young

Retired Linda Esposito Randall Lambert

Student Members Yasmeen Abdrabo Hartley Abner Sali Abro May Alebraheem Joel Arackal Nilmarie Ayala-Fontanez Anthony Battaglin Rachel Bear Anastasia Berezova Victor Camargo Mateo Carrillo Tyler Cerutti Aasmitha Chitturi Katelyn Clem

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Ashli Crull Hannah Dalogdog Courtney Deiters Morgan Dermody Jacob DeSalvo Lindsey Disbrow Michaela Droyin Annalise Duong Kamila Dymala Sandra Ekoma Breanna Failla Deja Finley Kody Frye Michael Gallagher Rosanna Gambino Emeline Gbegan Haley Gegelman Michael Genet Tanya I. Ghannam Rachel Goldberg Steven Gonzalez Lisa Gosa Alexandra Guzman Gada Hamed Alexandra Herman Sally Hermiz Reem Hnaihen Alexandria Holler Allison Hotop Joann Huynh Majd Ibrahim sanah ibrahim Jayla Jack Shenita Jackson Melinda Jorns Stephanie Kandathil Katelyn Kennedy Leah Kereri Stefanie Kerns Fatima Khaleq Suhail Khan Krystyna Kwak Nicole Kwilos Rebecca Laesch Abigail Landewee Shinae Lee Veronica Leon

Shin Lewis Jacob Linao Nnebuhe Maraizu Amal Massad Conner McClain Monica Metry Bethany Meyer Mary Mitchell Arturo Montero Megan Muldoon Teskiratou Nachirou Ammarah Nadeem Anna Najem Sara Neale Jason Newton Anna Ngo Nhung T. Nguyen Allison Nicklow Elizabeth Ofori-Apau Oluwabusola Oginni Dhara Patel NICKY Patel Priya Patel Radha Patel Alanna Pommes Misbah Qureshi Sanya Qureshi Riddhi Rangoonwala Lauren Ratliff John Rubino Craig Schaefer Vanessa Schumm Ashley Seely rita seman Marvin Serdena Frank Shin Arthur Sima Alexandria Simpson Tia Smith Stacey Stevens Lesley Swick Shelby Tam Stephan J. Tancredi Gracie Tate Madeline Taylor Ashley Thoma Jessica Thomas

ILLINOIS PHARMACISTS ASSOCIATION • VOL. 80 - NO. 4 (4th QTR 2017)

Kristen Thompson Kate Toler Alina Viteri Tara Warren Kurt Weissheimer Patrick White Brentsen Wolf Darlene Ymson Gelmina Zabulionyte Olivia Zanger Jeena Zaya Linda Zheng

Student Members (Out of State) Ali Hachem Sebastiano Mangiamele Jaime Sibayan

Technician Belinda Diaz Kaitlyn Jokisch Patricia Summers


Welcome Aboard

to the following 4th Quarter 2018 NEW MEMBERS Academic Dues Members Kacie Kuehn Trishia E. Shaw

Associate Dues Members Jeff Barkoff Markus Cicka

Joint Dues Bryan V. Schneider

New Practitioner Members (Out of State) Kelly Kovl Megan Schaller Seth Nelson Carey Unthank

Regular Members (Out of State) Michelle Katsiyiannis Bryan J. Micklevitz

Regular Members Anna M. Bryan Brenda L. Bowden Krista Carlson Dino Dibella Naeil Elhaj Erin Fehrenbacher Mitul M. Gandhi Lelliza Geary Charles R. Karwowski Matthew Kemper Adam Kielbasa Andrea Kim SHITAL MANEK Alaina P. Moy Irene M. Scardino Prittis Steve S. Smith Paul W. Springborn Nanette R. Wrobel

Student Members Emily Hanners Sharifah Abdallah Jessica Akioyamen Fauwaz Alaswad Lisa Alexander Shahad Almahmoud Ali Almuktar Abdul Atif Kassidee Aufderheide Alexia Bauer Kaainaat Beelut Jonathan Bien Skyler Boll Olivia Brandner Y. Bueno Duyen Bui Iwona Cabaj Gervacio Cabel Jenna Cairo Omar Cano Kevin Castro Sonia Castro Joe Chakiath Christine Chang Irene Cho Prinkal Choksi Ben Chong Marryssa Conway David E. Courteau Jenna Crosby Ebo Dadzie Vanderly Dang Jazmin Delgado Alisha Desai Krystal Do Amanda Dominguez Danuta Dukala Angela Dylewski Pamela East Marianne Edquiban Nisreen Elagha Ramzi Elayan Mariam Elghorr Alexandra Felix Jemi George Samaneh Ghassemi Justin Han

Cydnee Harris Nicholas Hartmanis Abdallah Hasan Sara Hillebold Megan Hindmon Katarzyna Hipner Heejin Hur Amy Hwang Jolanta Ignaciuk Nkechinyerem Ihenacho Juliana Ihm Mariam Jabro Suany Jass Karolina Jekielek Hannah Jenkins Simon Jubrail Vivian Kadus L Kakooni Angelo Katsoulos Arashpreet Kaur Rachel Kautz Ronya Kawji Kaley Kepplinger Zoha Khan Menahil Khawaja Bokyung Kim Kyoungeun Kim Sean Kim Stephanie Kovac Nicole Kozlowski Phoebe Kunjara Na Ayudhya Tiffany Kuo Dagmara Kutrzuba Kelsey Lamartina Henry Le Chihyi Lee Esther Lee Soo Hyun Lee Youngsun Lee Kyle Leto Hannah Lewis Amy Liu Abbey Londa Emad Malick

Anthony Mankarious Sabrina Mastronardi Kimberly McCarter Audra Melton Rachel Miles Sooweon Min Kristine Mique Huda Mirza Monica Miserendino Jessica Molnar Shavonne Montgomery Braigen Mueller Shannon Mulholland Michaela Murphy Waad Nader Amanda T Nguyen Jessica Ni Huma Nizamuddin Hunter Novosad Oduyemi Odumosu Jimmi Patel Rema Patel Simoli Patel Sonja Paulson Jovan Perkins Nivedha Poondi Joallyn Porter Lauren Purvis Robert Raya Oussama Rayes Courtney Reed Jessie Riederer Emily Rousseau Sarah Sabah Sonal Sahni Sara Salama Brenda Salas Ruba Samara Catherine Sanden Lugain Sbeih Jacob Seiver Shalvi Shah Richard Shin Daniel Sikora Mandip Singh Sadaf Sleman

ILLINOIS PHARMACISTS ASSOCIATION • WWW.IPHA.ORG

Saned Soheil Otilia Soto Angelika Sowizdzal Kendall Spicer Eric Steele Sarah Suk Henoke Tekeste Rachel Thomas Marina Toska Thao Tran Tuyet Tran Thomas Uli May Marne Virtudazo Nancy Vo Nicole Waring Sara Weber Amanda Wegner Brooke Williams Natalia Wojciaczyk Alyssa Wu Sabina Wytrwal Amira Yusuf Kaili Zeng David Zhao

Student Members (Out of State) Asante Acheampong Paulina Bakalina Kate Bybee Chelsea Cribben Terry Doxey Hajer Ibrahim Thanh Pham Yvonne Yen

Technician Jean Campbell

49


Time Capsule

Pharmacy 

Dennis B. Worthen, PhD, Cincinnati, OH | Posted on October 12, 2018

One of a series contributed by the American Institute of the History of Pharmacy, a unique nonprofit society dedicated to assuring that the contributions of your profession endure as a part of America’s history. Membership offers the satisfaction of helping continue this work on behalf of pharmacy, and brings five or more historical publications to your door each year. To learn more, check out: www.aihp.org

1993

• “Health Security Act” was introduced in early years of Clinton presidency. Amendments sought to include pharmacists’ services. Bill failed to garner support and was not passed.

1968

• Alejandro Zaffaroni formed ALZA Corporation (the name is the first two letters of his first and last names) to pioneer new technologies for drug delivery leading to the introduction of dermal patch delivery systems. • Denton Cooley performs the first successful heart transplant in the United States.

1943

• Mary Hunt, known as “Moldy Mary” was a lab technician at the Agricultural Research Station in Peoria, IN in 1943 when she discovered a cantaloupe with a Penicillium chrysogenum strain that was far more productive than earlier strains and was partially responsible for the increased output of penicillin.

1918

• J ohnson & Johnson produced sterilized components of Carrel-Dakin solution which was used to irrigate wounds received in the trenches on the Western Front during WW I. This was the most effective way to fight infection in the preantibiotic era.

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ILLINOIS PHARMACISTS ASSOCIATION • VOL. 81 - NO. 2 (3rd AND 4th QTR 2018)


SUPPORTING PHARMACISTS. ADVANCING CAREERS. Find the best jobs and highly qualified pharmacists Illinois has to offer.

ONLINE CAREER CENTER www.ipha.org


10 TOP

REASONS TO JOIN

IPhA

5. Proclaim Your Professionalism Adding your name to the ranks of your colleagues who currently are members declares your pride in the profession you have chosen. Support IPhA’s advocacy efforts as we work with policy makers to implement health care reform legislation and as we continue to advocate for legislation and regulations that positively impact the profession. Join us in efforts to promote the important role of pharmacists on the health care team.

1. Strengthen Your Career

6. See It All

IPhA members enjoy educational opportunities designed to increase knowledge and keep up with the latest information. Members also receive a discount on titles available in the IPhA Bookstore, as well as access to the Online Career Center.

IPhA is the only statewide pharmacy organization that represents all pharmacists in all practice settings – you can learn about all the opportunities available within pharmacy and gain insights from pharmacists representing a variety of practice settings.

2. Advance Patient Care The more you learn about drug and treatment updates through our publication, Illinois Pharmacists, as well as electronically through the EIE (E-Info Exchange), the better equipped you are to help your patients. IPhA is also a licensed partner to provide the following certificate programs: •

Delivering Medication Therapy Management Services

Pharmacy-Based Cardiovascular Disease Risk Management

Pharmacy-Based Immunization Delivery

The Pharmacist and Patient-Centered Diabetes Care

As well as the advanced pharmacy training program: Pharmacy-Based Travel Health Services

3. Network with Others in Your Field IPhA members are invited to join their colleagues at the IPhA Annual Meeting. Meet members with similar professional interests online through IPhA’s networking sites on Twitter,  Facebook, and www.ipha.org. Members are encouraged to join e-Communities and Special Interest Groups. Pharmacy professionals can also meet and engage with other professionals by attending Local Pharmacy Association Events.

4. Advocate for Your Profession By joining IPhA, you are supporting the only organization the represents the unified voice of all pharmacists. During the past year, IPhA’s work on health care legislation and regulation increased policy makers’ awareness of the pharmacist’s role in combating the medication use crisis. IPhA continues to work to affect policy on your behalf. The Legislative Report keeps you up-to-date with current bills that IPhA is tracking that have potential to affect your practice!

7. Reach Out to Your Community IPhA recognizes an array of local and cultural organizations that provide an opportunity for you to network within your own community.

8. Develop Your Leadership Skills Participate as an active leader in a variety of workshops, training series, and volunteer leadership positions that will develop your skills as you give back to your profession.

9. Receive Scholarships and Awards IPhA has a distinguished awards and scholarship program recognizing members for involvement in the Association, for leadership, academic success and grassroots advocacy. The IPhA Foundation supports members through awards and scholarship programs. In 2015, IPhA is adding two new awards: IPhA Educator of the Year and Generation-Rx, sponsored by Cardinal.

10. Gain the Competitive Edge IPhA gives you exclusive access to unique experiences, career information, and resources designed to meet your needs and provide support as you advance in your career.

JOIN TODAY www.ipha.org


See what our tomorrow looks like at: phmic.com/tomorrow2

ILLINOIS PHARMACISTS ASSOCIATION • WWW.IPHA.ORG

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JOIN + SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL ASSOCIATIONS See calendar of upcoming events on www.IPhA.org homepage for events.

Assn. of Indian Pharmacists in America

Lithuanian Pharmacists Assn.

Central Illinois Pharmacists Assn.

Metro-East Pharmacists Assn.

Harish Bhatt, President (815) 725-1102 harishbhatt@gmail.com

Ben Calcaterra, President ky_bjc@yahoo.com

Champaign Area Pharmacists Assn. Rick Ingram, President 217-469-2007 mowog1@aol.com

Chicago Pharmacists Assn.

Stephanie Hasan, Executive Director (773) 643-4200, info@cpha1922.com

DuPage County Pharmacists Assn. Ron Grossmayer, President (630) 881-3582 dupagepharmacists@gmail.com

East Central IL Pharmacists Assn. Charles Luchtefeld, President (217) 347-1343 cluckyrph@yahoo.com Ben Calcaterra, President ben.calcaterra@gmail.com

Gateway East Pharmacy Assn. Gary Ceretto, President (618) 444-0431 cerettorx@aol.com

National Pharmacists Assn. Thomas Hanson, President (847) 658-2904 rphth@msn.com

North Suburban Pharmacists of Chicagoland Gary Frisch, President info@nspharmacists.org www.nspharmacists.org

Polish American Pharmacists Association Alan Mader, President (847) 772-7661 Katarzyna Wielgosl Papa, kwielg3@uic.edu Kellie Byrd, President 2pharmhawks@gmail.com

South Suburban Pharmacists Assn. Moira Maroney, President (708) 638-4853 sspa2006@yahoo.com

Southeastern Pharmaceutical Assn.

Illinois Valley Pharmacists Assn. Donna Morscheiser, President (815) 224-4555 mohouse5@comcast.net

Thomas Blasdel, President (618) 895-2844 shoecreek@gmail.com

Springfield Pharmacists Assn.

Korean Pharmacists Assn. of Chicago

54

Anthony Budde, Executive Secretary (618) 978-3520 budde76@charter.net

Quad City Area Pharmacy Assn.

Far Southern Pharmacists Assn.

Jane Hyonchu Lee, President (773) 319-6547 kaphachicago@gmail.com

Birute Apke, Joe Kalvaitis, Co-Presidents birute.apke@gmail.com pharmjoe@hotmail.com

Preeteka Dhamrait, President preeteka@aol.com

The Voice for Pharm acy in Illinois TM

ILLINOIS PHARMACISTS ASSOCIATION • VOL. 82 - NO. 2 (3rd AND 4th QTR 2018)


ADVERTISE HERE ¼ page, ½ page, & full page ads available. Reach up to 15,000 pharmacists. Also ASK US about advertising on our website and in our monthly newsletter. Call Erica Pinkley at 217-522-7300


When: On-Demand, Online & On-Demand Where: Online, United States Contact: kimc@ipha.org

Illinois State Opioid Antagonist Training Program

Presented by: Kelly Gable, PharmD, BCPP, Chris Herndon, PharmD, BCPS, Jessica Kerr, PharmD, CDE, & Garth Reynolds, BSPharm, RPh T his program is on-demand and can be taken at any time. You will receive information on how to access webinar, immediately after registration.

Pharmacist Registration - $75 If you are a pharmacist working in a pharmacy organization or chain, you may wish to contact your district or regional manager to determine if your company has partnered with the Illinois Pharmacists Association to provide this education on a group contract. If you are interested in a group contract, please contact IPhA at 217-522-7300 or email Kim Condon at kimc@ipha.org.

The Illinois State Opioid Antagonist Training Program has been approved by the Illinois Department of Public Health, the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation, and the Illinois Department of H uman Services and meets the requirements set forth in PA 99-0480. Upon completion of this knowledge-based activity, the pharmacist will be able to:

56

1)

Describe the opioid abuse and overdose epidemic on a state and national level.

2)

Review unique pharmacological properties of commonly prescribed opioids and heroin.

3)

Discuss the neurobiology of addiction and opioid use disorder.

4)

Understand risk factors, signs of an opioid overdose, and the role of opioid antagonist therapy.

5)

Describe the role of pharmacy personnel in opioid overdose management.

6)

Evaluate key elements of patient and caregiver education on opioid overdose management.

7)

Discuss standardized procedures, naloxone standing order sets, and clinical documentation. ILLINOIS PHARMACISTS ASSOCIATION • VOL. 82 - NO. 2 (3rd AND 4th QTR 2018)


ACPE accredited for 1.75 hour (0.175 CEUs) | ACPE Universal Activity Number: 0135-0000-16-002-H04-P

Initial release date: 03/11/2016 | Planned expiration date: 03/11/2019

Activity Type: Knowledge-based | Target Audience: Pharmacists in all practice settings

Course Instruction Design and Participant Requirements: This CPE activity will be knowledge-based learning activities to meet the needs of pharmacists. Immediately after registration, participants will receive a links to access a recorded video, examination, and evaluation. To be eligible to obtain a maximum of 1.75 contact hour (0.175 CEUs) the participant must watch the video, successfully pass the examination with a score of 70 percent or greater, and complete an evaluation. Refund Policy: Due to the nature of this unique program type, self-paced with immediate content access, this program is not eligible for refunds. We apologize for the inconvenience.

The Illinois Pharmacists Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education as providers of continuing pharmacy education. Technology note: The session will be provided in video / PDF formats. It is the responsibility of the participant to use compatible technology. Typically, these formats will download best using a Google Chrome or Firefox browser. The course materials will be emailed to you post-registration. Please be sure to provide an accurate email address. Continuing Pharmacy Education Requirements This activity is structured to meet knowledge-based educational needs and acquire factual knowledge. Information in knowledge-type activities is based on evidence as accepted in the literature by the health care professions. Continuing pharmacy education (CPE) credit will be earned based on participation in the activity. Participation is required before obtaining CPE credit. Participants must complete an activity evaluation and posttest (if applicable) with a passing score of 70 percent or greater. This activity is accredited through ACPE for pharmacist continuing pharmacy education credit. If all requirements are met, participants will receive continuing pharmacy education credit in the following manner. Partial credit will not be awarded. Please allow 60 days for processing. Pharmacists: CPE Monitor, a national, collaborative effort by ACPE and the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy (NABP) to provide an electronic system for pharmacists and technicians to track their completed CPE credits, went into effect on January 1, 2013. IPhA, as an ACPE-accredited provider, is required to report pharmacist CPE credit using this tracking system. Pharmacist participants must provide their NABP e-Profile Identification Number and date of birth (in MMDD format) when they register for a CPE activity or complete activity evaluations. It will be the responsibility of the pharmacist to provide the correct information (e-Profile Identification Number and Date of birth in MMDD Format). If this information is not provided, NABP and ACPE prohibit IPhA from issuing CPE Credit. Online access to their inventory of completed credits will allow pharmacists to easily monitor their compliance with CPE requirements and print statements of credit. Therefore, IPhA will not provide individual printed statements of credit to pharmacists. For additional information on CPE Monitor, including e-Profile set-up and its impact on pharmacists and pharmacy technicians, go to www.nabp.net.

ILLINOIS PHARMACISTS ASSOCIATION • WWW.IPHA.ORG

57


ATTENTION CURRENT IPhA MEMBERS...

Register 1 of 2 new ways to renew your dues and make renewing easier! 1

Auto Membership Dues Renewal

2

Quarterly Membership Dues Renewal

Complete this form to authorize your automatic ANNUAL membership dues renewal!

Complete this form to authorize your automatic QUARTERLY membership dues renewal!

Name: _______________________________________

Name: _______________________________________

Street: _______________________________________

Street: _______________________________________

City: __________________ State: ____ Zip: _______

City: __________________ State: ____ Zip: _______

Is this your: q Home

Is this your: q Home

q Business/Organization

q Business/Organization

Email: ________________________________________

Email: ________________________________________

H-Phone: _____________________________________

H-Phone: _____________________________________

B-Phone: _____________________________________

B-Phone: _____________________________________

q I authorize IPhA to charge my credit card for my membership dues automatically each year on or near the date of my dues renewal date until I notify the IPhA in writing to discontinue.

q I authorize IPhA to charge my credit card for my membership dues quarterly until I notify the IPhA in writing to discontinue.

Card number: __________________________________

(Visa, MasterCard, American Express or Discover)

Card number: __________________________________

(Visa, MasterCard, American Express or Discover)

Expiration: ________________________ CVV:______ Signature: ____________________________________ Date: ________________________________________ A receipt for your annual dues renewal payment(s) will be sent after payment is processed each year.

Expiration: ________________________ CVV:______ Signature: ____________________________________ Date: ________________________________________ Please note there will be a $5.00 processing fee for making quarterly payments.

We value your membership and thank you for your continued support of the IPhA! 58

ILLINOIS PHARMACISTS ASSOCIATION • VOL. 82 - NO. 2 (3rd AND 4th QTR 2018)


Contact Information

Name: _____________________________________________________________________ Street Address: ______________________________________________________________ City: _________________________________ State: ________ Zip+4: ______________ Senate District Number: _________________

House District Number: ________________

Phone: ______________________ Email: ________________________________________ Yes, I want to invest in the future of pharmacy in Illinois!

The Illinois Pharmacists Political Action Committee (IPPAC) is a voluntary non-profit unincorporated committee of Pharmacists with an interest in the election of qualified state (and local) candidates to public office and to further the interests of Pharmacy in the State of Illinois

m Enclosed is my single contribution of: q $5,000 q $2,000 q $1,000 q $500 q $250 q $100 q $50 q Other $_________ m I would like to contribute on a monthly basis until I notify IPhA to discontinue. Please charge my credit card $______ on the 15th of each month. m I would like to contribute on a monthly basis for one year: Please charge my credit card $______ on the 15th of each month. Payment Information

q My check payable to IPPAC is enclosed q Please charge my: m Visa m MC

Political contributions are not tax deductible. A copy of our report filed with the State Board of Elections is (or will be) available for purchase from the State Board of Elections, Springfield, IL.

m AmEx

Card Number: __________________________________

Expiration Date: _________________ CVV: _________

Signature: _____________________________________ Date: _________________________________________

Mail To IPPAC 204 West Cook Street Springfield, IL 62704-2526 Fax To (217) 522-7349 For More Information (217) 522-7300

2018 PAC Contributors Garrett Andes Birute Apke Wyane Beekman Carl Bode Carmen Catizone Gary Ceretto Janice Douglas David Falk Erin Fehrenbacher Janice Fogelman Ann Hobel Carl Hudson Jr. Richard Izard Leola Jones Charles Karwowski

Janice Kleppe Gordon Mazotti John McLachlan Cindy Mende-Russell Mike Minesinger Seth Nelson Richard Parker Alan Reed Garth Reynolds Ellen Ritz Edgar Scott Scott Sexton Fadi Sobh Richard Sphere Dalia Trakis

ILLINOIS PHARMACISTS ASSOCIATION • WWW.IPHA.ORG

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Illinois Pharmacist 3rd/4th Quarter 2018  

The Illinois Pharmacists Association is dedicated to enhancing the professional competency of pharmacists, advancing the standards of pharma...

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