IPA Journal Summer 2023

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IPA NATIONAL TOUR A MUSICAL TRIP TO MEMPHIS AND NASHVILLE IRELAND SUMMER 2023 www.ipaireland.org Issue 57 THE LIFESTYLE & LEISURE MAGAZINE FOR IPA MEMBERS OF AN GARDA SÍOCHÁNA ARAN ISLANDS EVENT 2023 ANOTHER GREAT FAMILY EVENT, NOW IN ITS NINTH YEAR IPA SOCCER SUCCESS IN MAJORCA INAUGURAL IPA LADIES TEAM DID US PROUD

Accommodation Prices 2024

IPA House Dublin

IPA Members €35 per night PPS

Non Members €40 per night PPS

Single Supplement charge is withdrawn

Children under 16 years old – Half Price & Infants under 3 years old - Free

Apartments (excluding Killarney)

IPA Members €30 per night PPS

Non Members €35 per night PPS

IPA Members children (16+) €30 per night

All Children under 16 yrs FREE in all Apartments

Bed Linen & Towels (Overseas Visitors Only) €10 per person per stay

Single Supplement Charge is withdrawn

High Season (July & August)

Galway €575 per week

Cork €450 per week

Sligo & Wexford €400 per week

Note: Minimum 7-day rental in High Season, Sat to Sat, (week max)

Bed Linen & Towels (Overseas Visitors Only) €10 per person per stay

Killarney Apartment Only

Rate per night includes the following:

• Accommodation for up to 6 adults/kids

• Free Parking

• Cleaning/Linen & Towels

• Family Access to Aquila Leisure Centre/Gym

October – April €220 two nights minimum (Additional nights at €110 per night – Max €500 for 7 Nights)

May €500 per week

June €675 per week

July €725 per week

August €725 per week

September €550 per week

All Prices are shown inclusive of Vat at 13.5% rate Vat invoice issued for each booking

May – September - Seven nights minimum stay Saturday to Saturday Only

Low Season (October to June inclusive Apartments Only)

Cork, Sligo & Wexford €300 per week

Galway €365 per week

Note: Applies to 7-day rental in Low Season only

Ben Linen & Towels (overseas visitors only) €10/person (per stay)

Accommodation Officer: Chris Verling, 13 Iona Drive, Glasnevin, Dublin 9, D09 RC94, Ireland

Email: accommodation@ipaireland.org

Tel: +353 (0)1 830 2907

Facebook: www.facebook.com/ipaIrelandHouses

Twitter: www.twitter.com/IpaIrelandHouse

2 IPA Journal | Spring 2023
COMPETITION/OFFERS 2 IPA ACCOMMODATION Updated Pricing for Summer 2023 36 ST. PAULS GCU Check the latest exclusive offers 36 IPA APP FLIER Download the IPA App to receive updates on IPA events and activity 30 IPA ACCOMMODATION Finland and Portugal FEATURES 8 IPA RETIREMENTS Region 2 Members receive their retirement pieces 9 IPA MAJORCA SOCCER COMPETITION Irish Ladies and Mens Teams do us proud 10 IPA NATIONAL TOUR –TENNESSEE A musical journey with Ann Liston 14 THE TITANIC The proclaimed unsinkable ship Part 2 18 IPA ARAN EVENT Another fun filled family event in Galway 22 BELLA TUSCANY Richard Casey takes us through this Italian Gem 29 IPA SUPPLIES ADVERT IPA Supplies can be ordered online 32 NATIONAL COUNCIL 2023 A busy weekend in Dundalk REGULARS 4 EDITORIAL News and views on your IPA Journal edition 5 PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE A message and thoughts from the President 6 PRESIDENT’S DIARY It has been a busy time of late in IPA Ireland 26 MOTOR REVIEW Kieron Fennell takes a look at the Suzuki Swace Hybrid 08 22 18 26 10 32 SUMMER 2023 IPA JOURNAL IRELAND CONTENTS IPA Journal | Summer 2023 3

Welcome to the Summer 2023 edition of the IPA Journal.

Editorial

By the time you are reading this, most of you will be wondering if we had a summer at all! July was certainly a washout, here’s hoping for a warm September. Despite the weather, there was certainly plenty of IPA activity since our last Edition, both here and abroad, with 56 members making the trip across the Atlantic to the ‘Volunteer State’ of Tennessee, which was another fantastic trip organised by Travel Officer Ann Liston, no doubt motivated by the Chicago trip last year which seems destined to go down as the greatest IPA escapade yet.

In this edition, we have a mix of articles which I hope you will find of interest, in particular those featuring IPA activity around the country. The IPA Aran Event, organised by Region 29 Galway, was held in July and attracted visitors from here and abroad. In its 9th year, the event is going from strength to strength, and there is no doubt that this family event will remain a star attraction for members and their families each Summer.

In May, Section Ireland sent three soccer teams to Majorca, which included a Ladies Team for the first time in IPA Ireland history. The Ladies got through to the semifinal, claiming a well deserved third place in the overall competition. We would encourage each Region to send a Team to the next IPA 5 a side competition, which will take place on 19th October 2023 in Longford. The winning and runner up team for the men’s and the winning ladies Team will travel to Majorca in 2024.

We would continue to encourage you to go to our website and register for online access, before downloading the IPA App. This will provide you with prompt communications on IPA activity and events worldwide. Don’t forget to turn on ‘push notifications’!

I hope that you have an enjoyable and relaxing summer.

email: chris@ipaireland.org

JOURNAL IRELAND

IPA Journal is distributed to members of the International Police Association in Ireland, 75% are serving members of An Garda Síochána of all ranks, the remainder being retirees. We also mail the magazine to friends of IPA Ireland overseas.

This magazine is sustained by the generous support of sponsors and advertisers; we exhort our members to appreciate this and to patronise those who contribute to our success. All revenue received by IPA in excess of requirements is devoted to philanthropic purposes. IPA provides funding for scholarships, relief of distress, charities, education, sport, cultural pursuits, bonds of friendship and co-operation between all police officers.

IPA Office:

IPA House, 13 Iona Drive, Glasnevin, Dublin 9.

T: 01 830 2907

F: 01 830 4612

E: ipairish@gmail.com

Editorial Board

President: Conor O’Higgins

Editor: Chris Cahill

E: chris@ipaireland.org

1st Vice President: Marie Daly

National Treasurer: Damian Crummey

Contributors

Ann Liston

Chris Verling

Conor O’ Higgins

James Codd

Publishers

James Healy

Joe Fanning

Kieron Fennelly

Richard Casey

Real Media Group Suite 167, CoLab Business Centre, Port Road, Letterkenny, Co. Donegal

T: 074 91 77893

E: publish@realmedia.group

Disclaimer:

The views expressed in IPA Journal unless expressly stated, do not necessarily reflect the views of the Editor, the Publications Management Committee, the International Police Association, the Publisher, An Garda Síochána or the Garda Commissioner. The Editor reserves the right to edit and abridge any material submitted for publication. Durgan Media excludes liability for any loss or damage resulting from errors or inaccuracies in the printing or omission of the whole or part of any advertisement. Further, views expressed within editorial content reflect those of the author, not those of Real Media, and are printed in good faith for informational purposes only. Advertisement material may not be reproduced without prior written permission from Real Media. The contents of the publication, such as text, graphics, images and other material may be protected by copyright under both Irish and foreign laws. Unauthorised use of the material may violate copyright, trademark and other laws.

Photo by Shifaaz shamoon on Unsplash
IPA
www.ipaireland.org SUMMER 2023 4 IPA Journal | Summer 2023

President’s Message

Conor O’Higgins

Summer 2023

When you sit down to read our summer edition you are probably enjoying your summer break or just back. In either case I hope that you are enjoying the long days and getting out and about.

Since our last edition we had a very successful National Council, hosted by our friends in Region Louth. The Fairways Hotel proved to be a very suitable and comfortable venue with excellent accommodation and very good food. I thank all involved, who assisted in the successful staging of a very fruitful Council. With a very full agenda and the planned one-day council, we started earlier than usual and worked into the evening to finish. I would like to commend all in attendance for your cooperation during National Council. The format of National Council will be reviewed at the Half Yearly meeting in the Autumn. I salute and thank the two members of the National Executive Committee, Joe Lynch and Mary O’Connell, who have stood down, for their great contributions during their term of office and to wish both well in their post NEC life. I also thank Denis Dunne whose term of Immediate Past President ended with National Congress and wish him well also.

We now turn our eyes to the remainder of 2023. In September Social Officer Donal Sweeney will be running off the National Soccer and Golf Competitions. I encourage all Regions to participate and make these competitions a great IPA social occasion.

In October/November (date to be fixed) we look forward to our Half Yearly meeting of Regional Chairs and Secretaries. This meeting reviews decisions of National Council and concentrates on issues of interest to the membership. Secretary General, Carlo Griffin, will be circulating the venue, agenda and date of the meeting in September..

Our new IPA App is now well established. At this stage, around 1,000 members have signed up. This is the way of communications going forward. Now that Accommodation Officer, Chris Verling, has managed to place accommodation bookings online, members will have to have signed into the IPA App to book accommodation in future. Please sign up for the App to avail of all IPA services and be instantly aware of IPA activities and offers

All regions are required to hold their annual meeting in the month of October. This is ideal for planning activities for the future. Make sure that your Liaison NEC member is invited and all issues requiring clarification can be discussed..

Thank you for your continued support and membership of the International Police Association, Section Ireland.

Yours in Friendship

IPA NATIONAL GOLF COMPETITION 2023

Dear Member,

The very popular IPA National Golf Competition will take place at Tullamore Golf Club again this year on 30th August 2023.

The event commences at 14:00 hrs (tee time) and runs until about 16:30 hrs. Teams of two (2) only please.

For more information or to register please contact Donal Sweeney, Social and Clubs Officer, on or

Servo Per Amikeco

IPA Section Ireland

THE NED JOY IPA SCHOLARSHIP

Passing out Parade, Garda College, 8th July 2023

Presentation of The Ned Joy, International Police Association Scholarship to Garda Jake Sexton who will be posted to Drogheda, Louth Region, at Passing out ceremony Garda College 28th July 2023

Photo from left – Garda Patricia Devine, Garda College, Garda Helen Mc Grath, Secretary Garda College Region, Minister for Justice, Helen Mc Entee, Garda Jake Sexton, Deputy Commissioner Ann Marie Mc Mahon and Conor O’Higgins, President IPA Ireland.

PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE
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Northern European Forum – Munich 11th to 14th May

I was happy once again to participate in the Northern European Forum and join with Presidents from many Sections. This year the forum was hosted by Section Germany and a full agenda and program was in place for the meeting.

North European Forum Agenda

1. Opening Remarks

2. Roll Call

3. Apologies for Absence

4. Minutes of the NEF Meeting at 2022 in Tallinn

5. Matters arising from Minutes

6. Presentation - Identity Theft / Dark Net (Dr. Marc Maisch)

7. World Congress 2023 – All members

8. Motions for World Congress 2023 - All Members

9. Discussion – All Members

Lunch Break

10. Presentation - 3D crime scene reconstruction –(Fabian Puchelt – BLKA)

11. National / International IPA Events

12. New International Relations Commission – All Members

13. Social / Cultural / Professional – Examples of Good Practice – All Members

14. Conclusion – Date / Location of Next Meetings

All items were fully discussed and areas of mutual interest were teased out at sidebar meetings. A full report on the NEF meeting was discussed at the next NEC meeting.

Annual Garda Commemoration – Dublin Castle 20th May

It was an honour to once again represent IPA Ireland at the annual commemoration of members of An Garda Síochána who died during the course of duty.

A very fitting ceremony attended by Government, Garda Authorities, including family members of deceased Gardai, serving and retired members and all of the Garda Sister Organisations. The ceremony was led by Chaplains to the Force, the Garda Band and Choir.

UK National Council – 2nd to 4th June

It was my honour to be Guest of Honour at the National Council of Section UK. I was in attendance for their council and experienced a very efficient and work like program of discussion.

I was accompanied by my wife Catherine and was presented with a special plaque which incorporated three specially minted coins to mark the passing of Queen Elizabeth, Coronation of King Charles and the patronage of the Princess Royal to IPA Section UK.

National Executive Committee and Commission meetings

NEC and Commission meetings were held on a monthly basis both virtual and in person.

Yours in friendship

PRESIDENT’S DIARY IPA Journal | Summer 2023 7

IPA Region 2 Retirement Presentations

Congratulations to IPA Region 2 DMR East members, Maura Philips and Kieran Brown, who received their IPA Retirement Pieces recently. The Regional Committee chose the beautiful surroundings of Dalkey Island for the occasion.

We wish them well in their retirement.

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IPA Soccer Competition Success in Majorca

ON THURSDAY 11TH MAY 2023 I HAD THE PRIVILEGE OF LEADING 3 TEAMS FROM IPA IRELAND OUT ONTO THE PITCHES IN SANTA PONSA FOR THE OPENING CEREMONY OF THE ANNUAL 5 ASIDE SOCCER TOURNAMENT. HISTORY WAS MADE THIS YEAR WHEN AN IRISH LADIES IPA TEAM TOOK PART IN THIS PRESTIGIOUS EVENT. IT WAS A PROUD MOMENT FOR ALL 3 TEAMS: TULLAMORE, CAVAN/MONAGHAN, AND THE IRELAND LADIES LED BY THEIR RESPECTIVE MANAGERS ENDA KENNY, JAMES MORRISROE, MICK DEMPSEY AND RAY DOYLE.

The football kicked off on Friday with Cavan/ Monaghan (Irish Rovers) and Ireland Ladies both playing 8 matches of 15-minute duration. Both teams performed very well, and both qualified for the knockout stages, with the Irish Rovers collecting a total of 16 points, and the Ladies collected a total of 21 points. Tullamore played their 8 games on the Saturday, but unfortunately it was a very tough task and they failed to qualify after a gallant effort.

The knockout stage began on Sunday morning and the Irish rovers were first up. They played exceptionally well and won 2-1, qualifying for the quarter final. In the quarter final they were eventually beaten by a better team. The Ladies had a good 1-0 win qualifying for the semi-final. In the semi-final the tiredness started to show, and they were unlucky to be beaten. They were left with a showdown for 3rd place, and after a brilliant drawn game they came out on top in the penalty shootout to claim a brilliant 3rd place.

It was a very proud moment for IPA Ireland when the ladies collected the trophy for 3rd place, the best result ever for an Irish team in Majorca. I would like to take this opportunity to thank the 3 teams who participated on behalf of IPA Ireland and did us proud. I would also like to thank the managers Enda Kenny, James Morrisroe, Mick Dempsey and Ray Doyle and of course Colette Conlon for all her help and support. Looking forward to next may in Santa Ponsa. Servo per Amikeco

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Donal Sweeney Social Secretary/Clubs Officer
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Tuesday was a morning of leisure and in the evening the group headed out to The Grand Ole Opry. We were lucky to get a group photo and then the heavens opened……our second shower of the day….all ran to take refuge under a tree!! One cannot put into words, the experience of the Grand Ole Opry. It was a fantastic night of entertainment which on that night included famous singers such as Josh Turner and Ashley McBryde. The Group had free time to visit places like the Johnny Cash Museum, Ryman Auditorium, Nissan Stadium, the Hop On Hop o Bus Tour, and of course a Pub Crawl during our stay in Nashville.

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Unfortunately, our 8-day trip had to come to an end. “Farewell Drinks” were enjoyed by all in the Hotel on our last night, together with a good singsong. It was a great trip and enjoyed by all. A great group of people. The group bonded well and there was lots of fun and laughter. Many famous places visited, sightseeing, a boat trip, a little shopping and a “little bit” of partying, singing and dancing.

We will all hold our special memories of same, together with many photos and videos. We met up with old acquaintances and made many new friends, and who knows, maybe we will meet up again on another trip. I certainly hope so.

Remember the motto of IPA is “Service through Friendship”.

This National Tour is an annual event organised by IPA Ireland and supported by the host Section. To hear about this and other upcoming tours, please ensure that you register for our online members area (see inside back cover for details).

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THE TITANIC WAS DESIGNED TO FLOAT WITH UP TO FOUR “WATERTIGHT” COMPARTMENTS IF THEY WERE BREACHED, BUT THE COLLISION WITH THIS MASSIVE ICEBERG CAUSED SIX OF THESE COMPARTMENTS TO BE BREACHED. AS A RESULT EACH OF THE BREACHED “WATERTIGHT” COMPARTMENTS STARTED TO FILL UP WITH SEA WATER AND FLOOD. THIS CAUSED THE BOW TO START TO SINK AS WATER STARTED TO POUR OVER THE BULKHEADS, FLOODING THE HULL. THE WEIGHT OF THE WATER RUSHING INTO THE COMPARTMENTS, TIPPED THE SHIP DOWN, RESULTING IN MORE WATER COMING ON BOARD AND AS EACH COMPARTMENT FLOODED, IT PULLED THE SHIP FURTHER DOWNWARD, FILLING ALL OF THE “WATERTIGHT” COMPARTMENTS ONE AFTER THE OTHER.

At 12.05 am on the fateful day 15th April, Captain Smith ordered evacuation of the ship. Radio operators transmitted a Come Quick Danger (COD) distress call followed by a further signal Save Our Souls (SOS) call.

At 12.15 am the ships resident band started to play ragtime tunes in the first class lounge, and later on the Boat Deck in an attempt to calm passengers and keep their spirits up.

At 12.45 am an Order was given to load the lifeboats with women and children first to be evacuated. At the same time, having picked up the distress call, the Cunard ship RMS Carpathia, headed to the rescue scene. Distress rockets were also fired, but they appeared so low over the ship’s deck that they made

no sound and did not appear like distress rockets, so no great concern was taken.

The unsung heroes of this shipping disaster were without doubt the 300 men working below deck who kept the pumps going and the electricity flowing for as long as possible before the ship finally sunk, thereby saving many more lives. The trimmers took coal from the bunker to the furnaces where it was fed by the stokers to keep the engines going. The firemen’s duty was to keep a certain amount of pressure in the system and firing the boilers which produced electricity. Their function was most important, as if the electricity failed the lifeboats could not be launched and if there was no light at this time of night, which was moonless, the passengers would be unable to make

their way to the lifeboats. The engineers, under their chief, Joseph Bell, coordinated the desperate attempts to keep the ship afloat as long as possible, which was about two hours and forty minutes after the collision with the iceberg before the ship finally sank. Even when the order was given by the Captain to abandon ship, none of these men did so, and continued with their responsibilities the result of which was that 200 of them lost their lives.

Shortly after 12.45 am , the first lifeboat, starboard No. 7, was safely lowered away. It left with just 28 people aboard but could carry 65. At 12.55 am: the first port-side boat No 6 was lowered and left with 24 from its capacity of 65. At the same time No 5 lifeboat left with 41 on

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board, well under its capacity of 65. At this time Fifth Officer Harold Lowe ordered Bruce Ismay to stop interfering with his commands.

At 01:00 am : Starboard lifeboat No 3 was lowered with 32 on board including 11 crew - capacity 65.

At 01:10 am : Starboard lifeboat No 1 was lowered with 12 on board, with a capacity 40. At the same time Port-side No 8 lifeboat was lowered carrying 39 people with a capacity of 65.

At 01:15 am : Sea water rises to reach the Titanic’s name on the bow, which caused her to list slightly. The tilt on the deck grew steeper.

At 01:25 am : Port-side boat No 12 was lowered with 40 women and children on board. Two seamen were put in charge of this boat. After the Titanic sank, this boat was tied together with boats No’s 4, 10, 14 and collapsible boat D. Later on, survivors were moved from boat 14 to other boats by Fifth Officer Lowe, so that he could return to pick

up swimming passengers. Boat 12 was subsequently over-loaded with 70 passengers, many rescued from collapsible boat D.

At 01:30 am : As boat No.14 was lowered with 60 people, panic appeared to be visible among some passengers with some of them ready to jump into this full boat which caused Lowe to fire shots into the air to warn them away.

At 01:35 am : Port-side lifeboat No 16 was lowered with 50 people, with a capacity of 65. Starboard lifeboat 13 was lowered with 64 people, just one under capacity, and contained mostly second and third-class women and children. Thirty seconds later Starboard No 15 was lowered and became overloaded with 70 aboard when the capacity was 65. It almost collided with lifeboat No 13 as it was lowered but No.13 pulled away just in time.

At 01:40 am : Most of the forward lifeboats had by this time moved away and remaining passengers moved to the stern area.

As the forward Well Deck became awash, Ismay himself left on collapsible lifeboat C with 39 on board out of a capacity of 47. This was the last star-board lifeboat to be launched.

At 01:45 am: Port-side lifeboat No 3 was lowered with 33 people on it, when it could carry 65. As the Carpathia was rushing to the scene the last message that it received from the Titanic was to the effect that “Engine room full up to the boilers”.

At 02:00 am: Water was by now only 10 feet below the Promenade Deck. At 02:05 am: There were still over 1,500 persons aboard this sinking ship. Collapsible lifeboat D was one of the last lifeboats remaining, with room for 47 people. As a rush to this lifeboat took place, in order to prevent a stampede, Lighttoller first waved his pistol before firing in the air, as crew members formed a circle with arms locked together to allow only women and children to board. The lifeboat was lowered with 44 aboard as the Titanic’s forecastle head sank underwater, as the tilt of her decks grew steeper.

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Photo by K. Mitch Hodge on Unsplash

At 02:10 am : Captain Smith released wireless operators from their duties. At 02:17 am : Wireless operator Jack Phillips sent the last radio message as the Captain told crew members “It is everyman for himself” before he returned to the bridge to await the end.

Father Thomas Byles heard confession and gave absolution to over 100 second and third-class passengers who had gathered at the aft end of the Boat Deck.

The Titanic’s bow plunged under the water enabling the ensnared collapsible lifeboat B to float clear upside down. The ships band stopped playing its ragtime tunes as many passengers jumped overboard. The Titanic’s forward funnel collapsed, crashing into the water and crushing a number of the swimming passengers. Collapsible lifeboat A started to float free as about two dozen people in the water grabbed hold of it. The boat cleared the ships right side but was swamped and dangerously overloaded. Lowe in boat No 14 saved some of them but over half of them had died from hypothermia as the water temperature was minus 2 degrees centigrade.

KEY DATES

At 02:18 am : A huge noise was heard as movable objects inside the Titanic crashed forward towards the submerged bow. The ships lights blink once and then go out. The stern of the ship had at this stage risen high in the water as the bow section flooded further and sank deeper into the sea. The strain on the frame of the ship resulted in this huge ship to break in two. The bow half sinks.

At 02:20 am : The Titanic’s broken off stern settled back into the water, righting itself before it started to fill with water from its open front and again the stern lifted high in the air as the front areas flood by the weight. Very shortly afterwards the whole stern section slid at an angle into the sea and sank. As it sank, the 1,500+ people still on board are crying and screaming for help as those swimming in the water and clinging to wreckage only last about 15 minutes, before succumbing to hypothermia in the freezing water.

At 03:30 am : The Carpathia’s rockets were sighted by the lifeboats as she raced to the rescue scene at 17 knots which exceeded her normal speed of 14 knots.

At 04:10 am : Amid floating ice and debris from the Titanic, passengers from the first lifeboat No. 2 were picked up by the Carpathia. At 05:30 am: The Californian, which was about 20 miles away, headed to the rescue scene having picked up notification from the Frankfort which was about 100 miles away.

Between 06:00 am to 6:30 am: Lifeboat No 14 picked up survivors from collapsible lifeboat A as does boats No’s 4 and 12 from collapsible boat B.

At 08:30 am : The last lifeboat No. 12 was picked up by the Carpathia and Lighttoller was the last survivor to come on board. The Californian, which had arrived at the scene, made a check of the disaster area for any further survivors.

At 08:50 am: The Carpathia left for New York carrying 705 survivors with an estimated 1,523 persons lost. Mr Ismay, who himself was safely on board this ship, wired White Star New York offices with the message “Deeply regret to advise you the Titanic sank this morning after a collision with an iceberg, resulting in a serious loss of life. Full particulars later”.

17th April 1912: White Star hired another ship, the Mackay-Bennett, which left Halifax, Nova Scotia, to search for bodies at the disaster site.

18th April 1912 – 09:00 am: The Carpathia, having passed the Statute of Liberty where over 10,000 people had gathered to view, arrived at New York. Having deposited the lifeboats at the White Star piers, she returned to the Cunard pier to unload the survivors.

19th April 1912 : The United States Senate launched an enquiry into the disaster headed by Senator William A. Smith.

22nd April 1912: White Star sent a further ship the Mania from Halifax to assist the Mackay-Bennett which had already picked up 306 bodies in the disaster area. This ship found a further 17 bodies after a week-long search.

24th April 1912 : The stokers on the Titanic’s sister ship the Olympia, which was about to leave Southampton in the UK, went on strike having refused to work on a ship that did not carry sufficient lifeboats for all persons on board. This sailing had to be cancelled.

2nd May 1912 : The British Board of Trade launched an enquiry into the disaster.

6th May 1912 : White star sent another ship the Montmagny out from Sorel, Quebec, to search for bodies and found another four.

15th May 1912 : White Star sent a further ship the Algerina from St. John’s, Newfoundland, to search for bodies. It found just one more and this final search brought the total to 328 bodies found from the estimated 1,523 dead.

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The first-class passengers on the Titanic had the distinct advantage of being closest to the lifeboats when they were launched as opposed to the third class who were located furthest away near the cargo area. When the lifeboats were launched, despite the ‘women and children first’ policy, the first-class passengers had a higher survival rate than the third-class children. The final figures bear this out as three out of five first class passengers survived, with just two out of five travelling in second class, and just one out of four in third class. The class distinction which was entrenched and pertained in society in 1912 was no different even when it came to the disaster of the Titanic. People of that era were expected to know their place and abide by it without question.

When it came to notifying New York about the passenger survivors that had been picked up by the Carpathia, their names were given by telegraph on a class footing beginning with first class, followed by second class with the names of third class not given due to time limitation. This meant that relations of the latter class who were awaiting anxiously for news of

their loved ones did not know whether they were alive or dead.

When the Carpathia docked in New York, where a huge crowd had assembled at the pier to meet those that had been rescued, class distinction again took over, with first class survivors being the first to be allowed to come ashore, followed by second class, then third class and finally crew members.Even in death, class distinction still pertained with coffins been allocated to first class passengers when their bodies had been picked up at sea by ships, identified by their apparel. When the supply of coffins had been exhausted, lower class passengers were put in body bags to be taken ashore.

The very sad feature of this major shipping disaster was that the majority of the third class passengers were emigrants, many of whom were Irish, who were emigrating to America to find employment and a better way of life but never made it there.

(To be continued in the next Issue)

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Image by David_Do from Pixabay
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Mick Walsh and Carlo Griffin with the even taller Baldur Olaffson, Icelandic Section A member enjpying the swim event.

ARAN EVENT

IPA Region 29 Galway did it again this year in the Aran Islands, where for the ninth year the IPA Aran Event took place in glorious weather. A sizeable group participated this year, which included guests from Germany, Iceland and Northern Ireland, and of course lots of kids, as this is primarily a family event. As always there was plenty on offer for everyone, including guided tours, walks, swims, and activities to keep all ages entertained. A draw was held at the Gala Dinner which raised an impressive €1,150 for the two official IPA charities, Little Blue Heroes and the Laura Fund. Here are some pictures of the event, which will have its 10th Anniversary in 2024, so be sure to subscribe to IPA channels for news of the 2024 event.

CONTINUED OVER
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event. Ben Some of the Little Blue Heroes and their families who were welcomed to the event again this year. Little and Large Icelanders on wheels!
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Mick Walsh and Joe Dunleavy of Galway Region with Secretary General Carlo Griffin accepting a presentation of a ‘mule’ mug from Annmarie Dooley Keane of Little Blue Heroes of the Aran Islands Hotel. Alan Keane from Little Blue Heroes worked his magic on this one. Future Committee hard at work
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Ben O’ Keeffe and Milo Lennon, joint winners of the junior swim! year.

Bella Tuscany

PRIOR TO OUR ARRIVAL, ALL I KNEW ABOUT TUSCANY CENTRED ON CHIANTI WINE, VINEYARDS, AND CYPRESS TREES OR PENCIL PINES AS THEY’RE ALSO KNOWN. THE REALITY WAS FAR, FAR MORE EXQUISITE AND PROVED A VERITABLE CORNUCOPIA OF PICTURE POSTCARD LANDSCAPES, COUNTLESS HILLTOP FORTIFIED TOWNS AND VILLAGES, HISTORY AND ARCHITECTURE AT EVERY TURN, FOOD TO DIE FOR, AND A PEOPLE WHO SEEM TO HAVE ‘LA DOLCE VITA’ DOWN TO A FINE ART.

Aftertouching down in Pisa airport we were very quickly pointing our baby Fiat southwards towards Manciano, our first hilltop town. Despite our enthusiastic cries of ‘allora andiamo’ we also very quickly realised said baby Fiat was better suited for pootling around city centre streets than barrelling along the autostrada.

Much of our accommodation, which we booked as we went, was in agritourismos which consisted of exceptional conversions of old farm buildings. At breakfast next morning, in a room displaying all sorts of cycling memorabilia, we learned that the owner’s grandfather was a local legend who had completed several Giro D’Italias. Later that morning our first walk consisted of a 12 mile circuit from Saturnia passing stunning thermal waterfalls at Cascade de Molino.

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Richard Casey

Our next port of call was the beautiful hilltop town of Pitigliano from where we completed a 6 km walk along ancient Etruscan pathways to Sovana from where we returned by bus to our starting point. That evening we drove the stunning Roman road from Bolsena to Orvieto which runs straight as an arrow for miles lined by Umbrella Pines. In countryside reminiscent of ‘Gladiator’ I half expected to see Maximus Decimus Meridius strolling through the barley fields which stretched into the distance.

The next day we had to admit defeat an hour into what should have been a 4.5 hour circuit from Vivo D’Orcia on the forested slopes of Monte Amiata. Neither our map nor our route notes were able to shed any light on the maze of forest trails and tracks we encountered so we retraced our route, me with a thick head on me, rather than venture further into the unknown. It was cold comfort to me that a lot of tree felling the previous season had completely changed the network of pathways criss-crossing the mountain. We threw our heads down in Montalcino that night and the town more than made up for our earlier hiccup.

A 3 hour walk through glorious countryside the next day brought us to the Abbey of Sant’Antimo which, given its history, felt like we had walked through time. With time to spare we drove to Siena that evening and were awed by its beautiful piazza famous for its horse racing. Being a relatively small city, Siena is ideal for pottering, people watching, ice creams and PDAs (public displays of affection). Apparently I’m absolutely amazing at the ice cream bit but pure useless at the PDA bit!.

IPA Journal | Summer 2023 23

A 4 hour circuit from Gaiole the following day brought us through some beautifully dappled oak forests, the highlight of which was cooling our feet in an ancient spring well adapted for that purpose as we ate our sandwiches. We drove to Florence that evening and walked the old town but having spent so long in the countryside we felt like ducks out of water.

Next morning I was beaten into 2nd place at Menzola Parkrun by the local Adonis who accelerated passed me like a gazelle on the last lap. Despite the ensuing thick head on me I’d highly recommend it as the local runners were really friendly and welcoming.

Our destination that evening was San Gimignano, another beautiful fortified medieval town, and possibly the nicest town of the trip. While we sat on the steps of an old church on the piazza after dinner that night, listening to a local music student playing

Irish airs on a harp, the PDAs began to come naturally to me at last, or it could have been all the ice cream!.

The circuit from San Donato the following day was captivating and we were accompanied by the sounds of cuckoos and collared doves throughout. Following a quintessential Tuscan lane lined with cypresses, we also caught glimpses of a red squirrel bounding up and down the trees in front of us.

Our penultimate day began, once again, in a beautiful fortified hilltop town. The 3 hour circuit from Volterra ranged through countryside rich in history including Etruscan cave tombs, a Roman amphitheatre and a Medici fortress.

The guidebook used throughout was the Sunflower Tuscany Guide which, as it contains 75 long and short walks and 8 car tours, has ‘qualcosa per tutti.’

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IPA Journal | Summer 2023 25

IN 2019, TOYOTA AND SUZUKI SIGNED A TECHNOLOGY-SHARING AGREEMENT. FOR TOYOTA, THE INTEREST WAS SUZUKI’S SMALL CAR EXPERTISE, WHILE SUZUKI GAINED ACCESS TO TOYOTA’S ELECTRIC DRIVE KNOWHOW. IN MARKETING TERMS, THE AGREEMENT HAS SPURNED SEVERAL ‘NEW’ MODELS FOR BOTH PARTIES. CERTAIN SUZUKIS ARE BADGED TOYOTAS IN MARKETS SUCH AS INDIA AND EAST AFRICA, WHERE SUZUKI IS ESPECIALLY STRONG AND RECIPROCALLY SUZUKI IS SELLING A COUPLE OF REBADGED TOYOTAS IN TERRITORIES SUCH AS THE BRITISH ISLES, WHERE IT LACKS A MEDIUM-SIZE CAR PRESENCE. THE FIRST OF THESE WAS THE SUZUKI S CROSS, BASED ON THE TOYOTA RAV 4, TESTED IN THESE PAGES IN 2022, AND THE SECOND IS THE SUZUKI SWACE.

To all intents and purposes, the Swace is a UK-built Toyota Corolla with a slightly di erent radiator grille. Whereas the Corolla o ers a full range, the Swace which is coming o the line at Burnaston, Derbyshire, at the rate of 2,000pa, is available only as a five-door estate and in two trim levels. The ‘Motion’ trim is priced (in the UK) at £29,000, and the ‘Ultra’ at £30,800 , both below the Corolla. The Swace then is a conventional front-wheel drive hybrid: its 1.8 petrol engine is augmented by an electric motor driving through an (automatic) CVT gearbox.

Because there are no mechanical gearshi s as such, a continuously variable transmission provides particularly smooth acceleration thanks to the infinitely variable belt drive. Think of a bicycle with a seven-speed cog, then replace the cog with a cone and the chain with a belt where the belt moves up or down depending on whether a low or high ratio is required. On very small throttle openings, the Swace will run on battery power alone, useful when driving in stop-go tra ic, otherwise the electric motor is contributing about a quarter more power to the engine, meaning the latter is able to work less hard.

26 IPA Journal | Summer 2023

The attraction of this configuration is refinement and notable mpg. At 70 mph, the Swace, which is a medium-size five-seat estate car, records an impressive 59mpg and if you can bear to travel 10 mph slower, an average of 65mpg is possible. Even in intense tra ic mpg does not seem to fall much towards 50 mpg. A full load and headwinds will of course drag these figures down perhaps 10%, but it is still remarkable economy, and you do begin to wonder why Europe has persisted with smelly diesel cars for so long.

In terms of appearance, the Swace tends to look like every other car on the road, but at least it is not another SUV, and its carrying

capacity is at least equal to and probably greater than many medium-size (and more expensive) SUVs. A generous five-seater – for its class the rear seat has impressive legroom, the cabin is comfortable and quiet. The suspension is a compromise between firmness and comfort: there is enough suppleness to ensure reasonable comfort and insulation for passengers, yet the Swace retains a degree of body control which means it handles acceptably on winding, uneven roads. Such conditions though are not its forte, but while in extremis it will still hold on to the road, even the least sympathetic driver would unlikely not subject it to such treatment. The very nature of the Swace encourages smooth progress, aided by the automatic gearbox which even in ‘sport’ mode is a model of decorum. Indeed, the prospect of 65 mpg is su icient to ensure most drivers find the natural gait of the Swace and simply adapt their driving style to it.

With a combined 140 bhp to move 1,425kg, the Swace is no ball of fire, but the unobtrusive way it gets on with the job is both impressive and relaxing. The petrol engine only really audible under acceleration, faint though unfamiliar sounds from the transmission let the driver know the belts are working hard. The steering is light with that typical remote electric steering feel, but it is accurate enough and brakes are progressive. Visibility from the driver’s seat is good, though the slightly

a erthought-looking and rather small touch screen is slightly obtrusive. In fact, the entire dashboard layout looks a shade old fashioned, but on the other hand it is simple and the driver is not overwhelmed by a plethora of functionality and options he or she is likely never to use. The Swace’s very simplicity is attractive. Such items as electrically folding door mirrors and separate driver and passenger air conditioning are standard. The only serious criticism is the anachronistic touch screen which needs to be wider and set lower and be altogether more intuitive. It does though have a very e ective widescreen reversing camera. Fit and finish of cabin materials are correct - this is a car from the budget end of the Toyota

Corolla range, and probably hard-wearing. The upholstery in grey cloth has a decent quality weave. Although the dashboard and door interiors are finished in slightly hard-looking plastics, above all the Swace’s interior appears functional, though not unwelcoming. Front seat comfort is excellent and the driving position such that even a er five hours at the wheel, the driver experiences no sti ness or discomfort. The somewhat high window line means rear seat passengers, unless very tall, cannot see out especially well, but the seats are well-shaped. The boot with its double floor is capacious: with the rear seats folded, the loading platform is a useful 1,860 mm. An unremarkable car, the Suzuki Swace distinguishes itself by being so easy-going

IPA Journal | Summer 2023 27

yet completely practical. Pleasant if unexciting to drive, spacious, unobtrusive and remarkably economical, the Swace makes a virtue out of being simple, o ering running costs no worse than an electric car, yet not requiring the complex infrastructure needed (not to say secure power supply) to operate the latter. With concerns growing about who controls the availability of lithium, there is growing debate about an all-electric future for personal mobility and when manufacturers can build hybrids of the quality and economy of the Swace/Corolla, it is little surprise they are lobbying Brussels to li the arbitrarily legislated ban on hybrid sales from 2035.

Speci cation

engine: 4 cylinder 1798cc fuel injection

electric motor: 70kW. Combined combustion & electrical power: 140bhp

transmission: automatic. (Continuously variable transmission)

Tyres & wheels: 205x55 R16

weight: 1,420kg

performance: 0-100kph 9.4 s max speed 112mph/180kph

economy: 62.7mpg (WLTP gure combined urban & motorway)

emissions: 102g/km

Price: (RoI) from €32,095

28 IPA Journal | Summer 2023

We have a selection of International Police Association and Garda branded supplies and merchandise available in the shop section on www.ipaireland.com with up-to-date stock levels be it pins, patches or an international police association branded polo shirt.

In the coming editions The Supply Press will feature some of our old favourites and some new products that are coming on line soon.

We also want to hear from you as to what supplies you want the shop to stock: be it pins, coins, patches, or wearables, we what to your feedback – drop us a line at ipairish.supplies@gmail.com

If you know of an IPA member that’s about to retire (or has retired) and didn’t receive a presentation, then contact ipairish.supplies@gmail.com with the following details.

Name, registered number, years of membership (start to finish) and the name and address (including Eircode) of where the presentation is to be posted.

IPA Journal | Summer 2023 29

IPA House Finland- Ylläs

General Information

Location

The IPA House VIias is situated in Akaslompolo, which is also known as “the seven fells village”, in the municipality of Kolari in the Finnish part of Lapland. It is located next to a lake of the same name, north-east of Kolari.

Akaslompolo, along with Yllasjarvi, is the primary village for the ski resort of Yllastunturi, or known as Yllas for short. The Yllas ski area has a total of 330 km of cross-country ski tracks, as well as 61 Alpine ski slopes with 29 ski lifts. In summer, Akaslompolo is popular among hikers, anglers, canoeists, and other outdoor enthusiasts. There are several hotels and many holiday homes in the area.

Accommodation

IPA House Yllas, the Flagship of IPA Section Finland, is the northernmost official IPA House in the world. The house, or should we say IPA mansion, is located in western Lapland about 150 km above The Arctic Circle. The IPA House is a log mansion with 10 mini-apartments available to all IPA members. Each mini-apartment is fully equipped with beds for a maximum of 4 persons. A mini-kitchen, including a fridge and micro-wave oven, as well as a toilet, shower, radio and TV can be found in each apartment.In addition, as it is a Finnish IPA house, there are of course saunas: two to be precise. There is also a room with a washing machine and tumble dryers.

Bookings: Eija Aspholm

Email: ipa-house@ipa-finland.org

Tel: +358 40 510 7282

Website: http://www.ipa-finland.org

Address: Rykimatie 2, Fl - 95970, Akaslompolo

Information Yes No House X Apartment X Bedding/Linen Provided X Towels Provided X Ensuite Rooms Available X Communal Bathrooms (saunas) X Hairdryers Available X Non-Smoking House X Kitchen Utensils/Cutlery Available X Fridge/s & Freezers X Stove: Electricity X Stove: Gas X Central Heating X Parking Available X Pets Allowed X Facility Caters for the Disabled X Washing/Laundry Facilities on Site X BBQ/Braai Facilities Available X Conference Facilities Available X Catering can be provided on Request X TV Available X Wi Fi Facilities Available X Internet Facilities X Telephone Facilities X Restaurant on Site X Restaurants Nearby X Hospitals Nearby (Kolari, Rovaniemi) X Police Nearby (Kolari, Kittila) X Within a holiday resort X
Additonal Information Details Location Akaslompolo, Lapland House Manager Teppo Hämäläinen Bookings Eija Aspholm International Code FIYL Number of Rooms 10 Number of Persons to sleep 24 30 IPA Journal | Summer 2023

IPA House Portugal- Loulé

General Information

Location

The Louie IPA house is located in the city of Louie, Faro in the Algarve. The IPA House is located in Largo Professor Cabrita da Silva, 8, in the historic area of the city, in a very quiet and located 15 minutes away from the beaches and 20 minutes’ drive from Faro Airport and 15 minutes’ drive from the Railway Station.

Louie is located in a region of rolling hills stretching between the picturesque villages of the Serra do Caldeirao and the splendid coast of Algarve.

Faro is a bustling commercial city in contrast to the relaxed beach atmosphere of coastal resorts. The coastline of Louie is known as the “Golden Triangle”, an area which includes the luxury resorts of Vale do Lobo, Quinta do Lago and Vilamoura, where the golden beaches, elegant hotels, renowned courses, the marina, the casino and the endless leisure and entertainment options make this one of the best holiday destinations in Europe.

Accommodation

The house consists of 7 bedrooms, living room and terrace. One room has 3 beds. Six rooms are composed of a double bed. It has 4 bathrooms in the area of the rooms.

From the terrace the house has a comprehensive view of the city and may be seen from the sea.

Bookings: Eija Aspholm

Email: geral@ipa-portuqal.pt or deleqacaosul@ipa-portuqal.pt

Tel: +351 217 157 206 / +351 962 029 629

Website: http://www.ipa-portugal.pt

Information Yes No House X Apartment X Bedding/Linen Provided X Towels Provided X Ensuite Rooms Available X Communal Bathrooms (saunas) X Hairdryers Available X Non-Smoking House X Kitchen Utensils/Cutlery Available X Fridge/s & Freezers X Stove: Electricity X Stove: Gas X Central Heating X Parking Available X Pets Allowed X Facility Caters for the Disabled X Washing/Laundry Facilities on Site X BBQ/Braai Facilities Available X Conference Facilities Available X Catering can be provided on Request X TV Available X Wi Fi Facilities Available X Internet Facilities X Telephone Facilities X Restaurant on Site X Restaurants Nearby X Hospitals Nearby X Police Nearby X Within a holiday resort X
Additonal Information Details Location Louie, Faro in the Algarve House Manager C ontact IPA Portugal Bookings C ontact IPA Portugal International Code N/A Number of Rooms 7 Number of Persons to sleep 14 IPA Journal | Summer 2023 31

National Council 2023

Section Ireland held its annual National Council in Dundalk in April this year. Hosted by Louth Region, this year’s event took place at the recently renovated Fairways Hotel and credit goes to Regional Chair PJ Galvin and his team, assisted by the Council Arrangements Committee, in bringing this together in this picturesque part of the country.

Council was o cially opened by Michael Walsh, International Treasurer, and International guests included Ms. Yvonne Mc Gregor, Vice President, Section UK, and Ms. Deirdre Mahony, Chair, Northern Ireland Region, Section UK.

A number of important motions were discussed and we were delighted to see some new Regional delegates. National Council 2024 will take place in Killarney.

IPA Region 2 (DMR East) Committee Members making a presentation to IPA Ireland of a picture of the second ever Garda Intake, the training of which took place at Collinstown (Dublin Airport). This print will proudly be displayed at IPA House, Iona Drive. Some of the Regional Delegates eagerly awaiting votes on motions! IPA Ireland President Conor O’ Higgins making a presentation to IPA International Treasurer Michael Walsh who formally opened National Council.
32 IPA Journal | Summer 2023
IPA Ireland President Conor O’ Higgins making a presentation to Section 2 (Northern Ireland) Chair Deirdre Mahony. Neil O’ Malley, on behalf of the host Louth Region, making a presentation of funds collected for the IPA Laura Fund. Conor McCaughley from the IPA Cycling Club receiving the IPA Club of the Year Award. IPA Member of the Year Award being presented to Brendan Matthews from Louth Region.
IPA Journal | Summer 2023 33
Joe Dunleavy, Galway Region, accepting the IPA Region of the Year Award from President Conor O’ Higgins.Louth Region. Standing Orders Committee keeping a keen eye on proceedings IPA Ireland President Conor O’ Higgins with Ms Yvonne Mc Gregor, Vice President, Section UK Regional Delegates enjoying the days proceedings
34 IPA Journal | Summer 2023
Fomer IPA Section Ireland Presidents Bill Saunderson and Joe Lynch with Eamon Hession, President, Garda Síochána Retired Members Association (centre)

New IPA Website & App needs you!

Section Ireland launched our new Website and IPA App in November 2022.

Users of the App now benefit from much improved communications on IPA news, activities and events, which will be sent directly to the App in the form of a notification on your device’s lockscreen. We hope that this will lead to much improved use of our database, providing you our membership with timely and relevant information.

Our Members Area will facilitate access to our other online IPA facilities such as IPA Accommodation, IPA Supplies and back issues of the IPA Journal. Regional Committee members are now able to complete and submit activity and travel grant application forms online, directly to the Secretary General. This has already been used successfully by a number of Regions.

Don’t forget to register for your online members access by completing the following steps:

1. Go to www.ipaireland.org;

2. Click on ‘Members Login’ at the top right corner and complete your details;

3. Note that the IPA Office will have to check and approve your registration details;

4. Once you are approved you will receive a confirmation email;

5. You should now download the App from the Apple or Google Play Stores. You can use these QR codes with your phone’s camera to access if you wish.

Remember: You must register and be approved on the website first –then you can sign in on the App. Be sure to permit push notifications in the app settings, and also any internal settings on your device, such as ‘notifications’.

Section Ireland

IPA App Sub-Committee
IPA Journal | Summer 2023 35
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