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APRIL 20 13

Part Deux

Part Deux

MAGAZINE


ISSUE 002


TABLE OF CONTENTs

26 GIRL OF THE MONTH

Teika with Selective Potential.

30 DENIS PREDESCU

Our new structural gown designer.

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40 BEAUTY

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Think Pink.

7 WHO WE ARE

Learn about the faces behind the magazine.

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LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

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46 SWEET STREET

Fashion from the sidewalks of Chennai, India.

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BEHIND THE FASHION The San Francisco Opera.

ABOUT INSPIRARE How INSPIRARE works and what we are doing for you.

City Classics with Jessica Joyce.

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70 BEHIND THE SCENES

EVERYTHING YOU NEED FOR SPRING The goods to make you look good.

58 COVER STORY

What goes on when you aren’t looking.

72 TRENDS

This season’s hottest.

76 FASHION INSIDER

Hasti Kashfia, Celebrity Stylist.

80 EVE PALASAK

City Brights.

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INSPIRARELAND Fashion Incubator San Francisco.

108 COMING UP NEXT

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INSPIRARE.COM INSPIRARE.COM


INSPIRARE.COM


who we are

MEET THE FOLKS BEHIND INSPIRARE MAGAZINE:

ABIGAIL COLYER Journalist.

ADRIENNE GLENN Executive Editor.

MAX SARRAZIN Art Director.

VALERIE FORTIN

Assistant to the Executive Editor.

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CONTRIBUTORs

THE AMAZINGLY TALENTED PEOPLE THAT ADD TO THE WORDS, IMAGES AND FASHION OF INSPIRARE MAGAZINE To the ones who make our world go round... PEARL

MICHAELSON

Writer.

LEAH WATANABE Photographer.

She’s been a photographer for the past five years and has been studying at the Academy of Art where she will be graduating with her BFA in Dec 2013. She loves working with people and setting a mood to her art, especially if it has a tiny hint of fantasy and wonder to bring out the big kid in her.

FREDERICK STEVEN PRICE Photographer.

A Bay Area based fashion photographer who is currently in his last semester at the Academy of Art University getting his BFA in Photography. His Plans are to relocate to New York and start his business there.

A mid-twenties gal with an endless curiosity about culture and style. Since an early age, she has cultivated her writing craft, marrying it with her passion for fashion. She prizes books, laughter, and love above anything else. Graduating from Sacramento State University in May of 2012 with a degree in English Literature, Pearl has followed her lifelong literary pursuit as she explores the infinite variety fashion delivers to cultures worldwide.

KATTY LOPEZ DE GULL

Wardrobe Stylist. Knowledgable of fashion and the message it sends, committed to her customers and aimed to help them achieve their objective with a sense of aesthetics that allows her to recognize the best colors, shapes, textures and proportions for each person.

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BETSY KERSHNER Photographer.

KRISTINE ROSE RAQUENO Make-up Artist.

Talented, motivated and ambitious, she specializes in bridal and editorial makeup. She has worked on the sets of major fashion shows and beauty campaigns alongside the industry’s most influential photographers, models and designers and was published at the age of 19.

A professional photographer with a background in the visual arts and literature. She began her journey in NYC photographing nightlife, events, concerts, and performers. Betsy is a regular photographer for The San Francisco Opera, The Conservatory of Music, and various other organizations.

ROBBY KIWAN Hair Stylist.

Hairstylist for Artbeat Salon and Gallery. Robby enjoys creative directing and hairstyling for editorial fashion and working with innovative teams. He’s been published in local magazines such as BayFashion and now Inspirare.

WOULD YOU LIKE TO BE A CONTRIBUTOR? Contact us at

hi@inspirare.com 9


Letter from the Editor

Second chances, we so often wish we could have them and sometimes we are lucky enough to get them. As we approach publication of our second issue, Part Deux, I see it as our second chance to show our designers and customers what Inspirare is all about. Our goal is to bring the fashion world directly to you; easy access to purchasing specialty designer pieces in our online Inspirare Designer Marketplace, exciting stories about our featured designers and interesting insider stories about the world of fashion! I am so excited to share with you the amazing teamwork in Inspirare Magazine Part Deux, and would like to take a moment to thank everyone that took part in this issue and showed what wonderful work can come out of true love and passion for what you do. We look forward to showing you more wonderful and diverse work as the season’s pass and months turn to years. To contact our Executive Editor, you can reach her at adrienne@inspirare.com or 415.449.8894

I hope your Spring is full of lucky second chances‌

ADRIENNE GLENN Executive Editor. 10


Inspirare Cover Model

A MOMENT WITH OUR COVER MODEL

HAILEY JOHNSON… by Adrienne Glenn

Sweet as pie, Hailey came into our office and brought with her the soft spoken kindness that you rarely see in anyone these days, let alone in a drop dead beauty. At the age of 23 she has a quiet and thoughtful wisdom that few achieve in a lifetime. This gorgeous mix of Italian, Irish and German braved the cold winter breezes of San Francisco in summer dresses without so much as a single complaint, and was by far one of the most humble models I have ever been in the presence of. I encourage you to spend a moment to get to know a little more about Hailey in this exclusive Inspirare interview: Where were you born and where did you grow up? I was born and raised in a suburb north of LA. For the past five years, I lived in San Francisco, where I studied classical singing at the conservatory there.

What is your favorite color? Pink. For my clothes, though, I tend to wear a lot of black.

What is your favorite food? Asian cuisine. I used to live near Japantown… needless to say, it was great.

Tell us what got you started in modeling… I met Laura Moreno, founder of LALY Designs, about a year ago, and she invited me to go to a casting for one of her runway shows. I did the show

(I was so nervous!), and the people I met there were very positive and professional. It made me want to keep learning about the modeling industry.

A healthy body is important as a model, how do you keep yourself fit and happy? It’s simple, but I really like walks. It’s nice having that time to listen to music, or to catch up with friends.

What do love most about being a model? I love the creativity and collaboration that go into making a great photo. Getting hair and makeup done is definitely fun, too.

What are the biggest challenges so far? Modeling (and singing) present a lot of opportunities for rejection. I’m always working on developing a thicker skin, and picking myself up again when I’m disappointed.

Do you have a favorite clothing item or accessory? I wear black ankle boots almost everyday. I’m also a big fan of cuff bracelets.

How did you prepare for this cover shoot with Inspirare? I researched Inspirare and the designer I’d be wearing. I also tried to eat well, exercise, and make sure I was generally presentable!

If you met the designer, Jessica Joyce, what would you tell her? I’d tell her that her clothes make the woman who wears them feel good. They’re feminine, comfortable, and unique.

What does fashion mean to you? I love how fashion has the ability to transform your outlook. I feel prepared for my day when I’m wearing something that both suits the occasion and my personality.

If you could tell the world one thing about Hailey Johnson what would it be? I’m very inspired by Audrey Hepburn. She was incredibly beautiful and stylish, but she was also known for her genuine kindness, and her work with UNICEF.

For more information on Hailey visit: www.facebook.com/ HaileyJohnsonMusicianAndModel 12


about Inspirare

AT INSPIRARE, WE BELIEVE THE BEST WAY TO CREATE INNOVATIVE FASHION IS TO CONNECT INSPIRED DESIGNERS WITH INDIVIDUALS WHO LOVE TO EXPRESS THEIR OWN STYLE. OUT OF THAT CONNECTION COMES COLLABORATIVE, UNIQUE AND BEAUTIFUL CLOTHING. DISCOVER

EMPOWER

SUPPORT

At Inspirare, we find emerging designers to share with you. You help launch new brands by voting, buying, and sharing with your friends.

Inspirare is fashion empowered by consumers. Designers get their big break, and you get clothing that truly lets you express who you are because you helped create it.

Support your favorite designers by voting and purchasing, and let your personality shine through Inspirare curated designers. Be rare. 14


ARE YOU A DESIGNER? Submit your designs and be discovered. Join Inspirare Designer Market Place to list your products and start selling in over 20 countries. INSPIRARE.COM


how it works

YOU ARE A DESIGNER! Here are few steps on how to get started.

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Register on Inspirare Blog to start publish about your brand, inspiration, behind the scene work and product release.

Submit your designs to get discovered.

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Join Inspirare Market Place to start listing your products and selling to over 20 countries.

Get professional assistance on your site building, brand identity development, product development. 16


JOIN OUR DESIGNER MARKET PLACE SIGN UP TODAY

at INSPIRARE.COM


BLOG DISCOV COMPE SHOP


VER ETE INSPIRARE.COM


Haute Items

SPRING IS HERE! Finally, the sun has peeked out from behind the wintery clouds and those layers are shedding. It is time to let your skin out to breathe and soak up the vitamin D. Celebrate this wonderful season with light colored laces, mint green accents and fabulous nautical stripes. These fashion necessities in the hottest new pastels will say, “See ya!� to the cold weather and welcome in Spring the way fashion should!

Vince Camuto

Mint Cross Body Bag $138

Shop Nordstrom

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Gucci

Flora Silk Scarf $420 Shop Gucci

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Carrera

Sunnies $99

Zara

Shop Carrera

Necklace $35.90 Shop Zara

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Coco Chanel H&M

Nautical Blazer $49.95 Shop H&M

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Mademoiselle $105 Shop Chanel


Sephora + Pantone Universe Emerald Lacquer $18 Shop Sephora

Asos

Super Skinny Gold Belt $10

Shop Asos

Cloversoul

Delicate Bangle $115 Shop Cloversoul

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Jeffrey Campbell

Lita Daisy Show in Tan $160 Shop KarmaLoop

TopShop

Playsuit Coverup $60 Shop TopShop

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GIRL OF THE MONTH

TEIKA

WITH SELECTIVE POTENTIAL Written by Abigail Colyer

Tieka is the stylish mastermind behind the blog, Selective Potential. A trained graphic designer and native Michigan-ite, she has reached an impressive level of popularity with her blog, especially considering she just does it just for fun! With her adorable, vintage-inspired style and equally cute blog layout, it is hard not to want to hang out with this uber cool girl. She has made blogging and fashion accessible for all people, from wannabes to full fledged fashionistas! In this issue we have the honor of getting to know a little more about her:

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5 words about your personal style… Go!

Feminine. Playful. Grungy. Simple. Fun.

What do you think are this season’s “must haves”?

Personally I’m excited for tangerine lips, t-straps and wood wedges, top-knots and loose waves and white lace. I’m feeling kinda 70’s inspired for the upcoming spring and summer. Funky floral prints are also a top contender in my closet right now.

What item of clothing can you not live without?

Who is Tieka and Selective Potential?

FEMININE PLAYFUL GRUNGY SIMPLE & FUN

I started Selective Potential almost four years ago now! I had a huge sudden interest in fashion after losing 35 pounds. I was so inspired by the many new ways I could dress my body. I came across an article on fashion blogging and started the next day! I’ve been hooked ever since and can’t imagine my life without my blog.

I don’t think I could live without cardigans. I’m constantly dressing up a simple jean look or cute dress with a cardigan. It’s such a staple item. I’m trying to collect one in every color.

What item must be in every woman’s wardrobe?

Belts have really helped me change up styles. Belts and tights. You can wear the same dress and have it look totally different with a different belt or pair of colored tights.

We love your ability to pull off vintage outfits without looking outdated! What’s your secret to pulling off vintage clothes? I’m more interested in vintage-inspired items, than actual vintage items. But the few items I do have, I try to mix with new pieces. I have one yellow dress from the 50s that I adore, but I pair it with new coral wedges, some new accessories and a big mint bow belt. That way it’s still fresh looking.

What is your favorite style era?

I would always say 90s before- I love floral baby doll dresses, tights, lace up boots and leather bomber jackets. But lately, I’m loving elements of the 70s. It’s pretty mixed though. I don’t have a specific era I strive for with my style.

We love your attention lipstick! How do you keep those lips sultry all day? What is your must have lip-shade? I love the bright red colors! I feel like it’s a perfect color through all seasons. I’m also looking forward to

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tangerine and coral lips for spring. I also tried a hot pink recently and loved it. I’m excited to dive into more colors with spring outfits.

Spring Trend: Pumps or Wedges?

Wedges. Easier to walk in and they can make a really bold fashion statement!

We know you love your hometown of Michigan. How has living there influenced your fashion sense? 29

It has majorly influenced my fashion sense. Between the seasons and landmarks, I’m constantly dressed for this state. I love lighthouses and quirky adventures, so I’m always trying to dress to match my locations. It makes getting ready so much more fun and the pictures always turn out better. I like being matchy-matchy.

On a weekend night, burgeoning style icon? where can you be found? If you are in need of I’m huge into music, between playing in bands and growing up with people who played in them, I’m usually at a show. I also love riding my scooter around when it’s warm, traveling around the state and going to the movies. With her eternal hometown devotion, how could you NOT be smitten with this

more Tieka (and how could you not be?) make sure to follow her blog Selective Potential and happy fashioning!

Find Teika at: selectivepotential.com Twitter: @teekuh Facebook: facebook.com/ selectivepotential Pinterest: pinterest.com/ selectpotential/ Instagram: instagram. com/teekuh


DESIGNER

DENIS PREDESCU

Denis Predescu’s designs defy typical. Romanian born, and self-described as a man of contrast, he discovered his love of fashion at the early age of 3. Now, at the still youthful age of 26, he finds inspiration for his designs in geometry, volume, optical effects and vibrant colors. His background and strong love of architecture is apparent in the dynamic shape of his sketches and completed gowns.

When asked what excites him most about fashion, he told us, “The ability to transmit ideas, to adopt beliefs, to emphasize what we represent, but also to play different roles in everyday life according to the way that we choose to live. Fashion always fascinated me more than an art, it is one of the Written by Adrienne Glenn most powerful ways to express individuality.” The structure of his clothing is the epitome of individuality. The woman that clads their form in one of this young man’s dresses will definitely not look like any other woman in the room. Predescu designs for a woman that exudes

ARCHITECTURAL PERFECTION

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“I AM A MAN OF CONTRASTS.”

femininity and strength; driven by powerful beauty, he designs for a woman who knows what she wants to wear and knows how to wear it with confidence and grace. His favorite design inspiration “arises from (his) favorite theme: classic boudoir atmosphere, reinterpreted in a contemporary way with futuristic accents.” 33

Drawn to women such as Cleopatra and Mata Hari, this designer truly has an appreciation for the strong and graceful presence of timeless women. As the fashion season shifts from Spring to Fall (yes, it is always far beyond the season we are actually in) we here at Inspirare are very excited to see what

this incredibly original designer has in store for the holiday dress season. To all of you strong and beautiful women out there, pay attention to this up and coming talented designer, he is going to do amazing things and you definitely want to be wearing him! For more information: www.denispredescu.com


“STRONG FEMININITY AND BEAUTY”


“CLASSIC BOUDOIR ATMOSPHERE, REINTERPRETED IN A CONTEMPORARY WAY”


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THINK PINK

SPRING IS HERE, AND WITH THIS SHINING REBIRTH OF NATURE COMES ALLERGIES, AND MOST IMPORTANTLY, A HEALTHY PINK FLUSH OF REVITALIZED SKIN. by Beauty Editor: Pearl Michaelson

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T Photographer: Tom Huynh www.tomhuynh.co Model: Danielle Birum MUA: Jasmine Cardenas www.facebook.com/jasminecardenasmakeup Hair: Tina Romo www.tinaromo.com Photo Asst: Quinn Ung 42


THINK PINK The sun is finally poking her head out from behind winter’s clouds, and what better way to emphasize the glowing sun than to highlight your blushing pink cheeks as you walk down the street. ‘Tis the season to embrace your femininity as you re-vamp your look and Think Pink. The perfect way to brighten your look is to don your cheeks with a true pink blush. Highlight your look

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with a golden sheen for the healthy skin you’ve always wanted. Golden undertones will bronze the skin in a subtle and angelic way. There’s no need to cover your complexion with a heavy matte look as you enjoy the sun’s rays; less is more. Lightweight coverage to blend your skin tone to base your youthful pink glow will turn the clock back on any age and make you look like an original Venus. How do you keep the freshly glowing pink cheek without looking worn out and tired? Using a hydrating concealer around the corners of your nose and eyes brightens your complexion while keeping a goddess glisten. I stash my concealer in my purse

during these terrible tissue months for the unavoidable touchups before happy hours and date nights. The lips say it all this season. Dress them up in a loud pink, or make a daytime down statement with a softer pink flush. Spring brings health and renewal, and nothing showcases this concept more than a pretty pink pout. There are infinite shades to cater to your style, skin tone, and daily list of events, but remember to showcase your vibrant and fresh faced self as you Think Pink this spring.


SWEET STREET

CHENNAI, INDIA With its majestic endless shores, temples, classical music and delicious yet spicy street food, Chennai is an ethnical destination like no other. The capital of Tamil Nadu is quite peaceful and safe which makes it great for late night shows and has one of the best silk industries that would satiate any fashionista’s desires. Photographer: Anjan Kumar http://anjankumar.tumblr.com

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LATE NIGHT SHOWS AND ONE OF THE BEST SILK INDUSTRIES 49


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BEHIND THE FASHION:

SAN FRANCISCO OPERA INSPIRARE WAS GRACIOUSLY GIVEN THE OPPORTUNITY TO STEAL A MOMENT WITH THE COSTUME DESIGNERS OF THE SAN FRANCISCO OPERA, TO SHARE WITH YOU WHAT HAPPENS WITH THE DESIGNS OFFSTAGE... 51


BEHIND THE FASHION:

SAN FRANCISCO OPERA Written by Abigail Colyer Images by Betsy Kershner

The unassuming exterior of the San Francisco Opera Costume Shop camouflages the glamour and secrets burgeoning inside. The three-floor warehouse contains thousands of costumes dating back to the early part of the 20th century. Walking through the building, you can’t help but sense the talent and artistic energy that has floated through this building and onto the War Memorial Opera House stage. A library of clothing, it truly is an unknown historical landmark for San Francisco and opera as a whole. Two extremely talented designers behind the costume’s materialization and transformation are Christopher Verdosci and Kristi Johnson. Christopher is the Assistant Costume Director for the San Francisco Opera, as well as the stylist extraordinaire of the SF Opera’s young artist programs, Merola and Adler Fellowship. Kristi dons the title of Production Supervisor and was the costume designer for the SF Opera’s recent world premiere of Nolan Gasser’s The Secret Garden.

Displayed on the top floor of the shop are almost a dozen dress forms showing new and old costumes; merely a glimpse of the range of style and theme the designers have produced on a daily basis, since the SF Opera’s start in 1923. It is the second largest opera company in North America, only surpassed by the Metropolitan Opera in New York City, and is a close running mate to the Met in terms of costume design production. Hundreds of huge name artists have designed for the company, including Bob Mackie, Gianni Versace, Zandra Rhodes, and most recently Christian Lacroix. According to Kristi Johnson, each opera can take up to four to six months to fully design and produce. The costume shop employs two teams of tailors that focus on menswear, a specialty tailor who focuses on specific costume details, two teams of women’s wear drapers with two to three stitchers under them, and a specialty women’s wear team that focuses on time period

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and experimental costumes. Then there is also a craftsperson, a milliner, a painter-dyer, a rental coordinator, assistants, and a shopper. With the enormous staff, the costume shop is able to dress up to 200 singers and actors for each of the season’s eight or nine operas. Each designer came into opera from very different backgrounds. For Johnson opera was always her highest goal, but not until after attending a theater arts high school, “…not really knowing what to do. My roommate in college was a stage manager and I always did hair and costumes. So I kind of just got sucked into it and it sky rocketed from there.” She then got an internship with the SF Opera Costume Shop, which led to a footwear position, then a junior shop assistant, which ultimately led to her current Supervisor position. “An interesting journey for sure,” recalls Verdosci, “I did start in fashion and I, personally, had a ‘crisis of faith’ and it was the realization

that the fashion industry is, obviously, commerce driven, and not driven by the art of the dress or the design. And so I was looking for something to be a little more rewarding, more challenging. To me, it was finding the character behind the garment, and finding the reason, and having all these fantastic, tangible details of a character that need to be expressed through color, shape, form. We have to tell you about this person before they say a word and I think costume is really effective that way.” Although they are most deeply inspired by the art and history of costuming, both designers have always looked to fashion to push the envelope in opera and foresee future design details. Verdosci explains that Costume Designers are constantly “at the mercy of fabric trends.” He describes how the history of costume design and production is documented through the fabric used. “I’ve always been fascinated by how you can look at a historically designed show, like a Romeo and Juliette, and they can all be trying to achieve the 15th century, but I can tell you what decade they were created—because again, it’s at the mercy of the textile industry. So fashion is fascinating because it plays a huge influence [in costuming] and even more so now. The advent of celebrity culture and the internet has all brought major designer names into the vernacular, so you have designers coming in and saying ‘I want her to look like she just walked out of Dior.’ A perfect example: I was talking to James Schuette [the costume designer of SF Opera’s Dolores Claiborne] about Vera Donovan in Dolores Claiborne, and we were shopping in New York for beautiful pink tweeds and his direction was: ‘keep this in mind: Vera’s in a St. John’s suit, not a Chanel.’ So it’s interesting, especially in a modern show, meaning any point in the 20th century, the influence of fashion designers.” Johnson further illustrates that costumers must always keep in mind that they are replicating clothing based on the fashions of the times and “when you study what they wore, and the shapes, and why they wore it, it’s very inspiring. 54


Being a costume designer, you don’t always have to stick to historical accuracy, so you get to actually play a fashion designer in some ways because you’re adding your own touches to it; you’re manipulating fabrics, changing shapes a little bit to the way you want to; maybe exaggerating shapes, or making shapes a little bit askew.” With influences like Dior and Schiaperelli, both designers gush about the flattering A-line silhouettes of the 1940s and 1950s. “There’s a reason why they’re iconic,” Johnson quips. Surprisingly, the opera costume industry faces much of the same challenges as the fashion industry. Johnson reveals that much of what costumers face are that “the old school theories of opera are still out there. We are trying to break away from the traditional, to do something that is more fashion forward, is more interesting. Sometimes it’s hard to do that, so the more we get to do experimental shows… using different fabrics, textures, and silhouettes [the better]. Pushing opera forward, just like how fashion gets pushed forward every season, we get to get to try to push it forward in its own context.” And just like fashion, there are yearly trends. Johnson finds that there “…tends to be trends with shows and colors. We’ll have a year where [every opera company] is doing gray and black. And this year, we get some color and some spring in a lot of our shows. Opera companies talk, so they know what everyone is doing.” With the pressure to move this old art form with the new technology of the 21st century, both Johnson and Verdosci are excited by the new technological advances in fashion, including electronic and transforming garments. “I’m dying over Hussein Shalayan right now,” gushes Verdosci, “now he’s doing these sort of tops, skirts, dresses and they have beautiful ruching at the neckline, but then you pull a string and the whole thing drops down into a full length evening gown, with a train. Talk about ‘day to night Barbie at the opera.’ And he’s also doing a lot with technological fibers—garments that can move and change on their own. Imagine 55

“THERE ARE PLENTY OF FASHION DESIGNERS AROUND THAT PROVE THAT FASHION CAN STILL BE ART.” - Christopher Verdosci


having someone on stage and seeing their garment change completely. It could be effective in so many ways—passage of time. I think he’s AMAZING. That’s the big one that I think just has to go on stage.” Johnson adds that she can’t wait to see “electrical fashion, where costumes unzip or unravel into something else just electronically, and using LEDs and lights in costumes.” Also, the added pressures from the fashion industry, including body image and size have become a hot topic on the forefront of the opera industry. More and more, companies are employing smaller singers, moving away from the stereotype of the “fat lady.” This has caused major changes in the sound of opera, but also the style of opera. “In the past you’d have an extreme case, where a singer would come in and you’d have to create a costume because you just didn’t have anything that big,” reveals Verdosci, “well now, you have the same thing happening on the opposite end of the spectrum: someone coming in that is so small that you don’t have anything that works [for them].” Further, much of the Opera Costume Shop’s designs are based on mid century cuts and they must accommodate the modern body shape and height, within strict guidelines.

“WE ARE TRYING TO BREAK AWAY FROM THE TRADITIONAL, TO DO SOMETHING THAT IS MORE FASHION FORWARD...”

Verdosci is eager to see the fresh new perspectives and talents coming up in the fashion world. He urges that young designers “… should continuously look at costume in Art because that to me is where you really find some of the most incredible inspiration. I’ve gone to tons of museums over and over, stood in front of the same paintings, and you always see something different—depending on the time of day, the light hits something [in the painting] differently. There are plenty of fashion designers around that prove that fashion can still be art.”

- Kristi Johnson 56


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CITY CLASSICS

with

JESSICA JOYCE Art Director: Adrienne Glenn Photographer: Leah Watanabe Photog Asst: Steven Price Model: Hailey Johnson Stylist: Katty Lopez De Gull Hair: Robby Kiwan MUA: Kristine Rose Raqueno

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Dress: Jessica Joyce Coat: Ann Taylor Cuff: Ann Taylor Sunglasses: H&M

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Dress: Jessica Joyce Handbag: Banana Republic

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the fashion world. Forcing our bodies to fit preexisting design molds is a thing of the past, as Joyce’s designs remind us that we have many, many choices.

THE STORY BEHIND THE DRESS Written by Pearl Michaelson Designers are finding it harder and harder to establish a foothold in the fashion industry. One must have boundless hunger and tireless stamina to compete in today’s games. Jessica Joyce has those two traits and so much more. Amsterdam native, Joyce has created a brand unique and timeless among her peers, establishing herself as a rising star in the Netherlands’ fashion scene. Her mod style and unique branding makes her line shine. The fashions produced by Joyce’s line are timeless and relatable. They make sense to women, and are not articles of clothing symbolizing far-fetched ideas non-conducive to real life and real living. Not everyone is a runway model, but Joyce’s designs bring the runway to everyday living in an effective and feel-good way. Who is the woman- the muse- inspiring Joyce’s designs? Joyce explains her work as, “… Creating a sense of style for a strong, worldly and independent women of all ages. I believe we all want our favorite dress in many different colors, material and patterns.” Fashion is a way of creating an exterior, every day that showcases our individuality. By creating multiple designs for the same woman, giving her options and a sense of control, Joyce is designing for women’s wants, allowing us to forget what we aren’t in

Joyce set out on her long fashion trek to runway show glory at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp, Belgium. She finished her fashion design degree at the Academy of Arts in Arnhem, but while her schooling enabled her to achieve her fashion designer goals with the required technical training, her desire to design blossomed at an early age. The passion to pursue the long and arduous journey burned inside her, making her a rare success story among a sea of daydreaming and sometimes naïve designers. Her earliest designs penned in crayon; Joyce’s career seems to have stemmed from a genetic predisposition to cast her into the fashion industry. The designer’s fashion genius is channeled in her studio, as she fervently works, sketching designs by hand and on her computer. Joyce reveals, “I love those tremendous moments of ultimate focus. Magic happens when I make mistakes drawing; new ideas and technical solutions are the outcome. I love these moments of accidental happiness.” Those happy accidents are the reason we love her line so much! The abstract and open-minded nature of her collections allows room for individuality and unique style among wearers. While she creates her collections in her studio, inspiration for her styles are supplied by endless sources amid metropolitan streets. The people and excitement kindle her fashion fire. There are hazards in this industry, stressors that cannot be avoided. The constant balancing act in the fashion circus is between creativity and sales. The artist wants to create, while the people’s demand encourages sales in another direction. Joyce handles this brilliantly by catering to several different audiences with her variety of styles within collections and specific looks. She knows the buyer, and offers styles for different 64


body types, all the while staying true to her aesthetic and creating the fashion in which she believes. Her beautiful designs showcase a modlike approach to modern day fashion and style. As she manages the tightrope, balancing perfectly between her creativity and the necessity for sales, Joyce reaps the benefits of the industry. When asked what the most exciting aspect of her career, Joyce cheerfully responds, “Runway shows are pretty cool and exciting! There is nothing greater than creating your own perfect little fashion world for 12 minutes!” While the industry encourages competition for buyers and audiences, the medal for Joyce is the fashion show. The Jessica Joyce brand has created a unique approach to fashion, bringing strength and confidence to women in the styles shown on the runway. The mod style is adorable, flattering, and altogether irresistible, so she can keep on enjoying those fashion shows of hers, because we sure love them, too! There is so much to beware of in the fashion industry, sinkholes and grenades found anywhere between self-doubt to malicious sabotage. Joyce has risen above all the competition with her agile branding. Her athletic sense of the industry has proven successful for her line. Joyce expresses her thoughts on the industry as, “…Running a marathon twice a year.” In order to be victorious in the marathon, she advises, “You need to know yourself and your cultural reference. Even if it’s not fashion-related, doing something can help you find out what you like and don’t like. The fashion industry is a hard world, but if you’re willing to put in the hard work and hours, then go for it and don’t be afraid!” The advice Joyce gives rings true for much more than the fashion industry. She encourages growth and an openminded experience of life, similar to her fashion philosophy and line. Jessica Joyce has brought fashion to audiences in a way that promotes the best of us. The line encourages style in the rat race, making fashion 65

Dress: Jessica Joyce Handbag: ALDO Necklace: Talbots Bangles: The Limited

accessible to everyone through her eager-toplease line. Joyce’s hunger for style inspiring strong and confident women gives her the power to push through competitors. Her stamina to keep creating her unique, ever-evolving and exciting line has brought her to the forefront of the fashion race. The Jessica Joyce collections will always finish with a shining medal and endless praise because of Joyce’s dedication to creating a line that inspires women with fun and creative ways to feel great and fashion forward. To shop Jessica Joyce’s designs visit: www.jessicajoyce.nl


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Dress: Jessica Joyce Handbag: Banana Republic

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Dress: Jessica Joyce Coat: Ann Taylor Handbag: ALDO Opposite page Dress: Jessica Joyce Sunglasses: H&M Cuff: Ann Taylor

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Behind The Scenes

BEHIND THE SCENES OF OUR FEATURE EDITORIAL Everyone loves a little behind the scenes sneak peek to see exactly what goes into making that amazing cover image that sucked you in! This issue we decided to show you a little bit more of how the magic was made before this gorgeous creature, clad in fabulous dresses from Inspirare’s designer Jessica Joyce, stepped in front of the lens.

and enjoying a lunch break at the harbor. Wardrobe stylist Katty Lopez De Gull helped accessorize and make the story believable by adding professionally styled touches to each outfit. Hair stylist, Robby Kiwan and make-up artist, Kristine Rose Raqueno added to this lovely woman’s beauty by keeping her looking freshly styled throughout the entire 8 hour shoot!

Leah Watanabe, our lead photographer, expertly directed the team to help create and capture the art director, Adrienne Glenn’s vision of a modern day, vintage styled woman about town. Hailey Johnson cleverly stepped into her role of a woman about her busy day, hailing cabs

Frederick Steven Price showcased all of this wonderful behind the scenes action with his stellar photography. And as a bonus, for an exclusive behind the scenes video created by him, visit: www.vimeo. com/62838661

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TRENDS

SPRING IS THE TIME OF YEAR TO REALLY FLEX YOUR EXPERIMENTAL FASHION MUSCLES, AND SHOW THEM OFF! This season you can showcase the current trends while at a picnic in the park with your friends or enjoying the longer evenings out on town. Add a quick bronzer to your cheekbones to create an early summer glow and try out any and all of these great Spring trends‌ Nautical

Oscar de la Renta

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Sheer and Lace

Valentino

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Floral Erdem

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Retro Louis Vuitton

Color Diane von Furstenberg

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The Fashion Insider

HASTI KASHFIA:

CELEBRITY STYLIST Hasti Kashfia, also known by her friends in the industry as the “Silicon Valley Rachel Zoe”, is the creator of the fabulous MODE Bay Area, San Francisco Bay Area’s Leading Digital Fashion & Lifestyle Publication.

Photo credit: Ezra Gordon http://ezragordon.com For more information on Hasti, visit: www.modebayarea.com

On top of also being a wife and mother, she rounds out her days with celebrity styling as well as styling for ever impressive publications like Vanity Fair. She has dressed the likes of Kristi Yamaguchi, Taylor Armstrong, Real Housewife Gretchen Rossi, and Randi Zuckerberg. On top of all of this, she also is a fashion contributor for NBC Bay Area and an avid philanthropist with creations such as Project Pink with Westfield, a fashion show that benefitted

the American Cancer Society. The bow on top of this busy and incredibly talented package, is the fact that she is just a lovely human being. Hasti took a moment to share her fashion insider wisdom and show us how this mega-professional would style a gorgeous dress by Inspirare designer, Alejandra De Coss for a few occasions each woman may encounter this Spring season. 76


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TRIP TO THE GROCERY STORE 1- GEORGIE EXCLUSIVE Perforated Faux Leather Moto Jacket $318 Get It 2- ALDO Black Ankle Boot $120 Get It 3- RED Valentino Flower Tote $295 Get It 4- CHAN LUU Pink Mix Chain Wrap Bracelet on Henna Leather$170 Get It 77


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NIGHT AT THE OPERA 3

1- SWAROVSKI Tabloid Cuff $475 Get It 2- SWAROVSKI Selma Earrings $180 Get It 3- PRADA Satin Crystal Strass T-Strap Sandal $1800 Get It 4- HOURGLASS Rouge Liquid Lipstick $28 Get It 5- EDIE PARKER Black Lara Glitter Clutch $995 Get It 78


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OUTDOOR DAY WEDDING 1- GIVENCHY Crystal Shine Smoothing Gloss $27.50 Get It 2- FRANCESCA’S Cross Pearls Stretch Bracelet $16 Get It 3- FRANCESCA’S Skinny Spike Bangle $12 Get It 4- ST. TROPEZ Bronzing Mousse $32 Get It 5- GAGA MILANO 48mm Manuale Watch $1200 Get It 6- VALENTINO ‘Rockstud’ Ballerina Flat $595 Get It 79


DESIGNER

EVE PALASAK City Brights

Photographs by Adit Sombunsa

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_ Designer

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EVE PALASAK


EVE PALASAK


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EVE PALASAK

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Inspirareland

FASHION INCUBATOR SAN FRANCISCO:

THE CHANCE

Housed in the old Macy’s building just off of Union Square, Fashion Incubator San Francisco resides in a building full of the ghosts of clothing giants. What better place to get the air of success breathed into your dream, but in the walls of one of the top clothing retailers of the world? Written by Adrienne Glenn

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E OF A LIFETIME


FASHION

INCUBATOR Fashion Incubator is a nonprofit business development organization that offers a yearlong program to six individual, specially selected designers. In its second year of operation FISF gives these budding entrepreneurs a workroom, showroom, classroom and office space where they can focus on the growth of their design business. Their specialized curriculum consists of the four main categories of time, customer, imaging and business. When asked who created this particular curriculum, Jeanne Allen, the newly appointed Executive Director of this amazing program, tells us that

“We borrowed the initial curriculum from the Chicago Incubator--they have been in business for 6 years. With the help of Amy Williams, Fashion Chair at CCA and Diane Green, Fashion Chair at City College, we developed the curriculum for the inaugural class of designers. This year I have changed the timing and am adding 30% more classes-especially in the areas of social media and branding. The Designers need to do the practical things within the first 60 days of their residency: Design and production calendars, accounting system, their marketing and merchandising plans. Legal comes next...then media training, branding, financing and sales training follow.” So, as you can see, these designers are being afforded the top level of education in the field of fashion design. They couldn’t be lead through this journey by a more dynamic and appropriate leader. Jeanne Allen has lived a life of fashion since the 1970s when she met her design, business and life partner Marc Grant. A true lover and supporter of this industry, she tells me, “When I see real talent and fresh ideas it just makes me swoon--who doesn’t loveto swoon?” Not only does she care immensely, she has had the kind of success that got her elected to the CFDA (the Council of American 96


Designers) and has written 8 books on color, fashion and Japanese prints. That is the kind of director that I would want leading me through the world of sketch, pattern, sew, market and sell! Passion for fashion, silly to say, but for those of us that share that passion, it means everything. San Franciso is an amazing city (I’m partial) that has had songs written about it and has an immense history of business and wealth; yet, over the last couple decades of my lifetime the fashion industry has felt almost non-existent. For a city of such sharp and intuitive dressers, it seems that work in the fashion industry is mostly a struggle. Being quite familiar with San Francisco for many years, I asked Jeanne why the SF fashion industry is so behind those of Paris and New York; she intelligently told me, “The fashion industry was San Francisco’s second largest industry just behind tourism until the nineties. Then increased industry regulation by the state of California and cheap production in China sucked the jobs and companies off-shore. We are just now beginning to recover ground.” There is definite truth to that. With amazing new growth opportunities like FISF springing up and the help of industry greats such as Macy’s and other large companies, fashion can once again fund 97

WORK HARD AND ALWAYS SAY “THANKS”TO THE PEOPLE WHO HELP YOU ALONG THE WAY--IT COSTS NOTHING AND MEANS EVERYTHING. -Advice from Jeanne Allen

the streets of San Francisco. Jeanne backs that thought up by sharing, “West coast designers need to convince Silicon Valley investors to back the local fashion start ups that are popping up all over the Bay Area. This is beginning to happen--slowly--but when it catches on San Francisco will quickly be a fashion center again.” For those of you that have an interest in applying for the next class of FISF, they start taking applications in September. The Board of Directors cut it down to the top ten designers, and then a committee interviews those ten and cut it down to the class of six very special designers. The current sophomore 2013 class of designers that are being incubated from fledglings to

soarers, took a minute to tell us a little bit about themselves and what makes them tick as designers. Be sure to take a minute and acquaint yourself with these talented individuals because you will be seeing their clothing on your neighbor very soon!


Do you have an education background in fashion or are you self-taught?

MICHELLE BYRNES

OF SAGA SWIMWEAR

I grew up in a house of seamstresses and finally wanted to join the bunch. I studied at CCSF and have been designing and sewing for 12 years.

If you could dress only one person, alive or dead, who would it be?

Angelina Jolie, the woman understands her body and has managed to look timeless in every public appearance. What excites you most Even off camera she has about FISF? I am excited by the opportunity impeccable taste and I admire and appreciate a woman that to be surrounded by experts that are on my team. Every time knows how to dress. we meet with a member of Zippers or buttons? the board I learn something Buttons all the way. There is invaluable. I am grateful to be something special about each in an environment that lends itself to roundtable discussions button being sewn on and the care of both the maker and the and collaboration of thought. wearer. It takes a little more patience and says nothing but What/who inspires you to class. create fashion? Women, strong, ambitious, talented and confident, inspire me. I am amazed at the things a woman is capable of

What dreams do you have for your brand?

I want saga to be the brand of swimwear you want to be seen in. I would like to expand the line to include beach apparel that suits a city girl and maybe some fun accessories too.

What can we look forward to seeing in your F/W collections?

In my resort collection you will see my first cover-ups and more mesh I can’t get enough of it. For more information: www.sagaswimwear.com

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DIANA MITCHELL OF DDCC

What excites you most about FISF?

The workroom! Having a space dedicated to being creative allows me to stay organized and focused on DDCC designs. The mentors and other designers are a wealth of thought and information, allowing me to obtain advice and answers to questions almost immediately.

What is the main thing you are hoping to get out of this program?

To have a well-merchandised line that appeals to those with active lifestyles, and to be able to produce my line using mostly American-made and eco-friendly products.

What/who inspires you to create fashion?

My mother and grandmother both sewed, so I always had 99

an interest in the creation of garments. I love the structure of wovens, and the comfort of knits, and this is not always easy to find/achieve. I enjoy the challenge and thought process that goes into the patternmaking and construction of my ideas, and finding the perfect fabric to bring the garments to life.

to Apparel Arts to complete a more intensive patternmaking program, and also took several seminars on Apparel Production.

Who is your customer?

I’ve been prototyping and testing a capri legging for months, and it is almost perfected. The capri is the perfect blend of a yoga and fashion legging, and a lot of fans are anxiously awaiting its launch. I’m also going to be bringing back some popular styles in new fabrics and colors.

Active women with busy lives! Moms, yogis, cyclists, hikers, brunch enthusiasts. People who love to go outside and live life to the fullest.

Do you have an education background in fashion or are you self-taught? I grew up learning to sew from my mother, and later attended the Cañada College Fashion program to perfect those skills. I later transfered

Zippers or buttons? ZIPPERS

What can we look forward to seeing in your F/W collections?

For more information: www.ddccsf.com


KYRA & BREE

OF VERMEULEN & CO What excites you most about FISF?

The opportunity to get a jump start on moving forward with our company in ways that would otherwise take us several years. Plus the workspace is amazing - the cutting table is a dream.

What is the main thing you are hoping to get out of this program? Wholesale orders for our 2014 collections! We’re looking for guidance on how to reach our audience and scale up our business using local manufacturing. Advice from industry experts, such as Jeanne, is invaluable.

artisan goods, and prefers to own fewer, high quality goods. What/who inspires you to She values people, the planet, create fashion? Clothing that flatters the female and herself. body, fabrics that look and feel Do you have an education amazing, the details in vintage background in fashion or garments and visions of the clothing we want to wear but are you self-taught? can’t find anywhere else. Kyra: I took several fashion classes as part of my costume What dreams do you have design education. I have focused my professional work for your brand? within the fashion industry in To build a thriving business of the Bay Area for many years, well-made, beautiful clothing for women who may not be the and have learned about the business side of the industry current idealized body type we from hands-on experience. see in most advertisements, Bree: My first industry job but are gorgeous nonetheless. was sewing costumes for Baz Curvy women of many sizes Luhrman’s Broadway version are currently underserved, and of La Bohéme. I learned so we want Vermeulen & Co. to much every day from the be their treasured favorites, wonderfully talented stitchers the clothing they wear when and designers in the workshop. they want to make a powerful I’ve continued to take on impression. professional challenges that keep me learning. Who is your customer? Our customer is an educated working woman who appreciates craftsmanship,

If you could dress only one person, alive or dead, who would it be? Kyra: Christina Hendricks Bree: Stockard Channing

Zippers or buttons?

Both! Each has an important look and function. For more information: www.vermeulenandco.com

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“THIS COLLABORATION IS REALLY SOMETHING SPECIAL AND SOMETHING THAT WILL HELP AG IMMENSELY.” Jake Thomas-Franklin Wall

JAKE THOMAS-FRANKLIN WALL OF ARTFUL GENTLEMAN. What excites you most about FISF?

The fact that this isn’t so much a “school” with a set curriculum, but an opportunity designed to best foster and grow my specific business and the businesses of my fellow Designers In Residence. There are so many great people involved in the Incubator... experts with experience and passion and a real desire to help. Over the last two year’s as we have been working on Artful Gentleman. -- well, everything we have done has been learned “as we do it.” I don’t come from a fashion or apparel background nor does 101

my business partner and co-founder, Nate Johnson, so as we look to take AG to the next level, it is amazing to have all these resources literally within an arm’s reach...

What is the main thing you are hoping to get out of this program?

Refining our model and really tightening up all the elements that go into our business to make this something we can take beyond San Francisco. We have proven our concept and with the help of the FiSF team and network, we are focused on taking our bespoke clothing model across the

country. We believe that our tailor-made approach to style is exactly what modern men and women are looking for and that our unique aesthetic delivers and then some. We aren’t building a fashion house, we are focused on building a style house and serve our clients as their personal style curators. With the help of the FiSF, we are also looking to refine our “voice” and what we put out as our “collections” with each season....


coming from a non-traditional background as a creator and designer, this will be one of the first times we have had the opportunity to preview what we create with industry experts and fellow creators. This collaboration is really something special and something that will help AG immensely.

What dreams do you have for your brand?

I want to see Artful Gentleman. move beyond just a bespoke brand in San Francisco, to a bespoke style house based in San Francisco with locations nationwide and a full website for complimentary designs and products. We want to provide the best possible quality, fit, and comfort with a take on style that manages to run the balance between timely and timeless.

occurred over the last two years has really been an “on the job” training model. I learn something when I need to know it... we have answered a lot of questions over the last set of years with a “yes... we can do that...” and then I go to the drafting table and get to mapping it out. I have failed way more than I have succeeded, so by the time you see our finished product... know that it didn’t happen overnight. Or maybe it did, but it took more than one pass to make it look just that good.

If you could dress only one person, alive or dead, who would it be?

The emperor... I hear the last time he was in the market for some new clothes he had a tailor...

Zippers or buttons?

Is there a specific reason we Do you have an education can’t have both? They each background in fashion or are serve their purpose.... but I can do WAY more with buttons you self-taught? then I will ever do with zippers. So unless you count having Buttons are a necessity, a mother who was a clothing zippers simply a convenience. and gift buyer for a college bookstore, then we would have to go “self-taught.” Just about For more information: www.artfulgentleman.com two years ago, I quit my job and traveled overseas. In the process I began an informal apprenticeship with a team of classically trained craftsman in the true art of hard tailoring and bespoke suiting and shirting... everything that has 102


“AN ENVIRONMENT LIKE THIS WILL PUSH ME TO DO ALL THAT I CAN TO MAKE THIS WORK.” Sarah Liller What/who inspires you to create fashion?

I am a total girl’s girl. I love successful women and am constantly being inspired by those bay area women who are paving the way. Great, well fitting clothes can give you so much confidence and giving women clothes that make them feel beautiful will make them even more of a force to be reckoned with out in the world.

Who is your customer?

SARAH LILLER

OF SARAH LILLER DESIGN What excites you most about FISF?

I am incredibly excited to be given guidance on how to build my brand. I know that an environment like this will push me to do all that I can to make this work, and I’ll have people who have been in the industry in San Francisco watching my every step to make sure I do all the right things. 103

My customer is a young professional who is living the quintessential San Francisco life…a fabulous job, dinner at Bar Tartine, drinks at Bourbon and Branch, Castro farmer’s market, and brunch at Plough. My girl needs clothes that can take her smoothly from one event to the other.

Do you have an education background in fashion or are you self-taught?

I have been making clothes since I was thirteen. My mother taught me the basics,

but I went to Parson’s Design School in New York City to get my formal training.

If you could dress only one person, alive or dead, who would it be?

Zooey Dechanel, she’s got such great personal style, and is brainy to boot! I love her blog, Hello Giggles.

Zippers or buttons?

Zippers, there’s nothing easier than putting on a dress, zipping it up, and walking out the door totally fabulous!

What can we look forward to seeing in your F/W collections?

The mood is English Country meets Mad Men, rich reds, browns, and plaids, defined waists and feminine touches. For more information: www.sarahliller.com


about the team

THE PEOPLE BEHIND INSPIRARE.COM

CAROLE PLANCON Marketing.

SEAN PENG

CAROLINE TIAN

CAROLINE CHONG

ABIGAIL COLYER

CEO Founder.

Business Development.

Customer Service Manager. Business Development, Blogger.

TARA SHANNAHAN Technical Designer. 104


BLOG DISCOVER COMPETE SHOP INSPIRARE.COM

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CONTACT

INSPIRARE.COM 350 Townsend St, Suite 220 San Francisco, CA 94107 415-666-2002 hi@inspirare.com

For inquires about the magazine please email Editor, Adrienne Glenn: adrienne@inspirare.com

Model: Anastasia Bachykala 107


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Next in

Magazine 109

Spring 2013 Global Fashion Design Competition Winner and Judge features. Plus much, much more... image by: secondshoutout.com


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MONA

MONA IS AN ISRAELI BORN FASHION BRAND CREATED IN THE SPRING OF 2010, INFLUENCED BY FASHION OF PAST DECADES. Inspired by her grandmother, designer Moriah Hemed, likes to emphasize her garments with pleats, unusual buttons and collars. To her “small details make a huge difference.” Clothing that is feminine and flirty, the Mona Spring line is destined for your closet.

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Each item is produced in Tel-Aviv in small quantities, so you can be sure you are wearing something special and unique. For more information visit her store in the Inspirare Designer Marketplace or here at: http://www.ilovemona. com/


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Inspirare Magazine - Issue 002