Page 1

X

DIGITAL MAGAZINE FOR CREATIVE ARTISTS

1 0

T 1

INSPIRING ARTISTS AROUND THE WORLD

InPrint Magazine FEBRUARY - APRIL www.inprint-mag.com

2


2

InPrint Magazine inspiring artists around the world FOUNDER AND EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Elo | elo@elodesigns.com

GRAPHICS AND LAYOUT Elo | elo@elodesigns.com

GRAPHIC DESIGNER KING ARTHUR | king.e.arthur@gmail.com

PROGRAMMER EDUARDO GARCIA | eds.nett@gmail.com

CONTRIBUTORS - WRITTERS KIMON FOUNDOULAKIS | kimon@eckacreative.com RICK BYRNE | rick_byrne@hotmail.com

PUBLISHER InPrint Magazine media

INPINT ON SOCIAL MEDIA FACEBOOK: facebook.com/InPrintMag | TWITTER: @InPrintMag | FLICKRflickr.com/photos/inprintmag

ADVERTISING SALES EMAILS: inprintmagazine@inprint-mag.com | info@inprint-mag.com artists@inprint-mag.com | sales@inprint-mag.com

HOME PAGE inprint-mag.com

ABOUT INPRINT MAGAZINE

InPrint Magazine is published bi-monthly. InPrint Magazine is a professional magazine for the arts industry

- design, illustration, fashion, literature to show contemporary visual arts to a wide variety of audience. Subscriptions and distribuition is free to qualified individuals. Single copies may be obtained from publisher for $0.99. All the works published in InPrint Magazine are property of the respective authors.

INPRINT MEDIA

Copyright Š2012 InPrint Magazine, Inc. Some rights reserved. No parts of this periodical may be reproduced without written permission of InPrint Magazine. Neither the publishers nor the advertisers will be held responsible for any errors found in the magazine. The publishers accept no liability for the accuracy of statements made by the advertisers. If you have any questions contact InPrint Magazine at (619)630-5735 San Diego, California.

/ FEBRUARY 2011


3

MESSAGE FROM

THE EDITOR

Art creates culture. Culture shapes values. Values determine the future.

The fascination of art has to do with time. Visual art is the quickest of all serious cultural forms to make its full nature clear to the beholder. It's worth dwelling on the rapidity of art. It is conventional, in the moralizing rhetoric of the critic, to say Rembrandt repays a lot more time than most works of art - you can look at his pictures for a lifetime and still find new depth in them. But what if this is not the most important thing about great art? What if it's the instant effect that matters? So it's not always true that great art takes a long time to appreciate and instantaneous art is shallow. In fact, some of the most revered paintings can be appreciated much more quickly than video art - which has, as I've already conceded, brought narrative time into the gallery. Why is timebased art so popular? Does it seem more important because it takes up time? Personally, I agree with Leonardo da Vinci. The most magical thing in art is the instant and complete image.

“LOVE ART AND LOVE INPRINT MAGAZINE AS MUCH AS WE DO”

Elo

(FOUNDER & EDITOR-IN-CHIEF OF InPrint Magazine)


4

/ FEBRUARY 2011


unlock the

5

code

FEBRUARY 2011 /


6CREATIVES

FEATURED IN

th S ssue 10 18 28 34 38 48 62 76 84 92 100 / DECEMBER 2012

TEGAN WHITE JORDAN JELEV ALAN ARIAIL JACOB CASS - READING MIKLOS KISS CHRIS PIASCIK DAVID FULLARTON ANDREAS SCHEIGER SASHA PROOD JOHN SOKOL RECIPIES OF THE WORLD


7

In Honor Of Typography Artist Doyald Young And All The Ones Who Love Typography! InPrint Magazine FEBRUARY 2011 /


8

Doyald Young 1926 - 2011


9


10

Tegan White

ILLUSTRATOR - USA

Teagan White is a freelance designer and illustrator from Chicago, currently a student at the Minneapolis College of Art and Design. Her experience working with a diverse range of clients, from those in the music, fashion, and editorial industries to small business owners and individuals, has allowed her to reject much of the sterility of contemporary design in favor of an aesthetically-focused approach that bridges the perceived gap between graphic design and illustration. Intricate line work, naturalistic rendering, and subdued color are integral to her visual identity, while a fascination with natural history, antiquities, and mortality drives the content of her work. / FEBRUARY 2011


11

I remember telling my teachers I wanted to be an artist and they’d always say “that’s not a career”


12


13


14


15


16


17


18

/ DECEMBER 2012


19

Jordan Jelev

GRAPHIC DESIGNER - BULGARIA

Jordan Jelev is a world-renowned designer known mainly for his award winning wine labels and expressive calligraphy. With more than 15 years experience, Jelev is popular in industry circles as The Labelmaker 贸 in part because of his prolific work designing wine labels. He usually creates custom lettering and logos, giving his designs a distinctive, bespoke look. Labelmaker铆s work was featured in many world famous books, magazines and blogs. In 2009 Jelev won the 1st Prize of Bulgarian Wine Chamber Contest for Wine label Designs.In 2011 he won The Big Prize for wine label design of Vinaria Expo, Plovdiv, Bulgaria. FEBRUARY 2011 /


20


21


22


23


24


25


26


27


28

Alan Ariail LETTERING ARTIST - USA I am a freelance lettering artist living in the Chicago area. My work has appeared in advertising, packaging and branding projects for over 3 decades. For this issue of InPrint I selected 3 recent projects which include examples of concept sketches and vector comps. Every project starts with a pencil and paper to generate ideas. What I find fascinating at this point of my career is each line I put on a piece of paper in the concept phase has value regardless of the draftsmanship. It takes a lot of trial and error sketching to determine what can be developed and fine tuned in vector format for finished lettering. / FEBRUARY 2011


29


30


31


32


33


34

How To Write An Effective Design Brief and Get The Design You Want! STORY: JACOB CASS

H

get a high quality design that meets your get awareness of your product / service? needs, providing you have chosen the •How do you differ from your competitors? right designer. ow do you get the design you •Do you want to completely reinvent want? The perfect design you envision yourself or are you simply updating your How To Write An Effective in your head? … The design brief is Design Brief? promotional material? the answer. If you answer these questions below in Tip: You should also provide old proWhether you are a designer or a client, an ordered and detailed fashion, your motional material to assist the designer. an effective design brief is the single design brief will be 90% done… the most critical factor in ensuring that a other 10% will come from further ques- Who is the target market? project is successful. tions from the designer after you submit •What are your target market’s demoThis article will tell you how to write an your brief. graphics & phychographics? ie. the age, effective design brief that will be both Have fun answering the questions and gender, income, tastes, views, attitudes, beneficial to the client and the designer. remember, provide as much detail as employment, geography, lifestyle of This article will be based from the client’s possible! This does not mean one line those you want to reach. perspective. answers.

What Is A Design Brief?

First off, you may want to know what a design brief is. A design brief is something that is vital to any design project as it will provide the designer(s) with all the information needed to exceed your expectations. A design brief should primarily focus on the results and outcomes of the design and the business objectives of the design project. It should not attempt to deal with the aesthetics of design… That is the responsibility of the designer. The design brief also allows you (the client) to focus on exactly what you want to achieve before any work starts on the project. A good design brief will ensure that you / FEBRUARY 2011

What does your business do?

Tip: Never assume that the designer will know anything about your company. Be clear and concise and avoid jargon when replying.

Tip: If you have multiple audiences, rank them in terms of importance.

What copy (text) and pictures are needed?

Tip: The copy and pictures used in a design are as crucial as the design itself and you should clearly state who is going to be •What does your company / organiza- providing the copy and pictures if needed. tion do? You may need to look into getting a pro•What is your company’s history? fessional copywriter / photographer – ask your designer for some recommendations. •What copy needs to be included in the What are the goals? Why? •What is the overall goal of the new de- design? Who is providing the copy? •What pictures / photographs / diagrams sign project? •What are you trying to communicate etc need to be used? Who is providing these? and why? •Are you trying to sell more products or


35

(Ian Gowdie creator of mind map) What are the specifications? •What size is the design going to be?

•Where is it going to be printed / used? The web, business cards, stationery, on your car? •What other information should the designer know in regards to specifications?

Have you got a benchmark in mind?

and will avoid disappointment on your behalf.

and delivery.

Tip: Rushing design jobs helps no one and •Providing a budget prevents designers mistakes can be made if a complex job is wasting valuable time and resources pushed through without time to review, when trying to maximize your budget. however, there are times when a rush job •Providing the budget upfront also al- is needed, and in these cases you should lows designers to know if the project be honest and upfront about it. is going to be worthwhile to complete. Make sure you are worth their time. Tips For The Designer

What Is Your Budget?

•You should provide the designer with some examples of what you consider to What is the be effective or relevant design even if timescale / deadline? it is from your main competitors. This •Give the designer a detailed schedule of will set a benchmark for your designer. the project and set a realistic deadline for •Provide the designer with things not the completion of the work. You should to do, and styles that you do not like or take into account the various stages of wish to see in your design. This will give the design project such as consultation, the designer an idea of what to avoid concept development, production

As a designer it is important to have a template such as this one to give to clients as clients will not always come to you with a design brief – feel free to use this one as you please. By having a template ready, it shows them your professionalism and ultimately saves them (and you) a lot of time and money. FEBRUARY 2011 /


36

GET THE PRINTED VERSION

/ FEBRUARY 2011


37

FEBRUARY 2011 /


38


39

Miklos Kiss

GRAPHIC DESIGNER - HUNGARY

I am a Hungarian designer and artist. I worked on a projects in architecture, fine art, design, graphic design, typography. Mindfreek Productions is a Hungarian start-up production office, which produces movies, TV ads and manages music bands. They asked me to make a classic but a little bit playful logotype, which shows the word-play between Mindfree and Mindfreak. Thank you for Balazs Makrai, Istvan Hanzel and Daniel Magyar giving scope for my abilities. FEBRUARY 2011 /


40


41


42


43


44


45


46


47


48

Chris Piascik GRAPHICS/ILLUSTRATOR

- USA

An artist who recently held his sixth solo exhibition, Chris Piascik is also active in the design community. With six years of professional experience at award-winning firms in New England, he is currently working as a freelance illustrator and designer. He holds degrees in Visual Communication Design and Art History from the Hartford Art School at the University of Hartford, where he has moonlighted as an instructor of several design courses. His work has been published in numerous books and publications including Communication Arts, The Logo Lounge series and Typography Essentials.

/ FEBRUARY 2011


49


50


51


52


53


54


55


56


57


58


59


TIO N E ATT ALL

IN THE NEXT ISSUE OF

N

U O Y ST? E I A R RT A N A

WE ARE LOOKING FOR

InPrint MAGAZINE ARTISTS

would you like to showcase your work in the pages of InPrint Magazine? Send us 3 samples of your works with a short brief of yourself as an artist to: artists@inprint-mag. com or printed samples to PO Box 83342 San Diego, California 92138. Don't miss this

opportunity to show us and the world what you've got!


61

ADVERTISE WITH US WHAT IS INPRINT MAGAZINE? InPrint Magazine currently has over 20,000 page views per month. You can email us for more specific Google Analytic statistics. Our goal is to show contemporary visual arts to a wide variety of audience which attracts readers from USA, Europe - UK, Spain, France, Germany, Italy, Australia and the rest from all over the world!. InPrint is a bi-monthly online magazine. The author's intention is to publish the works of modern designers, fine artists and illustrators. All the works published in InPrint Magazine are property of the respective authors.

WHY SHOULD I ADVERTISE? We cover major facets of artistic news, events and installations making sure our readers become industry insiders through reading our publication. Our feature writers cover industry topics from top to bottom including technical areas of creative, prepress and print. Our regular commentators are recognized experts in their fields bringing knowledge, depth and passion to the page. The latest technology is unveiled and reviewed with insights from topics on design, prepress, print, bindery, sales and marketing. Fresh ideas will inspire, inform and energize you.

WHAT WE OFFER: Our distribution list is constantly updated ensuring your advertising message will be read by the key decision makers in the printing and graphic arts industry. In a sea of competitors, we are a lighthouse of value. Our distribution list is always kept current. Every one of our readers is a potential client for your services whether creative, prepress, print, bindery, or software. InPrint Magazine is published 6 times per year and boasts the most reliable schedule in the market. We deliver on time, everytime. High-quality service and very competitive advertising rates make Inprint Magazine the best value on the market today.

WHO SHOULD I CONTACT? You can contact our editor chief Elo @ sales@inprint-mag.com or info@inprint-mag.com. You can also advertise on InPrint website. Contact us for special multi-issue offers!


62


63

David Fullarton

ILLUSTRATOR - USA

David Fullarton is a Scottish born, San Francisco based artist. He keeps notebooks filled with scraps of paper, scribbled phrases, and other ephemera that he incorporates into his artwork. These elements represent the often overlooked stuff of daily life, which is the root of Fullarton's inspiration. He sees beauty in the ways people manage to find joy and meaning in the minutiae of existence. The artist paints vibrantly complex canvases whose disparate elements jumble and mix together in a facsimile of modern life. Fullarton compliments these with smaller mixed media drawings on paper. These paper works are sometimes the genesis of the finished paintings, but are more often stand-alone vignettes featuring forlorn characters who find themselves in compromising situations. FEBRUARY 2011 /


64


65


66


67


68


69


70


71


72


73


74


75


76

Andreas Scheiger

DESIGNER/ILLUSTRATOR - VIENNA

Andreas Scheiger, born and living in Vienna. Studied economy and business administration. Private studies in graphic education and freelance illustrator.Works as an art director in advertising and on free personal graphic projects. The series "Evolution of Type" is an interpretation of a text by the famous typographer William F. Goudy: A letter should possess an esthetic quality that is organic, an essential of the form itself and not the result of mere additions to its fundamental form nor to meaningless variations of it."Frederic W. Goudy," "The Alphabet and Elements of Lettering", 1918. The letters are handcrafted and consist of MDF-wood, polymer clay, chicken bones, corals, acrylics and clear varnish / FEBRUARY 2011


77


78


79


80


81


82


83


84


85

Sasha Prood

DESIGNER/ILLUSTRATOR - USA Sasha Prood grew up just outside of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and currently resides in Brooklyn, New York. She creates typography, illustrations, patterns and graphics using pencil, pen and watercolor with the computer. Thematically her works lean toward the organic, natural and scientific with vintage, utilitarian and childhood influences. FEBRUARY 2011 /


86


87


88


89


90


91


92

John Sokol

ARTIST/WRITER - USA

John Sokol was born in Canton, Ohio. He is a writer, painter and an artist living in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. John is the winner of the 1999 Redgreene Press Chapbook Competition. His short stories have appeared in Akros, Descant, Mindscapes, The Pittsburgh Quarterly, Redbook, and other journals. One of his stories has been translated into Danish, and, another, into Russian. His drawings and paintings have been reproduced on more than thirty-five book covers.His poems have appeared in America, Antigonish Review, The Berkeley Poetry Review, Georgetown Review, New Millennium Writings, The New York Quarterly, and Quarterly West, among others.His short stories have appeared in Akros, Descant, Mindscapes, The Pittsburgh Quarterly, Redbook, and other journals. One of his stories has been translated into Danish, and, another, into Russian. His drawings and paintings have been reproduced on more than thirty-five book covers. / FEBRUARY 2011


93


94


95


96


97


98


99


100

RECIPES AROUND THE WORLD Name Of The Dish Bobotie

Origin Of The Dish South Africa

History Of The Dish

Bobotie has a slightly sweet taste with a light curry flavor and an egg topping. In 1954, Bobotie was declared the National Dish of South Africa by the United Nations Women's Organization.

Interesting Facts

Although not particularly spicy, the dish incorporates a variety of flavours that can add complexity. For example, the dried fruit (usually apricots and raisins/sultanas) contrasts the curry flavouring very nicely. The texture of the dish is also complex, with the baked egg mixture topping complementing the milk-soaked bread which adds moisture to the dish. The Bobotie recipe was transported by South African settlers to colonies all over Africa. Today, recipes for it can be found that originated in white settler communities in Kenya, Botswana, Zimbabwe and Zambia. There is a variation that was popular among the 7,000 Boer settlers who settled in the Chubut River Valley in Argentina in the early 20th century, in which the bobotie mixture is packed inside a large pumpkin, which is then baked until tender. A dish in a Bobotie style has been made with haggis in Scotland, but this is not true bobotie.


101


102

WHAT IS NEEDED: \\INGREDIENTS\\ 1 small onion, chopped 2 tablespoons vegetable oil 2 1/2 pounds lean ground beef 1 teaspoon crushed garlic 1 teaspoon turmeric 1 to 2 teaspoons curry powder 6 slices white bread, soaked in milk 2 teaspoons lemon juice 1/4 cup packed brown sugar

\\TOPPING\\ 2 eggs, beaten pinch of salt 4 bay leaves

Do you have recipe you would like to share? email it to us @ editor@inprint-mag.com


103

1

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

2

In large skillet, saute onion in vegetable oil over medium high heat until softened.

3

Add ground beef. Cook until browned.

4

Add garlic, turmeric, curry powder (add a little at a time, tasting as you go, until you achieve the desired flavor), and salt to taste.

5

Add bread, lemon juice, and brown sugar. Mix well. Cook until heated through.

6

Pour into a 2 quart casserole dish. In small bowl, beat together egg and pinch of salt. Pour over top of meat mixture.

7

Arrange bay leaves on top. Bake 10 minutes or until the egg is set and top is slightly browned.

FEBRUARY 2011 /


FEBRUARY - APRILBOX 83324 SAN DIEGO, CA 92138

Inspiring Artists

InPrint Magazine Issue 2  

InPrint Issue 2 "typography" was originally launched on February 2011 and re-launched on December 2012

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you