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EDITORIAL

Shaping the PP scenario olypropylene (PP) has been one of the top-selling polymers worldwide, second only to polyethylene. Although the largest user of PP is the automobile industry, this polymer finds applications in an array of industries and is used to produce packaging films, bottle caps, fibre ropes, bicycle helmets and nappies. In the recent past, the PP market has experienced some turbulence of sorts mainly due to less propylene feedstock and weak demand. However, according to Merchant Research & Consulting Ltd, this difficult phase seems transitory and will end with a significant demand for PP arising from the expansion of its user segments. Forecasts peg the global demand for PP to surge at a compounded annual growth rate of a little less than 5 per cent from 2009 to 2020. At this rate, the volume is likely to touch 59.6 million tonne in 2020. Thus far, Asia has accounted for the largest share of the total global PP demand, and this leadership trend is likely to continue until 2020. Without much surprise, China and India, the two fastest growing economies of the world, continue to take PP consumption forward. Although the present per capita consumption of PP in India is quite low, its rate of growth has been fairly high and in line with the burgeoning economy. The growing demand mainly from end-user segments, such as packaging, automotive and construction, in emerging economies continues to shape the PP scenario. A complex combination of evolving factors including product preference, economic growth rate, demographic profiles and environmental norms will play a key role to further define the demand–supply dynamics of PP. Another recent study highlights the impact of on-purpose propylene technologies in balancing the demand and supply of propylene feedstock for the PP industry. According to this study by Ceresana Research, huge capacity expansions for propylene and downstream products in the Middle East and China will significantly affect the global propylene market. With countries in the Middle East showing the largest increases in propylene production and demand, these numbers are further expected to double by 2014. Considering fluctuating feedstock prices as well as energy inputs for final products, numerous challenges remain ahead for the global PP industry. In this scenario, the chances of the industry moving towards a consolidation appear highly probable. While this will unleash opportunities for expansion of capacities and markets, one also needs to exercise due diligence on research and development to bring out innovative and customised products.

P

Editorial Advisory Board A E Ladhabhoy Plastics Technologist

Dr Sushil K Verma Former Director General, CIPET

Dr Swapan K Dhara Regional Technical Head, Basell Polyolefins India Pvt Ltd

Mohan K Jain MD, Indoplast & Past President, AIPMA

That said, welcome to the third edition of Plastics @ Gujarat! We have revisited the plastics industry of the State to gauge its prospects and pitfalls based on the latest developments. Turn to Spotlight for this and more.

P P Kharas Chairman, Ecoplast

Raman M Patel Chairman, Industrial Products Mfg Co

Vijay Merchant

Manas R Bastia manas@network18publishing.com

President, Polycraft

March 2013 | Modern Plastics & Polymers

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CONTENT S

Spotlight

93

41

Polymers in healthcare ........................... 94

Plastics @ Gujarat

Medical plastics ...................................... 96 Interface: Manoj Bhardwaj .................. 100

Insight & Outlook

81

Medical Plastics

Green shoots ........................................ 101 All-electric IMMs ................................ 102 Interface:

Dies and moulds .................... 82

Special Focus Dies & Moulds

Jignesh Bavishi .......................... 104 Nanda Kumar T ........................ 105

Multi-functional

Temperature control units .................... 106

component tooling..................... 84

Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF) ......... 108

Interface: Saranjit Singh......... 86

Lean thinking....................................... 110

Roundtable ............................. 88

Engineering plastics in medical applications ............................. 112

March 2012 2013 | Modern Plastics & Polymers

81

Automation Trends

114

Computer-aided tool design: The automation edge

116

Efficiency through heat recovery: Using residual heat for higher productivity

118

Dealing with quality: Problems and solutions

120

Injection moulding: Reducing the costs of production

Energy Management Policies & Regulations Strategy Tips & Tricks

122

Maintenance of injection moulding machine: Prerequisites for efficient operation

128

Indo-German International Seminar: Plastics in automotives: Redefining possibilities

In Conversation With

Event Preview

38

Shirish V Divgi Managing Director, Ferromatik Milacron India Pvt Ltd

90

N A Corporation (Naroto): Striving for customer delight with futuristic solutions

Event Report

129

Windsor Endowment Lecture on New trends in rigid and flexible packaging: Mapping new trends for future growth

Highlights of Next Edition Special Focus: Injection Moulding Insight & Outlook: Engineering Plastics

REGUL AR SEC TION S Editorial ................................. 9 News, Views & Analysis ...... 28 Projects ............................... 124 Tenders ............................... 125 Event List........................... 126

Book Review ...................... 130 Products.............................. 131 List of Products.................. 138 List of Advertisers .............. 140

Facility Visit

Cover photo courtesy: Bayer MaterialScience

Details on pg no. 126

Note: ` stands for Indian rupee, $ stands for US dollar and ÂŁ stands for UK pound, unless mentioned otherwise

March 2013 | Modern Plastics & Polymers

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Business Insights •Technologies•Opportunities

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Views and opinions expressed in this magazine are not necessarily those of Network18 Media & Investments Ltd (Network18)*, its publisher and/or editors. We at Network18 do our best to verify the information published but do not take any responsibility for the absolute accuracy of the information. Network18 does not accept the responsibility for any investment or other decision taken by readers on the basis of information provided herein. Network18 does not take responsibility for returning unsolicited material sent without due postal stamps for return postage. No part of this magazine can be reproduced without the prior written permission of the publisher. Network18 reserves the right to use the information published herein in any manner whatsoever. Printed by Mohan Gajria and published by Lakshmi Narasimhan on behalf of Network18. Senior Editor: Manas R Bastia Printed at Infomedia 18 Ltd, Plot no.3, Sector 7, off Sion-Panvel Road, Nerul, Navi Mumbai 400 706, and published at Network18, ‘A’ Wing, Ruby House, J K Sawant Marg, Dadar (W), Mumbai - 400 028. Modern Plastics & Polymers is registered with the Registrar of Newspapers of India under No. MAHENG / 2008 / 25265. Network18 does not take any responsibility for loss or damage incurred or suffered by any subscriber of this magazine as a result of his/her accepting any invitation/offer published in this edition. *Ownership of this magazine stands transferred from Infomedia18 Ltd (Infomedia18) to Network18 Media & Investments Ltd (Network18) in pursuance of the scheme of arrangement between Network18 and Infomedia18 and their respective shareholders and creditors, as approved by the Hon’ble High Court of Delhi and the necessary approval of Ministry of Information and Broadcasting is being obtained.

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MPP Mar_2013 Ad Name: Alok Tab-2, Pg No. 15


TOSHIBA

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NEWS, VIEWS & ANALYSIS

Rollepaal Engineering India to double its capacity at Ahmedabad facility Rollepaal Engineering India Pvt Ltd, a wholly owned subsidiary of Rollepaal BV, Netherlands, is on an expansion drive. Rajesh Sonar, General Manager (Sales), Rollepaal Engineering India Pvt Ltd, said, “The company is going to double its capacity by November 2013. This capacity expansion will be seen in terms of the number of machines produced and the space of the facility.” Further, recently, the Rollepaal Group celebrated its 50 th anniversary at the Dedemsvaart, Netherlands facility along with their customers, agents, relations and suppliers worldwide. The 5-day event attracted nearly 600 people, of which 170 representatives were from the PVC and PO pipe industry. On the third day, Rollepaal even invited their agents who make up their global sales network. Interesting presentations were done to update the team on latest offerings and upcoming new developments. On the fourth day, a seminar with presentations was conducted on raw material and ancillary equipment. Further, the last two days were dedicated for an Open House, where participants were able to witness Rollepaal’s latest technology on bi-axially oriented PVC and multi-layer pipes. Avani Jain

Luxus targets India’s auto market with new venture Technical plastics recycler and compounder Luxus has formed a partnership with global polymer distributor KPL International with the aim of building its presence in the Indian automotive market. The UK company has been developing sustainable thermoplastic materials for the interior trim market for more than a decade, building a portfolio of polymers with the level of scratch resistance needed by the auto industry. Alex Clarke, Business Improvement Manager, Luxus, said, “Increasingly, we have been asked by our European clients if we have an Indian presence, so this partnership will no doubt enable us to maintain our leadership in the interior trim and other markets.” Rohit Chopra, Polymers Manager, KPL International, added, “We are pleased to announce our partnership with Luxus. Its proven technical capabilities and strong eco credentials position it to strongly outperform the market on both quality and cost.” 28

Modern Plastics & Polymers | March 2013

LANXESS looks forward to India’s automotive and tyre industries LANXESS recently hosted ‘Rubber Day’ in Mumbai. This is the second time in India that the company organised such a high-level symposium around the theme of ‘High-tech Mobility and Emerging Trends’. The country’s experts in rubber production came together to discuss India’s growing rubber industry and its contribution to the nation’s burgeoning transportation sector. The event saw the involvement of distinguished speakers, panellists and about 300 attendees from the rubber and automotive industries, academia and government. Some of the prominent speakers were M F Farooqui, Secretary, Department of Heavy Industry, Ministry of Heavy Industries and Public Enterprises,

Government of India; Dr Rainier van Roessel, Member of the Board of Management, LANXESS AG and Sudhir Rao, Managing Director, Skoda Auto India. Dr Joerg Strassburger, Managing Director and Country Representative, LANXESS India, remarked, “India is clearly emerging as a global automotive hub. All international car manufacturers have a market in India. This growth will usher in new needs, new opportunities and new challenges. We will need to develop technology-driven solutions for a more sustainable future.” The panel discussions included topics such as ‘The Future of Mobility in India’, ‘Innovation in Rubber for a Greener Tomorrow’, ‘Technological Trends in Automotive Rubber Components’ and ‘Driving Growth and Delivering Safety’.

DSM reduces water footprint at engineering plastics site in Pune As a global life sciences & materials sciences company, DSM continues to support its customers’ drive to achieve increasingly ambitious sustainability targets. The company also continues to set important benchmarks in lowering its own environmental footprint. In 2012, DSM dramatically reduced the level of water consumption at its engineering plastics compounding site in Pune, India. The water footprint of the operation, where the company produces compounds of thermoplastic polyesters and polyamides, has been slashed by two-thirds, thanks to increased process water recycling and strict monitoring of potential water leakages. DSM’s Pune site, operational since 1998, already has a strong track record of highly efficient water management. It was one of the first DSM sites to completely eliminate waste water from its production process. Since 2010, all water used on the site has been treated, checked and reused for gardening purposes. These latest improvements in Pune are a

reflection of DSM’s ongoing efforts to reduce environmental footprint, both within its own operations and along its value chains. In addition to reducing the environmental footprint of its operations by reducing energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions, it is driving sustainability via the plastics it produces and in the applications they are used for. Fredric Petit, Sustainability Director – Engineering Plastics, DSM, said, “The company focusses its Bright Science on a number of key aspects of products and innovative developments in the use of feedstocks derived from renewable resources and more eco-efficient application solutions. DSM also offers alternatives for materials with hazardous concerns and searches for materials with recycle content that can be recycled end of life.”


NEWS, VIEWS & ANALYSIS

SABIC to launch new technology and innovation centres in Bengaluru and Shanghai SABIC has unveiled plans to launch four new technology and innovation facilities in 2013 – two in India and China. The new centres in Bengaluru and Shanghai will host about 500 professionals. Two other new centres will be based in Saudi Arabia itself and will take the number of the company’s research facilities across the world to 18. The four new centres represent a strategic investment of about half a billion US dollars. Mohamed Al-Mady, SABIC Vice Chairman & CEO, said, “These four new facilities will empower our global technology and innovation centres to build on their innovative systems to develop new technologies, improve manufacturing processes and contribute to a sustainable environment for our communities.” The Bengaluru research centre is scheduled to open in the second quarter of 2013. It will deal with application development, strategic business research and corporate research and will focus primarily on diverse areas of research in chemistry, material science, process engineering, analytical and application technology. Its aim is to support business as a strategic centre of excellence to cater to global and regional needs. The centre in Shanghai will open in the third quarter of 2013.

Plastindia Foundation to offer global investment opportunities Plastindia Foundation is organising the Indian visit of a leading European delegation on March 4, 2013. This delegation, called WINNTECH, has a cluster strength of 2500 members in 8 clusters that will be exploring joint venture partners in India for investment opportunities. Some of the main objectives of the delegation will include identification of reliable partners for information gathering & distribution, initiation of joint activities, business collaborations, trade opportunities, inward investment, joint research and development projects. The offer for co-operation includes new developments in renewable energies & biomaterials, technology transfer, professional channelling of request from Indian partners and entry of cooperation requests into the databases of the European clusters. During its visit, the delegation would focus on market areas such as green transport, waste management/recycling, water/air treatment, high efficiency building and renewable energies. Significant amount of focus would also be put in technology that is used in polymers/plastics, manufacturing processes and downstream tooling. 30

Modern Plastics & Polymers | March 2013

Smart innovates the smallest fully automatic extrusion blow moulding machine in the world Smart Machinery & Moulds Pvt Ltd has launched the smallest extrusion blow moulding machine in the world. According to the company, “Maximum utilisation of floor space was the key force driving the need to develop c o m p a c t extrusion blow moulding machines. Customers can gain higher productivity from the same floor space available with them – smaller footprint, faster cycles result in higher output.” Smart extrusion blow moulding machines have smallest floor space used in the industry and are custom built to be suitable

Technip awarded important contract by JBF Petrochemicals Ltd for world-scale PTA plant in India Technip was awarded by JBF Petrochemicals, a wholly owned subsidiary of JBF Industries Ltd, an important contract for a 1.25 million tonne per year latestgeneration Purified Terephthalic Acid (PTA) unit to be located in the special economic zone in Mangalore, India. PTA is the primary feedstock for polyesters used in textiles and packaging. The contract covers the basic engineering, front-end engineering design, detailed engineering and procurement services for the Inside Battery Limit (ISBL) and the Outside Battery Limit (OSBL) of the unit. The scope of work also includes supply of materials and construction management

for various applications. Products covered are used for packaging of cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, medicals, pesticides, lubricants, automotive and much more. The smallest blow moulding machine has capacity from 5 ml to 2 litre and can be operated from very small space. The fully automatic machine also helps reduce manpower. S m a r t machines are compact, fast and energy efficient as compared to the complex large siz e machines. The main features of Smart blow moulding machines are single or double station, microprocessor controls, helical gear box, larger mould area, superior mixing screws, AC drive, fast dry cycle, energy efficiency and user friendliness. services for the ISBL. The plant will feature BP’s leading-edge proprietary PTA technology. Technip has operating centres in Rome, Italy, and in Chennai, Mumbai and Delhi, India. It will execute the contract, which is scheduled to be completed in the first semester of 2015. Marco Villa, Senior Vice President, Technip Region B, commented, “We are very proud to have been selected for this worldscale PTA project. It will bring together the competencies of our operating centres in India and Italy. This contract also reinforces our strong long-lasting collaboration with BP for PTA. We believe that the PTA market growth in Asia will open up further opportunities, and we hope to develop a longterm relationship with JBF to support their future developments.”


NEWS, VIEWS & ANALYSIS

William J Murray becomes President of Teknor Apex

William J Murray Teknor Apex, an international polymer technology company and one of the world’s leading custom compounders of plastics, has appointed William J Murray as its new President. He holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics from the University of Rhode Island and an MBA from Bryant University. He succeeds Jonathan D Fain, who is the present CEO and now the Chairman of the board. Murray will be responsible for the company’s worldwide compounding businesses. Teknor Apex operates twelve manufacturing facilities in the US, Europe and Asia. He has also been appointed President of Singapore-based Teknor Apex Asia Pacific. Talking about his new role, Murray said, “As

President of Teknor Apex, I am responsible for directing our global compounding businesses for PVC, nylon and TPEs. This includes oversight of supply chains, technical development and manufacturing at our facilities around the world. In addition to ensuring that Teknor Apex continues to supply quality products with a high level of service to our existing customers, I will focus closely on further developing our business in highgrowth countries like India and China. Our technical expertise and manufacturing capabilities on three continents make us well positioned to provide responsive, reliable service to customers no matter where they operate their plants.” Prior to this new role, Murray served as Executive Vice President since 2006. Murray joined the company as Project Engineer in 1978. Subsequent positions included those of Plant Engineer, Plant Manager and Corporate Director of Engineering. He was promoted to Vice President of Manufacturing in 1992 and to Senior Vice President of Manufacturing in 2002. At this time, he also became a member of the company’s Senior Management Team. Sweta M Nair

Solvay reshapes operating structure Solvay has announced a new business structure that reflects the Brussels-based group’s integration of Rhodia, the French materials group it acquired in 2011. Rhodia’s polyamides business has been placed into an operating segment called Functional Polymers along with Solvay’s chlorovinyls business. This segment mainly supplies to the construction & infrastructure, automotive and electrical/ electronics industries. Specialty polymers – fluoropolymers, fluoroelastomers, 32

Modern Plastics & Polymers | March 2013

Acquisition unites plastics industry leaders Milacron and Mold-Masters Milacron LLC and Mold-Masters have announced that they are combining to form a leading global solutions provider positioned to serve the full range of customer needs. Milacron is backed by its private equity investor CCMP Capital Advisors. The transformative transaction will create a rapidly growing company with world-class capabilities across five businesses: Milacron (Plastics Machinery), MoldMasters (Hot Runners), DME (Mold Base Technologies), Aftermarket (Parts and Service) and CIMCOOL® Fluid Technology (Metalworking Fluids and Services). The combined entity will provide its customers with market-leading technologies, superb global engineering and R&D leadership. Through their complementary product lines, Milacron and Mold-Masters will be able to offer a broader portfolio of exceptional products and services, providing solutions for customers’ complex plastics needs. In addition, with enhanced financial and operational strength, reduced cyclicality and a diverse international footprint with a strong market position in hot runners in Asia, the combined company will have greater opportunities for global expansion. Under the terms of the transaction, Milacron will acquire 100 per cent of the shares of Mold-Masters for an enterprise value of $ 975 million. Tom Goeke, Chief Executive Officer of Milacron will lead the combined entity and Bill Barker, President and CEO of Mold-Masters will continue to lead that business. Goeke said, “The acquisition creates a global leader in the plastics industry with the scale, technological leadership, international presence and competitive positioning to deliver a wide range of products and services to more customers in more markets around the world. Mold-Masters’ expertise in the high-growth hot-runner market is second to none, and we are excited by the unique customer value proposition and numerous opportunities for growth that will result from this combination.” The transaction, subject to customary closing conditions, is expected to close in the first half of 2013.

fluorinated fluids, semi-aromatic polyamides, sulfone polymers, aromatic ultra polymers, high-barrier polymers and cross-linkable high-performance compounds – are part of an operating segment called Advanced Materials, which also includes silica, rare earths and special chemicals. End markets for these materials are advanced transportation, healthcare, energy efficient tyres, automotive emission control, smart devices and hybrid vehicles batteries. The other operating segments are Consumer

Chemicals, Performance Chemicals and Corporate Business and Services. Jean-Pierre Clamadieu, CEO & Chairman – Executive Committee, Solway, said, “Through the mobilisation of our teams, we have managed to convert the two former companies into one of the ten largest chemical companies worldwide. Our new signature ‘Asking more from chemistry’ is more than a pledge; it is a vision and a challenge to which we are fully committed.”


MPP MAR _2013_TAB 3_BLEND PG_33


MPP MAR _2013_TAB 3_STREE 2 PG_34


NEWS, VIEWS & ANALYSIS

A unique world tour for the injection moulding industry Husky Injection Molding Systems has kicked off the Husky World Tour 2013. This is a new series of global customer events that will take place throughout the year in the Americas, Europe, the Middle East and Asia Pacific. A firstof-its-kind for the injection moulding industry, the world tour is stated to give current and prospective customers more direct access to Husky’s latest technologies at a local level. The tour will support Husky’s increasing focus on providing targeted solutions to help customers in its core markets reduce

Huntsman creates new position of VP & MD, Indian Subcontinent

Steve Stilliard

Huntsman Corporation announced the creation of the new position of Vice President and Managing Director, Indian Subcontinent, and the appointment of Steve Stilliard for this role. Prior to this position, he was previously the Vice President, Asia-Pacific, of Huntsman Corporation’s Performance Products Division. Commenting on the appointment, Peter R Huntsman, President and Chief Executive Officer, Huntsman Corporation, said, “This appointment recognises the need to accelerate our investment in people and physical assets to strengthen our longterm position in this exciting market, which already accounts for over $ 500 million of our sales and over 1,000 associates.” Huntsman added, “Steve Stilliard has an extensive experience of working and living in the region, a proven track record in building successful businesses in emerging

36

Modern Plastics & Polymers | March 2013

variability, improve part cost and increase productivity. “We are excited about the Husky World Tour 2013 because it will give us a number of ongoing opportunities to showcase our technologies directly to customers throughout the year, while creating a platform for richer, more focussed customer interactions,” said Jeff MacDonald, Vice President – Marketing, Husky. “In 2012, key industry tradeshows played an important role in helping launch our biggest products and will continue to play a role for us. Having a number of product launches in 2013, this new approach will allow us to markets and has a deep understanding of the Huntsman business and culture.” The new role was created to provide leadership for Huntsman’s rapidly expanding presence in the subcontinent. Based in Mumbai, Stilliard will report to Paul Hulme, President, Huntsman Textile Effects Division and the senior executive responsible for the Indian subcontinent. He will coordinate the corporate and cross-divisional activities required to deliver growth, including investments and partnerships, strengthening the company’s asset base, developing people capability and building relationships with governmental organisations and other key stakeholders. Sharing his thoughts about this new position, Stilliard said, “My role is to helm the Huntsman Organisation across the Indian subcontinent, with an objective to build capability for sustained further growth from the current base of $ 500 million revenue and approximately 1,000 employees. This will stretch across the human capital dimension in addition to asset development and brand positioning.” When talking about his priorities, he spoke about enhancing the effectiveness of teams by ensuring internal process improvements, investment in appropriate infrastructure and focussing on delivery of an enhanced experience to the company’s customers and business partners. Sweta M Nair

introduce our latest technologies as soon as they are ready,” he added. Husky kicked off the tour with a Beverage Packaging Day in Korea that was attended by more than 100 existing and prospective customers who learned about the latest trends and innovations in beverage and closure manufacturing from Husky and industry experts. This will be followed shortly by a Specialty Closures Day in Europe, a Beverage Packaging Day in Latin America and additional tour events throughout the year for customers in the beverage packaging, food packaging, closures, medical and hot runner markets.

Plenary speakers at SPE ANTEC® 2013 to focus on latest advances in polymers Plenary speeches by four industry leaders at the Society of Plastics Engineers (SPE) ANTEC® 2013 will address new technical and business developments with great potential for benefitting plastics. ANTEC® 2013 will take place on April 22–24, 2013, at the Duke Energy Convention Center in Cincinnati, Ohio, US. Plenary sessions will take place on each day of the conference. On day one, the conference will focus on topics such as ‘Fractal Structuring in Polymer Processing’ by Dr Han Meijer, Professor of polymer technology, Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, Netherlands, and ‘New Polymer Materials Developed in SINOPEC’ by Dr Jinliang Qiao, Vice President, SINOPEC Beijing Research Institute of the Chemical Industry. Day two will include one presentation by Dwight N Tozer, Vice President, Adhesion Industry Business, ExxonMobil Chemical Company, on ‘Abundant US Shale Gas Supplies are Revitalizing the Plastics Industry’. The last day will showcase a plenary speech by Gregory J Lampert, President and CEO, General Cable, on ‘Driving Innovation in the Wire and Cable Industry’.


IN CONVERSATION WITH: Shirish V Divgi

“MOST INNOVATIONS ARE TARGETED TOWARDS HIGHER PRODUCTIVITY, ENERGY SAVING AND LOW OPERATING COST” …opines Shirish V Divgi, Managing Director, Ferromatik Milacron India Pvt Ltd. In an exclusive interview with Avani Jain, he underlines that with the growth in demand in the application sectors such as automotive, packaging, construction, irrigation, medicine and consumer durables, the demand for plastics processing machinery will increase. What are the current demand trends and growth drivers for plastics processing machinery, especially injection moulding machinery in India? Current demand of injection moulding machines in the Indian market is about 5,000 machines. Further, the plastics processing industry will grow with the demand in the application sectors such as automotive, packaging, construction (electrical fittings, plumbing accessories 38

Modern Plastics & Polymers | March 2013

etc), irrigation, medicine and consumer durables. The machinery industry is expected to grow by 12 to 15 per cent every year. This domestic demand itself is a good growth driver. Indian machines are also well accepted in the Middle East, Africa and America. With this kind of demand, machinery manufacturers in India would be definitely encouraged regarding future growth. Further, in terms of technology trends, injection

moulding machinery manufacturers are adopting servo, two-platen and all-electric technology for higher productivity, precision, energy efficiency and minimal ownership costs.

What are the important advancements in technology in this segment in recent times? Servo-powered injection moulding machines – Replacement of


Shirish V Divgi

conventional power pack (induction motor + fixed/variable delivery pump) with servo motor gives about 40 per cent energy savings. Two-platen injection moulding machines – Provide great advantage in space saving at least up to 30 per cent, and being faster machines, the productivity is higher. They also consume less hydraulic oil and energy because of their unique design features. All-electric injection moulding machines - These machines are used not only for energy and noise reduction but also for reduction in cycle times because of the possibility of parallel operations. Being highly precise, these machines result in accurate part dimensions and weight consistency. Application-specific injection moulding machines - Specific applications such as thin-walled containers, polyethylene terephthalate preforms, chlorinated polyvinyl chloride fittings, multi-colour furniture and household articles are served by special application-specific models equipped with related necessary options and programs that provide total solutions to customers.

What are the latest innovations making headway globally in this sector, and how is Ferromatik Milacron India gearing up towards these? Most innovations are targeted towards higher productivity, energy saving and low operating cost. Some major developments are in all-electric, servo-driven and twoplaten machines. In fact, while we see saturation in terms of control technologies, innovations are primarily driven by the need of reduction in capital and operating cost. Keeping these points in mind, Ferromatik Milacron India offers servodriven injection moulding machines, global & high-end technology at local cost (two-platen machines & all-electric machines) and Nova Servo & Omega Servo machines which are cost-effective solutions.

What are your suggestions for the industry in terms of energy efficiency, and what steps have you taken in this regard? At the operational level, we need to employ possible steps to reduce energy such as using solar energy, daylight, water conservation etc. We also have to provide solutions to our customers through our products consuming optimum energy. Ferromatik Milacron India has been following this principle for many years not only in many operational areas but also through our products such as replacement of conventional power pack (induction motor + fixed/variable delivery pump) with servo motor, all-electric injection moulding machines up to 450 T, adopting linear motion guides for injection units to transfer maximum power during injection phase and control features and programs to save energy.

What is the cost–quality ratio of Indian injection moulding machinery as against global counterparts?

How do you deal with a tough situation? One should deal with a tough situation with patience and focus.

What are the future growth drivers of this segment? The major growth drivers for the plastics processing machinery segment are the growing automotive, packaging, drip irrigation and medical sectors. At present, the per capita consumption of plastics in India is 7 kg compared to the global average of 27 kg. Changing consumer behaviour and larger replacement from metal to plastics in various applications are also leading to an increase in demand for plastics processing machinery.

What are your growth plans for the company?

As such, there is no specific and standard cost–quality ratio followed in Indian injection moulding machinery. Quality and cost performances are measured in terms of uptime, productivity, quality & consistency of parts, lower rejections, low capital and operating cost. Strong aftermarket support and training modules help upgrade the operator skill levels as well as all the above parameters.

We want to reach our optimum manufacturing capacity of 2,000 injection moulding machines per annum. In addition, we want to indulge in developments in processing of new engineering plastics, provide solutions from machine selection to performance proving and focus on after-sales services. Further, we wish to participate in key national & international plastics industry exhibitions. We also aim to provide growth opportunities to all the stake holders, ie customers, employees, strategic partners and investors.

What are the challenges for the plastics processing machinery segment in India?

What are the five things that you check before signing a deal or getting into a partnership?

There are few challenges faced by the plastics industry in India. First, plastics waste collection and recycling is a major concern in India. Second, fluctuating raw material prices is an issue. Third, there is competition from global players, especially Chinese & Taiwanese manufacturers of low-cost machines. Last, availability of skilled labour is also a big challenge for the industry.

The five things are trust, confidence, integrity, past record with long-term strengths and people.

What was the toughest business decision ever made by you?

One should be passionate and take pride in whatever one does.

Indian machines built for global markets.

What is the business etiquette that you value the most? Respecting commitments is the most important.

Your message for aspiring professionals…

Email: avani.jain@network18publishing.com

March 2013 | Modern Plastics & Polymers

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SPOTLIGHT: Plastics @ Gujarat

Plastics @ Gujarat Envisioning a bright future: Gujarat leads the way! ..........................................................................................................................................42

Interface: Khushboo Doshi, Executive Director, Rajoo Engineers Ltd .......................................................................................44 Mahendra N Patel, Former President, Gujarat Chamber of Commerce & Industry and Chairman, Mamata Group ..........46 Rajesh K Pandya, Vice President - Operations, Parikh Packaging Pvt Ltd ...................................................................48 Rajiv Trivedi, Vice President (Marketing), Prasad Group & Chairman, Indian Plastics Institute - Ahmedabad Chapter .....50 V Ramesh, Chief Executive Officer, Negri Bossi SACMI Engineering (India) Pvt Ltd....................................................54

Roundtable: Will the rationalisation of duty for synthetic fibre help in lowering costs? .......................................................56

Processing prowess: Riding high on growth and profitability .............................................................................................................58

Manufacturing might: In pursuit of automation .......................................................................................................................................62

Infrastructure edge: Expanding the business horizon ..........................................................................................................................66

Trade policy: What Gujarat is ‘doing right’ yet ‘could do better’..............................................................................................72

Human resource development: Skill building for global competence....................................................................................................................76

March 2013 | Modern Plastics & Polymers

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PLASTICS @ GUJARAT: Envisioning a brightt future

GUJARAT LEADS THE WAY! Gujarat has constantly reinforced its position as the most industrially developed state in India – ranking first in industrial investment and second in value of production and value addition in the industrial sector. Over the years, Gujarat has diversified its industrial base substantially. Anwesh Koley delves into the prominent reasons for the monumental strides taken by the plastics industry in the state and the potential it holds for the future.

I

ndia is one of the top ranking countries when it comes to the availability of manpower, access to local & international markets and its strong fundamentals. It is also the second most favoured destination for Foreign Direct Investment (FDI), with FDI inflow growing at an average rate of 9 per cent at a time when the rest of the world is experiencing a dark recession. Currently the world’s 12th largest economy, India is already on the path to becoming the fifth largest consumer market in the world by 2025, with predictions that the total Indian consumer expenditure will be approximately $ 1.77 trillion. Rohan Shrikant Shahane, Regional Director – South East Asia, Machine Point Consultants SL, says, “Gujarat has probably played the most important role in the economic history of India and has the fastest growing 42

Modern Plastics & Polymers | March 2013

economy of all the states within India. In 2010, Forbes listed Ahmedabad as the third fastest growing city in the world. As the most industrialised state within the nation, and the largest producer of polymers, Gujarat will be at the forefront of all the fast-paced developments.”

Exclusively Gujarat The unique challenge associated with business development in Gujarat is bridging the gap between the way that Indians conduct business and the way that Europeans do, as the majority of the machines procured are from European sellers. Various added value solution providers in the state are adept in intermediating between two culturally different parties and can ensure that the different cultural issues that constantly arise do not affect the negotiations. “Gujarat – the industrial

hub of the country – has managed to get companies from fast moving consumer goods, consumer electronics, electrical equipment and minerals through investment facilities of over 1,600 acre in the industrial estate of Sanand. Companies such as Colgate Palmolive, Hitachi, TBEA, Corning, Allied Minerals and Bosch are together expected to invest in excess of ` 3,000 crore in the state,” mentions Shahane. The economic boom in India has given momentum to such sectors as packaging, agriculture, infrastructure and healthcare – all of which use polymers, and therefore rely on the plastics industry. This will result in a great demand for plastics processing machinery and ancillary equipment, consequently creating a huge opportunity for business development in the plastics industry. This is the primary reason why several


Envisioning a bright future

foreign players are keen on investing in the Indian market. Furthermore, a lot of joint ventures are expected to take place in the Indian plastics processing sector. Gujarat, with its favourable location and infrastructure, is expected to garner maximum business from the above mentioned prospects. All of these investments and projects will require plastic packaging in various forms, and the quantum of packaging required today is only going to rise with the times to come. “This will open new avenues, and Japanese and American companies coming to Gujarat will bring in more innovative ways of packaging and means to learn from for the plastic packaging sector,” opines Shahane. These units will also enable the tier 1 and tier 2 sub-contracted manufacturers to generate more employment for people and hence to generate more revenue for an individual and the state. The plastics industry in Gujarat is one of the oldest in India and among the earliest initiatives towards manufacturing of polymer raw material. Majority of India’s plastics business revolves around the packaging industry. As Gujarat contributes 65–70 per cent to the country’s plastics production, it is home to many packaging industries in the small and medium segment. The $ 3,513 million worth plastics industry in Gujarat contributes about 2.17 per cent of India’s total exports.

Gujarat is the largest producer of polymers with a $ 3,513 million worth plastics industry and contributes 65–70 per cent to the country’s plastics production.

Aiding the cause of the environment Gujarat recycles about a fourth of the plastic waste of the country, thus topping the list of the environment-friendly states on this front. “About 20 lakh tonne of plastics is recycled every year in India, with Gujarat recycling about five lakh tonne of this alone. From this, it can be gauged that Gujarat is ahead not only when it comes to recycling plastic waste but also when it comes to producing and using plastics, as we know that there is an impressive growth of 20 per cent year on year in the recycling of plastics,” opines Shahane. Considering the need for more plastics throughout the country, the industry is working on making plastics a green product. Because plastics has become integral to all major industrial activities, it is important to know its proper usage. Considering the growing needs and the concern for the environment, the All India Plastic Manufacturers’ Association conducts regular discussions with key industry players to create and sustain awareness about the growing need to ensure eco-friendly plastics production. Gujarat hosts refineries such as RIL, Essar and IOC, chemicals and liquefied natural gas terminals at Dahej & Hazira and chlor alkali plants such as Tata Chemicals, Indian Rayon, Atul, UPL, Shriram, GACL and IPCL (RIL). In addition, there are soda ash plants of Nirma, Gujarat Heavy Chemicals, Saurashtra Chemicals, Dhrangadhra Chemicals and chemical fertiliser plants of IFFCO, GSFC, GNFC etc. “In spite of being called the hub of the chemical and petrochemical industry, the Government of Gujarat has constituted the Gujarat Pollution Control Board with a view to protect the environment and to prevent and control the pollution of air and water in the state,” says Shahane.

Towards a brighter future The consumption of plastics is expected to increase three-fold from 2011 to 2016. Commodity plastics is expected to have the largest market share with 88 per cent, with polyolefins restricted to 61 per cent. The extrusion-based processes account for

Gujarat has probably played the most important role in the economic history of India and has the fastest growing economy of all the states within India. In 2010, Forbes listed Ahmedabad as the third fastest growing city in the world. Rohan Shrikant Shahane Regional Director – South East Asia, Machine Point Consultants SL

62 per cent of the total plastics produced, followed by injection-moulded products which account for 27 per cent. To meet the future growth potentials of the plastics industry in Gujarat, the local processing segment needs to bring in new technologies and scale up production capacities. This could be achieved by testing European technologies with higher outputs and better processing qualities to match expectations of the newly formed European and American partners at very subsidised rates. Major international companies from various segments of the industry including automobiles, electronics, communication, food processing and packaging have set up large manufacturing plants in the state and have helped develop the market. “The per capita consumption of plastics in India is only 6 kg as against 30 kg in China and 80 kg in developed economies. Gujarat’s per capita consumption of plastics is 8 kg. With growing per capita income and a favourable demographic profile, the demand for plastics in India and in Gujarat is expected to show strong growth,” avers Shahane. Email: anwesh.koley@network18publishing.com

March 2013 | Modern Plastics & Polymers

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PLASTICS @ GUJARAT: Inter face — Khushboo Doshi

“The state has a very business-friendly and stable political & bureaucratic environment” …opines Khushboo Doshi, Executive Director, Rajoo Engineers Ltd. In an exclusive conversation with Avani Jain, she talks about the growing plastics processing machinery sector in the state. How does Gujarat’s plastics processing industry meet global quality standards? Both machiner y manufacturers and processors employ world-class technologies. Availability of skilled and educated manpower further enhances quality standards. Most importantly, to compete on the global platform, companies need to improve quality constantly. This ensures that the industry conforms to global quality standards.

What are the industry efforts towards research and development (R&D) in the machinery sector?

What are the advantages of Gujarat as a hub for the plastics processing industry? Polymer manufacturing facilities have a very long existence in Gujarat, thus making the state the logical choice for the birth of machinery manufacturers and downstream processors. In addition, the entrepreneurship skills inherent in the Gujarati community give a further fillip to the plastics processing industry. Further, there are many other advantages of Gujarat as a hub for the plastics processing industry. First, it is the most preferred location for industrial investment and is endowed with rich natural resources. Second, the state has a very business-friendly and stable political & bureaucratic environment. Third, there is good availability of skilled and educated manpower in the state. Fourth, the state has one of the best infrastructure in the country. Last, existence of the automotive sector in the state also brightens the prospects of the plastics processing industry. 44

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The industry’s efforts towards R&D have been mostly limited to adaptation of technologies for the domestic market. However, this is fast changing with availability of qualified engineers and the desire to innovate. The industry is constantly moving forward to make machines more energy efficient as electricity is the second highest cost in plastics processing. Further, in the times to come, many foreign players will find it more economical and effective to conduct R&D operations in India.

What are the export opportunities for plastics processing machinery manufacturers in Gujarat? Plastics machinery manufacturers in Gujarat have been at the forefront of exports. The plastics machinery manufacturers offer world-class machinery at affordable prices with efficient utilisation of scarce capital. Further, existence of Gujarati diaspora overseas has surely helped in this effort. Thus, opportunities have been exploited in both developing and developed markets. However, markets

in countries of Latin America and the Commonwealth of Independent States are yet to be exploited. In addition, growth in traditional markets of Africa and Middle East is needed.

What are the challenges before Gujarat’s plastics industry? The biggest challenge for Gujarat’s plastics processing industry is to become competitive with processors in other parts of the country because polymer-producing facilities have now been created even in the North and East of India. The issue of freight disadvantage will have to be handled as soon as possible. Further, the processors will have to use more energyefficient technologies and equipment in order to compete in the market. In addition, cost of skilled manpower is on the rise as the cities in Gujarat are becoming more expensive to live, and this would directly increase the cost for the companies.

What are your suggestions to further boost the state’s plastics industry? A number of steps can be taken to boost the state’s plastics processing industry such as skill development programmes for the plastics industry to address the shortage of manpower, development of industrial clusters and supply chains for critical inputs, providing incentives to set up plastics processing and plastics machinery facilities in the state, providing a technology upgradation fund (similar to the textiles industry) for both plastics processors and machinery manufacturers and continuous & quality power should be made available at all times. Email: avani.jain@network18publishing.com


PLASTICS @ GUJARAT: Inter face — Mahendra N Patel

“Easy availability of raw materials is drawing many industries to set up their plants in the state” …opines Mahendra N Patel, Former President, Gujarat Chamber of Commerce & Industry and Chairman, Mamata Group. In an exclusive conversation with Avani Jain, he talks about the industrial development in the state and the challenges faced by the plastics processing industry. How do you assess the industrial development in Gujarat? The industrial development in Gujarat is happening at a very fast pace. The plastics processing segment is also growing continuously, as these days, we are getting an increasing number of orders for our machines from the companies in the state. Further, big automotive factories are coming up in Sanand, which means there would be more demand for plastics and hence the plastics processing machinery. Large projects are also coming up in the northern part of the state. Further, south Gujarat is being developed as a plastics processing hub. Many industries in the plastics segment are also coming up in and around Dahej as polymer plants are being set up in that area. Easy availability of raw materials is drawing many industries to set up their plants in the state. In addition, industries are attracted because of the availability of power and job opportunities. Furthermore, Rajkot is developing as a plastics processing hub. Due to the presence of special economic zones near Kandla and Mundra, the industries are also growing in these regions. Therefore, the outlook for industrial development in Gujarat is very good.

What are the advantages of Gujarat as a hub for the plastics processing industry? There is easy availability of raw materials in the state. The state has the maximum share in the total polymer production in India. Because the polymer production facilities are in Gujarat, it is obvious that the plastics processing segment will flourish. Transportation is becoming expensive, so every industry wants to be closer to its raw material supplier. Major companies in the plastics segment are 46

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etc available, ie a limited range of specialty plastics can be seen in the market. Another big challenge is high energy costs. In plastics processing, there are only two major costs for the manufacturer, ie raw material and energy costs. These two form 80 per cent of the cost for the manufacturer. Although there is good quality & continuous supply of energy and no power cuts to disrupt processing, the basic energy price is very high in Gujarat. There are public private partnerships to solve the issue of continuous power supply, but the model itself is complicated.

What are your suggestions to further boost the state’s plastics industry?

setting up their plants near Dahej because companies like ONGC are planning to set up their polymer production plant in that region.

What are the challenges before Gujarat’s plastics industry? The major challenge for the plastics industry in the state is polymer pricing. The prices continue to rise due to a number of factors. These prices are determined by the international markets and monopolistic prices prevailing in the domestic markets. Sometimes, government policies are also not favourable or discouraging - making imports costly is one such step by the government. Thus, raw material is not available at competitive prices most of the times. Further, if it is available, then a very limited range is available. Only generic materials are seen, and there are no special compounds, masterbatches

One cannot control the raw material prices, but if the energy prices are reduced, then it will definitely impact the growth of the industry. Further, land acquisition in the state for industrial purpose is a very complicated and costly affair. Land availability is also limited. Thus, if the government eases the policies related to land acquisition, then it will definitely help the industry to grow.

How has Gujarat performed as an investment destination? All the big companies in the various industrial segments, including the plastics processing segment, are setting up their plants in Gujarat. Further, major automotive companies have their plants in the state, thus providing a boost to the plastics processing industry. Thus, in the future, more investments will be seen in the plastics segment as there will be more demand for plastics in infrastructure products such as drainage pipes and electrical fittings. The demand for plastics in packaging would also increase. Email: avani.jain@network18publishing.com


PLASTICS @ GUJARAT: Inter face — Rajesh K Pandya

“There is excellent government support to industries in the state” …opines Rajesh K Pandya, Vice President – Operations, Parikh Packaging Pvt Ltd. In an exclusive conversation with Avani Jain, he talks about the benefits offered by the state for promoting industrial sectors, especially the plastics segment. What are the advantages of Gujarat as a hub for the plastics industry? A number of factors have provided a boost to Gujarat’s plastics industry. First, the state enjoys uninterrupted power supply, thus plastics processing is carried out without any interruptions. Second, for the growth of plastics processing industries, raw material availability (ie polymers) is very important; thus, the state houses major polymer plants such as Reliance. Third, the state has a good infrastructural setup. The state is well connected through roads, airports, seaports and railways, thus providing excellent logistics support to the industry. Because of the three inland ports within the state, import of raw material is easy and fast. In addition, for providing support to small, medium and large scale industries, there are inland container depots (such as Sabarmati – Ahmedabad) within the state, thus making way for easy clearing of goods locally. Fourth, there are excellent facilities available within the GIDCs across the state. Fifth, there is excellent government support to industries in the state, and the administration is strong and stable, which is also necessary for industrial development. Sixth, there is lot of skilled manpower available in the state. There are technical institutes, such as the Indian Institute of Management (IIM), Ahmedabad Management Association (AMA), Central Institute of Plastics Engineering & Technology (CIPET), Indian Plastics Institute (IPI), Gujarat Industrial Research & Development Agency (GIRDA), Entrepreneurship Development Institute (EDI) and so 48

Modern Plastics & Polymers | March 2013

forth, to provide skilled manpower to the industry. There are also a fleet of other global level institutions to provide support to the industry. These degree, diploma and industrial training and management institutes deliver continuously highly skilled and knowledgeable manpower to all the industries. There is Industrial Extension Bureau (iNDEXTb), a Government of Gujarat organisation to support industries and promote small and medium enterprises in the state. Seventh, the businessmen from Gujarat are very dedicated towards their business. This backed by their inherent entrepreneurial skills further strengthens the industry in the state. Last, but not the least, there are many industrial banks in the state to provide quick funds to the plastics industry.

How can one further boost the state’s plastics packaging industry? At present, the industry in Gujarat does not face any challenge because the power supply and infrastructure are good at all levels. Although there is good support from the government and financial

institutes to the industries (including small & medium enterprises and large corporations), there is need for strategies to further aid in the growth of the industry. Thus, a number of steps can be taken to further provide a boost to the plastics packaging industry in the state. New polymer processing plants should be set up in the state. Further, new special economic zones should be built so as to promote global exports from the state. Gujarat has vast knowledge about plastics manufacturing, processing and technology, while its entrepreneurs possess good business skills. Thus, increase of exports would definitely benefit the industry. In the future, industries dealing in plastics processing machinery and the packaging segment will see major export opportunities. The state already has a major share in the above segment and this will only increase in the future.

How is Gujarat unique as an investment destination? Gujarat is unique as it has an administration that is known globally for its support initiatives to the various industries in the state. In addition, the surplus electricity in the state is a unique selling point. Furthermore, the sharp business sense and the entrepreneurship abilities of the Gujarati community are globally acknowledged. There is no unnecessary interruption by unions. Moreover, the stable government is attracting the world to increasingly invest in Gujarat. Finally, several infrastructural projects in the pipeline will also directly impact the growth of industries in the state. Overall, Gujarat is seen as one of the best destinations for investment in India at the moment. Email: avani.jain@network18publishing.com


PLASTICS @ GUJARAT: Inter face — Rajiv Trivedi

“Amazing growth in the automotive sector is driving the growth of the plastics industry in Gujarat” …opines Rajiv Trivedi, Vice President (Marketing), Prasad Group & Chairman, Indian Plastics Institute – Ahmedabad Chapter. In an exclusive conversation with Avani Jain, he talks about the growing plastics sector in the state and the need for industry–academia collaboration. How do you assess the industrial development in Gujarat? The state of Gujarat has served as a good platform to interact and conduct business. There are ample opportunities for the industrial development in the state due to factors such as political stability and a dynamic, efficient & result-oriented government. Further, Gujarat enjoys uninterrupted power supply as compared to other states of India. The state also has a private port that leads to easy connectivity with the entire world. Above all, one of the most important facts about Gujarat is that it has the highest gross domestic product growth rate compared to other states of India. Due to these reasons, industrialists across the country and overseas are prompted to make huge investments in the state.

What are the advantages of Gujarat as a hub for the plastics processing industry? There are a number of advantages. First, major machinery, ancillary equipment and raw material suppliers have production facilities in Gujarat. Second, the Gujarat government shows keen interest in attracting industries (outside the state) from all the segments, including the plastics industry to set up their plants in the state. Third, the labour problems are less as compared to other states. Because the state has lenient policies, it is able to attract manpower from the other states of India.

What are the demand drivers for Gujarat’s plastics industry? Amazing growth in the automotive sector is driving the growth of the plastics industry in Gujarat. Major four-wheeler/ car manufacturers have established or are planning to set up their plants near the commercial capital of the state 50

Modern Plastics & Polymers | March 2013

industry should be appointed to the core team of institutes to decide the syllabus.

What is the importance of institutes like Indian Plastics Institute (IPI) in promoting industry–academia collaboration? IPI organises technical seminars on various subjects at a regular interval and invites experts from the industry for the presentation. It also arranges industrial visits for students. It acts as an adviser to various institutes related to plastics. In this way, it helps promote industry– academia collaboration in the state.

– Ahmedabad. Major cement plants and fertiliser producers in Gujarat are expanding production capacity at a faster rate. This is creating a good demand for raffia bags, carry bags etc. Further, the pharmaceutical sector is growing at a fast pace in the state. All this is leading to increasing demand for plastics.

How can industry–academia collaboration in the state boost technical skill development and talent building? To have good quality of entrepreneurs/ professionals in the industry, the role of academic institutes is very important. However, these days, institutes only provide theoretical knowledge and the syllabus does not include information about the latest technologies. Thus, regular interaction between industry and academia to boost technical skills and talent building is needed. There should be some focussed practical training programme provided by the industry, and the institutes should make it part of the syllabus. Institutes should also regularly update the syllabus to include latest developments. Experts from the

What are the challenges before Gujarat’s plastics industry? A few challenges faced by the industry are inadequate infrastructure in some parts, sudden fall or rise in raw material prices – a major set back to processors in the state where major units are under the small scale industry category, lack of global brand image and scarcity of manpower in manufacturing facilities – manpower turn to service sectors. Moreover, the plastics industry in the state needs to fight against the anti-plastics lobby by creating awareness and emphasising on recycling.

How can the state further boost the plastics industry? Several steps can be adopted by the state. First, a special plastics park should be created to promote significant business opportunity. Second, value-added quality products need to be introduced to compete with the Chinese market. Third, spread awareness about solid waste management systems to deal with plastic disposal. Last, promote plastics industries by providing benefits in tax structure as provided by other states. Email: avani.jain@network18publishing.com


MPP NAR _2013_TAB 4_EVEREST PG_51


MPP MAR _2013_TAB 4_MATSUI PG_51


PLASTICS @ GUJARAT: Inter face — V Ramesh

“Developing clusters will definitely help the industry to grow” …opines V Ramesh, Chief Executive Officer, Negri Bossi SACMI Engineering (India) Pvt Ltd. In an exclusive conversation with Avani Jain, he talks about the opportunities for growth of the plastics processing machinery sector in the state. What are the advantages of Gujarat as a hub for the plastics processing machinery industry? Gujarat, the largest polymer producing state, is known for the plastics processing machinery industry due to the presence of many leading manufacturers in the state for decades. Further, because of the presence of good basic infrastructure, the industry has grown a lot and will continue to do so in the future as well. Moreover, the basic raw materials like casting, machining and other support for machine building is readily available in the state. As the plastics processing machinery industry is also dependent on uninterrupted power supply, Gujarat has a clear advantage in being a plastics processing hub. Support from the proactive government has also helped in the industry’s growth.

What are the demand drivers for Gujarat’s plastics industry? The per capita consumption of plastics, as compared to the developed countries, is very low in India at present. Hence, there are huge opportunities for the plastics machinery manufacturers in the state. Further, the announcement of new automotive plants in Gujarat, increasing awareness about the healthcare industry, focus on infrastructural development and advancement in packaging technology due to the increasing trend in packed foods will definitely increase plastics consumption and augment the growth of plastics machinery in the state.

What are the industry efforts toward Research & Development (R&D) in the segment? When it comes to R&D activities, the industry needs to take various steps to match the advancements made in the machinery sector so as to meet the growing demand. Further, at present, 54

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good as we have already proved in many sectors that we are capable of producing international standard machines at reasonable prices.

What are your suggestions to further boost the state’s plastics industry?

lack of power supply in many states, high energy costs, need to reduce carbon footprint are pushing manufacturers in the segment to develop energy-efficient machines with environment-friendly technology. Thus, collective efforts are needed for these new developments. Because our company is part of a European group, we are well aware about the latest technology. However, the real challenge is to bring this to India and make it economically viable for the Indian market, which is highly price sensitive.

What are the export opportunities for manufacturers in Gujarat? Many machinery manufacturers have started exporting, but still the exports are very low as compared to China. However, with export-friendly policies adopted by the government, there is good scope for increasing exports. In the future, it would be imperative to focus on the export market so as to compensate the price sensitivity prevailing in the local market. There is a huge opportunity for exports in countries such as Africa, Vietnam etc, where the plastics industry has just started to grow. Further, the possibility for exports in European countries is

As the plastics processing industry is highly capital sensitive, much support is needed from the government to further provide a boost to the industry. Also, developing clusters, ie common facilities with the aim of sharing resources, will definitely help the industry to grow. In addition, as this industry has the potential to create a lot of employment opportunities, the government must address the concerns of this industry on a priority basis. Further, the industry needs a lot of skilled & semi-skilled labour, and students from technical institutes are not fully equipped, so it is necessary for institutes and the government to focus on the curriculum relative to the need of the industry. Hence, industry–academia collaboration is needed to further provide a boost to the industry.

How is Gujarat unique as an investment destination? Gujarat is a growing state. Further, because of the stable government, investment-friendly policies, better infrastructure like roads & ports and dedicated industrial corridors, the state serves as an ideal investment destination. Also, since the main issue for the plastics processing industry in India is the availability of uninterrupted and quality power supply, Gujarat is a preferred destination as there are no long power cuts. In addition, the natural entrepreneurship ability of the Gujarati community and their global presence have and will surely drive many investments in Gujarat in the future. Email: avani.jain@network18publishing.com


PLASTICS @ GUJARAT: Roundtable

Will the

rationalisation of duty for

synthetic fibre help in lowering costs?

Synthetic means man-made. A synthetic fibre is a chain of small units joined together, where each unit is actually a chemical compound. In India, the basic custom duty on cotton fibre (natural fibre) is nil, whereas a basic duty of 10 per cent is levied on man-made fibres. Sweta M Nair seeks answers from industry players as to whether some kind of rationalisation in duties are to enter the scene. Rahul Mehta President, Clothing Manufacturers Association of India

In the Union Budget 2012–13, the rate of excise duty on polyester fibres & yarns and their raw materials Purified Terephthalic Acid (PTA) and Mono Ethylene Glycol (MEG) had been raised from 10 per cent to 12 per cent. Synthetic fibre, which is used to make synthetic fabric, is predominantly used by the common man. Levying high tax on synthetic fibre and not on natural fibre, which is ideally consumed by the rich, does not balance the scales. Moreover, nowhere in the world is there any tax bifurcation of natural and man-made fibre. This increase in the production cost at the initial stage of fibre and yarn itself has had far-reaching effects on the entire value chain. The excise duty should be rationalised for fibres along with their raw materials. In turn, this would benefit fibre manufacturers and downstream users, texturisers and weavers. By lowering cost, it will also help revive market sentiments and increase consumption of synthetic fabrics.

Abhijeet Agarwal Joint Managing Director, Shyam Texturisers Pvt Ltd

Excise is a duty payable to the Government of India on the value of the goods manufactured if your annual turnover exceeds ` 1.5 crore. In this tax levy, CENVAT scheme grants credit of duty paid on inputs, capital goods and input services used in/or in relation to the manufacture of final products. Under this scheme, the manufacturer gets credit of duty paid on inputs/capital goods and service tax on input services. To simplify this process, the government has been in talks to bring in Goods and Services Tax, which will unite all the taxes under one roof. This would lead to uniformity considering tax differs from one state to another. This should be brought in soon, and a lower duty slab should be introduced for the same. This will largely level the field between synthetic and natural fibres. Synthetic fibre by cost is cheap, and it has mass production possibility unlike natural fibre. Lower duty will surely widen its reach to more masses.

Amit Gugnani Senior Vice President, Fashion – Textile & Apparel, Technopak Advisors

Currently, there is a differential in duties between cotton textiles and synthetic textiles. Excise duty imposed on cotton textiles (6.2 per cent) is half of that imposed on synthetic textiles (12.4 per cent). With rationalisation of duty on synthetics, the garment industry will be able to procure synthetic fabrics at a lower cost, which will further drive costs down on apparel and retail – benefitting the end consumer. If custom duty differential is removed between cotton and synthetic fibres, the spinning industry will benefit in terms of options of importing manmade fibres and further by reduced domestic prices of synthetic fibres. Indian garment manufacturing has traditionally been more cotton centric, whereas globally, the demand of synthetic products has been on the rise. If the duties were to come down, then the overall manufacturing product basket of India can improve.

Editorial take: Email: sweta.nair@network18publishing.com Many are vying for a fibre-neutral policy for the synthetic fibre industry. Elimination of excise and customs duty on synthetic fibre will enhance the country’s competitive advantage in the international market. To accelerate the industrial growth, the industry is looking forward to the introduction of the Goods and Service Tax. This will help the polyester industry compete with cotton yarn, which attracts zero duty. 56

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PLASTICS @ GUJARAT: Processing prowess

RIDING HIGH ON GROWTH AND PROFITABILITY

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lastics mainly consists of different types of materials such as plastic granules, which are the main raw material used. Then there are pigments, which provide colour to the product and the additives that give the functional benefit to the consumer of the end product. All these go into making a plastic product; hence, their proper disposal becomes very important. Shamik Shah, VP – Sales & Marketing, Monachem Additives Pvt Ltd, says, “Gujarat has always dominated the growth for the plastics industry compared to other 58

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With an established network of India’s leading petrochemical players, Gujarat presents itself as the most profitable destination for polymer and masterbatch manufacturers and suppliers. Anwesh Koley looks into the reasons why the state has seen heavy investments and technological advancements over the years in this field.

states of India because of various reasons. The most important reason being the states’ economy, which has shown a gross domestic product growth rate 2 per cent higher than the Indian economy. This is one of the reasons the plastics industry in Gujarat has also shown higher growth compared to other states in India.”

better final products and are in tune with environmental concerns. This has positively affected the number of exporters, manufacturers and suppliers of plastic and plastic moulding products in India. Manufacturers of plastic raw materials such as masterbatches, plastic resins and plastic compounds are taking up extensive Research and Development (R&D) activities to ensure international quality for their customers. Like any other raw material used in the production of plastics, the masterbatch industry forms an integral part of the polymer industry and both are directly linked. Over the years, it has been seen that the masterbatch market has grown and so has the number of players. This growth has helped existing players to expand and new manufacturers to establish themselves. “Gujarat, on its part, has complemented growth avenues substantially as 62 per cent of the total polymer production of the country is in Gujarat. The entrepreneurial nature of Gujaratis has also played an important role in new plastics industries coming up,” avers Shah. Because of these reasons, Gujarat can be called as one of the top-most industrial hubs for the plastics industry in India. In the future, with many new investments coming into Gujarat, the forecast is Gujarat will be one of the top-most industrial plastic hubs globally.

Aiming high Global demand for plastic has not only seen a change of usage but also facilitated to develop technology that

products in terms the need produces

A fitting business destination Due to the conducive business environment in Gujarat compared to other states, the overall industrial growth


Processing prowess

Gujarat, on its part, has complemented growth avenues substantially as 62 per cent of the total polymer production of the country is in Gujarat. The entrepreneurial nature of Gujaratis has also played an important role in new plastics industries coming up. Shamik Shah VP – Sales & Marketing, Monachem Additives Pvt Ltd

Since the last two years, ecofriendly plastic products have shown a rise in demand of 85–90 per cent, and Gujarat has been a leading supplier. R&D in the field of plastics is constantly going on, and manufacturers are looking for biodegradable and ecofriendly plastics. Parag Parikh Partner, Universal Colorant Company

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in Gujarat is higher compared to any other state of India. In addition, there are several other factors such as new plastics processing units coming into Gujarat due to its vision of becoming an automotive hub. The global masterbatch market is forecast to reach $ 8.25 billion by the year 2017. “Technology developments that help impart desired colour and property to the polymer and simultaneously reduce its cost are aiding in stimulating the market’s growth in the medium to long-term period, given the evolving demand among end-user industries for high performance and functional products, according to Global Industry Analysts. These advancements in technology and costeffectiveness are already percolating into the Indian market, coupled with increased awareness and quality standards,” says Parag Parikh, Partner, Universal Colorant Company.

R&D initiatives The polymer industry in the state has a unique blend of quality and consistency. “Manufacturers and suppliers offer innovative solutions to the plastics industry for improving performance and reducing costs. Various research and application development centres currently work on a lot of new solutions that improve final product quality and reduce costs,” adds Shah. Various other innovative solutions that the polymer industry in the state have witnessed are weight reduction in plastic parts for the automotive sector, improvement of nucleation properties of polypropylene & nylon and improving barrier properties of plastic films. Apart from standard innovations, additive companies have been successful in achieving reduction in loading levels of flame retardants for highly filled halogen-free flame retardant compounds for the wire & cable industry and have substantially improved the mechanical properties such as tensile strength, elongation & impact for polyolefins and engineering plastics,” says Shah. The key considerations for polymer manufacturers that have shown positive results are

reduction in costs at all levels and improvement in performance.

Growing awareness among consumers People are now aware of hazardous chemicals. The plastics industry is hence using products that are free of lead and benzene and are chemically friendly. Although there are not many manufacturers who produce such products, people are willing to spend more for these products. “Since the last two years, eco-friendly plastic products have shown a rise in demand of 85–90 per cent, and Gujarat has been a leading supplier. R&D in the field of plastics is constantly going on, and manufacturers are looking for biodegradable and eco-friendly plastics,” adds Parikh. The effect of conventional plastics on the soil is far more severe as compared to bioplastics. Besides, biodegradable plastics have negligible impact on the soil and thus on the environment. Plastics waste is a significant portion of the total municipal solid waste. According to industry estimates, approximately 10,000 tonne per day of plastics waste is generated in the country.

Challenges ahead While the polymer industry in the state has opened up to international standards, shown resilience in the face of crisis and pioneered innovative practices, there are pressing concerns that need to be addressed. “Currently, one of the biggest challenges for India’s plastics industry is the erosion of profit. Recently being offered to customers for helping them achieve sustainable and profitable growth is innovative solutions through plastic additives that allow them to differentiate in terms of cost reduction or improvement in performance,” says Shah. The customer-oriented approach adopted by the plastics industry has always shown positive results. This, coupled with large-key joint ventures and influx of foreign investment in the state, is expected to ensure high profitability and efficient polymer processing in the years to come. Email: anwesh.koley@network18publishing.com


PLASTICS @ GUJARAT: Manufacturing might

IN PURSUIT OF AUTOMATION Efficient application of automation is helping processors world over to meet the changing needs of the industry and business environment. The evolution of automation in the Indian plastics processing industry is however not at par with the international adoption of these techniques. Sweta M Nair looks for answers to advancements in processing technology and how the Indian scenario is shaping up in the light of global competition.

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ccording to a recent study conducted by Frost & Sullivan called ‘Automation – Catalyzing a Resurgent Indian Economy’, Indian manufacturing has come under the spotlight. This is purely because the government in its bid to increase manufacturing’s contribution to the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) has brought forth the National Manufacturing Policy (NMP), which envisages the manufacturing sector’s contribution to grow to about 25 per cent by 2022. “Despite challenges, the organic growth of industries and the increasing awareness of the importance of implementing automation solutions have led to substantial demand for automation solutions in India. Both control and automation IT products have witnessed a spurt in adoption across manufacturing sectors in India, over the five years,” reveals the report.

Optimising process Many different types of robots are used in the plastics processing industry. These robots are completely optimised to the particular requirements of this industry in terms of working range, operating volume, minimised floor space, weight and speed. 62

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Courtesy: KUKA Robotics

The most common being articulated-arm robots, one of the effective solutions for the plastics processing industry. However, the choice of a robot is determined less by the payload and more by the reach. The types of installation options for integrating industrial robots to do a specific production task are many, but ultimately the solution will be a perfect partnership between machine and robot. Because high productivity, speed, accuracy, cleanliness and dexterity are areas where automation can provide considerable advantage, processors are paying more attention to this segment. Avinash Wakchaure, Maintenance

Manager, Plastics Division – Gujarat Plant, Tata AutoComp Systems Ltd, says, “When referring to plastics, at Tata AutoComp, we are into the manufacturing of auto-components for exterior and interior applications. Because each component varies in weight from 3 to 5 kg, robots help us reduce cycle time by 20–25 per cent. Earlier, when industrial robots were not used, human operators had to open the doors of moulds, remove the formed component and fix it manually. With robots, the pick-up and drop activity has significantly increased productivity and limited human intervention. The application of industrial robots has also


Manufacturing might

When industrial robots were not used, human operators had to open the doors of moulds, remove the formed component and fix it manually. With robots, the pick-up and drop activity has significantly increased productivity and limited human intervention. Avinash Wakchaure Maintenance Manager, Plastics Division – Gujarat Plant, Tata AutoComp Systems Ltd

The QUANTEC K series ensures that there is a perfectly suited robot for every customerspecific application. For the first time, a single robot family covers the entire high payload range from 90 to 270 kg, with reaches from 2,900 to 3,900 mm. Guru Prasad Senior Manager – Sales, KUKA Robotics (India) Pvt Ltd

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helped scale up productivity.” Further, the use of intelligent software programs reduces and makes efficient use of nonproductive time that previously went unused. Related to the processing stage, robots find applications in high-speed de-moulding, insert loading, semiprocessed component transfer between cavities and injection machines, in-mould decoration or labelling, off-machine complementary component assembly operations during or downstream from injection cycle, gluing/sealing processes, parts’ control operations within the cycle time of the injection moulding machine and product packaging after manufacturing.

Specific applications Superior quality, less waste, greater repeatability per cycle and greater productivity are results of efficient product management. High-speed automation can support statistical process control and adapt just-in-time manufacturing techniques leading the way of continuous improvement. This gives processors the competitive advantage required in today’s plastics market. Although there are many, one technical advantage of using robots in plastics processing is that it contributes significantly in reducing cycle time. Across an extensive range of products, the commonly used industrial robot-arms are characterised by compact size, broad work envelopes, high speed, precision, resistance to all types of environments and, above all, the flexibility to adapt to the greatest number of tasks. Because the processing of plastics is not a one-step process, the inclusion of automation can increase production. To begin, sprue pickers, robots that quickly and precisely remove sprues and parts from injection moulding machines, are getting their fair share of acknowledgement in this industry. Pneumatic robots are designed for precise insert and removal jobs with fast movements and minimum vibration. Other types of servo robots, such as threeaxis, side-entry, stack moulds or camp end discharge, provide flexible automation for current and future requirements. Further,

to address precision injection moulding automation for small to large payloads, several electric servo-driven articulating robots have been designed. For processors looking at deriving maximum reliability, gantry robots have been designed for precision, high-speed operation and user-friendly setup. Talking about his company’s latest offerings for the plastics processing industry, Guru Prasad, Senior Manager – Sales, KUKA Robotics (India) Pvt Ltd, says, “We cater to three major applications such as de-moulding, ultrasonic welding and cutting/trimming. Our recently launched series of robots called QUANTEC K has an extensive range of models, comprising 11 basic robot types. The QUANTEC K series ensures that there is a perfectly suited robot for every customer-specific application. For the first time, a single robot family covers the entire high payload range from 90 to 270 kg, with reaches from 2,900 to 3,900 mm. The shelf-mounted robots of the QUANTEC K series make automation easier in the plastics industry, with maximum flexibility in the system planning and design phase, reduced conception and design work and greater planning security. With the latest stateof-the-art drive technology and the new KR C4 controller, the QUANTEC K robots achieve up to 25 per cent shorter unloading times and up to 30 per cent less energy consumption.”

Impending implications A decade back, the major deterrent of using robotics was price, but now processors are realising the benefits of using versatile robots. The usage of industrial robots in the Indian plastics processing industry is still at a nascent stage. However, the major development in the robotics segment is that they are becoming slimmer and the controller systems are becoming less complicated. Investing in intelligent automation and control systems to optimise manufacturing and monitor plant operation is the way forward for the Indian plastics processing industry. Email: sweta.nair@network18publishing.com


PLASTICS @ GUJARAT: Infrastructure edge

EXPANDING THE BUSINESS HORIZON Encouraging investments and providing a favourable business environment have propelled Gujarat to emerge as the prime industrial hub in the country. Over the years, manufacturers have found it increasingly conducive to start businesses in the state due to a variety of factors. Anwesh Koley tracks the various reasons why Gujarat has gained that quintessential edge over other states.

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he plastics industry in Gujarat has made significant achievements ever since its modest but promising beginning after commencing production of polystyrene about four decades ago. The plastics processing sector in India comprises about 30,000 units, of which Gujarat accounts for over 6,100 micro, small and medium scale units, thus contributing to about one-fifth of the total number of units in the 66

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country. These units are involved in producing a variety of items through injection moulding, blow moulding, extrusion and calendaring. India, in general, and Gujarat, in particular, possess the necessary technical skills to produce high-quality plastic goods, required machinery, efficient moulds and dies. In view of versatility of operations and low-cost production, the state has been ideally suited to serve as a sourcing base.

Steps towards realising a dream The per capita consumption of plastics in India is only 6 kg as against 30 kg in China and 80 kg in developed economies. Gujarat’s per capita consumption is 8 kg. With growing per capita income and a favourable demographic profile, demand for plastics in India and in Gujarat is expected to show strong growth. Further, a vast potential lies for the development of the plastics processing industry, as at present, the per capita


Infrastructure edge

Major international companies from various segments of industry, including automobiles, electronics, communication, food processing and packaging, have set up large manufacturing plants in the country and have helped to develop the market. Vivek Kothari Director, Shako Flexipack Pvt Ltd

consumption of plastics is only 0.7 kg compared to the world average of 11 kg. The capacities built in most segments of this industry coupled with inherent capabilities have made us capable of servicing the overseas markets. Vivek Kothari, Director, Shako Flexipack Pvt Ltd, says, “Major international companies from various segments of industry, including automobiles, electronics, communication, food processing and packaging, have set up large manufacturing plants in the country and have helped to develop the market. India is emerging as one of the fastest growing markets and is expected to grow by 12 to 15 per cent in the coming years.” Because of this potential offered by the Gujarat market, entrepreneurs in the state are motivated to acquire technical expertise, achieve high quality standards and build production capacities in various facets of the thriving plastics industry. Commendable developments in the plastics machinery sector coupled with similar developments in the petrochemical sector have facilitated 68

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plastics processors to build capacities to service both domestic and overseas markets. Both of these support the plastics processing industry. The availability of polymer raw materials has also played a pivotal role in the growth of this industry. “In addition to meeting the indigenous requirement of polymers, the state is the net exporter of certain polymers besides the finished goods. The export of plastic products has been identified as a thrust area, and entrepreneurs in the state are gearing themselves to capture the market abroad with greater dynamism and sincerity,” avers Kothari. The export of plastic articles has thus increased in the last few years at the rate of about 20 per cent.

Riding high on reforms The economic reforms launched in 1991 across the country have been a boon for the industrial development of Gujarat. “While the state already enjoyed geographical advantages in terms of procurement and dispatch of goods, the reforms added further fillip to the plastics industry in Gujarat. Joint ventures, foreign investments, easier access to technology from developed countries and many more advancements have opened up new vistas to further facilitate the growth of this industry,” opines Kothari. While continual developments in the plastics industry in the state have shown fruitful results, there remains a concern for the environmental impact which is often the bi-product of industrial growth. “Conventional plastic and synthetic polymers are persistent in the environment. Therefore, improperly disposed plastic materials are often a significant source of environment pollution. This has resulted in mounting worldwide concern over the increasing use of plastics and has initiated an important drive for development of biodegradable plastics,” says Kothari. Various Research & Development (R&D) activities on biodegradable polymers have identified these areas of concern, and remedial measures have taken momentum. The

industry has shown eagerness to join hands with R&D institutions to augment research activity in this important area of technology to save the environment and keep it cleaner and greener. Taking advantage of liberalisation, the Indian petrochemical industry invested approximately ` 350 billion in the 1990s, raising the domestic polymer capacity from less than 0.5 million metric tonne in 1990 to 4.2 million metric tonne in 2000–01. Gujarat has been on the forefront in realising its potential and leading the way for petrochemical expansion. Over the years, the main polymer production capacities have come up in the western part of India – in Gujarat and Maharashtra (Reliance Industries Ltd & India Power Corporation Ltd) – though there are production facilities in other parts of the country as well, such as Haldia Petrochemicals Ltd in the east, GAIL in the north and Chemplast in the south.

Reaffirming commitment towards growth Globalisation of the economy and the enhanced role of the market over the years have the potential to offer greater opportunities for the plastics industry. Gujarat has a tradition of regional specialisation in industries such as chemical, petrochemicals and pharma within the large scale sectors. This, coupled with the continuous impetus from the government, is expected to further attract international presence. “The long-term development perspective of the industries present in the state needs to take advantage of the regional potential that exists. While integration of world markets offers opportunities, it demands safeguards to minimise negative externalities and to protect the interests of the poor and backward sections of the population. This is more relevant in the case of Gujarat. It requires the need to have a long-term perspective so that the economy could develop policies for the desired direction,” feels Kothari. Email: anwesh.koley@network18publishing.com


MPP Mar_2013 Ad Name: Prayag Tab-5, Pg No. 69


MPP Mar_2013 Ad Name: Kalra Tab-5, Pg No. 70


PLASTICS @ GUJARAT: Trade policy

What Gujarat is

‘DOING RIGHT’yet ‘COULD DO BETTER’ With its eye on achieving high growth in the industrial and infrastructure sectors, Gujarat in recent years has been focussing on formulating long and short-term trade policies. After the Vibrant Gujarat Summit 2013, Sweta M Nair delves deeper to find what is in store for the Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) of the plastics industry that have already made this state their home and what does the industry think of the state’s prevailing trade policies.

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y assuming a pivotal role in the changing economics of the country, Gujarat today houses an impressive industrial belt including a hub of petrochemical industries that make the state a major contributor to the national economy. To factor the state’s advancements, the state’s governing institutions are creating and maintaining

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progress-friendly policies that promote its strategic growth. Most policies ideally identify a niche and then provide tailormade incentives and assistance. While promoting entrepreneurship in SMEs, the state is looking at inviting and facilitating greater investment. According to the Annual Survey of Industry (ASI) 2009–10, conducted

by the Central Statistical Organization (CSO) under Ministry of Statistics and Program Implementation, Government of India, Gujarat is the most industrially developed Indian state with regard to industrial investment, value of production and value addition in the industrial sector. Owing to its broad industrial base, the industrial development in the state at present is not confined only to major cities.

Congenial settings For the plastics industry specifically, the discovery of oil and gas in Gujarat has played an important role in setting up of petroleum refineries, fertiliser plants and petrochemical companies. At the same time, the inception of the Gujarat Industrial Development Corporation (GIDC) led to the establishment of industrial estates that provided developed plots and ready built-up sheds for the plastics industry. “Moreover, surplus power, excellent law & order situation, well-kept ports for exports and availability of land in plastic parks with infrastructure & single window clearance at very affordable prices helped the Government of Gujarat (GoG) create a fantastic environment for the plastics business. The All India Plastic Manufacturers’ Association (AIPMA) has signed a memorandum of understanding with the GoG to create plastic parks at Dahej and Sanand. The GoG should support the Association to run common facility centres in cooperation with stake holders in plastic parks,” shares Jayesh Khimji Rambhia, Managing Director, Premsons Plastics Pvt Ltd and Chairman, Plastic Parks & Projects, AIPMA. The development of infrastructure, such as power, roads, ports, water supply and so on, and the introduction of business-friendly regulatory trade norms have helped the plastics industry thrive in the state’s environment. “Gujarat is a golden destination, and it is the most industrialised state with more than 38 per cent gross domestic product. It comprises 55 special economic zones, 41 ports and 83 industrial clusters. The state contributes about 16 per cent of India’s


Trade policy

The minimum land allocated by GoG in plastic parks is 1 acre. Ideally, it should be revised to 5 acre to even smaller pieces of land ranging 250/500/1,000 sq ft area. Jayesh Khimji Rambhia Managing Director, Premsons Plastics Pvt Ltd and Chairman, Plastic Parks & Projects, AIPMA

Policies on intelligent manufacturing, enhanced design capabilities, conformation to international standards in production, effective energy management and proficient supply chain management need to be formulated. Pinakin Shah President, GSPMA

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industrial production, and it is home to some of the biggest petrochemical companies. In line with the government’s proactive policy, Gujarat has emerged as a hub of the petrochemicals industry, contributing to more than 62 per cent of India’s petrochemicals and 65 per cent of India’s plastics,” shares Pinakin Shah, President, Gujarat State Plastic Manufacturers’ Association (GSPMA).

Conducive attitude While addressing the issue of framing strategic policy at the Vibrant Gujarat Summit 2013, Narendra Modi, Chief Minister, Gujarat, spoke about the need of having more focus on need-based skill development, technological up-gradation and research in the SME sector to successfully compete in the global market. He acknowledged the employment creation ability of Indian SMEs and the need to raise them to the next level of quality and credibility, in ancillary industry or as clusters. With the renewed thrust on development of the Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises (MSMEs), the Minister shared his views on reaching out to the smallest of the industries across the state so as to provide opportunities that will help them take their business to the next level. Many of the state’s trade regulatory norms fall in line with its new Industrial Policy 2009, where emphasis is placed on facilitation of investment in the state, employment generation and employability enhancement and adherence to high quality standards. By promoting excellence in production of high quality standards, the policy aims at promoting the ‘Made in Gujarat’ line. In Rambhia’s views, since the plastics industry is dominated by MSMEs, the GoG should bring in policies that will largely take care of the interest of this segment. He says, “Currently, the minimum land allocated by GoG in plastic parks is 1 acre. Ideally, it should be revised to 5 acre to even smaller pieces of land ranging 250/500/1000 sq ft area. Smaller units would be useful for service providers such as accountants, lawyers, electricians, plumbers, motor-rewinders, fabricators,

screen printers, labour contractors, boxmakers, hardware suppliers etc. These entities will make it easy to run companies in remote locations. It will also increase number of beneficiaries of plastic parks where even small entrepreneurs can reap benefits.”

Important iterations Along with cluster development approach in the New Industrial Policy, the scheme would focus on harder interventions such as creation of clusterspecific common infrastructure and facilities, incubation centre, Common Facility Centre (CFC), Industrial Training Institute (ITI) extension centre and other need-based facilities. In a way, this would also encourage stakeholders to participate in public–private partnership initiatives to compete globally. In order to promote the use of renewable and environment-friendly sources of energy, the state aspires to set up power generation capacity of about 500 MW through various solar technologies. “To remain competitive in price and quality with China, reducing the power tariff for the plastics industry is important,” believes Rambhia. He adds, “Plastics as an industry sector enables major sectors of the economy such as agriculture, automobile, infrastructure, healthcare, packaging and so on. All benefits extended to the textile, food processing and leather industries should also be extended to the plastics sector.” To control problems of volatile prices, erratic supply of raw materials, lack of sufficient & skilled manpower, high excise duty, lack of organised solid waste management etc need to be addressed immediately by way of efficient governing. “For the plastics industry in Gujarat to be globally competitive, policies on intelligent manufacturing, enhanced design capabilities, conformation to international standards in production, effective energy management and proficient supply chain management need to be formulated with proper investment incentives,” believes Shah. Email: sweta.nair@network18publishing.com


PLASTICS @ GUJARAT: Human resource development

With the plastics industry expanding its horizon in the country, there is a need of nurturing professionals and empowering workforce to meet global standards and provide a boost to the industry. Gujarat has ensured this by setting up several educational institutions to develop skilled workforce to strengthen its stand in the plastics segment. Avani Jain highlights the steps taken by industries and institutes in the state in this regard.

SKILL BUILDING FOR GLOBAL COMPETENCE

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ujarat is one of the leading industrialised states of India. It boasts of several multinational corporations, large private sector companies, strong public sector enterprises and a large number of small and medium scale units in the plastics segment. In addition, the future of the plastics industry appears bright, as statistics show that per person consumption of plastics has increased significantly in recent times. Further, Gujarat produces more than 60 per cent of hydrocarbons, which is higher than that produced in any other state of the country. Moreover, the plastics processing industry in Gujarat has a great potential for global business. Thus, with automobile, packaging and infrastructure sectors booming, the plastics industry in Gujarat will witness tremendous growth and profitable operations.

Need for skill development In order to support the growth of the plastics industry in the state, several factors have to be kept in mind. One of the important factors is nurturing professionals and empowering workforce in the segment as this is necessary to increase business and meet the global quality standards. K M Shah, Managing Director, NU-VU Conair Pvt Ltd, notes, “Technology upgradation, be it in the mechanical or electrical aspects of plastics processing, is continuously happening, and if you are not aware of these changes, then your end product may not be of global standards. Thus, 76

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in such a case, it is essential to train the workforce and to make them aware about such changes and thus enhance their productivity.” Skills and knowledge are the driving forces of economic and industrial growth of any state or country. Countries and states with higher and better levels of skills adjust more effectively to the challenges and opportunities faced by the industries. As Gujarat moves progressively towards becoming a ‘knowledge economy’, it becomes increasingly important that the state should focus on advancement of skills for the advancement of the plastics industry. Thus, the need to focus on developing skilled manpower

is extremely important, and it is for the same reason that institutes such as Indian Plastics Institute (IPI), Central Institute of Plastics Engineering & Technology (CIPET), Plastindia Academy of Technology and Management at Vapi etc have been set up in the state. Tushar Parikh, Vice Chairman, IPI – Ahmedabad Chapter & Director, Neoplast Engineering Pvt Ltd, notes, “Skilled manpower is the demand of every industry, and the plastics industry is no exception. Today, with the way companies are expanding and employing new technologies, the demand for skilled manpower is increasing. However, it is a common fact that skilled manpower


Human resource development

Technology upgradation, be it in the mechanical or electrical aspects of plastics processing, is continuously happening, and if you are not aware of these changes, then your end product may not be of global standards. K M Shah Managing Director, NU-VU Conair Pvt Ltd

is a scarce resource. Thus, investing in human capital is an important step, and an effective way to achieve this is through industry–academia collaboration.” He adds, “In the plastics industry, all production processes require skilled engineers and the high-grade machines require skilled operators. In addition, the companies need an efficient workforce for marketing. Thus, through training institutes, the industry can actually train students to meet their requirements.”

Industry–academia collaboration Industry–academia collaboration in the state has offered several benefits to both the parties in the past and has the potential to do so in the future as well. With regard to the plastics & polymers industry, the industry can reap many benefits through collaboration, such as reduced costs, increase in knowledge and greater marketing power as well as availability of skilled human capital, which is the need of the hour for the industry. Moreover, the industry in Gujarat generally faces substantial shortage of research talent with the requisite skill set and experience in advanced analytical research; however, this collaboration will help the industry in this aspect also. Thus, industry–academia collaboration can serve as a strategy for ensuring success and growth of the plastics & polymers industry in Gujarat.

Role of institutes

Skilled manpower is the demand of every industry, and the plastics industry is no exception. Today, with the way companies are expanding and employing new technologies, the demand for skilled manpower is increasing. Tushar Parikh Vice Chairman, IPI – Ahmedabad Chapter & Director, Neoplast Engineering Pvt Ltd

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Institutes also have a major role to play in providing a boost to the plastics industry in the state. Plastics institutes should send out their researchers on a deputation basis to companies to work in their laboratories to gain experience on new equipment and processes. Institutes should also welcome technical staff from the industry to interact with their students so as to foster closer relationships and encourage more industry-focussed collaborations. The various plastics institutes in the state have adopted few of the above-mentioned steps to strengthen industry–academia collaboration. Parikh avers, “IPI acts as a link between academia and industry. We invite

companies for campus placements and while organising workshops for students. Even technical experts are invited to deliver guest lectures on technical and specialised subjects. We organise one technical seminar every year.” These days, the institutes also provide on-the-job training to students. Shah notes, “Various training institutes such as CIPET, Indo–German Tool Room, IPI etc have laboratories and are well equipped with all the instruments, so the students can learn how to operate the machines and learn about the production process. Further, practical knowledge is very important to sustain in the market.” Thus, the private sector needs to be open to collaboration with these institutes, as the industry gets immediate benefits in terms of more profits and trained manpower, while students get the benefit of seeing their ideas work and will get encouraged. Through this, institutes can also be assured of regular fund supply and required practical exposure.

Gauging the future Thus, keeping in mind the increased industry–academia collaborations taking place in the plastics segment in the state, nurturing professionals and empowering workforce so as to meet global standards seem an easy task. It can be seen that Gujarat is investing steadily in higher education and research infrastructure. The state has both private and public universities. While the government supports public universities, various bodies and societies support private universities. In addition, Gujarat is home to numerous research organisations and educational institutions, which directly or indirectly provide educational and career opportunities in the field of plastics engineering and technology. Thus, these steps taken in Gujarat to develop skilled manpower could be taken by institutes, organisations and governments in other states as well so as to meet global quality standards. Email: avani.jain@network18publishing.com


SPECIAL FOCUS

Dies & Moulds Dies and moulds: Efficient moulds for increased productivity ............................................................................................ 82

Multi-functional component tooling: Making the cut! ....................................................................................................................................... 84

Interface: Saranjit Singh, Proprietor, Bamra Engineering Works ........................................................ 86 Roundtable: Do Indian processors have the right software to reduce mould change time? ...................................... 88

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SPECIAL FOCUS: Dies and moulds

EFFICIENT MOULDS FOR INCREASED PRODUCTIVITY

Courtesy: Condor Tools

Specialised equipment are used in the plastics industry, and these require highly efficient moulds to work in harmony to produce the final plastic product. Anwesh Koley looks into the various advancements witnessed by this industry and the issues that need immediate attention. Courtesy: Solid Carbide Tools

O

ver the years, die and mould makers in India have recorded transformational and high all-round market growth. Today, these makers can compete globally. The main issue in Indian tool rooms is shortage of capacities, which is met through imports by Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMS). The industry has shown consistency in improving its tooling requirements through better liasioning and partnership with OEMs, seeking their support in reinforcing their commitments to increase domestic production. With their support and commitment, Indian tool rooms have the potential to venture into expansion activities with confidence and make large amount of investments. The advantage of this industry is its ability to remain capital intensive. G S Kochhar, Managing Director, Precision Moulds and Dies, says, “Large-scale

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growth in manufacturing capacity will be needed to meet the demands of a large number of OEMs desiring to make India their global manufacturing hub. The tooling market’s growth is estimated to grow at 20 per cent. With OEMs desiring to develop domestic tooling manufacturing, we can foresee rapid manufacturing growth of tooling.”

Meeting international standards With the global trend towards faster processing equipment and higher accuracy in terms of production, manufacturers across the country have adopted technologies that help achieve higher levels of innovation and end-user satisfaction. Major processing techniques, such as injection moulding, blow moulding and extrusion, warrant the use of complex end-to-end systems for individual units for the automotive, electronics, household goods and

medical industries. This requires the use of customised moulding systems that complement the effective functioning of equipment. Each process requires reliable conveying as well as dosing and mixing systems for high-volume production. Srikanth Padmanabhan, Managing Director, Motan-Colortronic Plastics Machinery (India) Pvt Ltd, says, “Individual extrusion systems require high-precision structures that deliver consistency for the continuous production of films, cables, pipes and profiles. Raw materials and masterbatches require accurate dosing and mixing systems for continuous production.”

Mould protection Manufacturers have been developing systems to protect injection moulds that record the force path on mould closing. A control curve can be


Dies and moulds

applied to this saved master curve at a freely adjustable axial distance. If the force path as currently measured intersects the control curve during the closing movement (eg a part is caught in the parting line), the machine will stop the closing movement. Compared to conventional mould protection systems, these systems are reliable even at maximum mould closing speeds, thus the shortest mould movement times will be achieved. The system not only provides positive protection for injection moulds but also reduces cycle time, with the result that efficiency of production increases. The moulding sector has witnessed several innovations over the years as manufacturers have had to adapt to changes according to growing customer needs. Companies are seeing much innovation in the field of plastic moulding. “There is a large scope in the field of injection moulding machines, as there is a major segment in the plastics industry that wants to switch over from basic manual injection moulding machines to modern programmable logic controllers with advanced hydraulics and energysaving machines,” says Kochhar. Today, there is more emphasis on the energy-efficient, maintenance-free and high-responsive machines. The machines are now fitted with servo motor-driven pump in place of normal induction motor, which saves energy of 20–60 per cent, and this depends on the cycle time and other conditions. “Also, due to the availability of advanced hydraulics and energy-efficient solutions, the hydraulic clamping machine, with low maintenance and long life, is more adopted as compared to the toggle-type clamping machine,” adds Padmanabhan.

Right tooling techniques Tooling is an essential element of near net shape manufacturing processes such as injection moulding and die casting, where it may account for over 25 per cent of the total product cost and development time, especially when order quantity is small. “Development of rapid and low cost tooling, combined with a scientific approach to mould cost estimation and

control, has therefore become essential. Cost drivers include the geometric features of cavity and core, managed by analytical cost estimation approach to estimate the basic mould cost. Cost modifiers include tooling parameters such as parting line, presence of side cores, surface texture, ejector mechanism and die material, contributing to the total mould cost,” adds Kochhar. The methodology has been implemented and tested using numerous industrial examples globally. The average deviation was 0.40 per cent, with mould manufacturers relying on independent efficiency-enhancement measures according to specific market requirements. The model is flexible and can be easily implemented for estimating the cost of a variety of moulds and dies by customising the cost modifiers using the quality function deployment approach.

Large-scale growth in manufacturing capacity will be needed to meet the demands of a large number of OEMs desiring to make India their global manufacturing hub. G S Kochhar Managing Director, Precision Moulds and Dies

Industry concerns The die and mould sector seems to grow and adapt according to changing market needs. However, there are issues that concern the sector. “Prices of polymers have gone up drastically since they use a petroleum base. Energy and labour costs have also gone up substantially. The challenge of the plastics processing industry has been to manage these steep cost increases without the same degree of increase in sales prices and sharp drop in margins,” laments Padmanabhan. The measures taken by the industry to cope with these shortcomings are to lower input resources (eg energy and space). Manufacturers are coming up with equipment that have higher productivity and consume lesser space within the plant. Another important measure is to reduce waste (eg operational rejections, waste heat and spillage). Apart from technical requirements, a major problem is the availability of skilled work force. Companies are working on strengthening skill levels by rigorous training and educational measures. All these measures are expected to go a long way in improving the overall quality of products. Email: anwesh.koley@network18publishing.com

Individual extrusion systems require high-precision structures that deliver consistency for the continuous production of films, cables, pipes and profiles. Raw materials and masterbatches require accurate dosing and mixing systems for continuous production. Srikanth Padmanabhan Managing Director, Motan-Colortronic Plastics Machinery (India) Pvt Ltd

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SPECIAL FOCUS: Multi-functional component tooling

MAKING THE

CUT!

Usage of dies and moulds for high-performance plastics has been increasing in various industry segments. With construction, household appliances, automobile and other industries having a great demand for plastics, the market for multi-functional component tooling is broadening. Sweta M Nair finds out that although the scope of this segment is still unknown, its potential in the Indian plastics industry is huge.

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he applications of plastic products are extensive, which provides a broad market for plastic moulds. The overall market trend in the mould industry is smooth and progressive. In the future mould market, the growth rate of plastic moulds will be higher than other moulds. Large-scale, high-precision, multi-functional composite moulds are being favoured. The trend towards multifunctional component tooling is gradually gaining steam.

Significant role Popularly known as modular tools, multi-functional component tools are mechanical assemblies that can be utilised for more than two functions and usually involves a marginal variation in the end product. In some instances, this concept can be extended to more complex profiles of the end components. However, the similarities between the end components take into consideration either the volume or area of the component. “The advantages of these multi-functional component tools are many. Reduced cost, reduced maintenance, reduced footprint of the in-house inventory of tools, quick change of inserts and low downtime during maintenance are some of the clear 84

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benefits,” says Vineet Seth, Managing Director – India & Middle East, Delcam Plc, UK. Providing an example, he adds, “A mould base can be generalised to house various modular inserts, such that given a certain volume of material, at least three or more different components can be moulded using a common mould base. Here, the ejection system is planned in such a way that it is optimal for the ejection of all the components that will be moulded. In addition, the cooling system is planned in a way to accommodate the changes of all components involved.” Because quick change of inserts is possible in multi-functional component tools, cycle times are significantly shorter, which is good news for moulders. Further, to some extent, the setting up of the machine is simpler and faster. With operations simplified and assembly effort reduced, moulders can be assured of quality and enhanced reproducibility. This versatility that multi-functional component tools offers results in less floor space and, in some cases, lower energy consumption.

Latest developments The competitive market in the global plastics industry is compelling moulders to explore ways that can help them achieve

the maximum in shorter time. One way to maximise press uptime in such an environment is to implement faster, more effective mould changes. Talking about the latest developments taking place in the multi-functional component tooling space, Seth adds, “This technology holds a large scope for development but is not widely researched. However, mechanisms to house inserts, to enable a quick change and to optimise the runner and cooling system in modular moulds are currently being explored. There is also a paradigm shift in the concepts that define a typical mould base. There is a clear shift to use tougher case-hardened steels because of the expected longer life cycle of the modular tool. Angular and profiled guideways for a quick replacement of inserts coupled with hardened wedges to lock the inserts in place are other avenues of interest.” When moulds for plastics products are designed, considerable care is taken to make sure the location of the ejectors does not disturb the proper stripping from the core. The visual appearance of the products can be considerably influenced by selecting suitable ejector components. It is important that the mould performance becomes even more reliable and production improves. In


Multi-functional component tooling

multi-functional component tooling, adjustable ejection and location pins among others are the areas in which continued developments are taking place. “There are also challenges in maintaining accuracy on medium and large size mould bases – especially considering the mass production processes; however, new-age steels and optimal hardening processes ensure that these inaccuracies are under control. With additive manufacturing being researched in many universities around the world, one of the challenges of optimal cooling design is being addressed with the help of conformal cooling channels that can be built ground up. I believe the additive manufacturing research area will add a lot of value to multi-functional component tooling. For example, a homogeneous mixture of metal with varied tensile strength is likely to increase the life of the tooling. Internal bearing structures built up with graphite particles will help reduce friction in guide pins and other moving parts,” informs Seth.

Seth informs, “Delcam’s unique tribrid modelling and assembly software PowerSHAPE Pro is continually being enhanced to aid the quick design of custom tooling, which includes the rapid creation of user-defined mould base assemblies and tooling components. The fully parametric design enables quick change across tooling design quickly and efficiently.” Thus, in India, moulders cater to quite a lot of low volume high-precision components that will actually make the use of multi-functional component tooling more suitably productive instead of individual toolsets for every low volume component. Email: sweta.nair@network18publishing.com

Scope in India An overbearing population stretching the demands of manufacturing is the primary growth driver in any segment. The same applies for multi-functional component tools, where its scope is tremendous due to the sheer demand. Simultaneously, hardware and software programs are being developed to enable advanced control. With regard to this,

The additive manufacturing research area will add a lot of value to multi-functional component tooling. For example, a homogeneous mixture of metal with varied tensile strength is likely to increase the life of the tooling. Vineet Seth Managing Director – India & Middle East, Delcam Plc, UK

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SPECIAL FOCUS: Inter face - Saranjit Singh

“Mould manufacturers in India need to take advantage of automation solutions to enhance productivityâ€? ‌avers Saranjit Singh, Proprietor, Bamra Engineering Works. In an interaction with Anwesh Koley, he highlights the importance of efficient moulding solutions for the Indian plastics sector and the various challenges that need to be addressed in the years to come. Tell us about the latest trends in the die and mould industry in India.

How has the Indian die and mould market evolved over the years?

The die and mould-making industry of India is venturing into many new sectors, such as the aerospace sector, to boost growth. The rising demand for commercial aircraft along with investments by the Centre will further boost the presence of die and mould manufacturers. It is believed that technology advancement becomes possible only when end applications of moulding technologies boost and expand their horizons. Over the years, the Indian mouldmaking industry is witnessing a steady growth path due to the reason that dies and moulds are probably used in every industry. In the recent times, the demand for high-precision die and mould components has witnessed a significant jump. At present, it is important that the Indian mould manufacturers develop designs that are more accurate and raise profitability. Previously, Indian firms mainly focussed on conventional customers such as automobile, heavy engineering etc, but the rising demand from the aviation sector has lead to advancement in technology.

The market for dies and moulds in India is fairing quite well due to heavy domestic demand. However, the best quality moulds are still imported from European countries. For the past decade or so, mould manufacturers in India have started developing indigenous technology that reduces their dependence on imports. However, processing units consider imported moulds to be of better quality. Mould manufacturers in India face a lot of problems in terms of logistics and procurement of parts. In European countries, mould manufacturers have developed clusters through which they can procure all their requirements from a limited geographical area. This reduces cost of transportation and the overall price of the final product. Till date, we have to manufacture all the required parts ourselves, which reduces delivery time and affects the payment cycle.

Which sectors benefit the most from efficient tooling? The motor vehicle industry is the major end user of tools and dies. Like all auto suppliers, tool and die makers have been adversely affected by the downturn in the motor vehicle market since 2007. The production of cars and light trucks fell by 31 per cent between 2006 and 2010 in the US, which was one of the steepest declines in decades. This had an immediate impact on suppliers such as tool and die makers. When motor vehicle manufacturers cut back on design changes and reduce new 86

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model introductions, they need far fewer tools, dies and moulds. Since the trough of the recession in 2009, the domestic motor vehicle industry has recovered, with Indianmade car and light truck production increasing by over 50 per cent from 2009 to 2011. It is important to note that during the downturn, the die and mould sector was busy all through with Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) focussing on introduction of new models. Today, with the boom of the auto sector, OEMs are more keen on meeting the market demands by focussing on manufacturing in their plants. However, this boom will generate new tooling business and increase the demand for new and sophisticated moulds.

What is the way ahead for die and mould manufacturers in India? With the help of automated conveying, blending and gravimetric loss-in-weight extrusion process control systems, one can ensure production quality with consistency. Creating awareness among the key industry segments is also a big challenge as many consumers still hold onto the myth that process automation is the luxury of large organisations. Mould manufacturers in India need to take advantage of automation solutions to enhance productivity. Cost comparisons consider labour cost saving, whereas the fact is that process automation is the way forward in quality and productivity enhancement with better management control over key processing inputs. Email: anwesh.koley@network18publishing.com


SPECIAL FOCUS: Roundtable

Do

Indian processors have the

software to reduce mould change time? right

Innovation and development are critical in maintaining a dynamic industrial environment. Reliable Quick Mould Change (QMC) systems are designed to integrate manufacturing processes with flexibility and adaptability. In an interaction with industry experts, Sweta M Nair finds out if Indian processors have the right software to reduce mould change time.

Deepak Lawale Secretary General, Organization of Plastics Processors of India

QMC, or Single Minute Exchange of Dies (SMED), is practised by many moulders in our country. It involves prior preparation of the next mould for loading on the machine while the current mould is still running on the machine, machine platen equipped with hydraulically operated quick clamps or magnetic mould mounting plate, mould cooling liquid lines being connected using quick couplers, being equipped with an automated material feeding system with quick change over facility and quick coupler on ejector. Further, it involves the machine’s control capability to recall mould operating data stored in memory and stopping production when the desired number of shots is produced. However, the Indian plastics processors are not using any software for QMC. Some injection moulding machine producers are also not aware of any software programs made for QMC.

Ashok Huprikar Director, A R Engineers

While interacting with some Indian moulders, I believe they are not well aware of the QMC concept. Thus, the concept of QMC should be talked, discussed or published further. Basic QMC consists of a system of easy loading of moulds in vertical & horizontal position, automatic centring of moulds and quick clamping. A standard set of plates is fitted to moulds of different sizes. This makes the overall size of mould standard, thereby making QMC feasible. Those who do not use QMC are spending at least an hour to an hour and a half in mould change. If there are two changes per day, then one will be wasting at least three hours of production, which is almost 15 per cent. Increase in productivity of more than 10 per cent will recover cost of QMC. Ideally, training should be provided to workers, and workers should be involved in the initial discussion and installation phases. Even though QMC is a standard procedure, it is custom built for each customer after understanding requirements and limitations.

Sanjay Dedhia Executive Director, Mitsu Chem Pvt Ltd

Most Indian processors do not have the resources to adapt the right software programs to reduce the mould change time. Their reasons could be failure of software to cope with varying mould sizes, the need to have vertical & horizontal types of loading systems, reluctance due to price, insufficient availability of space and non-cooperation of workers in adapting to new equipment & systems. There is a huge scope in this area for the small and medium enterprises. If we have to compete globally, we will have to eventually adapt softwarebased mould changes. Reduction in mould change time can be further aided by SMED, which can help processors in reducing the overall mould change time. Standardisation of mould bases and quick-change parts will further help in swapping the moulds more efficiently and when used in combination with right software programs.

Editorial take: Email: sweta.nair@network18publishing.com The Indian plastics industry’s initiatives towards adopting and practising new technological applications are yet to gain speed. Investments where one could reap assured benefits in the long run should be considered in the plastics industry. Injection moulding machine producers should provide the thrust in helping plastics processors assimilate software programs for QMCs. 88

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FACILIT Y VISIT: N A Corporation (Naroto)

Striving for customer delight with futuristic solutions With the advent of new technologies and applications such as material handing products, waste management, fuel storage etc, the rotomoulding industry in India is growing at a fast pace. This has led to the growth in the business of companies like N A Corporation (Naroto), which is one of the leading players in the segment. Avani Jain notes the factors responsible for the company’s impressive success.

T

he Indian rotomoulding industry is currently standing at exciting crossroads, with growth and expansion in every direction. The rotomoulding industry grew more than 10 per cent per annum between 2006 and 2011. Houston-based consulting firm Chemical Market Associates Inc claims that India’s rotomoulding sector is projected to grow from 260 million pounds of plastic consumption last year to 474 million pounds in 2016. Indian rotomoulders added 88 million pounds of capacity in the last two years. The industry has large scope for growth in automotive, agriculture, travel and other industries. Keeping pace with this growth of the rotomoulding sector in the country, N A Corporation (Naroto) tops the list when it comes to companies supplying rotomoulding parts and machinery.

Manufacturer of Naroto brand of rotomoulding plants, the company has completed 31 years and continues its quest for the best. The company is a onestop shop for the complete product line for rotomoulding process. Anand Panchal, Marketing Director, N A Corporation (Naroto), says, “The rotomoulding machinery manufacturing and ancillary equipment sector is fairing well in India and even the export scenario is good. Because the quality of Indian machines has improved considerably as compared with other imported machines, the market is growing at a very fast pace. Thus, Naroto is involved in making machines using latest technology, which are very well accepted in India and in the overseas market.”

A humble beginning The company started in the year 1982

with manufacturing of moulds for rotomoulding tanks. Panchal notes, “At that time, the total work space was 300 sq m. Soon we expanded our activities and initiated developing rotational moulding machines, ancillary equipment including pulveriser, mixer, extruder, scrap grinder and mild steel & stainless steel moulds under the brand Naroto. In 1994–95, the first machine was exported, and since then, we never looked back. At present, the company is exporting to nearly 67 countries and supplying machines to 26 states in India.”

State-of-the-art facility Based in Ahmedabad, the facility is spread over an area of 12,000 sq m and is involved in manufacturing of pre-process equipment (ie colouring & powdering machines), Programmable Logic Controller (PLC; ie automation-

Photo: Nachiket Gujar

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N A Corporation (Naroto)

Photo: Nachiket Gujar

The workshop

based closed heating type rotomoulding machines), open-heating type Rock N Roll rotomoulding machines, rocking oven machines, various models of bi-axial machines and post-processing/recycling equipment (ie scrap cutter & grinder). Panchal avers, “There are separate units for different process machinery, and all the machines are tested thoroughly for capacity/efficiency prior to dispatch to customers, thus ensuring trouble-free working at the customer’s end.” He adds, “Currently, we have a manufacturing capacity of 28–30 plants per annum. Further, the company can manufacture 1400–1500 moulds per year.”

Research & Development (R&D) initiatives The company has employed novel methods in manufacturing and has an in-house R&D centre to keep up with the international trends towards automation and manufacturing excellence. “The company employs a lid machine to manufacture rotomoulded covers, thus replacing readymade injection moulded lid covers. There is a second charging facility for multi-colour products. Further, there are training facilities for the machine operators and technical staff to run the rotomoulding plant efficiently. Also, reflecting the requirements of the customers, we have initiated handling turnkey projects across the world,” notes Panchal.

Increasing machine efficiency The company has taken various steps to increase efficiency of its machines. Panchal notes, “The company manufactures energy efficient and environmental/user-friendly machines for its customers. Further,

changes have been made in oven design, a four-mould carrier has been introduced and a ‘T’ die arrangement has been adopted for the extruder machine.” With the growth in the rotomoulding industry segment, concerns are growing about achieving energy efficiency and reducing costs. This has led to the development of new machines and technologies. Panchal avers, “To reduce the energy cost, the rotomoulders are adopting energy-efficient rotomoulding machines that ensure reduced heating time, better cooling media, usage of better quality raw materials and so on. Thus, our machines are designed especially to minimise cooking time, thus resulting in reduced energy (fuel/ power) consumption. Every care is taken at Naroto for ensuring energy efficiency by implementing efficiently designed burners & blowers, using better quality insulating media/increased size for reducing the resin sintering time and fuel cost per resin weight. Further, a PLC system is used to reduce manpower, to monitor & control the process and to maintain error-free working of the machines consistently. Implementing this, the company has reduced the cooking time from about 5 min/mm of plastic to about 3.5 min/mm. Thus, our machines are designed to minimise cooking time, thus resulting in reduced energy (fuel/power) consumption.”

High quality standards The company is ISO 9001:2008 certified. Panchal says, “We employ computer numerical control machines for precision in manufacturing important spare parts of machines. There are modern testing equipment to monitor machine performance. Further, there are raw material testing/non-destructive testing,

The rotomoulding machinery manufacturing and ancillary equipment sector is fairing well in India and even the export scenario is good. Because the quality of Indian machines has improved considerably as compared with other imported machines, the market is growing at a very fast pace. Anand Panchal Marketing Director, N A Corporation (Naroto)

dimensional & aesthetic checks, actual product trials performed for every machine. Last, there are well-experienced engineers who make moulds using computer-aided design.”

Envisioning growth and future plans Panchal concludes, “The future trend will be to minimise the cost of production in energy consumption by improving the oven thermal insulation to reduce heat loss, to improve air circulation to reduce the resin sintering time, to reduce the mould cooling time to increase production and using clamping devices for quicker de-moulding rather than using conventional nuts & bolts. The company is doing its best to address the above-mentioned points. In the future, the company also wants to reduce the cooking time to 2.5 min/mm of plastic and is putting in all the necessary efforts to achieve this aim. Further, the company has re-organised its facility area for better flow of processes, and one more facility is sought for future expansion plans.” Email: avani.jain@network18publishing.com

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INSIGHT & OUTLOOK

Medical Plastics Polymers in healthcare: Setting new benchmarks ............................................................................................................... 94

Medical plastics: Injecting healthy growth opportunities ..........................................................................................96

Interface: Manoj Bhardwaj, Managing Director, SMC Medical Manufacturing Pvt Ltd ........100 Green shoots ........................................................................................................................... 101 All-electric IMMs: Achieving energy efficiency ........................................................................................................ 102

Interface: Jignesh Bavishi, Director, Neejtech India............................................................................104 Nanda Kumar T, President, Wittmann Battenfeld India Pvt Ltd ......................................105

Temperature control units: Keeping moulds under control! Y R Anand, Partner, Unimark ...................................................................................................... 106

Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF): A versatile fluoropolymer with many applications David Seiler and Sachin Upadhye, Arkema .................................................................................... 108

Lean thinking: Creating value for customers M Hariharan, Director, Savoir Faire Management Consultancy Pvt Ltd .......................................110

Engineering plastics in medical applications: Delivering healthy solutions Vikas Acharya, Director, Gerresheimer Pharmaceutical Packaging Mumbai Pvt Ltd ....................... 112

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INSIGHT & OUTLOOK: Polymers in healthcare

NEW

SETTING BENCHMARKS High-performance polymers have enhanced the opportunities for plastics usage in the medical devices industry and have made diagnosis and treatment easy and efficient. Avani Jain highlights the role and benefits of using high-performance polymers in the medical sector.

Courtesy: DuPont Performance Polymers

T

he medical devices market in India has been experiencing a double-digit growth. The market for medical devices in the country is growing at a very fast pace with a predicted annual double-digit growth rate of 23 per cent or higher for the coming years. This growth in the medical devices sector is driving increased demand for high-performance polymers in the medical segment. Advancements in polymer technology have enabled plastics to be used in medical applications that demand high consistency, performance, precision and compliance with regulations. Over the years, polymer resin manufacturers, compounders, device processors and medical devices original equipment manufacturers have together risen to the challenge to provide application-specific polymer solutions. 94

Modern Plastics & Polymers | March 2013

Beneficial features of polymers The high purchasing power of the Indian population has helped in making advanced medical treatment more affordable. This has facilitated the healthcare segment to provide further growth opportunities for plastics, especially high-performance plastics such as polytetrafluoroethylene (also called Teflon), Polyether BlockAmide (PEBA), Polymethymethacrylate (PMMA) Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) and Ultra-High-Molecular-Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE). These materials are chosen for their high-performance properties such as clarity, impact & chemical resistance, sterilisability, lubricity and kink resistance. Dr Subhas Chandra Shit, Deputy Director, Central Institute of Plastics Engineering & Technology (CIPET) – Ahmedabad, notes, “Numerous innovations are happening as a result of continuous

research and development activities to increase the usage of high-performance polymers in the medical segment. New polymers such as UHMWPE are being developed to cater to the need of the medical sector. This material is used in bone implantation. Hydrogel polymer is an example of UHMWPE, which is injected into the body to regulate blood flow, ie for expansion and contraction of blood vessels.” Further, PEBA is the ideal material for making catheter tubing because of its enhanced flexibility. PEEK is also used to make catheter tubing. Fluoropolymers are mainly used in high-lubricity, heatshrink medical tubing. These are also used to some extent in medical implants. Acrylic compounds (eg PMMA) have various applications in the medical devices segment. Typical applications include diagnostic devices, Intravenous (IV) filter housings, IV spikes etc because of properties such as high ultraviolet transmittance capabilities and good resistance to gamma radiation and to lipids found in fluid treatment and body fluids.


Polymers in healthcare

Traditionally, PMMA was used mainly for curettes and cassettes. The advent of modified acrylics has broadened its scope in the medical devices industry. As PMMA has greater impact and chemical resistance than the traditional ones, it is used in disposable IV sets. Currently, on a global scale, acrylics account for almost an equal share. Up to 90 per cent of acrylic applications in the medical devices industry are for the disposable segment. Polyurathane, UHMWPE, PEEK and fluoropolymers are some of the major polymers used for orthopaedic implant applications. PEEK is mainly used in hip, knee and spine replacements because of its non-elastomeric nature. UHMWPE is mainly applied in spine implant systems, eg spacers.

Advantages of polymers Polymers in healthcare applications include medical device applications (disposable and non-disposable) and packing, wound care management and hospital environment. Performance polymers (eg PEEK & PMMA) are typically used in non-disposable device applications because they have minimal impact on body tissues. Dr Harindu Vyas, President (Technical & Development), Signet Industries Ltd, notes, “Applications of high-performance polymers in medical sectors start from artificial body parts such as limbs, knee, hips etc to very sophisticated applications such as intravenous cannula and cardiovascular stents. When polymeric vascular stents are used in surgical sutures, its shape memory property enables the wound to heal due to its self-adjusting tension, and thus resists the tissue rupture or damage that can occur due to over fastening of the sutures. This kind of polymer is known as shape memory polymer. Thus, polymers employed for such medical applications are known as polymeric biomaterials. The application also includes prostheses for tissue replacements such as intraocular lens, dental implants and artificial organs for temporary or permanent assist such as artificial kidney or heart, vascular graft etc.

He adds,“Polymers have recently found applications in drug delivery systems. PolyActive is a biodegradable polymeric drug delivery system. Its biodegradability and linear release properties make it an excellent technology for the controlled release of proteins and lipophilic small molecules for both local and systemic administration. It has applications in pharmaceuticals and medical technology. Further, high-performance polymers have wide applications in orthopaedics, dental, physiotherapy, medical safety accessories etc.”

Moving beyond convention A bewildering array of engineering plastics is available for manufacturers today, and the choices are still expanding as material developers are continuously involved in research and development activities to increase the usage of high-performance polymers in the medical segment. Globally, about 750,000 tonne of plastics is used in healthcare applications. Of this, about 7,500 tonne comprises engineering plastics (eg polycarbonate) and highperformance plastics (eg PEEK). Thus, high-performance plastics constitute a small volume of all polymers used in the medical sector. However, advancements in medical technology in the future will propel the consumption of engineering plastics and high-performance plastics in the healthcare sector. Further, quality plays a major role in adding value to a product in the medical devices sector. Differentiating medical grade polymers from standard grades would help enhance customer satisfaction. Shit notes, “The demand for highperformance polymers in the medical sector is expanding. However, the usage and choice of material will depend on the properties desired for specific applications. In the future, many innovations in plastics will be to increase their consumption in the healthcare sector. Hydrogels, polyurethane, biodegradable plastics are already used in the healthcare sector, and many new useful materials will be developed in the future.” Email: avani.jain@network18publishing.com

Numerous innovations are happening as a result of continuous research and development activities to increase the usage of highperformance polymers in the medical segment. New polymers such as UHMWPE are being developed to cater to the need of the medical sector. Dr Subhas Chandra Shit Deputy Director, Central Institute of Plastics Engineering & Technology (CIPET) – Ahmedabad

Applications of highperformance polymers in medical sectors start from artificial body parts such as limbs, knee, hips etc to very sophisticated applications such as intravenous cannula and cardiovascular stents. Dr Harindu Vyas President (Technical & Development), Signet Industries Ltd

March 2013 | Modern Plastics & Polymers

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INSIGHT & OUTLOOK: Medical plastics

Injecting

HEALTHY GROWTH opportunities

Courtesy: Pittsburgh Pastics Manufacturing

T

he growing population of India plays a pivotal role in the growth of the medical sector in the country. Contributing about 6 per cent to India’s gross domestic product, the demands in this sector are huge. This has resulted in a considerable growth in the industry’s manufacturing segment. The growth in the medical sector has given a boost to the Indian plastics industry. The global medical plastics market is estimated to reach nearly $ 10 billion by 2015. Most of this growth is expected to come from the Pacific region and Asia, including India. These days, there is increased usage of plastics in medical devices, which has led to the development of new technologies for manufacturing medical grade plastics. Plastics processors, including injection moulding solutions providers, are continuously adopting new ways for catering to market needs. Most commonly used injection moulding solutions for manufacturing of medical grade plastics include all-electric IMMs, micro-IMMs, multi-component IMMs and liquid IMMs. There are some variances of injection moulding solutions, which are 96

Modern Plastics & Polymers | March 2013

based on the medical plastics products. Of these, the usage of all-electric IMMs for moulding medical grade plastics is increasing at a fast pace. Jignesh Bavishi, Director, Neejtech India, notes, “There is an upsurge in demand of all-electric IMMs, especially in the medical segment. This is largely because injection moulded plastics used in medical devices meet the stringent specifications and quality norms. Further, these machines help in moulding innovative products which demand a high level of repeatability and accuracy.”

Market status The demand for IMMs in the Indian medical sector has been mainly for lower and medium tonnage machines. Amit Mahant, Director, PK Plastic International Pvt Ltd, says, “Until 2005–06, lower tonnage machines of 25–100 tonne had the major market share (about 70 per cent), while medium tonnage machines of 110–350 tonne had a market share of 30 per cent. From 2007, the requirement started increasing for medium tonnage machines. This shows a good demand for IMMs in the medical sector due to

The changing global healthcare landscape has resulted in increased usage of medical plastics, prompting manufacturers to continually adopt new injection moulding solutions such as allelectric Injection Moulding Machines (IMMs) for better results. Avani Jain highlights the demand for all-electric injection moulding solutions and the advantages offered by these in manufacturing high-quality medical grade plastics. increase in requirement, multi-cavitation, faster production etc. At present, the demand for medium tonnage machines is 70 per cent and that for small tonnage machines is 30 per cent.” He adds, “If we talk about the allelectric IMMs in particular, then with aggressive growth in medical, pharmaceutical and medical packaging sectors, investment in all-electric IMMs is expected to increase. This growth will be further fuelled by productivity improvement initiatives due to manpower shortage, wage inflation and higher power cost. Clearly, all-electric IMMs can provide numerous advantages to today’s medical moulders and medical grade plastics manufacturers.”

Demanding medical sector Medical devices are among the most challenging products for injection moulders to work with. In addition to the constant pressure to reduce cycle times and cost, medical moulders must meet stringent Food and Drug Administration (FDA) specifications, tight tolerances and sterilisation requirements for many of the parts they produce. The traditional


Medical plastics

There is an upsurge in demand of all-electric IMMs, especially in the medical segment. This is largely because injection moulded plastics used in medical devices meet the stringent specifications and quality norms. Jignesh Bavishi Director, Neejtech India

Courtesy: Suzler Ltd

hydraulic IMMs introduce variables and complexities into the process that can negatively impact precision and reliability. All-electric IMMs, on the other hand, make the process more efficient and cost effective. They are quicker and cleaner, especially given recent technological advances. Thus, the usage of all-electric IMMs is increasing in the medical sector.

Advantageous all-electric IMMs

Injection-moulded plastic parts are quickly replacing conventional materials in medical devices not only because of their wide-ranging material advantages such as sterility and design flexibility but also because of the cost and speed with which they can be manufactured. Amit Mahant Director, PK Plastic International Pvt Ltd

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The demand for all-electric IMMs is increasing manifold due to the benefits they offer customers, ie energy efficiency, greater cleanliness, quick start-up, shot-toshot consistency, better repeatability and noiseless operations. Further, they have fewer complex parts than hydraulic IMMs, making them relatively more reliable. Adding to the benefits offered by all-electric IMMs, Bavishi notes, “The allelectric IMMs are clean room compliant, ie absolutely not a drop of hydraulic oil or oil mist is seen around the machine. Further, they are regarded as green machines because they guarantee a low-emission production environment. These machines offer a high level of accuracy and repeatability, have a high uptime and provide product consistency. Also, there is no water cooling requirements for these machines and they require least maintenance as there are no valves, piping and oil leaks. They ensure constant high part quality at higher output and result in 10–15 per cent cycle time reduction. Further, they fulfil the stringent norms of FDA/quality system regulation. Moreover, the all-electric IMMs consume

the least energy among all the IMMs and this brings down the cost per piece of medical parts.”

Growth opportunities The medical sector presents huge growth opportunities for injection moulding solutions providers. Mahant says, “Every year, the demand for IMMs is increasing by 9–10 per cent as many of the medical components manufacturers understand the importance of quality machines and good manufacturing practices. Injectionmoulded plastic parts are quickly replacing conventional materials in medical devices not only because of their wide-ranging material advantages such as sterility and design flexibility but also because of the cost and speed with which they can be manufactured.” In the coming years, there would be a major demand for all-electric IMMs. Bavishi notes, “In the future, the demand for all-electric IMMs in moulding medical grade plastics would increase drastically due to switching over from hydraulic IMMs to all-electric IMMs by medical devices processors. The main reason for this will be stringent regulations in medical devices moulding, which at present are not very effectively enforced. Further, as we increase our exports, we would need to comply with international norms for medical moulding, which naturally would inspire moulders to go for all-electric IMMs because of the unique features offered by them.” Email: avani.jain@network18publishing.com


INSIGHT & OUTLOOK: Inter face - Manoj Bhardwaj

“Medical device moulding machines are being tightly integrated with downstream manufacturing and assembly” …opines Manoj Bhardwaj, Managing Director, SMC Medical Manufacturing Pvt Ltd. In an exclusive conversation with Avani Jain, he talks about the injection moulding process requirement in moulding medical plastics. He further elaborates on the current trends and innovations making headway in the segment. What are the recent trends in the segment?

What are the various injection moulding solutions available for manufacturing medical grade plastics? Most medical plastic components have to be injection moulded in clean rooms to ensure extremely low physical and biological contamination levels. Polymers have to be dried and blended with colorants/additives outside the clean room under controlled conditions and then fed to machine hoppers using automated conveying systems. Finally, injectionmoulded medical components have to be handled and packaged extremely carefully so that the low contamination levels are maintained even after removal from the clean moulding room. Besides conventional injection moulding, the special techniques used for medical components are Liquid Silicon Rubber (LSR)/liquid injection moulding, multishot moulding, insert moulding, micro moulding, gas assisted moulding and thin wall injection moulding. 100 Modern Plastics & Polymers | March 2013

State-of-the-art Computer-Aided Engineering (CAE) software and mould flow analysis tools are being used to help predict properties of moulded parts and carry out innovative experiments to analyse injection moulding. High precision and fully automatic injection moulding machines are being retrofitted with mould cavity pressure controllers for extremely high parts consistency. Robotics is being leveraged for automated insert placement, ejection, parts sorting and handling. For LSR, advanced moulding technologies are being used for making flash free components. Most excitingly, medical device moulding machines are being tightly integrated with downstream manufacturing and assembly, such as printing, gluing, welding, assembling and packaging. Online testing of subassemblies or finished devices is also being integrated in some cases. Automation and robotics play a major role in building such manufacturing, assembly and testing lines.

What are the leading innovations making headway in the segment, and what are the recent research & development initiatives of your company? Rapid prototyping techniques such as stereo lithography, selective laser sintering and 3D jet printing are used to convert Computer-Aided Drafting (CAD) models into 3D prototypes which help crunch time to market for new medical devices. In metrology, advanced visual, laser and X-ray-based metrology devices are used for making accurate measurements in a fraction of time. Some of these instruments are so fast and accurate that they are used on moulding, manufacturing or assembly lines for online metrology inspection. At

SMC India, we are building competencies to help our global customers redesign medical devices for the local market. This requires a deep understanding of the devices, manufacturing technologies and relevant therapies. This also requires knowledge of materials/parts sourcing and local distribution channels. We also require deep insight of the needs of doctors, hospitals, paramedical staff and patients. Besides building this competency in house, we are leveraging external competencies by partnering with key stakeholders in the local ecosystem.

What are the future trends? Future developments involve CAE, such as Simulia software & mould flow analysis, which helps predict the properties of moulded parts, innovative experiments to analyse processing, new machineries (processing) and recycling plastics. Usage of rapid prototyping techniques for converting a CAD model into a 3D part will also be seen.

What are the company’s growth plans keeping in mind the demand for injection moulding solutions in the medical sector? SMC India’s growth plans span across domestic & export markets in areas of medical device design rationalisation, injection mould design and fabrication, clean room & white room injection moulding, fabrication/machining of metals & plastics, manufacture of medical device components, subassemblies and full devices. With regard to injection moulding, we have made substantial investments in creating stateof-the-art design, tool room and clean room injection moulding with cutting technologies and will continue to expand in all these areas. Email: avani.jain@network18publishing.com


INSIGHT & OUTLOOK: Green Shoots

With numerous green initiatives on the horizon, we bring to you in association with the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) this section ‘Green Shoots’ – the latest to keep you updated on the green phenomenon and to help promote the eco-friendly manufacturing philosophy. We will get you closer to several green practices, products and technologies that not only have a lower impact on the environment but are also safer for company personnel. Read on to get more eco-friendly, energy-saving and economical solutions that can give Indian companies a global business edge.

March 2013 | Modern Plastics & Polymers 101


INSIGHT & OUTLOOK: GREEN SHOOT S: All-electric IMMs

ACHIEVING ENERGY EFFICIENCY

Addressing the global cry of conserving energy, moulders of plastic products are keeping an eye out to lap up the latest technology that will help them increase efficiency by reducing consumption of energy. All-electric Injection Moulding Machines (IMMs) are the latest rage in the industry, and Sweta M Nair evaluates the factors related to this phenomenon.

I

MMs play an important role in the plastics manufacturing industry. It is this machine that produces formed objects which are primarily made from thermoplastic materials. The process in an IMM begins when a molten plastic is injected into a mould. The plastic then cools and solidifies, the part is ejected and the cycle is repeated. The process is highly energy intensive because forming solid objects from thermoplastic material requires high clamping force during part formation. IMM builders are facing unprecedented change. The escalation of oil and natural gas prices has put the spotlight on innovations that focus on achieving not moderate but considerate energy savings in IMMs. There has never been a greater need to deliver improved performance and innovation in machine design. Popularity bagged by substance, the all-electric IMM owes its fame to its cleanroom compatibility and dramatically less consumption of energy. All-electric machines use only high-speed servo motors and are a better solution for the power-crunched industry because repeatable and precise cycles are possible, and they are faster than hydraulic machines.

Being accurate An all-electric IMM is digitally controlled and mechanically driven. Because allelectric IMMs have no hoses to expand, no valves to potentially stick and no 102 Modern Plastics & Polymers | March 2013

All-electric IMM from NIIGATA

hydraulic fluid to heat up or compress, their processes do not vary over time. Thus, all-electric IMMs offer several important benefits which are related to the fact that individual motors control each function, as opposed to a control system consisting of a complicated arrangement of hydraulic hoses. “As per the recent industry trend, moulders want to move towards the direction of achieving high productivity by lowering the running cost. The visible shift is in the attitude of people; earlier they were more conscious about the initial capital investment, but now they are a bit more relaxed about it,” divulges Dinesh Bharti, Senior Manager – Sales Engineering, Toshiba Machine India Pvt Ltd. He adds, “50–80 per cent less energy, no noise & vibrations, high productivity & less down time, low factory utility investment and excellent consistency & accuracy levels are some of the salient advantages of using an all-electric IMM.”

Maintaining quality Injection moulding becomes a more predictable operation when using allelectric IMMs. This type of technology makes it possible to continue and use the same process setup without affecting part consistency or quality. With regard to these machines, moulders often report that good parts can be produced by the third or fourth shot and then run without attention until it is time for a mould change. For instance, digital precision is used for screw position for fill and pack which eliminates over-packing and greatly reduces moulded-in stress. Unmanned shifts allow moulders to achieve consistent machine performance along with labour cost reduction. Hence, utilisation of skilled labour is greatly enhanced. “All-electric IMMs are designed for higher productivity. Customers in the Indian market are accepting these machines as they are


All-electric IMMs

beginning to understand their advantages. Moreover, if machine design is good, then it can be suitable for any segment of the plastics industry,” reveals Bharti.

Differential factors All-electric machines produce faster cycle times because of independent clamp/ injection functions. Their precision shot control saves material and prevents using more resin, colorant or additive than the part needs. Electric machines let processors mould closer to the threshold of just-the-right-amount of material, without falling below it. Whether small or large, all-electric machines dramatically reduce operating costs. Connected power requirements for an electric machine are only 25 per cent of those of a hydraulic machine. Bharti adds, “There are no complex parts in an all-electric IMM. The biggest advantage of having less parts is minimising the spare parts inventory cost. These machines can perform in low running cost even at low cycle time because individual servo motors are

constantly working. When referring to the relationship of the machine throughput, it all depends on the moulding process. Nevertheless, it is certain that the customer is going to get better unit/kg compared with a hydraulic machine.” Other standard features of all-electric IMMs are excellent injection response time & holding pressure endurance, repeatable precision moulding, a high rigidity clamping mechanism & frame, stabilised precision moulding, high cycle moulding with no time lag and maintenance-free operation. The average annual warranty costs of an all-electric IMM are less than half those of an equivalent hydraulic machine. However, to a certain extent, estimates of energy savings are typically based solely on the IMM technology type and throughput. Factors such as product type, product cycle time, injection temperature, clamping pressure, screw length and clamping distance also influence energy usage. Email: sweta.nair@network18publishing.com

All-electric IMMs are designed for higher productivity. Customers in the Indian market are accepting these machines as they are beginning to understand their advantages. Moreover, if machine design is good, then it can be suitable for any segment of the plastics industry. Dinesh Bharti Senior Manager – Sales Engineering, Toshiba Machine India Pvt Ltd

March 2013 | Modern Plastics & Polymers 103


INSIGHT & OUTLOOK: GREEN SHOOT S: Inter face - Jignesh Bavishi

“Moulders can achieve reduction in rejection rates” …says Jignesh Bavishi, Director, Neejtech India, representing NIIGATA, Japan, when talking about energy-efficient all-electric Injection Moulding Machines (IMMs). He also brings out interesting structural differences of an all-electric injection moulding system and discusses with Sweta M Nair the several important benefits that work in its favour. How has the injection moulding market changed in recent years? Trends in the injection moulding market are concentrated on deriving high productivity, increasing machine cavitations and adoption of hot runner moulds with ease. Thought process has changed from macro to micro, and small material saving considerably brings down cost. Customers look minutely to each avenue to optimise moulding cost. They acknowledge their environmental responsibility while moulding plastics. Advanced technology is also no longer a luxury for a select few. Inherent features of all-electric IMMs, such as high efficiency, major saving in the running cost (the power cost of allelectric IMMs is almost 1/3rd that of hydraulic IMMs), high accuracy, high repeatability, reduction in cycle times, clean room compatibility, high uptime and low maintenance requirement, prove to be real game changers in the market.

What are the structural differences between hydraulic and all-electric IMMs? Hydraulic drives and their interconnections with various actuators, valves, manifolds, hydro motors, pumps etc make hydraulic IMMs more complicated than allelectric IMMs with electrical drives. A high number of discrete components in hydraulic IMMs sometimes bring in many 104 Modern Plastics & Polymers | March 2013

variables such as oil leaks, friction losses, temperature changes etc. All these are replaced by few components such as ball screw, timer pulleys, timer belts and simple electrical wires connected with a couple of servo motors in an all-electric machine. With fewer components, the all-electric IMM not only performs consistently but also has easy troubleshooting options.

What sort of energy and cost savings are you referring to when considering all-electric IMMs? Major cost saving is in electrical power consumption. Because these machines do not have a drop of oil – no oil cooler is required, so moulders can get rid of cooling towers with their clumsy piping and maintenance menace. Moulders can achieve reduction in rejection rates, high uptime due to trouble-free working, 10 to 15 per cent cycle time reductions and no oil replacement or disposal.

Is maintenance relatively simpler in the long run for all-electric IMMs? Maintenance is simpler in electric machines. Gone are the days when the reliability of electronic components was doubted. World-class electronic drives and servo motors used in electric machines not only withstand harsh industrial conditions (eg quality of electrical power) but also protect the electronic controls

from external surroundings. Moreover, the ball screws and linear motion guideways used in all-electric IMMs are well proven devices that have been in use with computer numerical control machine tools since a couple of decades. In case of maintenance, the downtime is very short due to its ‘snap-on’ kind of simple electro-mechanical drive system where you can replace the parts with much ease, which is usually not the case with hydraulic machines where moulders have to take care of clumsy piping, oil leakage, oil cleaning, oil tank cleaning, cylinder realignments, dismantling of RAMs etc.

What are your company’s latest offerings? NIIGATA Japan offers a range of worldclass machines. These comprise all-electric machines ranging between 50 and 1,000 tonne. We also offer a vertical range from 30 to 150 tonne machines. The popular series MD XB (50–100 tonne) is a favourite among Indian customers. These machines are preferred by the medical, electronics and automotive segments because of their value for money. The MD W series (180–450 tonne) is suitable for the automotive and packaging industry. With repeatability to the tune of 0.008 g, we offer machine injection speeds from 130 to 600 mm/sec. Email: sweta.nair@network18publishing.com


INSIGHT & OUTLOOK: GREEN SHOOT S: Inter face - Nanda Kumar T

“The initial capital investment is justified by the machine’s energy efficiency” …says Nanda Kumar T, President, Wittmann Battenfeld India Pvt Ltd, when referring to all-electric Injection Moulding Machines (IMMs) as valued investments. In an exclusive interview with Sweta M Nair, Kumar reveals energy-saving possibilities that can be attained with all-electric IMMs. What recent trends have changed or shaped the injection moulding market? On an average, 50 per cent of the running cost is calculated on the basis of energy consumed. Most companies are formulating ways to reduce the running cost of IMMs. A reduction in energy cost is a huge savings that will positively save on the running cost as well. I believe the Indian market is starting to take concrete steps towards implementing energysaving methods. Increasing numbers of moulders are cutting electricity costs by switching to clean-running all-electric machines. The current energy crunch and massive energy price hikes also make these machines more alluring to moulders.

Does an all-electric IMM require an auxiliary cooling system? All-electric IMMs with a highly efficient servo drive do not need a cooling system – any external device will increase the running cost. Wittmann Battenfeld has designed the machine with an integrated system. This increases energy savings by a huge margin.

What amount of energy and cost savings can moulders achieve by using your machines? Wittmann

Battenfeld’s

EcoPower,

equipped with Kinetic Energy Recovery System (KERA), is a more efficient machine compared to the existing electric machines in the market. Other advantages of the EcoPower are speed, precise injection, repeatable holding for long time and backpressure. It has a clean and compact capsuled gear unit and consumes minimal energy because of internal utilisation of braking energy for power supply to the control system and barrel heating. This machine has a direct drive and no belt, due to which there is no loss of energy. This machine is widely accepted in the automotive market for its high hold on time. The EcoPower takes up modest space and is extremely low on noise emission. With this machine, moulders can achieve a minimum of 60 to 65 per cent power saving as compared to hydraulic machines.

Could you describe the standard features of your machines and services? Wittmann Battenfeld offers many standard features that give more energy saving for the moulder, such as incorporation of KERA, a direct drive to reduce transmission loss, built-in servo power pack to help in core pulling, Windows embedded controller to integrate with supporting equipment and free-of-cost 24/7 web service.

How can Indian moulders achieve energy savings in injection moulding processes? To achieve efficiency in process parameters (eg product cycle time, injection temperature, injection pressure, mass of resin per shot and screw diameter), IMMs should be optimised because energy is consumed in the form of heat and high injection pressure. From a moulder’s perspective, it is important to keep investments effectively used. At Wittmann Battenfeld, we have sealed toggle bushes that keep machines clean from dust. A machine-integrated maintenance schedule helps considerably reduce breakdown. To suit the Indian market, we are working towards reducing the cost of the machine through standardisation. Because return on investment is crucial, moulders should reduce running costs by installing efficient machines. Many features of the Ecopower significantly contribute in power saving during operation; thus, the initial capital investment is justified by the machine’s energy efficiency. From an international perspective, the company offers a range of injection units – from 5 to 300 tonne – suitable for all market segments. Email: sweta.nair@network18publishing.com

March 2013 | Modern Plastics & Polymers 105


INSIGHT & OUTLOOK: Temperature control units

Keeping moulds under control! The longest part of a typical injection moulding cycle is the cooling time of the part inside the mould. This article examines the choices for a moulder and the features of a good quality Temperature Control Unit (TCU). Y R Anand

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he most time-consuming part of the injection moulding cycle for thermoplastic parts is part cooling. Be it high-speed moulds used for tiny parts, typical caps and closures or technical parts with longer cycles, it is always about the cooling time. This is a direct function of the thickest section of the wall and, to some extent, the raw material. Accurately controlling the temperature inside the mould results in several advantages for a moulder: Improved surface finish Better dimension control Improved product quality Lower scrap rates Improved cycle time and productivity Increased machine and mould times Lower energy costs Let us look at what is meant by controlling the temperature inside the mould and what are the options for a moulder. Fundamentally, it can be accurately cooling or heating the mould.

Mould cooling Chillers: In fast cycle applications, the mould will have to be rapidly cooled in order to achieve fast cycle times. Many applications currently even run at a cycle time of less than two seconds. Chillers are normally of three types: 1. Air-cooled or water-cooled 2. Water-cooled 3. Cooling towers

kW rating. Thus, the higher the kW rating, the faster will be the heat-up time. However, once up to temperature, they can cool as well as heat; hence, the term ‘temperature controller’ is used rather than ‘heater’. In direct cooling, the cold water is introduced directly to the tank and hot water is dumped into the drain or the central cooling system. This system is a little crude but can be good for lower temperatures. In indirect cooling, the cooling is provided via a heat exchanger (coil, plate or shell and tube type). Indirect cooling is commonly used because of a greater level of control. For instance, a high-capacity plate heat exchanger can be used as opposed to a direct cooled unit to give a low temperature, but with the added control of an indirect unit. Such basic units have relatively low cost of purchase and will often use water. There is never a mess in the event of spillage and it provides efficient heat transfer. However, they offer a low temperature range. There is always potential corrosion from untreated water in mould (as opposed to oil) and calcification. For heating units above 90°C, one has to use oil as the boiling point of water is 100°C. For moulding shops, which are reluctant to use oil due to the fear of contamination,

Mould heating TCUs: Water or oil can be used as a medium of heat transfer from the control unit to the mould.

Water heating Basic TCUs are simple open tank systems that control water temperature up to 90°C. Such units heat water to a running temperature. They are often judged by their 106 Modern Plastics & Polymers | March 2013

Twin circuit TCU Courtesy: TOOL-TEMP AG, Switzerland

there are pressurised water units that can go up to 140°C or even 160°C. When under pressure, water can remain in liquid form at temperatures well above 100°C. A pressurised TCU becomes a closed system when the temperature reaches 85°C, thus creating a pressure within a sealed tank with a fixed volume of air and water. As the temperature increases, the water pressure increases allowing temperatures of up to 140°C (or 160°C) without boiling. With high pressures, significant safety features must be included within the unit, as well as improved pipe work for the medium. These units can heat and cool, depending on the demand from the consumer. Water is low cost and efficient in heat transfer, but it cannot reach as high a temperature as oil. The initial cost of a pressurised TCU is also significantly higher than that of a standard unit.

Oil heating There are numerous cases where the mould temperatures will have to be higher than 95°C. This is often the norm for moulding engineering polymers. TCU is also used in die-casting, chemical, textile and laminating processes. Using oil allows the moulds to run at much higher temperatures. However, heat transfer oil is expensive, can be messy and does not transfer heat as well as water. In an open system, mineral heat transfer oils can run at up to 150°C. In a closed system, the temperature can be increased to about 250°C. Synthetic heat transfer oils (eg Marlotherm) can be run at up to 360°C using appropriate oil heaters. The advantages of the oil unit are high temperature range (up to 360°C) and no calcification or corrosion. However, initial costs are higher, oil has lower heat transfer efficiency than water, heat transfer medium is expensive and maintenance needs to be regular. Besides, it is messy in the event of a leak.


Temperature control units

Features of good quality TCUs Accuracy of measurement: Accurate TCUs control and display with 0.1°C least count. Such accuracy can only result in very consistent parts. This could be critical in production of functionally important parts in every application, especially technical products. Sensitive flow meter: This shows the actual flow rates of the heat transfer medium on the control display unit. This feature is particularly useful to detect changes in the cooling channels due to contamination, cracks, calcification etc. Any change in the flow rate of the medium acts as a warning for the operator to finish the production run and inspect the mould. Suck back arrangement: This runs the pump in reverse in the event of a leak developing at the mould. The water is then ‘vacuumed’ around the mould allowing the production shop to finish the production run in an emergency. The negative pressure will not be equivalent to the positive pressure; therefore, flow rate may be compromised. However, this can be an advantage as leaks will occur during production and this feature compensates that to allow continuous production. Mould drain: This returns water or oil to the tank in the temperature controller. It is useful prior to mould changes. External thermocouple: Connecting an additional thermocouple to the TCU allows moulders to monitor the temperature at the mould rather than at the tank of the TCU. Interface: This allows the TCU to communicate with the moulding machine (machine with necessary hardware and software) and can be either digital or analogue (hard-wire). This is useful for automated production. Composite TCUs offer a combination of chiller and temperature controller features. Moulders can use the chiller to control the hydraulic oil temperature in the moulding machine and the mould temperature. For high-quality surface finish, there are TCUs where the temperature changes rapidly (30–150°C) with water. Such a TCU has two independent circuits that can be operated at different temperatures. A circuit for heating of the load is active, and the other circuit is used for cooling. Massive jumps in temperature can occur within a few seconds.

Summary Good production practices demand the use of a good quality temperature controller to ensure consistency and quality of parts. Y R Anand holds a Bachelor’s degree in Mechanical Engineering from University of Mysore and a Master’s degree in Production Engineering from IIT Kharagpur. Since 1980, he has been a partner in UNIMARK, which provides sales and service of machines for plastics processing, tool making, micro-electronics and wire mesh welding. Email: anand@unimark.in

March 2013 | Modern Plastics & Polymers 107


INSIGHT & OUTLOOK: Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF)

A VERSATILE FLUOROPOLYMER WITH MANY APPLICATIONS With many high-performance characteristics, Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF) is a polymer that has widespread applications. The usage of this versatile polymer ranges from providing cleaner water to increasing the life of lithium ion batteries. Recent technology developments in several segments make PVDF a fluoropolymer we cannot afford to ignore. David Seiler and Sachin Upadhye

T

he selection of a polymer for an application often requires several outstanding properties in combination rather than a single strong feature. PVDF possesses several special properties as compared to other polymer choices as well as metallic options. PVDF is known in many industries for its property of resistance. It is resistant to chemicals, weathering (stability to ultraviolet weathering), constant moisture, long-term temperatures of 150째C, abrasion and impact. It also has a high resistance to burning and smoking when in contact with flames. In addition, PVDF is Food

and Drug Administration compliant and has high mechanical strength, the ability to dissolve into solution to make films & coatings and a low permeability to gases & fluids.

Developments in PVDF Recent technology developments include copolymer technology (where the vinylidene fluoride monomer is reacted along with a fully fluorinated comonomer to provide higher chemical resistance for certain applications), greater flexibility, impact resistance, higher clarity, higher elongation at break and the ability to be coextruded with other polymers on achieving lower melting point.

Another development is continuous foam extrusion and the ability to form moulded structures, reducing the weight of the final product by over 40 per cent. Foaming can increase flexibility while maintaining high temperature during use as well as provides improved insulation properties. In wire & cable applications, foaming improves the dielectric constant (making it lower) and makes wire jackets easier to strip. Other processes for foaming PVDF sheets in a batch process can yield shapes that reduce the specific gravity by 60 times the original value of 1.78. PVDF compounding technology has been introduced in many product types, and some of the more popular product offerings are carbon fibre-reinforced products for high strength and low mould shrink materials, conductive materials for handling fuel and other chemicals that have a concern with static build up, blends with acrylics to make longlife paint finishes & protective films and functionalised materials that allow bonding to other structural polymers. If the molecular weight of PVDF can be reduced enough and the appropriate molecular structure obtained, then fine fibres can be processed out of this polymer. This would allow the production of woven and non-woven fabrics. Although this market is new and still developing, it is exciting and holds a lot of promise.

Markets and applications

Courtesy: Arkema Inc

PVDF insulation for wires and cables

108 Modern Plastics & Polymers | March 2013

Architectural paints: PVDF is used in paint finishes for application on to aluminium outdoor building products such as wall panels, doors, window frames, roofing and other common construction


Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF)

Courtesy: Arkema Inc

Glove box made of PVDF

items. This product enables architects to design buildings in nearly any colour and the coating will not fade or flake off for many years, even with heavy exposure to direct sunlight. Before the adoption of fluoropolymer paint finishes, architects were concerned with colour fading over time, and they often opted to design buildings using brick, stone or concrete rather than using painted metal. Since the development of typical coating grade PVDF, architects have even found ways to create reflective paint coatings that conserve energy for building owners, especially those in warm sunny climates. Chemical process industry: PVDF and Flex PVDF are used mainly to handle highly corrosive and hot chemicals that would otherwise severely oxidise common metals or would stress crack or dissolve common plastics. The most common chemical applications for PVDF piping, tanks, pumps, valves and tower packing are for chlorine & chlorinated solvents, bromine & brominated solvents, hot acids (chromic, hydrobromic, hydrochloric, hydrofluoric, methane sulphonic, nitric, phosphoric and sulphuric), mixed fuels and high-purity deionised water. The combination of high mechanical strength, abrasion resistance and chemical resistance makes PVDF fluid handling components a favourite among mechanical and chemical engineers who deal with highly corrosive chemicals. Wire and cable: Flex PVDF is used to insulate wire and cable in many types of constructions. Because of its high

temperature capability, flame resistance, abrasion resistance, good flexibility and chemical resistance, PVDF is used in cathodic protection cables in the mining industry, automotive wires & cables, aircraft cables, marine cables and cables exposed to chemicals. The fact that this fluoropolymer has a low enough processing temperature to be processed on equipment also designed for polyolefins, nylons and polyvinyl chloride gives it a cost advantage for the manufacturer compared to fluoropolymers that require special equipment tooling to process. Photovoltaic/solar energy: PVDF films are used as the back sheet in the production of solar panels in the energy industry. The most cost-effective and durable solar panels need to be designed with materials that can handle constant exposure to ultraviolet light and general weathering conditions for up to 40 years without limiting the efficiency of the unit. PVDF films have been tested to UL standards for relative thermal index and are rated an amazing 140°C for continuous use. Top laminators of solar systems use PVDF back sheet to protect the inner polyester layers as well as the new inner polymer layers being developed. Lithium ion battery binders: With the world moving to longer life batteries using lithium ion technology, the manufacturers of such batteries need to choose a long-life binder that will maintain its function in the cathode for the expected lifetime of the product. PVDF binder products are used in

solution to bind the carbon in electrodes, and its good stability allows better battery performance over a long lifetime. By choosing the correct molecular weight of PVDF for the process, the battery manufacturer can use only minimal amounts of binder in the carbon matrix. Water purification: Because PVDF can be put in solution and has chemical resistance to cleaning agents and overall stability, an emerging market for this polymer is in ultra-filtration and micro-filtration membranes. Flat sheet membranes are commonly used in pharmaceutical applications, and hollow fibre membrane technology is common in water filtration systems. With the choice of the proper PVDF, the system can be steam-cleaned, ozonated and cleaned with bleaching chemicals with little or no effect on the life of the membrane system. Water treatment companies are increasing the usage of PVDF in their system designs.

Summary PVDF is not just limited to the markets considered above. With all of the properties discussed, there exists a possibility of many other usages that have yet to be discovered or are still in the development stage. A combination of properties makes PVDF and Flex PVDF versatile for engineers, architects, designers, chemists and manufacturers. David Seiler is Americas Business Manager, Industrial & Global Advisor, Fluoropolymers, at Arkema Inc. Email: david. seiler@arkema.com Sachin Upadhye works with Arkema India and has more than 15 years of experience in the coating industry. Email: sachin.upadhye@arkema.com

Arkema has been manufacturing PVDF homopolymer and copolymer grades for more than 35 years. These polymers are sold under the brand names KynarÂŽ and KynarÂŽFlex.

March 2013 | Modern Plastics & Polymers 109


INSIGHT & OUTLOOK: Lean thinking

CREATING

value for

customers

Lean thinking is about aligning the people and process to the purpose (customer value) so that the provider prospers. Going lean does not mean getting into cost reduction, but it focusses on getting more with less. M Hariharan

A

ccording to James Womack, a lean organisation searches for a perfect process that is valuable (creates value for customers), capable (minimises process variability), available (has reliable processes), adequate (meets the demand), flexible, flowed (moves towards one-piece flow), pulled (provides when customers want) and levelled (anything, any time).

Building blocks for a lean journey Customer value: Lean thinking focusses on creating value for the customer. Value is critical for an organisation to Identify the consumer (not only the immediate customer appearing in the books but all the stake holders who are impacted by the offerings) Articulate the value proposition Identify the gaps in value creation and fulfilment Thus, value forms the starting point of the lean journey.

Do unto others as they would wish to have done unto themselves Anything that does not add value for the customer is waste. Lean thinking focusses on waste elimination. Taichi Ohno, the guru of the Toyota Production System identified seven areas of waste (Muda) that destroy customer value. 1. Defects (output beyond the tolerance limits) 2. Overproduction (work performed well and before the customer wanted it) 110 Modern Plastics & Polymers | March 2013

3. Waiting (work waiting to be processed; men waiting for instruction) 4. Transportation (movement of work outside the workplace to get processed somewhere else and brought back; resources moved to locations where it is not needed) 5. Inventory (work completed and waiting) 6. Motion (movement of information through hierarchy; strain in working postures) 7. Extra processing (rework, iterations more than warranted) Ohno also identified overproduction as the mother of all wastes. Shigo Shingo, who developed the concept of Single Minute Exchange of

We expect our customers to give us orders to take care of our minimum batch quantity requirement. What we fail to understand is our customers’ minimum requirement is much lesser than our minimum batch quantity.

Die, added “Non-utilised creativity of people” as the eighth area of waste. All these waste areas arise primarily because we tend to focus on local efficiencies at the cost of global efficiencies. Our processes focus on internal customers and fail to think from the perspective of external customers. We expect our customers to give us orders to take care of our minimum batch quantity requirement. What we fail to understand is our customers’ minimum requirement is much lesser than our minimum batch quantity. “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you” is often misunderstood to expect our customers to change their requirements to meet our requirements. We need to “Do unto others as THEY would WISH TO HAVE DONE unto THEMSELVES.”

What the customer ‘does’? The common refrain is ‘understand what the customer wants’. Quite often, the customer may not be in a position to articulate what he wants. More appropriately, we need to understand what the customer does with what we give him. Let us take the following example. Refractory is a product such that if the quality improves, the sales drop. If the quality improves, the wear and tear of the refractory could minimise. Hence, it would be replaced less often. So long as the sales representative of the refractory company meets


Lean thinking

the purchase executive of the steel maker, only the want of the purchase executive to reduce the price of the product emerges as the customer want. If we start looking beyond the purchase executive’s want of reduced price, we can understand what the production in-charge does with the product we give the company. With improved refractory quality, the number of times the furnace is stopped to relay the bricks comes down. This leads to released capacity available for producing more from the same plant. If this value proposition is addressed, it is no more a relationship between the sales and purchase. It will emerge as a relationship between the supplier design engineer and the user’s production in-charge. As Theodre Levitt said, “People don’t want a quarter-inch drill; they want a quarter-inch hole.”

Who actually pays for the product/service? After understanding what the customer does, we need to look beyond the apparent customer representative to understand the real customer. The customer is not the only one who pays for a service. Everyone who is impacted by a product/ service has a say in the purchase decision. In the case of a customer for a product such as earth-moving equipment (dozers), many people impact the purchase decision of the product – Purchase executive (normally looks at the lowest price), Mine in-charge (normally expects a faster output from the equipment), Dozer operator (wants a hassle-free user experience), Maintenance (expects the uptime to be higher), Finance (expects easier paper work for funding), Material handling (expects lower cost of operation) and Safety (expects the equipment to be safe to operate). In a typical situation of the sales representative meeting the purchase representative, most of the other interests are either missed out or compromised. To define the customer requirement, it is imperative to look beyond the immediate decision maker.

Conclusion Lean implies being effective and not simply efficient. Processes that fulfil the customer requirement are effective processes. Doing these processes consistently is being efficient. To create an efficient process, we have to understand whether the process that we need to excel in is required by the customer. Thus, the critical first step to embark on a lean journey is defining who the customer is, what he wants and what he does.

M Hariharan practises consultancy in the field of cost management, lean thinking, constraint management, management control system and business excellence as Founder Director at Savoir Faire Management Services. Savoir Faire helps organisations to improve their profitability by aligning their people and processes to customer value and articulate the bottomline impact using the cost excellence (CE©) model. Email: hari@sfccostmanagement.com

March 2013 | Modern Plastics & Polymers 111


INSIGHT & OUTLOOK: Engineering plastics in medical applications

Delivering healthy

solutions With engineering plastics making rapid inroads into medical applications, the key to competency and profitability lies in innovating for quality and safety. From implants to disposables, plastics offers various advantages including design flexibility, impact, strength, biocompatibility and the ability to be formed into many different shapes through different processing methods. Vikas Acharya

A

dvanced technology, novel materials and new concerns have transformed the healthcare scenario across the globe, inspiring new standards in plastics for medical devices. With a promise to ensure active healthy lifestyles and quality of life, the usage of plastics is gaining prominence in medical devices and equipment. Manufacturers are also continually engaged in developing breakthrough materials, novel product designs and line extensions. Innovations in medical plastics are expected to fundamentally transform the healthcare and delivery subsystems. Further, the ability of plastics to reduce cost allows disposables to replace devices that were previously cleaned, sterilised and reused. There is a worldwide growth in demand for intelligent drug delivery and quality primary packaging solutions. Innovation is key for the medicalgrade plastics industry in order to deliver tailor-made solutions for medical and pharmaceutical applications. Glass has conventionally been used in the medical devices industry. For designing and developing plastic grades for this industry, it is essential to understand the requirements and limitations of the end user. Here, material compounders and product designers can combine the advantages of both glass & plastics. One result of this overarching competence is the new multi-layer plastic vial 112 Modern Plastics & Polymers | March 2013

made from cyclic olefin polymer and polyamide. Glass and plastics experts in various countries have succeeded in significantly improving essential product characteristics. To achieve this, the usually single layer wall of the plastic injection vial is modified to a multi-layer design through the use of state-of-the-art injection blow moulding technology. An intermediate layer of polyamide is placed between the two layers of cyclic olefin polymer, increasing impermeability.

Quality issues Outstanding quality and continuous innovation are integral to design and development of medical devices. An essential factor for high product quality for the pharma & healthcare industry is production, processing & product assembly in clean & controlled shop floors. Defect-free manufacturing translates not only into a healthy bottom line but also builds brand equity with confidence and consistency. Thus, it is necessary to constantly review the status quo and improve processes, products and services. In a quality- and innovationdriven industry such as medical applications, it is important to promote continuous learning in the laboratory and shop floor, thereby encouraging a culture of excellence and high performance. To guarantee that manufacturers can maintain and develop high-quality claims and offer customers the best possible product, quality culture must

be an integral component of corporate strategy. Constant knowledge transfer and proactive, partnership-oriented direct dialogue with business partners are ideal ways to stay competent in the pharma & healthcare industry.

The plastics advantage Besides delivering standard drug packaging systems, plastics is employed to develop highly innovative and complex systems for all types of inhalers for treatment of respiratory diseases and insulin pen systems for patients with diabetes to various disposable products for laboratory & molecular diagnostics. Plastics has the unique ability to provide a wide range of high-quality primary packaging for liquid and solid medication. This includes application & dosage systems, such as eye droppers and miniature nasal spray vials, as well as special containers for tablets & powders. This range is complemented by key design features, including multi-function closure systems with tamper-evident, child-resistant closures and integrated desiccants.

Revolution through innovation The pharma packaging components for the new generation of biopharmaceuticals play a major role in the development of drug delivery systems. This is because these components have significant influence on the stability and safety of ourtesy: OPTI the respective drug formulation launched as parenteral solutions. The innovative


Engineering plastics in medical applications

design of high-performance multi-layer vials based on a combination of the plastic material cyclic olefin polymer is highly compatible to sensitive biodrug formulations and is a single polyamide layer that provides high-barrier properties to protect sensitive drug formulations from oxidation or water

Characteristics of medical plastics solution providers 360 degree services: From product development to export logistics Global network of production sites and clean-room facility In-house mould making for product flexibility Machinery engineering capacity to increase cycle times Innovative automation engineering to reduce human interaction Competence in validation/ certification and worldwide quality standards

vapour. The inertness of the inner drug contact surface and improved barrier of multi-layer vials against oxygen improve drug stability over shelf life. Advantages for the pharma industry are increased efficiency and higher dose accuracy. For various reasons, safety requirements have been forcing the pharma industry to look for high crack-resistant packaging. Here, multi-layer vials demonstrate superior resistance against break or crack as compared to glass vials. The specific multi-layer design with its inner polyamide layer provides additional integrity assurance even when unusual forces are applied to these types of containers. Although injection vials made of glass are important products for the pharma industry in Europe and North America, their enormous demand in emerging markets is demanding rapid plastics usage. Further, growth segments in the still predominant Western pharma markets are drug delivery systems made from plastics and glass, which

facilitate administration, dosage & safe application of medicines. Global solution providers invest increasingly in these innovations, eg insulin pen and skin-prick aid are important products for the diabetes market. Demand for pre-fillable syringe systems made of glass is also displaying unprecedented growth. This is due to steady spread of certain illnesses such as diabetes and asthma. The importance of self-medication is also growing. Thus, there is plenty of room for innovations in the field of drug delivery systems. Here, the focus is on medical systems based on plastics and realised by a full-service basis for companies involved in pharma, diagnostics and medical technology. From product idea to continuous series production, the emphasis is on individually customised and user-friendly technology. Vikas Acharya is the Director of Gerresheimer Pharmaceutical Packaging Mumbai India Pvt Ltd. Email: V.Acharya@gerresheimer.com

March 2013 | Modern Plastics & Polymers 113


AUTOMATION TRENDS: Computer-aided tool design

THE

AUTOMATION EDGE Tooling design for manufacturing processes refers to direct tooling for making parts such as moulds and dies. In the last two decades, Computer-Aided Design (CAD), Computer-Aided Engineering (CAE) and Computer-Aided Manufacturing (CAM) tools have been developed to assist mould designers in mould design configuration, analysis and machining. In a bid to grasp the automation scene in computer-aided tool design, Sweta M Nair quizzes players of this segment.

A

decade ago, the vocation of mould making was largely based on skilled experience and artisanship. Typically trained under an apprenticeship scheme, the moulder or maker acquired his skill set through time-consuming years of practice. This arrangement was overhauled completely when CAD/ CAM technologies were introduced in the late 70s. However, in contrast to other industry verticals, its acceptance in mould designing has been relatively slow. Until only quite recently, commercial software systems have begun to appear and are being adopted in the toolmaking and moulding industry. The high concentration of mould design activities has led to the development of many software programs focussing their effort on providing solutions to the mould design aspects.

Distinct challenges Automated parting line, surface determination, core & cavity design, runner & gate selection, analysis of temperature distribution and flow of plastic material in the mould and the effective interfacing with different mould bases are focus areas of these software systems. However, this segment has challenges of its own. “One of the biggest challenges in CAD for plastic tool design is the creation of a parting line for a given component, particularly when profiles become increasingly intricate. Although the intention of this software tool is 114 Modern Plastics & Polymers | March 2013

Delcam’s automated electrode solution

to make life easier in times like these, continued development of the software along with training of the designer can address this issue. Another challenge is overcoming the diversity in CAD model formats and unifying it, especially when neutral formats come with their own baggage of data losses, surface mismatch, units mismatch etc. Therefore, data exchange is also one of the major challenges in the plastics tool design industry. Furthermore, in small plastic parts for the electronic and automotive industries, there are many areas in a core/cavity that cannot be machined on a computer numerical controlled milling machine. Such areas need to be ‘extracted’ for electrical discharge machining and automatically masked for the subsequent milling process. Finally, the creation of the mould base itself, based on industry

standards or user-defined standards, continues to be a challenge,” reveals Vineet Seth, Managing Director – India & Middle East, Delcam Plc, UK. Although the industry as of now has developed simulation tools such as Moldflow (which addresses flow-related troubleshooting), many manual changes are done in the 2D drawings of each individual item in the mould assembly due to limitations of software programs. Rajiv Bajaj, Head Manufacturing, Autodesk India & SAARC, adds, “The main concerns would be to make the CAE tool design software to update automatically, which means any change made in the part automatically gets updated in the tool design software with good accuracy. Moving on, the next major test would be to infuse manufacturing intelligence, where a software program would be capable of


Computer-aided tool design

automatically generating a parting line considering manufacturing feasibility and optimal tooling expenditures without any human interference. Having a built-in database of plastic materials in the CAE tool is another area of development. Hence, the next logical step would be to have a tool which can address core manufacturing decisions.”

Automation edge With unlimited possibilities, computeraided manufacturing makes it possible to evolve, broaden and produce several similar products with the same equipment. “With the software, now it is easier to create solid models of any non-standard components and define relationships with the other components. Furthermore, all identical parts within an assembly are recognised automatically as instances of the same component. This prevents unnecessary duplication of data, reduces overall model sizes and makes regeneration of the complete tool much faster after design changes. Automated methods to generate the general assembly and all the component drawings are now made faster and more reliable. Thus, the time needed to produce a complete set of drawings for even a complex mould takes no longer than a day in contrast to the two to three weeks that were typically needed with traditional drawing methods. One of the latest advancements in tool design automation is the end-to-end electrode design, manufacture and inspection suite. This automates the process of extraction of an electrode or a group of electrodes by means of a step-by-step wizard that takes the user through selection of areas to creating automated tool-paths and probepaths for machining and inspection, respectively,” says Seth. The need of the hour is on formulating new-age solutions that have been formulated with regard to mould cooling analysis when using computer-aided tool design. Sharing the latest on this topic, Bajaj adds, “Transient cooling has really emerged as a fantastic tool in CAE. With this, heat fluctuations in the mould are recognised. It helps in understanding

when a stable state is achieved from production start-up. This solution can be integrated with tool designing software wherein the software recognises high heat fluctuations in mould vicinity and creates cooling channels.”

Areas of improvement Significant advancements in CAD/ CAM software help ensure that the final component of a mould tool complies with the design parameters with a high degree of accuracy that can be verified automatically at each crucial stage. However, there is room for improvement when concentrating on certain areas. Achieving optimal clamping force at the designing table is more of a science than an art. Factors such as area of the part, runner system, mould surface, cavity pressure, opposing force etc along with the additional factor of safety are taken into consideration. To this, Seth explains, “Experience factor, external factors such as heat and type of moulding machines are other variables that contribute to the optimal clamping force calculation. Now you can imagine that it is not a straightforward summation. This area not only needs more research but also more practical training for the operator and production engineers in order to optimise this function further.” Bajaj too voices a similar concern; he says, “There is a lot of difference in the clamping results from the 2010 version. However, there have been times when the customer has raised issues that clamping tonnage predictions are not near to their practical results. The effect of side cores on clamp is another area which could be addressed.” For enhanced automation to enter the scene, computer-aided tool design should be coupled with practical experience and technical knowledge. This would lead to the creation of a range of effective tools that would help in solving dayto-day challenges. Moreover, working closely with moulders and documenting their feedback would enable designers to prioritise and zero-in on specific problems. Email: sweta.nair@network18publishing.com

One of the biggest challenges in CAD for plastic tool design is the creation of a parting line for a given component, particularly when profiles become increasingly intricate. Vineet Seth Managing Director – India & Middle East, Delcam Plc, UK

Transient cooling has really emerged as a fantastic tool in CAE. With this, heat fluctuations in the mould are recognised. It helps in understanding when a stable state is achieved from production start-up. Rajiv Bajaj Head Manufacturing, Autodesk India & SAARC

March 2013 | Modern Plastics & Polymers 115


ENERGY MANAGEMENT: Ef ficiency through heat recover y

Using

RESIDUAL HEAT for higher PRODUCTIVITY Moulding and manufacturing of plastic parts require transferring considerable amounts of heat. Hence, it becomes important to follow heat recovery mechanisms to enhance efficiency in the moulding process. Anwesh Koley explores the various ways by which plastic waste heat can be recovered.

T

he efficiency with which heat is extracted from the various processes can have a tremendous impact on maximising productivity and remaining competitive. A method of recovering energy in plastic pipe manufacturing uses a sealing gasket compression moulding process in which a gasket moulding material is placed in a cavity – formed between fixed and movable mould members – with a predetermined shape. Pressure is then applied between the fixed and movable mould members to cause the gasket moulding material to conform to the shape of the mould cavity. A compression or injection moulding operation is used to form a sealing gasket that is used in the subsequent manufacturing operation as part of the energy recovery system. “A Stirling engine cycle is used to recover heat during gasket manufacture. The Stirling engine is driven by waste heat from the mould members or other associated parts of the injection or compression moulding apparatus,” says Mangesh Manjrekar, Director, Raj Engineering Works. The recovered waste heat is used to subsequently heat the female pipe end in the pipe manufacturing process.

116 Modern Plastics & Polymers | March 2013

Managing heat through chillers The most common method of accomplishing heat extraction is through the use of a portable chiller. Portable chillers are generally sized according to tonne of capacity. Here, a tonne is defined as the capability to extract or reject 12,000 British Thermal Units (BTUs) per hour. A 5-tonne chiller can reject 60,000 BTUs per hour. “If a chiller is needed for an injection moulding machine that is processing 120 lb of high density polyethylene per hour, a 4-tonne chiller should be selected for the job. Generally, portable chillers are available in sizes ranging from fractional tonnage up to 30–40 tonne. Beyond that, the units are too large and cumbersome to really be considered portable,” says Vijay Bali, Vice President, Reynold India Pvt Ltd. For the most part, portable chillers are offered in two styles: air-condensed and water-condensed. Air-condensed units utilise a radiator-type coil and fans or a squirrel-cage blower to condense the refrigerant. This implies the need for a constant supply of relatively cool, fresh air. By contrast, water-condensed units incorporate a shell-and-tube heat exchanger to accomplish the same task, requiring condensing water from a cooling tower.

Chiller speed according to requirements Variable speed chillers are specific to injection moulding and it does not carry any advantage for extrusion. These chillers


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Ef ficiency through heat recover y

have been designed for specific injection moulding needs that help users to produce results from the process while maintaining the lowest life cycle cost of the equipment. In order to gain the desirable benefits from the latest technology equipment and processes, chilled water, as an auxiliary supply, needs to be available at precise flow rates and pressures, in addition to temperature accuracy. Different parameters of the equipment such as capacity output, power consumption, performance and electrical load conditions must be inspected for the right performance. Chiller manufacturers need to work within a range of capacities varying precisely as per the changing process loads, enhancing process control and saving energy by up to 25 per cent. Chillers must have high-pressure multistage pumps with the flow rate varying precisely as per the process requirement. “For specific process requirements, the water pressure must be adjustable along with rust-free chilled water supply for accurate process control and low equipment maintenance. This chilled water should be controlled via an automatic chilled water level controller with by-pass arrangement. Air-cooled units must have high-efficiency aluminium condensers with high flow and low noise fans,” adds Bali. Installed equipment may be operating at their maximum efficiencies, so they must be synchronised with other modern technologies to have higher levels of efficiency. Trained people must operate these chillers considering their multi-faceted requirements.

Water-condensed chillers The choice between an air-condensed or water-condensed chiller requires careful consideration. Because portable chillers transfer the heat from the process to its surroundings in one form or another, the environment in which the chiller will be used must be suitable. Aircondensed chillers must be located in an open, well-ventilated space to avoid

overheating. If the chiller has a blower rather than fans, the heated air may be carried away via ductwork as long as adequate makeup air is provided. In addition, air-condensed chillers should not be used in areas where the ambient air temperature exceeds 35°C. Water-condensed chillers can be operated in hot, closed areas as long as they can be supplied with cooling tower water to carry away the heat. The amount of water needed will vary based on the capacity of the chiller. “Components and features available in today’s portable chillers are drastically different from those offered just a few years ago. Probably the most important change has been the introduction of scroll compressors and brazed plate evaporators,” says Manjrekar. Scroll compressors, which use a mating pair of orbiting scroll plates to compress the refrigerant, have fewer parts than reciprocating piston compressors. The efficiency of brazed plate evaporators permits the transfer of significant amounts of heat in a compact size. This change has allowed chillers to be much more space-efficient than in the past, making better use of valuable plant floor space. Other features that are more prevalent today are non-ferrous construction to minimise corrosion & water contamination and features such as microprocessor controls with special communication capabilities.

Way ahead The recovery of waste heat during plastic processing plays an important part not only to increase energy efficiency but also to increase productivity. With the advancements in technology and the numerous requirements from chillers, it has become important to combine features such as robust design, temperature control and faster cooling with energy efficiency. While the heat generated during plastics processing is managed through chillers, it is important to ensure that these chillers remain free of emission. Email: anwesh.koley@network18publishing.com

Components and features available in today’s portable chillers are drastically different from those offered just a few years ago. Probably the most important change has been the introduction of scroll compressors and brazed plate evaporators. Mangesh Manjrekar Director, Raj Engineering Works

For specific process requirements, the water pressure must be adjustable along with rust-free chilled water supply for accurate process control and low equipment maintenance. This chilled water should be controlled via an automatic chilled water level controller with by-pass arrangement. Vijay Bali Vice President, Reynold India Pvt Ltd

March 2013 | Modern Plastics & Polymers 117


POLICIES & REGULATIONS: Dealing with quality

PROBLEMS AND SOLUTIONS

Courtesy: Ngai Hing Hong Ltd

The Indian polymer industry has adapted well to changes in the global market. It is now moving towards evolving as a major global player as the international plastics fraternity is noticing the high quality standards followed in India. However, the enthusiastic expansion plans of companies in the polymer industry are wrought with challenges that hinder the smooth working for manufacturers. Anwesh Koley analyses some of these obstacles and suggests suitable steps.

T

he consumption of Indian polymer products is on the rise. While manufacturers were sceptical about using the latest technology earlier, this trend has given way to extensive Research and Development (R&D) in the field of masterbatches. We now witness the advent of the latest machinery in the country. The plastics industry is currently gearing up towards reducing the pollution caused by the industry. Several machines have been developed that produce less wastage and help in reprocessing of the waste. “Polymer consumption is expected 118 Modern Plastics & Polymers | March 2013

to double in the next three years as products by Indian manufacturers are competitively priced as compared to those by European manufacturers,” says R K Aggarwal, Managing Director, Prayag Polytech Pvt Ltd. Manufacturers now ensure that the waste they produce is either disposed properly or can be recycled.

Quality issues The primary requirement for the industry is availability of high-grade polymers. The final plastic product depends heavily on the quality of raw materials available with manufacturers.

Rajeev Bhatia, CEO, Premier Pigments & Chemicals, says, “We face an acute problem of low-quality polymers for the industry. The Indian quality is not up to global standards; hence, we have to import from Europe, particularly from Germany.” Dependence on imported polymers has not changed in the past years, with manufacturers finding it difficult to find options in the domestic market. The industry requires imports for specific materials such as Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC), which is in short supply. This is because India has a net shortage of PVC and few large-scale players manufacture this raw material.


Dealing with quality

“The Indian consumer is increasingly becoming aware about the compatibility of the packaging material with the product inside. Hence, manufacturers of raw materials ensure that no hazardous chemicals are used in the production of plastic products and are also refraining from using metals,” says Aggarwal. Earlier, such initiatives were taken only for plastic products used for packaging food items, but gradually, the entire packaging industry along with manufacturers of fast moving consumer goods have adopted such practices due to consumer demand. These days manufacturers of air-conditioners, refrigerators and even automobiles are using heavy metal-free plastic materials as these not only reduce the final mass of the product but also help in better designing avenues for the product.

Role of the government The government does not have specific policies for the polymer industry and, while this has not hindered manufacturers from being profitable, policy support in some areas could make a difference. “The government needs to have a better understanding of the usage of polymers and their applications. This will help manufacturers as the customer will better understand the quality of the product,” feels Bhatia. Even for polymer machinery manufacturers, advancements in plastics technology provide scope to adopt internationally accepted standards and higher consumer satisfaction. “New resins, additives and fillers are entering the market, which can enhance material properties without much change in the price. As compared to the conventional single-screw machine, twin-screw extruders and gravimetric feeders have taken a lead with higher output, better quality and less involvement of people,” says Aggarwal. The latest technology in plastics helps in better detection of the material according to specific requirements. Most companies have their own R&D facilities, and those that do not, generally outsource research activities to achieve a more customer-centric final output. The latest technology used in the raw

material production machinery ensures that more customisation can be achieved along with higher rigidity.

Land constraint Another constraint for manufacturers is space availability. At times, expansion plans of companies are stalled due to lack of infrastructure and land availability. Most manufacturers operate in small areas and often do not have adequate space to implement measures towards achieving green productivity norms. “Even after going ahead with our expansion plans, we cannot achieve the desired levels of efficiency as we are handicapped for space of operation. Acquiring land is an area of concern, as it is often a cumbersome procedure,” says Aggarwal. European polymer manufacturers operate on a much larger scale compared with their Indian counterparts.

Polymer consumption is expected to double in the next three years as products by Indian manufacturers are competitively priced as compared to those by European manufacturers. R K Aggarwal Managing Director, Prayag Polytech Pvt Ltd

Pricing it right Pricing is an important factor determining the growth of the polymer industry. In the long run, pricing determines the competence of a country. “The prices of masterbatches have been on an upsurge for the last few years due to a sharp rise in raw material prices and consolidation of international raw material suppliers. Sourcing quality raw material from consistent and reliable suppliers will be the key in the coming years,” says Bhatia. New masterbatch players, both domestic & international, will need to keep the selling prices competitive, thereby presenting a challenging market scenario and reduction in margins. The volume growth should help sustain most players but, as in most industries, efficiency and innovation will be required.

Future outlook The latest technology in polymer processing needs to be supported well with proper infrastructure. Manufacturers are willing to innovate and bring quality up to international standards, but without adequate power and land availability, expansion plans cannot be taken forward. Email: anwesh.koley@network18publishing.com

We face an acute problem of low-quality polymers for the industry. The Indian quality is not up to global standards; hence, we have to import from Europe, particularly from Germany. Rajeev Bhatia CEO, Premier Pigments & Chemicals

March 2013 | Modern Plastics & Polymers 119


STRATEGY: Injection moulding

REDUCING

THE COSTS OF

PRODUCTION Injection moulding has been the preferred processing technology for part manufacturing that requires high output and accuracy. With the increasing demand for injection moulding machinery, the concerns over reducing the costs for ensuring efficient injection moulding process is also increasing. Avani Jain notes some of the cost reduction techniques that can be adopted by injection moulding processors. is required to offer better priced, highquality machines that produce higher volumes, and the injection moulding machinery segment is no exception. This forces a drive of cutting the cost and increasing efficiency in producing quality products. To reduce the cost of production, aspects such as power cost, productivity, machine breakdown time and material cost can be tackled.”

Cost considerations

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he accessibility of plastics has increased with the rising number of industries using plastics. This has bolstered the growth of the injection moulding process. At present, the injection moulding industry in India is growing at 14–15 per cent per annum. Commenting on the market for injection moulding machines in India, Praveen Sharma, Managing Director, Hinds Plastic Machines Pvt Ltd, says, “The demand for injection moulding machines is different in different sectors. If we talk about the automobile sector, then the demand has decreased in the last three to four months as the overall 120 Modern Plastics & Polymers | March 2013

economic growth has also slowed down. However, in the field of commodity plastics & packaging, the demand is quite high and is continuously increasing.” Despite the rising growth and opportunities for injection moulding machinery, the industry is faced with certain issues that need to be tackled at the earliest so as to increase the demand further. One of the basic issues is cutting cost without compromising on the efficiency of the process. Hitesh R Shah, Business Head – Injection Moulding Machines, Windsor Machines Ltd, notes, “In the global competitive market, every manufacturer

There are various cost components that one needs to consider at various stages of the injection moulding process. Shah avers, “During production, machine selection, energy consumption, cycle time and rejection rates have to be considered. Thus, one needs to pay attention to optimum machine selection, which increases productivity due to lower cycle times. Further, selection of machines with servo motor will lead to low power demand per kilogram. In addition, six sigma should be practiced for better quality control and for reducing rejection. Moving ahead, the quality-related costs depend on shot-weight inconsistency and colour dispersion quality. Further, during changeover, increase or decrease in cost


Injection moulding

may be due to mould changeover times and purging costs. Thus, one should also use mould height adjustment and auto purging. Lastly, the maintenance cost involves spares and down time costs. Thus, reduction in spare cost can help reduce the maintenance cost to a very large extent.” These steps can be adopted by the injection moulder during the various stages. Apart from these, there are various other considerations that the processor should keep in mind. “First, preventive weekly & monthly maintenance is very important to reduce breakdown cost. Second, moulds should use advanced technology (ie fully automatic) and, if possible, the mould should have hot runners. The cost of these moulds may appear higher at the time of purchase, but in the long term, it reduces the cost of runner regrinding and the cost of removing burrs manually. Third, the machine should be equipped with the required auxiliary equipment, such as hopper, dryer & auto loader, which saves the time & cost of loading the material manually. Fourth, time-to-time inspection of the final product to minimise rejection is also important,” notes Sharma. He adds, “Our company provides training to the end users on a regular basis so as to make them friendly with the machine and educates them on how to maintain the machine. That can minimise breakdown and increase the efficiency of the machine, which can also reduce the overall cost of production.”

Increasing overall efficiency Thus, the industry is continuously setting new highs each year thanks to the increased ability of Indian injection moulding machinery suppliers to accommodate better technologies to enhance production and reduce costs. Sharma notes, “To increase the efficiency of the moulding process, the machines are designed in such a way that the machine gives higher output with minimum rejection. To achieve this aim, we design the machine with closed loop circuit that ensures correct injection pressure required to inject the material into the mould in each cycle. In addition, the machine has advance technology control through a programmable logic controller, which can graphically display the injection

pressure and various other parameters to ensure zero rejection production. The production in-charge checks the hourly production, the number of good and bad shots as well as the reasons of bad shots etc.” Further, there are an umpteen number of innovations occurring in the injection moulding segment for improving the quality of machines. Sharma avers, “To improve the quality of machines, we provide the machines with the latest technology and all the advanced features. In fact, we were one of the first manufacturers in North India who introduced the servocontrolled RAM-type injection moulding machine in 2009, which saves energy up to 40 per cent. Also, we have a quality check of each and every component at different stages of machining.” Noting the advantages of servo motors in reducing power costs, Shah says, “These days, servo motor-driven geared pump machines are also increasingly used because the geared pump offers the highest efficiency of transmission. This, when used with servo motor feedback and drive, offers the best response level of actuators, resulting in high repeatability and highest power cost savings.”

We design the machine with closed loop circuit that ensures correct injection pressure required to inject the material into the mould in each cycle. Praveen Sharma Managing Director, Hinds Plastic Machines Pvt Ltd

Future trends Influence of technology in plastics processing machinery adds value by reduction in cost and increase in profit. Shah avers, “Reduction in cost during the injection moulding process can be achieved by lower power cost, high consistency in production, high repeatability of performing parameters, lower machine down time and lowering material content without compromising on the physical properties desired of moulding.” The future injection moulding machine will be the all-electric machine with an affordable price. Sharma concludes, “We have to develop these machines to fall within the budget of a moulder. We also have to expand our manufacturing facilities to produce injection moulding machines in large volumes. The tool room should be equipped with the latest equipment & machinery, and each part of the machine should go through different stages of quality checks & trials.” Email: avani.jain@network18publishing.com

In the global competitive market, every manufacturer is required to offer better priced, high-quality machines that produce higher volumes, and the injection moulding machinery segment is no exception. Hitesh R Shah Business Head – Injection Moulding Machines, Windsor Machines Ltd

March 2013 | Modern Plastics & Polymers 121


TIPS & TRICKS: Maintenance of injection moulding machine

Prerequisites for efficient operation Injection moulding is one of the most prominent methods used in the plastics industry. Over the years, this technique has helped manufacturers by offering them design versatility and a variety of texture options for the final product. It thus becomes important for manufacturers to keep in mind certain factors required for the maintenance of Injection Moulding Machines (IMMs). Anwesh Koley highlights the prerequisites for efficient operation of IMMs.

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he process of injection moulding involves various steps that must work in tandem for the final output to be produced according to the required specifications. A significant

number of accidents have occurred because safety devices supplied with machines have deteriorated by use or have been removed and not replaced. Electrical and mechanical parts involve separate techniques to be

kept in a healthy working condition. This requires both manual as well as motorised elements to keep equipment in order. (With inputs from AB Diachem Systems Pvt Ltd) Email: anwesh.koley@network18publishing.com

The following minimum checks should be made to ensure that safety is maintained:

Electrical parts: Electrical parts constitute the main units of any IMM. If sufficient attention is not paid to maintenance, electrical components may easily loosen due to machine vibrations and cause machine failure. The terminal block and wiring should be periodically inspected and tightened in order to avoid any loose electrical ends. External wiring should avoid collision, and the use of friction materials should be avoided.

Maintenance of hydraulic system: The injection pressure in an IMM is a major factor that determines product quality. Hence, the stability of the hydraulic system is very important. Failure of the hydraulic system mainly results due to the improper working of temperature controls and oil pollution. The operator must check the temperature control in this situation, and if unusual, must notify maintenance personnel to reduce the oil temperature.

Preventive maintenance work: The manual central lubrication system, lubrication distributor and lubricant hose should be checked daily. The four Gelin columns must be kept clean. The feet moving template slip and slide should be kept clean and lubricated. The designed working pressure should be kept at the exact level to clamp the mould. The mould position should be adjusted only when the mould is opened to the maximum.

Replacement and temperature control: The mould should be replaced periodically so that it does not allow cooling water flow to the control box. The control box temperature should be checked; temperature must not be too high or else it will affect the c o m p u t e r. S p e c i fi e d voltage relays should be used if the relays need to be changed. Regular dust removal from the electric box is a must.

Maintaining oil temperature: Oil temperature should be maintained at 30–55°C. If the oil temperature exceeds 55°C, long-term operation will cause problems (oxidation and operational deterioration). The internal oil cooler should be cleaned once in six months to prevent damage/maintain optimum internal cooling performance. Contaminated hydraulic oil leads to valve failure and accelerated wear of hydraulic components.

Regular maintenance: The two guiding cylinder pillars of the injector and the surface and dry injectors should be clean. Besides plastic materials and additives, no other thing can be added into the hopper. If there is extensive use of the turning mill outlet, the hopper magnet should be added to prevent metal fragments into the barrel. In case the barrel set up melting temperature is not reached, the hydraulic motor should not be activated.

122 Modern Plastics & Polymers | March 2013


PROJECT S

New projects and expansion activities are the barometers of industrial growth. These also present business opportunities to service providers like consultants, contractors, plant & equipment suppliers and others down the value chain. This feature will keep you updated with vital information regarding new projects and capacity expansions being planned by companies in the plastics, polymers and allied industries.

Plastic park All India Plastics Manufacturers Association (AIPMA) Project type New facility Project news All India Plastics Manufacturers Association (AIPMA) is planning to set up a plastic park in Dahej, Gujarat. Nearly 30 plastics manufacturers in and around the financial capital of India will be investing ` 600 crore in the upcoming plastic park in Dahej. The units are eyeing to save capital and operations costs by moving to the state. The plastic park will be spread across 200 acre. The first phase of the project will have firms establishing non-polluting units on more than 125 acre. Project location Dahej, Gujarat Project cost ` 600 crore Implementation stage Planning Contact details: All India Plastics Manufacturers Association (AIPMA) AIPMA House, A-52, Street No. 1, MIDC Marol, Andheri (East), Mumbai – 400 093 Tel: 022-28217324/25, 28352511/12 Fax: 022-28216390 Email: office@aipma.net

Polyester film plant SRF Industries (Thailand) Ltd Project type New facility Project news SRF Ltd, a multi-business entity engaged in the manufacture of chemical based industrial intermediates, has announced to set up a film plant in Bangladesh and a metalliser in Thailand. The company is planning to set up a polyester line with a capacity of 28,500 tonne annually in

Bangladesh and a metalliser with a capacity of 7,050 tonne annually in Thailand at a total investment of about ` 290 crore. Project location Bangladesh and Thailand Project cost NA Implementation stage Planning Contact details: SRF Industries (Thailand) Ltd 3 Map-Ta-Phut Industries Estate I-1 Road Tambol Map-Ta-Phut Amphur Muang, Rayong 21150 Thailand Tel: +66-38-683600-6 Fax: +66-38-683101

Polyvinyl chloride & high-density polyethylene pipes and fittings Suraj Logistix Pvt Ltd Project type New facility Project news Suraj Logistix Pvt Ltd is planning manufacturing of polyvinyl chloride & high-density polyethylene pipes and fittings. Project location Jharkhand Project cost NA Implementation stage Planning Contact details: Suraj Logistix Pvt Ltd 706, New Sitaramdera PO Agrico, Jamshedpur – 831 009 Tel: 0657-2429701 Fax: 0657-2439087

Polyvinyl chloride rigid pipes and fittings Unibell Polyplast

Project type New facility Project news Unibell Polyplast is planning to set up a polyvinyl chloride rigid pipes and fittings manufacturing unit. Project location Patna, Bihar Project cost ` 30.315 million Implementation stage Planning Contact details: Unibell Polyplast Plot No. 393, Baghakole Bihta–Bikram Road Greater Patna – 801112 Tel: 09162666060, Fax: 08603475395 Mob: 08298895402 Email: info@unibellpipes.com

Rigid polyvinyl chloride pipes and fittings Finolex Industries Ltd Project type New facility Project news Finolex Industries Ltd is planning to set up a new polymers project at Ratnagiri in Maharashtra. The project involves manufacture of rigid polyvinyl chloride pipes and fittings. Project location Ratnagiri, Maharashtra Project cost NA Implementation stage Planning Contact details: Finolex Industries Ltd P14 Rajiv Gandhi Infotech Park MIDC Ph. 1, Hinjewadi, 26-27, Mumbai–Pune Road, Pimpri, Pune 411 018 Tel: 020-27475963

Information courtesy: Tendersinfo.com 1, Arch Gold, Next to MTNL Exchange, Poisar, S V Road, Kandivali (W), Mumbai - 400 067, Maharashtra, India Tel: 022 28666134 • Fax: 022 28013817 • Email: parmeet.d@tendersinfo.com

124 Modern Plastics & Polymers | March 2013


TENDERS

Latest LatestPopular PopularTenders Tendersbrought broughttotoyou youbybywww.tendersinfo.com www.tendersinfo.com High-density polyethylene/polypropylene woven bags Org : Udayapur Cement Industries Ltd TRN : 14741988 Desc : Supply of 10,00,000 pieces high-density polyethylene/polypropylene poly woven bags BOD : 11 Mar 2013 Loc : Nepal BT : Global (ICB)

Plastic sheets Org : New Delhi Municipal Council (NDMC) TRN : 14612483 Desc : Providing and fixing ultraviolet stabilised fibreglass reinforced plastic sheet in veranda of flats BOD : 11 Mar 2013 Loc : New Delhi BT : Domestic (NCB)

Poly film Org : Northern Command TRN : 14733036 Desc : Procurement of food grade poly film at military farms BOD : 13 Mar 2013 Loc : Dehradun, Uttaranchal BT : Domestic (NCB)

Perspex sheet Org : Chittaranjan Locomotive Works TRN : 14754857 Desc : Providing Perspex sheet for lighting arrangement in the shop along with aluminium paint BOD : 14 Mar 2013 Loc : Burdwan, West Bengal BT : Domestic (NCB)

Plastic bottles Org

: Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale della Lombardia e Dell - Emilia Romagna

TRN Desc BOD Loc BT

: : : : :

14506648 Supply of plastic bottles for milk analysis 15 Mar 2013 Italy Global (ICB)

Plastic sintering machine Org TRN Desc BOD Loc BT

: : : : : :

Hřgskolen I Gjřvik 14567827 Acquisition of plastic sintering machine 15 Mar 2013 Norway Global (ICB)

Bags and sacks for recyclable waste Org : Skien Kommune TRN : 14735415 Desc : Supply of bags and sacks for recyclable waste BOD : 18 Mar 2013 Loc : Norway BT : Global (ICB)

High-density polyethylene spiral vats Org : Department of Atomic Energy TRN : 14503880 Desc : Design, fabrication, testing and supply of high-density polyethylene spiral vats mounted on fibre-reinforced plastic-coated mild steel structure BOD : 18 Mar 2013 Loc : Mumbai, Maharashtra BT : Domestic (NCB)

Plastic containers Org TRN Desc BOD Loc BT

: : : : : :

Nagasaki University 14513416 Supply of plastic containers 18 Mar 2013 Japan Global (ICB)

Org: Organisation’s name, TRN: Tendersinfo Ref No, Desc: Description, BOD: Bid Opening Date, Loc: Location, BT: Bidding Type. Information courtesy: Tendersinfo.com 1, Arch Gold, Next to MTNL Exchange, Poisar, S V Road, Kandivali (W), Mumbai - 400 067, Maharashtra, India Tel: 022 28666134 • Fax: 022 28013817 • Email: parmeet.d@tendersinfo.com

March 2013 | Modern Plastics & Polymers 125


EVENT LIST

National Fax: 022-26736736 Email: oppi@vsnl.com

Compack Chennai

Hyderabad Andhra Pradesh May 31-Jun 3, 2013

India’s premier industrial trade fair on products and technologies related to Machine Tools, Hydraulics & Pneumatics, Process Machinery & Equipment, Automation Instrumentation, Packaging & Auxiliaries, IT Products, Electrical & Electronics, Material Handling and Safety Equipment.

For details contact: Network18 Media & Investments Ltd, Ruby House, 1st Floor, J K Sawant Marg, Dadar (W), Mumbai 400 028. Tel: 022 3003 4651 • Fax: 022 3003 4499 Email: engexpo@infomedia18.in Web: www.engg-expo.com

Indo-German International Seminar For the 5th time, the Organization of Plastics Processors of India (OPPI) and the German Plastics and Rubber Machinery Association within VDMA will jointly organise the Indo-German International Seminar on ‘Plastics in Automotives’. This technology seminar aims to introduce a wide range of emerging plastics processing technologies to Indian plastics processors. The conference will focus on plastics machinery for the automotive industry, emphasising the practical use of technologies to improve processes; March 7–8, 2013; at Trident, Chennai, Tamil Nadu For details contact: Deepak Lawale Secretary General Organization of Plastics Processors of India 404/405, Golden Chambers, New Link Road Andheri (W) Mumbai – 400 053 Tel: 022-66923131/32 126 Modern Plastics & Polymers | March 2013

Compack 2013 displays one of the most impressive and efficient collection of packaging equipment and materials which are of advanced technology. This event will demonstrate the most important packaging and processing solutions. The visitors coming to Compack 2013 will comprise high profile executives from the packaging and transportation sectors; June 7–9, 2013; at Chennai Trade & Convention Centre, Chennai, Tamil Nadu For details contact: Narendar Bafna Smart Expos New No. 116, Manickam Lane Mount Road, Guindy Chennai 600 032 Tamil Nadu Tel: 044-22501986/1987 Mob: 09952966752 Email: compackexpo@smartexpos.in Website: www.compackexpo.com

Pharmapack Expo Pharmapack Expo is the most cost-effective marketing opportunity and is the best opportunity to meet senior buyers and decision makers from all facets of the user industry. The exhibits will include packaging materials & products, glass & plastic jars and bottles, aluminium & plastic tubes, corrugated & cardboard boxes, dosing machines for liquids & powders, filling machines, blister packing machines, strip packing machines, labels & labelling equipment, form-fill-seal machines etc; September 12–14, 2013; at Bombay Exhibition Center (BEC), Mumbai For details contact: Intel Trade Fairs & Expositions Pvt Ltd 113, New Sonal Link Industrial Estate Building No. 2, Link Road Malad (W ) Mumbai - 400 064 Tel: 022-26003977 Email: info@intelexpo.com Website: www.pharmapackexpo.in

IPLEX Chennai

PlastShow

The Tamil Nadu Plastics Manufacturers Association, the organiser of IPLEX, has come forward to exhibit various moulds and dies, equipment and machineries exclusively required by the plastic manufacturing sector of India. The exhibitors are well versed with the respective range of products so that attendees can select the best for their firms; June 27–30, 2013; at Chennai Trade & Convention Centre, Chennai, Tamil Nadu

PlastShow is dedicated to offering a comprehensive range of plastic products and processing equipment. The event strives to offer complete information about the recent inventions of the plastic manufacturing sector. The exhibitors find this expo to be the perfect business meeting place where the exhibiting companies get an opportunity to establish themselves and promote their brands; September 27–30, 2013; at Vapi Industrial Association Ground, Vapi, Gujarat

For details contact: Senthil Kumar N The Tamil Nadu Plastics Manufacturers Association C-1, First Floor, Rams Square Village Road, Nungambakkam Chennai Tamil Nadu Tel: 044-28250107

For details contact: Brijesh Purohit Sunline Infotech 118, Lotus Arcade Opposite Automotive Gondal Road, Rajkot, Gujarat Tel: 0281-2460135


EVENT LIST

International Cables 2013 Cables 2013 is recognised as the leading forum looking at polymer developments in the cables industry. This wellestablished event regularly attracts over 245 international delegates from the global supply chain. The conference aims to bring together cable producers, raw materials suppliers and equipment manufacturers; March 5–7, 2013; at Maritim Hotel, Cologne, Germany

them into forming professional contracts and ties; March 6–8, 2013; at Inter Expo Center Sofia, Sofia, Bulgaria For details contact: Bulgarreklama Agency 147 Tsarigradsko Shaussee Sofia, Bulgaria Tel: +(359)-(2)-9655286 Fax: +(359)-(2)-9655231

Korea International Plastics Rubber Show Korea International Plastics Rubber Show (KOPLAS 2013) is a premium exhibition providing the latest and the best in plastic materials for manufacturing and processing industries alike. It is known to be the leading specialised exhibition of its kind; March 12–16, 2013; at Kintex – Korea International Exhibition Center, Goyang, Korea

Plast Imagen Mexico For details contact: Applied Market Information Ltd AMI House 45-47 Stokes Croft Bristol BS1 3QP Tel: +44(0)117 924 9442 Fax: +44(0)117 989 2128 Email: info@amiplastics.com

International Fair of Plastics & Rubber Processing International Fair of Plastics & Rubber Processing (EPLA) is a specialised international trade exhibition for the plastics and rubber processing industry. EPLA is an ideal platform for exhibitors from the industry to display their new products and services; March 5–7, 2013; at Poznan International Fair Grounds, Poznan, Poland For details contact: Poznan International Fair Ltd Glogowska Street 14 Poznan, Poland Tel: +(48)-(61)-8692000 Fax: +(48)-(61)-8665827 Website: www.epla.pl/en

Plast Sofia Plast Sofia is an event with a record of bringing international exhibitors and trade visitors with great decision-making powers under one roof. Exhibitors belonging to this sector will display their products and items in order to acquaint customers with the latest technologies and services and lure

Plast Imagen Mexico is an international trade fair. This leading specialised exhibition is considered the natural venue in Mexico for machinery manufacturers interested in international expansion for their products; March 12–15, 2013; at Centro Banamex Exhibition Centre, Mexico

For details contact: Korea E & Ex, Inc Room 2002, WTC 159-1 Samsung-Dong Kangnam-Ku, Seoul, Korea Tel: +(82)-(2)-5510102 Fax: +(82)-(2)-5510103 Website: www.koplas.com

For details contact: Carlos Gutierrez Marin E J Krause & Associates, Inc 6550, Rock Spring Drive Suite 500, Bethesda, Maryland, USA Tel: +(1)-(301)-4935500 Website: www.plastimagen.com.mx

Thai International Plastics & Rubber Exhibition

Pro-Plas Expo 2013 Pro-Plas Africa is an international regionalleading trade fair. It is considered the natural venue for machinery manufacturers interested in international expansion for their products throughout South Africa. Traders and investors of the region will be marking this event on their calendar as a must attend event; March 12–15, 2013; at Expo Centre Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa For details contact: Michelle Bedser Specialised Exhibitions (Pty) Ltd PO Box 82196 Southdale 2135, South Africa Tel: +27-11-8351565 Mob: +27-829557718 Fax: +27-11-4962854 Email: michelle@specialised.com Website: www.propakafrica.co.za

TIPREX is one of the premium exhibitions providing the latest and the best in plastic materials for manufacturing and processing industries alike. The unique feature of the expo is the presence of the entire spectrum of plastic and rubber products manufacturers from tyres to tubes, hoses, industrial components, extruded profiles, moulded goods, latex articles etc; April 3-6, 2013; at Bangkok International Trade & Exhibition Centre (BITEC), Bangkok, Thailand For details contact: Messe Dusseldorf Asia Pte Ltd 3 HarbourFront Place, #09-02 HarbourFront Tower Two Singapore 099254 Tel: +(65)-(6)-3329620 Fax: +(65)-(6)-3374633 Email: tiprex@mda.com.sg Website: www.tiprex.com The information published in this section is as per the details furnished by the respective organiser. In any case, it does not represent the views of Business Insights •Technologies•Opportunities

March 2013 | Modern Plastics & Polymers 127


EVENT PREVIEW: Indo-German International Seminar

Plastics in automotives: Redefining possibilities The inclination towards replacing metals with plastics in the making of vehicle components has become a global phenomenon. An assembly of some of the biggest names representing this trend is the need of the hour. With demands in this fast-paced environment increasing, the industry scouts for the latest innovations. In such circumstances, the Indo–German International Seminar on ‘Plastics In Automotives – Redefining Possibilities’ is going to be an eye-opener. Sweta M Nair

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part from being lightweight and versatile, automotive plastics is here to stay and make a magnanimous difference. Allowing efficient design changes in single piece or modular components, versatility is the key ingredient that is playing up on everyone’s mind. At the customer end, plastics in automotives is helping original equipment manufacturers to cut down on manufacturing costs and to enhance vehicle affordability. This phenomenon is gaining steam in India because statistically only about 10 per cent of a car’s weight is made up of engineering plastics, leaving much room for more plastics adoption. Voicing some of the biggest trends and presenting the latest technology, this twoday Indo–German International Seminar on ‘Plastics In Automotives – Redefining Possibilities’ is scheduled to take place on March 7–8, 2013, at the Trident, Chennai. Organised by the Organization of Plastics Processors of India, the event is supported and sponsored by Der Verband Deutscher Maschinen- und Anlagenbau (VDMA) – German Engineering Federation. This seminar has received official support from the Department of Chemicals and Petrochemicals, Government of India; Automotive Component Manufacturers Association of India (ACMA), Society of Indian Automobile Manufacturers (SIAM) and others.

Charting growth Plastics consumption is increasing, and further growth is expected because of the enormous rise in demand for plastic products in numerous key sectors, such as the automotive industry. The demand for equipment for the processing and manufacture of plastics is growing 128 Modern Plastics & Polymers | March 2013

A previous event organised by OPPI and supported & sponsored by VDMA

continuously, and the demands regarding quality, productivity and reliability of the machinery used are rising. The 5th edition of this conference will focus on plastics machinery for the automotive industry by emphasising on the practical use of technologies to improve processes. About thirteen renowned speakers from some of the world’s leading plastics machinery producers from Germany will present papers focussing on latest technologies. The speakers will be from the leading European companies and will cover the entire gamut of usage of plastics in automotives.

Introduction to emerging technologies On day one, presentations will cover topics such as ‘Advanced injection moulding techniques for high precision and surface parts in the auto industry’, ‘Innovative solutions for multicomponent applications’, ‘Modern manufacturing with injection moulding machines – Production efficiency + Optimization’, ‘New injection moulding technologies for the future automotive industry’, ‘Corrugated pipes for technical applications in automotive industry’, ‘Methods of weakening

instrument panels and doors for invisible air bags’, ‘Composite spray moulding in the automotive industry’ and ‘Advanced foil application processes – Combination of decoration and function’. Besides updating manufacturers of the latest technological advancements, the presentations could help gain insight on applications. On day two, the programme will have topics on ‘How extrusion blow moulding can help to overcome today’s challenges in the automotive industry’, ‘Thermoforming and joining of a door panel’, ‘Robot-based applications for the plastics automotive components’, ‘Modern automation with robot systems and auxiliary equipment’ and ‘Lightweight moulding with Cellmould & BFMold’. Leading companies such as Daimler, Mahindra & Mahindra, Maruti Suzuki, Tata Motors, Ashok Leyland, Mann & Hummel, Bayer Material Science, Reliance, Ferromatik, Mutual, Toshiba Machines, TVS, Varroc, Supreme Industries, Giess, Rane Group, Ti Anode, Tipco, Inergy, RTS, Zylog, Indian Oil Corporation, HPCL-Mittal Energy Ltd etc will be some of the main attendees. Email: sweta.nair@network18publishing.com


EVENT REPORT: Windsor Endowment Lecture on New trends in rigid and flexible packaging

Mapping new trends for future growth The plastics packaging (rigid & flexible) industry is growing at a very fast pace. Continuous innovations are taking place in the segment so as to match not only the domestic but also the global needs. In such a scenario, the Windsor Endowment Lecture on ‘New trends in rigid and flexible packaging’ organised by Indian Plastics Institute (IPI) – Ahmedabad Chapter, provided a platform for industry experts to share their knowledge with students and the industry. Avani Jain

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apping the growing trends in the flexible and rigid packaging market, IPI – Ahmedabad Chapter, organised a very interesting seminar – Windsor Endowment Lecture on ‘New trends in rigid and flexible packaging’ on February 16, 2013. The Technical Session Chairman for the seminar was Dr E Sundaresan, Product Head – PE, Reliance Industries Ltd. Talking about the main aim of the event, T S Rajan, Chief Operating Officer, Windsor Machines Ltd, said, “We always want to share latest information with the student community. Further, integration of academics and technical information is very necessary for increasing the knowledge of students. Thus, this platform provides an opportunity to the students to gain knowledge about the new developments in the industry. Moreover, various industry players come together at such a platform and get to know about the latest happenings.”

Inaugural address In his inaugural address, Rajiv Trivedi, Chairman, IPI – Ahmedabad Chapter, said, “The plastics packaging (flexible and rigid) industry in India is growing at a very fast pace. At present, the total Indian packaging industry is valued at $ 13 billion, and of this, the plastics packaging industry’s share is about $ 6.5 billion. The innovations in the segment are driven by lightweighting, corrosion resistance, attractive design etc. Further, increasing disposable income, changing lifestyle patterns and health consciousness are the key factors that are driving the growth and innovation in the segment. Thus, the key reason for organising this seminar was to spread awareness about the new trends in the industry.”

Fruitful discussions The speakers made their presentations on various subjects. Rakesh Shah, Head – Technical Services, Reliance Industries Ltd, spoke on ‘New trends in rigid and flexible packaging’. He said, “There is a shift from rigid to flexible packaging. At

present, the major market share is held by flexible packaging followed by rigid packaging. In the future, factors such as safety, convenience and affordability will bring further changes.” Divakar Vyas, Senior Manager (Sales), Windsor Machines Ltd (Injection Moulding Division), shared his knowledge on ‘Developments in rigid packaging’. He mentioned, “The rigid packaging industry is growing at the rate of 16–20 per cent per annum. The growth in this sector is mainly driven by the food and pharmaceuticals segment. At present, the focus in the segment is to provide lightweight & recyclable solutions and increase barrier properties. In the future, there will be demand for more sustainable materials.” Further, Vikas K Deo, Senior Manager (Business Development), Windsor Machines Ltd (Extrusion Division), threw light on ‘Developments in flexible packaging’. S A Siddiquee, Equipment Builder Manager, ExxonMobil, spoke about ‘Energy-efficient hydraulic oil’ and Ashok S Bhimani, Partner, Astech Systems, shared his knowledge on ‘New mould technologies for thin wall moulding’.

Platform for learning

An eminent panel (from L–R): Divakar Vyas, Senior Manager (Sales), Windsor Machines Ltd (Injection Moulding Division); Rakesh Shah, Head – Technical Services, Reliance Industries Ltd; Dr E Sundaresan, Product Head – PE, Reliance Industries Ltd; Vikas K Deo, Senior Manager (Business Development), Windsor Machines Ltd (Extrusion Division); S A Siddiquee, Equipment Builder Manager, ExxonMobil and Ashok S Bhimani, Partner, Astech Systems

The seminar saw 125–140 participants including students and industry associates. The event served as a knowledge sharing platform for all. Sundaresan averred, “It is very important to spread information about new trends not only among the industry but also among the students. On a platform like this, when students hear about new trends and technology, their knowledge increases as this kind of information is not available on the internet or anywhere because it is proprietary information. ” Email: avani.jain@network18publishing.com

March 2013 | Modern Plastics & Polymers 129


BOOK REVIEW

Extrusion of Polymers 2nd Edition Theory and Practice Author: Chan I Chung Price: ` 13,115 This book, in its second edition, has a total of ten chapters. These chapters are on the fundamentals of polymer physics and melt rheology for those who lack previous training. Hence, the book starts with a basic level that emphasises conceptual understanding and progresses to the advance level for ambitious readers. This second edition has three new chapters on die design, elastic effects in melt flow in addition to content in the previous chapters of the first edition. International experts have also contributed to the new content. The advent of high-performance screws improving the performance of single extruders is well highlighted. The chapter on theories of single screw extrusion details mathematical models on solid conveying, melting and metering with effects of flight clearance. This will help readers to understand how the theoretical models can be used in practice. This book will also provide readers an opportunity to apply the knowledge gained to commercial practice. This book will help process engineers to acquire much knowledge of the materials being processed as well as engineering aspects of process to fully understand both process and product. In the author’s words, “The philosophy and content of this book reflect my industrial academic and consulting experience of 38 years.”

The Polyurethanes Book Editors: David Randall & Steve Lee Price: ` 21,389 This book first appeared as ‘The ICI Polyurethanes Book’, and today, under the present owners since 1999, has been published as ‘The Huntsman Polyurethanes Book’. This is a fully revised and updated edition covering flexible and rigid foams, elastomers (including thermoplastics) coatings, adhesives, sealants & encapsulants and composites. The technical editor Dr David Randall and editor Steve Lee have invited contributions of 30 authors which makes the book complete with theory and practices. In addition to raw materials and chemistry of polyurethanes, the book covers environment, health and safety aspects. The original purpose of understanding of production, properties and potential of polyurethanes is well maintained, as the book will give better understanding and broaden knowledge of polyurethanes to readers.

Reviewer: Dr Yatish Vasudeo, President & CEO, By Innovations Consultancy India Pvt Ltd Available at: SCI-TECH Books & Periodicals, 414, Janki Centre, Veera Desai Road, Andheri (W), Mumbai – 400053 Tel: 022-26735260/66970507 • Fax: 022-6735424/26735260 • Email: scitechbooks@gmail.com

130 Modern Plastics & Polymers | March 2013


PRODUCT S

Looking For A Specific Product? Searching and sourcing products were never so easy. Just type MPP (space) Product and send it to

Name

51818

eg. MPP Moulding and send it to 51818

Gravimetric doser This highly advanced and costeffective single component gravimetric feeder is used for injection molding, extrusion and blow molding machines. It can also be used for feeding more than one component by adding another unit. It is used for dosing master batches, additives and reprocessed materials in granule, powder and liquid form. It has a userfriendly multiple language graphic display with advanced algorithm and has TCP/IP card for communicating with any MES software. With the gravimetric doser, significant saving is achieved with its consistent accuracy and repeatability, even at very low output rates. It is very simple and easy to operate with automatic calibration. It comes with integrated automatic venturi vacuum loader for masterbatch. Its unique design helps in fast screw change and quick material change, thereby saving time and money. With minimum cost, it can be used for more number of machines and is very easy to remove and fit on to different machines. Vista Intertrade Pvt Ltd Pune – Maharashtra Tel: 020-46781106, Mob: 09890512147 Email: abhijit@vistaint.co.in Website: www.liad.co.il

Servo pump The servo pump can be connected to injection moulding machines, blow moulding machines and hydraulic presses without difficulty. Combining the advantages of hydraulic power transmission with robust and inexpensive drive elements, it achieves high density of power and force with low inertia. The servo pump significantly reduces the energy consumption of hydraulic machines while enabling shorter cycle times, higher accuracy and reduced noise levels. It finds applications in hydraulic/hybrid injection moulding machines, machines for processing rubber, pressure die casting machines, all sorts of presses, bending machines etc. Baumuller India Pvt Ltd Pune – Maharashtra Tel: 020-40160303, Mob: 09850834273 Email: ashutosh.kulkarni@baumuller.in Website: www.baumuller.in March 2013 | Modern Plastics & Polymers 131


PRODUCT S

Energy saver for three-phase AC induction motor This energy saver is a field-proven thyristorised microcontrollerbased unit. The soft start–soft stop for three-phase motors energy saver can instantly detect any change in load variation and automatically adjust the output voltage by matching output to load. The losses (iron/magnetising and copper loss) inherent in all AC induction motors are considerably reduced, thereby improving the motor efficiency and reducing electricity bills. A bypass contactor is built-in for soft starter. The soft start facility is incorporated in all three phases of the energy saver. It provides a gradual and controlled increase (soft start) and decrease (soft stop) in the voltage applied to the motor terminals, thus eliminating the high peak current created during the starting cycle of induction motors. The power ranges from 5 hp to 150 hp at 440 V. It has a compact and efficient thyristorised microcontroller design, choice of startup functions, breakaway pulse, voltage ramp, voltage or current limiting, power optimiser and an additional microcontroller motor protection device. If average load is less than 50 per cent, then good level of energy is saved. It finds applications in air conditioning systems at malls, office complexes and in elevators, industrial presses, injection moulding machines, conveyors, quarries/mines, crushers etc to reduce starting load on generator on ships and more. Satronix (India) Pvt Ltd Mumbai – Maharashtra Tel: 022-26325242, 022-27122758 Email: sales@satronixndia.com, satronix@bom3.vsnl.net.in Website: www.satronixindia.com

ct Self sustainability: One must look for a produ in that has the potential ability to sustain itself ct’s produ the ine determ help will This . times tough ing its capability when the market boosts, reduc risk factor.

Dwaipayan Mandal (Managing Director) Divine Automation Pvt Ltd

Portable chiller Portable chiller has a high ambient option available that provides consistent cooling up to 120°F ambient-5 to 15 hp single refrigeration circuits. The 50°F leaving water capacity ranges from 1.2 to 28.8 tons. Range of leaving water temperature is 20–65°F. Compressor ranges from 1.5 to 15 hp. Nominal flow to process is 6–138 gpm. Various options include dual pumps, PLC control, condenser fan VFD and a shell and tube condenser. Nu-Vu Conair Pvt Ltd Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-32985993, 25841181 Fax: 079-25841259, 25836164 Email: nuvuengineers@yahoo.com Website: www.conairgroup.com

132 Modern Plastics & Polymers | March 2013


PRODUCT S

Plastic brighteners/shiners and whitener Plastic brightener, shiner and whitener is used for natural transparent, colours and milky white end products. It is also used for adding clarity and gloss finish to natural transparent polymers. The products give shining and bright finish colours to end products. It removes yellowness and dullness from the end products and make them super milky white. The products are used in virgin, second, dull natural or milky white sutli, ropes, twine, reprocess granules, HDPE-LDPE-PVC pipes and profiles etc. Plast Fine Polymers Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-65242332 Mob: 09825587152 Email: plastfine@indiatimes.com

Crystallised hopper dryer Crystallised hopper dryer has unique mixer inside the stainless insulated hopper which stirs the resin simultaneously while drying. To crystallise, it increases the IV value and speeds up the crystallisation process. The mixer dries evenly and in a short time. It is the best choice for PET users and applies to blow and injection moulding machinery factories. With the expansion of PET bottles application, there is a highperformance requirement on preform injection moulding equipment. Yann Bang Electrical Machinery Co Ltd Guandong - China Tel: +86-4-2271-6999 Fax: +86-4-2271-1988 Email: yb@yannbang.com Website: www.yannbang.com March 2013 | Modern Plastics & Polymers 133


PRODUCT S

Thickness measurement gauge Thickness measurement gauge is designed for use with all non-magnetic/ non-ferritic

materials such as plastic, wood, glass, ceramic, glass fibre, carbon fibre, non-ferrous metal etc. Application areas include wall thickness measurement of all types of containers such as bottles, cans and injection mouldings, complex shapes etc. It works on the magnetostatic principle and the gauge reaches a measuring rate of up to 20 readings per second. Two sensors are available covering ranges from 0 – 4 mm and 0 – 10 mm. Measuring accuracy up to ± (0, 5μm + 1%

of reading) can be obtained. Low range sensitivity is 0.1 μm. It is operated simply by sliding the probe across the area to be measured. Bombay Tools Supplying Agency Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022- 23426495, 23421326 Fax: 022 -23401933 Email: info@bombaytools.com Website: www.bombaytools.com

Statement about ownership and other particulars about newspaper/periodical, namely Modern Plastics & Polymers, as required to be published in the first issue of every year after the last day of February. Form IV (See Rule 8) (Press and Reg. of Books Act, 1867) 1 Place of Publication: Ruby House, ‘A’ Wing, JK Sawant Marg, Dadar (West), Mumbai - 400 028 2. Periodicity of Publication: Monthly 3. Printer’s Name: Mr Mohan Gajria Nationality: Indian Address: Ruby House, ‘A’ Wing, JK Sawant Marg, Dadar (West), Mumbai - 400 028 4. Publisher’s Name: Mr Lakshmi Narasimhan Nationality: Indian Address: Ruby House, ‘A’ Wing, JK Sawant Marg, Dadar (West), Mumbai - 400 028 5. Editor’s Name: Mr Manas Bastia Nationality: Indian Address: Ruby House, ‘A’ Wing, JK Sawant Marg, Dadar (West), Mumbai - 400 028 6. Names and addresses of individuals who own the newspaper & partners or shareholders holding more than 1% of the total capital: Network18 Media & Investments Limited** is the owner of the publication, namely Modern Plastics & Polymers, having its registered office at 503, 504 & 507, 5th Floor, Mercantile House, 15, K G Marg, New Delhi - 110 001. Details of the shareholders of Network18 Media & Investments Limited who hold more than 1% of the paid up equity capital of the Company as on 20-02-2013 are given below: a. RRB Mediasoft Private Limited, 403, Prabhat Kiran, 17, Rajendra Place, New Delhi - 110 008 b. RB Mediasoft Private Limited, 403, Prabhat Kiran, 17, Rajendra Place, New Delhi - 110 008 c. RB Media Holdings Private Limited, 403, Prabhat Kiran, 17, Rajendra Place, New Delhi - 110 008 d. Watermark Infratech Private Limited, 403, Prabhat Kiran, 17, Rajendra Place, New Delhi - 110 008 e. Colorful Media Private Limited, 403, Prabhat Kiran, 17, Rajendra Place, New Delhi - 110 008 f. Adventure Marketing Private Limited, 403, Prabhat Kiran, 17, Rajendra Place, New Delhi - 110 008 g. Shinano Retail Private Limited, 4th Floor, Court House, Lokmanya Tilak Marg, Dhobitalao, Mumbai - 400 002 h. Nexg Ventures India Private Limited, C-157, Industrial Area, Phase - VII, Mohali, Punjab - 160 055 i. Arizona Global Services Private Limited, 1204, 12th Floor, Hemkunt Chambers, 89, Nehru Place, New Delhi - 110 019 j. Acacia Banyan Partners, Citibank N A, Custody Services, 3rd Floor, Trent House, G Block, Plot No. 60, BKC, Bandra (East), Mumbai - 400 051 k. Independent Media Trust (held in the name of its trustee), Empire Complex 1st Floor, 414, Senapati Bapat Marg, Lower Parel, Mumbai - 400 013 l. Network18 Media Trust (held in the name of its trustee), 503, 504 & 507, 5th Floor Mercantile House, 15 Kasturba Gandhi Marg, Delhi - 110 001 m. Network18 Group Senior Professional Welfare Trust (held in the name of its trustee), 503, 504 & 507, 5th Floor Mercantile House, 15 Kasturba Gandhi Marg, Delhi - 110 001 I, Lakshmi Narasimhan, hereby declare that all particulars given above are true to the best of my knowledge and belief. Dated: 20th February 2013 LAKSHMI NARASIMHAN Signature of the publisher ** ownership of this magazine stands transferred from Infomedia Press Limited (formerly known as Infomedia18 Limited) (hereinafter “Infomedia”) to Network18 Media & Investments Limited (Network18) in pursuance of the scheme of arrangement between Network18 and Infomedia and their respective shareholders and creditors, as approved by the Hon’ble High Court of Delhi and the necessary approval of Ministry of Information and Broadcasting is being obtained.

134 Modern Plastics & Polymers | March 2013

Side sealing machine

The side sealing machine has a robust structure fit for side sealing 70 to 450 gsm fabrics up to 100 ft maximum. The sealing machine seals off HDPE/PP laminated fabrics, LD sheets of above 500 gauge and PVC coated, SRF nylon sheet, flex banner (poster), polyester fabric coated material. The structure length is 2 mtr long and includes pressure system, electrical control panel, air blower, rope reinforcement attachment edge welding width of 25 mm to 45 mm, automatic rope insertion and edge sealing. The machine also features a control panel with an in-house electronic and electrical assembly for the machine and a timer circuit to control the speed. Moreover, the machine has a three phase power load supply, drive system, heating system etc. Shri Gurukrupa Engg Works Vadodara - Gujarat Tel: 0265-3042371 Mob: 09376218406 Fax: 0265-2653007 Email: shrigurukrupaengg@yahoo.com Website: www.shrigurukrupaengg.com


PRODUCT S

Die changing system This is an automatic and labour-saving quick diechanging system and a printed circuit board punching and stripping system. Production cost can be reduced by automatic production, improved machine activation and high-quality finished ejection products. The automatic mould changing trolley system contains one-button fully automatic move-in and move-out types as well as semi-automatic move-in and move-out types. Forwell Precision Machinery Co Ltd Changhua County - Taiwan Tel: +886-4-8345196 Fax: +886-4-8345197 Email: forwell@forwell.com Website: www.forwell.com

Pulveriser The pulveriser is suitable for processing of P.V.C pipes, LLDPE, LDPE, HDPE, EVA, PS silicone rubber and PET. It is also used in rotational molding and master batch manufacturing industries. The pulveriser eliminates the use of conventional type drum mixer, high speed mixer for colour pigments, additives for subsequent processing in extruders or compounding machines. Instead of blending the colour pigments/additives with granules which results in uneven blending in the final product, the granules are pulverised in the pulveriser machine to produce the resin powder. The polymer resin powder is then blended with the required colour pigments/additives in the conventional mixer and processed in the compounding machine/ extruder. The pulveriser helps achieve optimum production and ensures superior quality standards in the finished products. N. A. Corporation Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-25840374, 25841821 Fax: 079-25840809 Email: info@naroto.com, sales@naroto.com Website: www.naroto.com, www.pulverizer.in

The information published in this section is as per the details furnished by the respective manufacturer/ distributor. In any case, it does not represent the views of Business Insights •Technologies•Opportunities

March 2013 | Modern Plastics & Polymers 137


LIST OF PRODUCT S

Looking For A Specific Product? Searching and sourcing products were never so easy. Just type MPP (space) Product Name and send it to 51818

eg. MPP Moulding and send it to 51818 Product

Pg No

Product

Pg No

Product

Pg No

4 loop din rail PID controller .....................................55

CPVC pipe....................................................................... 10,21

Fully automatic strapping plant ............................................ 77

Ac drive and soft starter .............................................87

Crystallised hooper dryer .................................................... 133

Gear pump .............................................................. 144

Acoustic enclosure ................................................................. 51

Crystalliser............................................................................. 73

Granulating and recycling ..................................................... 79

Additive masterbatch ...................................................... 33, 47

Cutting and stitching machine ............................................. 14

Granulator ............................................................ FIC, 73, 143

Air audits blower................................................................... 20

Cylinder engraving - lenticular and optical roll mould ...... 131

Gravimetric blender ............................................................ 143

Air bubble film extrusion line ............................................... 65

D.A / Glyd seal with NBR/FKM O-ring

Gravimetric doser ................................................................ 131

Air bubble sheet plant........................................................... 77

chevron set strip ...................................................... 137

Grip plier............................................................................. 133

Air cooled die face pelletiser ................................................. 27

Data logging software ......................................................... 131

Guide band, wiper and coupling ......................................... 137

Air-conditioner part .......................................................... FGF

Dehumidifying air dryer ............................................FGF, 143

HDPE tarpaulin heat sealing machine ........................... 24

All electric machine .............................................................. 23

Dehumidifying dryer .................................................... FIC, 52

Head lamp and tail lamp ............................................. FGF

Aluminum extrusion ........................................................... 133

Delphi ATDC brake motor .................................................. 25

Heart valve frame .................................................................. 34

Analog timer ........................................................................... 6

Delphi three-phase motor ..................................................... 25

Heat transfer roll ................................................................. 144

Automatic material handling system .................................... 27

Die changing system ........................................................... 135

Heater cooler mixer............................................................... 27

Automation system ............................................................... 79

Digital counter ...................................................................... 55

Heating and cooling.............................................................. 79

Barrel ......................................................................144

Digital meter ......................................................................... 55

High cavitation ..................................................................... 49

Barrel screw ........................................................................... 99

Digital panel meter ............................................................... 12

High performance screw ..................................................... 144

Batch weigh blender ............................................................. 26

Digital temperature controller............................................... 40

High precision hydraulic clamping

Biodegradable masterbatch ................................................... 47

Digital timer.......................................................................... 55

injection moulding machine.................................................. 97

Black masterbatch ........................................................... 33, 47

Din rail PID controller ......................................................... 55

High speed mixer ............................................................ 37, 75

Blender ......................................................................... FIC, 19

Door trim .......................................................................... FGF

HM/HDPE/IDPE/LIDPE ................................................. 77

Blending unit .................................................................... FGF

Dosing and mixing................................................................ 79

Hold back............................................................................ 137

Blower series ......................................................................... 79

Drive...................................................................................... 40

Hopper loader ..................................................................... 143

Blown film extrusion system ......................................BGF, BC

Dry van pump ....................................................................... 51

Horizontal handle clamp .................................................... 133

Box series wormgear unit ...................................................... 25

Dry-break coupling ............................................................... 20

Hot air dryer ........................................................FGF, 52, 143

Cam follower ........................................................... 137

Drying and dehumidifying.................................................... 79

Hot runner system ................................................................ 79

Cast film line......................................................................... 77

Drymax air-hot air dryer ................................................... FIC

Hydraulic injection moulding machine................................. 23

Central chilling system ......................................................... 57

Drymax dryer ..................................................................... FIC

Hydraulic motor .................................................................... 35

Chemical and industrial pump ........................................... 103

Drymax PET-dehumidified dryer ..................................... FIC

Hydraulic press ...................................................................... 27

Chiller ................................................................................. 107

Dual channel with modbus ................................................... 40

Hydraulic pump .................................................................... 35

Circular weaving machine ..................................................... 14

Dynamic controller ............................................................... 40

Hydraulic sealing solution ................................................... 137

Clamp .................................................................................. 133

Ejector.......................................................................20

Hydraulic servo drive ............................................................ 35

Clean room application ......................................................... 49

Elastomer extrusion pump .................................................. 111

IML technique ..........................................................49

Cleaning oven ..................................................................... 144

Electric injection moulding machine gearbox......................... 7

Industrial process chiller ....................................................... 57

Cluster facia ...................................................................... FGF

Element shrink disc ............................................................ 137

Infomedia yellow page ........................................................ 123

CNC vertical machining centre ............................................ 53

Energy saver for three phase AC induction motor ............ 132

Injection moulded component ............................................ 113

Colour masterbatch ................................................... 15, 33, 47

Exporter of thermoplastic component ................................ 113

Injection moulding machine ........................FGF, 5, 16, 17, 80

Compact chiller ............................................................. 57, 143

Extruder machine ............................................................ 37, 75

Inline drip irrigation plant .................................................... 71

Complete range of rational moulding machine

Extrusion ....................................................................BGF, BC

Inline drip tubing ............................................................. 10,21

and rational mould ................................................................ 22

Extrusion coating lamination plant................................. 14, 77

Jig ........................................................................... 133

Compounding extrusion........................................................ 22

Extrusion system ........................................................BGF, BC

Jumbo bag dumping station .................................................. 27

Compressed air dryer ...................................................... 29, 73

Feeding .....................................................................61

Keyless transmission element ................................... 137

Compressor ..................................................................... 20, 29

Feeding and conveying .................................................... 73, 79

Knob and switch ............................................................... FGF

Conductive compound .......................................................... 47

Ferrous casting .................................................................... 133

Lab extruder ..............................................................27

Conical twin screw extruder ........................................... 27, 70

Film extrusion line ................................................................ 65

Lab mixer .............................................................................. 27

Connector.......................................................................... FGF

Fixture ................................................................................. 133

Large flow water heater ........................................................ 79

Continuous screen changer ................................................. 144

Flame retardant masterbatch ................................................ 33

Loader ................................................................................ FIC

Control panel ...................................................................... 131

Flashing light alarm annunciation unit................................. 55

Loading arm.......................................................................... 20

Conventional phase failure relay ............................................. 6

Foam sheet ............................................................................ 65

Machined component .............................................. 133

Convertor ............................................................................ 131

Forged component .............................................................. 133

Manual and hydraulic screen changer................................. 144

Conveying and handling system ........................................... 61

Freewheel-one-way-clutch .................................................. 137

Masterbatch........................................................................... 33

Counter .............................................................................. 6,55

Fueling system ....................................................................... 20

Masterbatch mixer ................................................................ 27

FGF - Front Gate Fold, FIC - Front Inside Cover, BIC - Back Inside Cover, BGF - Back Gate Fold, BC - Back Cover

138 Modern Plastics & Polymers | March 2013


LIST OF PRODUCT S

Product

Pg No

Product

Pg No

Product

Pg No

Material dryer ....................................................................... 19

Pp-r pipes ........................................................................ 10, 21

Technical mould .................................................................... 49

Material storage .................................................................. 143

Pp TQ plant .......................................................................... 77

Temperature controller .................................. 6, 12, 40, 55, 131

Medical mould ...................................................................... 49

Pp/HDPE raffia tape line..................................................... 77

Temperature indicator ............................................................. 6

Milky polymer ..................................................................... 132

Precision fabrication work ................................................... 133

Temperature sensor ............................................................. 131

Mono and multilayer sheet line ............................................ 14

Precision moulding............................................................ FGF

Temperature transmitter (dual) ............................................. 55

Monofilament line................................................................. 14

Precision temperature control ............................................. 131

Tensioner nut ...................................................................... 137

Monolayer blown film ..................................................... 10, 21

Priming valve......................................................................... 20

Thermocouple ..................................................................... 131

Monolayer blown film line.........................................BGF, BC

Printing and cutting/rewinding machine .............................. 14

Thermoformer ............................................................BGF, BC

Motor .................................................................................... 25

Process controller .......................................................... 12, 131

Thermoforming ..........................................................BGF, BC

Motors and drive................................................................... 87

Process indicator ................................................................... 55

Thermoforming and PS foam....................................BGF, BC

Mould changing system ........................................................ 85

Product assembly ................................................................. 133

Thermoplast production pump ........................................... 111

Mould repair ....................................................................... 131

Profile controller.................................................................... 40

Thick and wide plastic sheet extrusion line.......................... 18

Mould temperature controller ................................. 52, 57, 143

Profile sheet........................................................................... 65

Thickness measurement gauge............................................ 134

Mould ........................................................................ 22, 37, 75

PRP powder ........................................................................ 132

Three arm bi-axial moulding machine .......................... 37, 75

Moulding............................................................................... 49

Pull action ........................................................................... 133

Thyristorised power controller ............................................ 131

MTC .................................................................................. FIC

Pulveriser ........................................................... 22, 37, 75, 135

Timer .................................................................................... 55

Multi component mould ....................................................... 49

Pump ....................................................................... 20, 51, 111

Toggle action clamp ............................................................ 133

Multilayer cast film line ........................................................ 14

PVC foam core pipe ....................................................... 10, 21

Toggle injection machine ...................................................... 23

Multilayer blown film ..................................................... 10, 21

PVC mixer cooler............................................................ 10, 21

Toggle press......................................................................... 133

Multilayer blown film line ...................................14, BGF, BC

PVC palletising lines....................................................... 10, 21

TPE/TPU compound ........................................................... 33

Multilayer blown film plant .................................................. 77

PVC pipe......................................................................... 10, 21

TPU masterbatch .................................................................. 15

Multilayer co-extrusion sheet line......................................... 18

PVC profile lines............................................................. 10, 21

Track roller .......................................................................... 137

Natural polymer....................................................... 132

Quick die change system ............................................85

Transmissions and pot........................................................... 20

Non-ferrous casting............................................................. 133

Quick mould change system ................................................. 85

Turned component .............................................................. 133

Oil chiller ..................................................................57

Rapid prototyping....................................................... 8

Twin - screw co-rotating extruder ................................ 34, 141

Oil cooler ............................................................................ 107

Reclaim system...................................................................... 65

Twin - screw element.................................................... 34, 141

Optic sheet extrusion line ..................................................... 18

Recycling line ........................................................................ 14

Twin - screw extruder ................................................... 34, 141

Optical brightener ................................................................. 47

Reducer ................................................................................. 25

Twin mill pulveriser ........................................................ 37, 75

Panel cooler ............................................................. 107

Relay ........................................................................................ 6

Twin roll mill ........................................................................ 27

Panel meter ............................................................................. 6

Resin dehumidifier ................................................................ 73

Twin screw extruder gearbox .................................................. 7

Paperless recorder .................................................................. 12

Resin dryer ............................................................................ 89

Twin screw extrusion line ..................................................... 70

Parallel and right angle axes gearbox ...................................... 7

Rigid sheet ............................................................................ 65

Two plate injection moulding machine ................................ 23

Pelletiser .............................................................................. 144

Robot.................................................................................. FIC

Two layer blown film ...................................................... 10, 21

PET/PE washing line ........................................................... 14

Rock and roll machine .................................................... 37, 75

Ultra sonic flow meter ................................................12

PET box strapping plant ...................................................... 77

Roots blower ......................................................................... 51

Underwater pelletiser ............................................................ 27

PET master matches ............................................................. 33

Round table carrousel............................................................ 37

Universal controller ............................................................... 40

PET perform dedicated machine.......................................... 59

RTD .................................................................................... 131

Universal input temperature scanner .................................. 131

PET sheet extrusion.............................................................. 18

Safety access equipment .............................................20

Universal masterbatch ........................................................... 33

PET-line injection moulding machine ................................. 23

Screw ..................................................................................... 99

UV & PU masterbatch ......................................................... 33

Phase failure relays .................................................................. 6

Seal ...................................................................................... 103

UV stabiliser .......................................................................... 47

PID controller ..................................................................... 131

Secon and dull polymer ...................................................... 132

Vacuum booster pump ................................................51

PID process controller .......................................................... 55

Servo energy saving machine ................................................ 59

Vacuum dryer ........................................................................ 52

PID temperature controller................................................... 55

Servo pump ......................................................................... 131

Vacuum forming machine ..........................................BGF, BC

Pipe extrusion solution.......................................................... 45

Shut off nozzle .................................................................... 144

Vacuum loader ................................................................... FGF

Plastic auxiliary equipment ................................................... 26

Shuttle remoulding machine ................................................. 22

Vacuum pumps and system ................................................... 20

Plastic brightener ................................................................ 132

Side sealing machine ........................................................... 134

Vacuum system ...................................................................... 51

Plastic brightener/shiner and whitener ............................... 133

Single bag feeding system ..................................................... 27

Variable displacement pump energy-saving machine ........... 59

Plastic conveyor belt.............................................................. 37

Single mill pulveriser....................................................... 37, 75

Vario speed variator............................................................... 25

Plastic masterbatch................................................................ 69

Single screw extruder ............................................................ 27

Vertical handle clamp.......................................................... 133

Plastic processing machine .................................................... 14

Single screw extruder gearbox ................................................. 7

Vertical machining center ..................................................... 63

Plastic processing machinery ancillaries and spare ............... 99

Single screw extruder plant ................................................... 70

Vfd’s and soft starters for modern industry .......................... 87

Plastic ternopol ................................................................... 132

Software for central monitoring............................................ 73

Vibratory screening system ................................................... 22

Plastic textile and machinery ............................................. BIC

Solid state relay ................................................................... 131

Vibro screen .................................................................... 37, 75

Plastic whitener ................................................................... 132

Stack mould .......................................................................... 49

Virgin polymer .................................................................... 132

PLC....................................................................................... 40

Storage tank equipment ........................................................ 20

Volumetric dosing unit.......................................................... 73

Polymer production pump .................................................. 111

Straight line action .............................................................. 133

Water chiller ..............................................................73

Polyolefin pipe................................................................. 10, 21

Strand pelletiser..................................................................... 27

Water jetting ......................................................................... 20

Portable chiller .................................................................... 132

SV power cooled motor ........................................................ 25

WFR .................................................................................. FIC

PP/HDPE-semi automatic strapping plant ......................... 77

System solution ..................................................................... 79

White masterbatch .......................................................... 33, 47

Pp glass filled compound ...................................................... 33

Tank truck equipment................................................20

Wiper NBR O-ring piston seal .......................................... 137

Pp mineral filled compound.................................................. 33

Tape stretching line with inverter driven cheese winder ...... 14

Wire EDM ........................................................................... 53

FGF - Front Gate Fold, FIC - Front Inside Cover, BIC - Back Inside Cover, BGF - Back Gate Fold, BC - Back Cover

March 2013 | Modern Plastics & Polymers 139


LIST OF ADVERTISERS Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details

Pg No

Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details

ACS Auxiliaries India Pvt Ltd ...................... 26

Pg No

Freeze Tech Equipments Pvt Ltd .................107 T: +91-044-42152387 E: info@freezetechequip.com W: www.freezetechequip.com

T: +91-02135 - 329112 E: acsindia@corpemail.com W: www.aecinternet.com

Gardner Denver Engineered Pro. (I) ............. 20

Adinath Controls Pvt Ltd ............................131

T: +91-79-40089312 E: info.ahm@gardnerdenver.com W: www.gardnerdenver.com

T: +91-2764-286573 E: info@adinathcontrols.com W: www.adinathcontrols.com

Gelco Electronics Pvt Ltd............................... 6

Alok Masterbatches Ltd ............................... 15

T: +91-79-22200902 E: info@gelco-world.com W: www.gelco-world.com

T: +91-011-41612244 E: sales@alokindustries.com W: www.alokmasterbatches.com

Heattrans Equipments Pvt.Ltd. ...................133

Blend Colours Pvt Ltd.................................. 33

T: +91-79-25840105 E: info@heattrans.com W: www.heattrans.com

T: +91-40-2436 1499 E: info@blendcolours.com W: www.blendcolours.com

Hiflon Polymers Industries ..........................137

Boge Compressed Air System ....................... 29

T: +91-79-25857182 E: sales@fluoroplastind.com W: www.fluoroplastind.com

T: +91-044-43009610 E: fc.jayakaran@boge.com W: www.boge.in

Hindustan Plastic and Machine Corporation 70

Bry Air (Asia) Pvt Ltd .................................. 89

T: +91-011-25473361 E: poonam@hindustanplastics.com W: www.hindustanplastics.com

T: +91-’011-2390677 E: bryairmarketing@pahwa.com W: www.bryairsystems.com

J P Extrusiontech Limited ............................ 14

Chamunda Equipments ...............................133

T: +91-2646-222163 E: info@jpextrusiontech.com W: www.jpextrusiontech.com

T: +91-79-27522437 E: clamp@chamundaequip.com W: www.chamundaequip.com

Jacobsen Lenticular Tool & Cylinder Engraving Technology Co., ( Jaco Tech) ........................131

Chi Chang Machinery (India)....................... 65 T: +91 9820141845

T: 1-630-467-0900 E: gj@jacotech.com W: www.jacotech.com

E: info@suprapti.com Dyna Automation Pvt Ltd ............................ 35

Kabra Extrusion Technik Ltd................... 10, 21

T: +91-79-26404605

T: +91-22-2673 4822 E: sunil@kolsitegroup.com W: www.kolsite.com

E: info@dynahydraulics.com W: www.dynahydraulics.com Everest Blowers ............................................ 51

Konark Plastomech Pvt Ltd .......................... 77

T: +91-11-45457777

T: +91-79-22891670 E: sales@konarkplastomech.com W: www.konarkplastomech.com

E: info@everestblowers.com W: www.everestblowers.com Ferromatik Milacron India Pvt Ltd ............... 23

K-Tron Process Group ................................. 61

Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details

Lan Marketing Pvt Ltd ................................111 T: +91-022-27893645 E: jai@lanengg.com W: www.maag.com Larsen & Toubro Ltd ................................... 31 T: +91-22-6752 5656 E: ss-ccd@lth.ltindia.com W: www.larsentoubro.com Laxmi Hydraulics Pvt Ltd ............................. 87 T: +91-217-2352001 E: lhpindia@lhpmotor.com W: www.lhp.co.in Lohia Starlinger Ltd. ................................. BIC T: +91-011-30641770 E: prom.lsl@lohiagroup.com W: www.lohiagroup.com Makino India Private Limited....................... 63 T: +91-80-28419500 E: slim@makino.co.in W: www.makino.com Matsui Technologies India Ltd. .................... 52 T: +91-0120-4243862 E: rahuldeep@mass.motherson.com Micon Automation Systems P. Ltd ................ 55 T: +91-79-32900400 E: sales@miconindia.com W: www.miconindia.com Mifa Systems................................................ 40 T: +91-79-26870825 E: info@mifasystems.com W: www.mifasystems.com Mold - Masters Technologies Pvt Ltd ........... 67 T: +91-422-4502171 E: mmiplinfo@moldmasters.com W: www.moldmasters.com N.A. Corporation ......................................... 75 T: +91-79-25840374 E: info@naroto.com W: www.naroto.com Nand Composites Pvt Ltd ...........................113

T: (856) 589-0500

T: +91-9822016337

E: salesfmi@milacron.com

E: info@nandcomposites.in

W: www.milacronindia.com

W: www.ktron.com

W: www.nandcomposites.in

T: +91-79-25890081

Forwell Precision Machinery Co., Ltd........... 85

L & T Plastics Machinery Ltd .................. FGF

T: 886-4-834-5196

T: +91-044-26812000 E: handigolg@larsentoubro.com W: www.larsentoubro.com

E: forwell@forwell.com W: www.forwell.com Our consistent advertisers

Pg No

Neejtech India (Braunform) .......................... 49 T: +91-79-26561312 E: info@neejtech.com W: www.neejtech.com

COC - Cover on Cover, FGF - Front Gate Fold, FIC - Front Inside Cover, BIC - Back Inside Cover, BC - Back Cover

140 Modern Plastics & Polymers | March 2013


LIST OF ADVERTISERS Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details

Pg No

Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details

Neejtech India (Niigata) ............................... 17

Pg No

Rajoo Engineers Ltd...........................BGF, BC

Advertiser’s Name & Contact Details

Sri Sai Plasto Tech ....................................... 59

T: +91-9909974224 E: contact@niigataindia.com

T: +91-2827-252701 E: kcdoshi@rajoo.com

T: +91-044-42994365

W: www.niigataindia.com

W: www.rajoo.com

W: www.srisaiplastotech.com

Rollepaal Engineering India Pvt Ltd............. 45

Neoplast Engineering Pvt Ltd ...................... 27

T: +91-9898598712 E: rrs@rollepaal.in W: www.rollepaal.com

T: +91-79-25830602 E: info@neoplastindia.com W: www.neoplastindia.com Network18 ..................................................123

Rotomotive Powerdrives India Ltd................ 25 T: +91-2692-230430 E: info@rotomotive.com W: www.rotomotive.com

T: +1800 200 1010 (toll free) E: mcc@network18publishing.com W: www.yellowpages.co.in

S&T Engineers ............................................ 53

NMTG Mechtrans Techniques Pvt Ltd. ......137

T: +91-422-2590810 E: stycm@stengineers.com W: www.stengineers.com

T: +91-79-22821527 E: nmtg@nmtgindia.com W: www.nmtgindia.com Nu-Vu Conair Pvt. Ltd ................................143

Sacmi Engineering India Pvt Ltd .................. 80

T: +91-9376783206 E: salesindia@conairgroup.com W: www.conairgroup.com

T: +91-7600003968 E: sales@negribossi.in W: www.negribossi.com Sanity International ..................................... 99

Piovan India Pvt Ltd .................................... 73

T: +91-79-65227458 E: info@sanityindia.com W: www.sanityindia.com

T: +91-22-27782367 E: amit.bajaj@piovnindia.com W: www.piovan.com

Seal Jet Seals ...............................................103

Plast Fine Polymers .....................................132

T: +91-020-27121581 E: vswasu@satyam.net.in W: www.sealjetseals.com

T: +91-79-65242332 E: plastfine@gmail.com W: www.plastfine.com

Shini Plastics Technologies I Pvt Ltd............ 79

Plastiblends India Ltd .................................. 47

T: +91-250-3021166 E: jnbhat@shiniindia.com W: www.shini.com

T: +91-022-67205200 E: rsd@koisitegroup.com W: www.plastiblendsindia.com

Shree Momai Autocast Containers................ 22

Prasad GWK Cooltech Pvt Ltd..................... 37

T: +91-2668-266440 E: iyer@shreemomai.com W: www.shreemomai.com

T: +91-79-25830112 E: plastics@prasadgroup.com W: www.prasadgroup.com

Shri Gurukrupa Engineering Works ............. 24

Prayag Polytech Pvt Ltd ............................... 69

T: +91-265-3042371 E: shrigurukrupaengg@yahoo.com W: www.gurukrupaengg.com

T: +91-011-47262000 E: delhi@prayagmb.com W: www.prayagmb.com

Soham Technologies Private Limited ............ 57

Procon Technologies Pvt Ltd ........................ 12

T: +91-2717-654353 E: info@sohamtechno.com W: www.sohamtechno.com

T: +91-79-27492566 E: info@procon.co.in W: www.procon.co.in R R Plast Extrusions Pvt Ltd ........................ 18

Specific Engineering ...................................141

T: +91-22-42461500 E: marketing@rrplast.com W: www.rrplast.com

T: +91-265-2646871 E: info@specificgroup.com W: www.specificgroup.com

Our consistent advertisers

Pg No

E: sspt_plastics@live.in

Steer Engineering Pvt Ltd ............................ 34 T: +91-80-23723309 E: info@steerworld.com W: www.steerworld.com Stratasys Gmbh. ............................................. 8 T: 49-69-420-9943-0 E: europe@stratasys.com W: www.stratasys.com Supermac Machinery .................................... 97 T: +91-9998040433 E: supermacmachinery@gmail.com W: www.supermacmachinery.com Suresh Engineering Works ........................... 71 T: +91-731-2527872 E: suresen@aittelmail.in W: www.sureshengg.com Toshiba Machine (India) Pvt. Ltd. ................ 16 T: +91-011-43291111 E: dineshelija@toshiba-machine.co.in W: www.toshiba-machine.co.jp Unimark (Maguire)....................................... 19 T: +91-22-25506712 E: infomum@unimark.in W: www.unimark.in Wittmann Battenfeld India Pvt Ltd ............FIC T: +91-044-42077009 E: info@wittman-group.in W: www.wittmann-group.com Woojin Plaimm Co Ltd .................................. 5 T: +91-9810043265 E: in@wjpin.com W: www.plaimm.com Xaloy Asia (Thailand) Ltd. ..........................144 T: +91-79-40327380 E: m.sanghvi@th.xaloy.com W: www.xaloy.com Zambello Riduttori Group ............................. 7 T: 39-0331-307-616 E: info@zambello.it W: www.zambello.it

COC - Cover on Cover, FGF - Front Gate Fold, FIC - Front Inside Cover, BIC - Back Inside Cover, BC - Back Cover

142 Modern Plastics & Polymers | March 2013


Reg No: MH/MR/WEST/234/2012-2014 RNI No: MAHENG / 2008 / 25265 Licence to Post at Mumbai Patrika Channel Sorting OfďŹ ce, Mumbai GPO., Mumbai 400 001. Date Of Posting 1st & 2nd Of Every Month / English & Monthly. Date Of Publication: 28th Of Every Previous Month.

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Modern Plastics & Polymers March 2013  

MODERN PLASTICS & POLYMERS’, the numero uno monthly B2B magazine for the plastics & polymers industry, offers the latest trends, in-depth vi...

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