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Modern Food Processing

July 2010


EDITORIAL

Indulgence, no more

T

he snacks sector in the country has surely come a long way. With healthier ingredients and contemporary positioning, the concept of snacking is fast emerging as a ‘guilt-free indulgence’ for many Indians. No wonder, a number of products with manifold key attributes, such as no trans-fats, high levels of whole grains or even natural & organic versions have already hit the retail shelves here. The Indian snack manufacturers have responded to this by offering baked/puffed snacks in most cases instead of fried ones. It is also interesting to see new product concepts, which include a mix of flavours usually found in ethnic snacks, or in formats that are contemporary and healthy. Besides, organised retail has played an important role in further extending the availability of these products. Some of the categories that have been driving the growth of branded snacks market include chocolates, potato chips and nuts & seeds. As this market finds higher acceptance among consumers, new categories like health, frozen, baked, etc are likely to further contribute to its expansion in the near future, based on the parameters of taste, health and novelty.

Published in association with Editor : Manas R Bastia Assistant Editor: Rakesh Rao Senior Features Writer: Prasenjit Chakraborty Features Writer: KTP Radhika Jinoy (Delhi) Senior Correspondent: Shivani Mody (Bengaluru) Correspondent: Geetha Jayaraman (Delhi) Copy Desk: Marcilin Madathil Products Desk: A Mohankumar Group Photo Editor & Creative Head: Shiresh R Karrale Design: Mahendra Varpe Production: Vikas Bobhate, Pravin Koyande, Dnyaneshwar Goythale, Ravikumar Potdar, Ravi Salian, Sanjay Shelar, Lovey Fernandes, Pukha Dhawan, Varsha Nawathe, Akshata Rane, Abhay Borkar Marketing & Branding: Jagruti Shah, Ganesh Mahale Chief Executive Officer: Lakshmi Narasimhan Associate Vice President: Sudhanva Jategaonkar Subscription: Sunder Thiyagarajan, General Manager - Copy Sales Sheetal Kotawadekar, Senior Manager Tel: 91-22-3003 4631/4633 Email: customercare@infomedia18.in

While the above developments offer plenty of opportunities for the snacks segment, there is a simultaneous need to align the product mix as per the needs of different consumer groups rather than taking the traditional ‘one-size-fits-all’ approach. The ‘Business & Markets’ section offers ample insights into the fast evolving segment of bakery and snack foods in India. Now, let us look at another sector, where the need to augment the demand is not as vital as to boost the supply side - the edible oil industry in India. Though it comprises nearly 15,000 oil mills, 600 solvent extraction units, 250 vanaspati units and about 400 refining units, still it has to import more than 50 per cent of its domestic requirement. Turn to the ‘Industry Update’ for further details about the growing demand-supply gap as well as some of the major challenges facing the edible oil industry.

Editorial Advisory Board Dr A S Abhiraman Former Executive Director - Research, Hindustan Lever Ltd Prof M Y Kamat Former Head, Food Engg & Technology Deptt., UICT, Mumbai

Manas R Bastia Editor manas@infomedia18.in

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Printed by Mohan Gajria and published by Lakshmi Narasimhan on behalf of Infomedia 18 Limited and printed at Infomedia 18 Ltd, Plot no.3, Sector 7, off Sion-Panvel Road, Nerul, Navi Mumbai 400 706, and published at Infomedia 18 Ltd, ‘A’ Wing, Ruby House, J.K.Sawant Marg, Dadar (W), Mumbai - 400 028. Modern Food Processing is registered with the Registrar of Newspapers of India under No. 14798/2005. Views and opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of Infomedia 18 Limited. Infomedia 18 Limited reserves the right to use the information published herein in any manner whatsoever. While every effort has been made to ensure accuracy of the information published in this edition, neither Infomedia 18 Ltd nor any of its employees accept any responsibility for any errors or omission. Further, Infomedia 18 Ltd does not take any responsibility for loss or damage incurred or suffered by any subscriber of this magazine as a result of his/her accepting any invitation/offer published in this edition. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without the written permission of the publisher. All rights reserved. Editor: Manas R Bastia

July 2010 | Modern Food Processing

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CONTENTS

30

LEADERS SPEAK 30

“Indian customers are looking for foods that can supplement their traditional eating habits” ...says, Chitranjan Dar, CEO - Foods Division, ITC Ltd

ROUNDTABLE 32

Contract farming: Yet to make an impact…

BUSINESS & MARKETS SECTOR WATCH 38

Bakery & snack foods: Growth through healthy innovations Rahul Ashok, Consumer Markets Consultant, Datamonitor India

32

STATUS REVIEW 42

Smart snacking options: Adding a tinge of wellness

MARKET TRENDS Baked foods: Vying for a bigger pie Srividyaranjani V, Research Associate (Chemicals, Materials and Foods), South Asia Middle East, Frost & Sullivan

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INDUSTRY UPDATE 48

Edible oil industry: On a refined path of success

QUALITY MANTRA 52

Fresh food safety: Need to handle contamination threats Courtesy: The Coca-Cola Retailing Research Council Asia

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TECH TRACK - AUTOMATION Managing quality in fragmented process: Integration is the key Courtesy: Rockwell Automation

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CASE STUDY R

ERP assimilation: A wholesome solution Courtesy: SAP AG

58

R

Modularised labeller: An effective marker for round bottles Laszlo Kerekes, Manager - Sales Department, Krones AG

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48

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R EG U L A R S EC TI O N S Editorial .................................................... 13 National News ......................................... 16 World News............................................. 24 Tech Updates ........................................... 28 Events Calendar ....................................... 64 Technology Transfer ................................. 66 Book Shelf ................................................ 68 Product Update........................................ 69 Product Inquiry ........................................ 81 Advertisement Inquiry.............................. 83 Product Index........................................... 85 Advertisers’ List ....................................... 86

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Modern Food Processing | July 2010

Highlights of Next Issue Sector Watch Industry Update

: :

Agri-commodities Food Safety Cover photo courtesy: The Puratos Group

Note: $ stands for US dollar and £ stands for UK pound, unless mentioned otherwise


NATIONAL NEWS RETAIL VENTURE

Mother Dairy plans exclusive retail stores

Mother Dairy, one of the largest milk processors in the country, plans to roll out a chain of exclusive retail outlets by FOOD PARK

Anand district to get a mega food park The Union Minister for Food Processing Industries, Subodh Kant Sahai, recently confirmed that Anand district in Gujarat, also known as the land of White Revolution, is likely to get a mega food park over the next few months. He also announced that Central Gujarat comprising districts PRODUCT LAUNCH

KSB India launches MoviBoost

KSB India has recently launched the MoviBoost range of booster sets NEW APPOINTMENT

Lavazza appoints Shivashankar as Director and Coutinho as CEO Lavazza, Italy’s prominent coffee brand and a major player in the Indian coffee market, has announced the appointments of R Shivashankar as the Director - South Asia, and Sanjay Coutinho as the Chief Executive Officer, Barista Coffee Company Ltd, India, with immediate effect. Both

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the name Gaurav Stores to market the entire range of its products across India. According to a report, the company has planned to launch 350 exclusive stores in New Delhi and 200 retail outlets in Mumbai in the first phase, to be expanded later in all major cities. The new concept has been introduced to create a better brand and street visibility, to consolidate its position in the wake of growing competition. According to Sanjay Sinha, Head - Milk and Dairy Products Business,

Mother Dairy Fruit & Vegetable Ltd, the entire retail operation would be carried out through the franchise route. He said that the first phase would be implemented by the yearend and the final course of action for phase two would be decided after the completion of phase one. The products would be available at the multi-brand retail chains and standalone kirana stores as well. However, the Gaurav Stores would be a one-stop shop for all Mother Dairy products.

of Anand, Kheda, Nadiad, Valsad and Navsari would be declared as a food processing corridor to attract investments into the region. Sahai was speaking at a function organised by the Entrepreneurship Development Institute (EDI), CII, and the Ministry of Food Processing Industries, to highlight the investment opportunities in the food processing sector. He further added, “Anand in

Gujarat is likely to get a mega food park soon.” The ministry is promoting this mega project to boost the country’s growing food processing sector.

in Pune at a ceremony attended by select dealers and the company’s sales teams from its various branches and zones. The participants were given an insight into the strong features of the new KSB MoviBoost. With the objective to make the product basket to address the building services market comprehensively, new products in the form of MultiBoost and the

Cora 75 submersible pumps were also launched at the same time. KSB MoviBoost pressure systems include up to six multistage vertical pumps, with controller and variable speed drives, to deliver constant water pressure for many applications like hotels, industrial plants, food processing units, water supply & treatment, mining and minerals processing plants.

the managers will be in charge of Lavazza business co-ordination for Asia-Pacific region. Lavazza entered India by acquiring Barista Coffee Company Ltd, one of the leading Indian coffee café chains, and Fresh & Honest Café Ltd, one of the leading coffee vending & retailing companies in India, in 2007. In his capacity as the Director of South Asia, Shivashankar will oversee the co-ordination of Lavazza’s

Modern Food Processing | July 2010

Subodh Kant Sahai

R Shivashankar

subsidiaries in India, Fresh & Honest and Barista, as well as the management of distributors in India, Nepal, Bhutan, Bangladesh, Maldives, Pakistan and Sri Lanka.


NATIONAL NEWS NEW COURSE

IGNOU announces new food safety course

Indira Gandhi National Open University (IGNOU), the apex body for open NEW PRODUCT

Parle Agro introduces pure apple juice Parle Agro, one of the leading players in the food and beverage category, has come up with Saint Apple Juice, 100 per cent juice made purely from green apples. According to the company, Saint Apple Juice is made from a single variety of the famous ‘Granny Smith’ apples. The juice from this unexplored PROPOSAL

Dr Kalam calls for separate ministry for fisheries

Dr A P J Abdul Kalam, former President of India, visited Central Institute of WINE MARKET

Australian wine-makers eye India Overcapacity and high costs are driving Australian wine-makers to explore strategic partnerships and distribution network with Indian liquor companies. John Griffith, President, Western Australian Wine Association, said, “All major Australian companies, including

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universities and distance education institutions in the country, has decided to start a two-week appreciation course on ‘Food Safety and Quality’ with the help of the Quality Council of India (QCI) and the School of Agriculture (SOA). The QCI is an autonomous body to establish and operate national accreditation structure & promote quality through National Quality Campaign, whereas SOA was established in January 2005

at IGNOU, New Delhi. In a statement, the university said that about 20 participants from different institutions across the country would attend the course. “The objective is to increase awareness regarding food safety and different national & international food standards. This would help participants understand the food safety acts, agreements and their implications,” stated IGNOU in a press release. The course will also include industrial visits.

fruit will offer consumers a taste that is unique only to green apples. The product comes with the natural benefits of green apples. Compared to other varieties of apples, green apples are rich in vitamin C and high on fibre content. They are an excellent source of potassium and antioxidants. “The concentrate for Saint Apple Juice is made from carefully selected green apples from the best orchards in Austria

and imported to India. The launch of Saint Apple is a strategic step that will help the company to grow in the 100 per cent juice category further,” said a press release.

Fisheries Technology (CIFT), Cochin, recently, to participate in the World Environmental Day and International Year of Biodiversity celebrations. On the occasion, he proposed the idea of creation of a separate Union Ministry for Fisheries in order to give impetus to fisheries development. Dr Kalam highlighted the issues of property rights in the inland & coastal fisheries for facilitating management and finding technological solutions for seasonal problems of the fishermen. He

opined that CIFT has to spearhead the strategies to conserve biodiversity of the aquatic resources. Dr Kalam observed, “With the growing demand for food, upward trend in seafood exports and growing constraints on land availability for agriculture, the fisheries sector will be playing a prominent role as a revenue earner, food supplier and job provider. Hence, it is essential to take the fisheries sector to the next level of development by undertaking initiatives to support fishermen.”

the top four, were looking at joint ventures and distribution of their wine brands in India. The top Australian winemakers include the Fosters, Constellation, Pernod Ricard and Cissallo.” He further added that even though Australia exports $ 200 million worth of wine to China, it sees India as a major market. “India in the long-term is a large opportunity for us,” he said.

With reduced tax barriers, it would be easier for the Australian wine producers to strike deals with domestic companies in India.

Modern Food Processing | July 2010


NATIONAL NEWS POULTRY UPDATE

Consumption of chicken to double by 2014

The poultry industry is set for a boom, with the consumption of chicken in the country expected to double in the next five years. The eating out phenomenon PRODUCT LAUNCH

Del Monte introduces two new fruit drinks FieldFresh Foods, a joint venture between Bharti Enterprises and Del Monte Pacific Ltd, has added two new variants to its Indian fruit drinks portfolio. The company has launched Green Apple and Orange flavours of the fruit drink in the country. According to company officials, “Apples and FOOD SAFETY

PFNDAI organises risk analysis workshop

Dr G M Tewari

For a processed food manufacturer to create a good brand value and get consumers’ confidence the product needs FOOD EXHIBITION

Grain Tech India 2010 to be held in August India witnesses a wastage of food grains worth Rs 58,000 crore every year because of inadequate storage techniques and deficiencies in supply chain. Taking due cognisance of the fact, Media Today will be organising a three-day GrainTech India 2010

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coupled with more quick service restaurant chains is changing the food consumption profile of Indians. “The Rs 40,000-crore domestic poultry industry produces 240 crore birds commercially every year. To cope with the doubling of demand by 2014-15, the industry will need to grow at a rate of 12-15 per cent annually,” said P G Pedgaonkar, Deputy General Manager, Venkateshwara Hatcheries, Pune. By then, the poultry industry could become a Rs 60,000-65,000 crore

sector. He maintained that the current chicken consumption is under 3 kg per head a year and it may increase to 4.5-5 kg per head, factoring in an increase in the population. Other players such as the Mumbai-based Godrej Agrovet and the Coimbatore-based Suguna Group maintained that the current consumption is just over 2 kg per head annually, but both agreed that consumption is expected to double by 2014-15.

oranges have emerged as the chosen flavours on account of their ability to refresh the consumers looking for better alternatives. With one of the highest fruit contents of approximately 30 per cent, which is two to three times that of the competitors in the category, the new Del Monte’s offerings are clearly superior.” It has been observed that in the recent times, the apple flavour has

emerged as a favourite amongst the youth, especially for the out-of-home consumption occasions where one needs an easy-to-carry pack. Besides, the orange flavour too is popular.

to be backed by research and studies to prove its safety. In order to solve some of the safety concerns of industry, Protein Food and Nutrition Development Association of India (PFNDAI) recently organised a workshop on ‘Risk analysis for processed food manufacture’ in Mumbai. This was followed by a series of workshops at different locations in order to have a better understanding of the concept of risk analysis both for industry personnel as well as for those in regulatory agencies.

In his welcome address, Dr G M Tewari, Chairman, PFNDAI, highlighted the safety issue, which is a global concern. “Safety is not only looked at from the point of view of consumption, but is being dealt from the raw product stage and at every step of processing till the final consumption and a step ahead, ie if it has health impact,” he said. Dr B Sesikeran, Director, National Institute of Nutrition (NIN), provided an insight into the whole exercise of risk analysis with a much-talked about topic of Bt Brinjal.

exhibition concurrently with India Foodex and AgriTech in Bengaluru, beginning on August 20, 2010. Grain Tech India assumes significance in the context of the National Food Security Mission, launched by the government in 2007-08 to give a big boost to the production of rice, wheat and pulses. All the three expos – Agri Tech, Grain

Tech and India Foodex – are closely interlinked, encompassing the entire food business – from the grower to the consumer.

Modern Food Processing | July 2010


NATIONAL NEWS RTE FOODS

MTR aims to double its turnover by 2012

Sanjay Sharma

MTR Foods, which was acquired by the Norwegian conglomerate Orkla COLD STORAGE

Around 2,000 applicants get approval for cold storage subsidy A total number of 2,221 cold storages with capacity of 92.23 lakh tonne have been approved so far with eligible subsidy of Rs 614.86 crore for cold storages in India. National Horticulture Board (NHB) provides back-end capital investment NOVEL PRODUCT

Britannia launches chocolate health drink

Britannia Industries Ltd, manufacturers of diverse products in biscuits, bakery and dairy categories, recently launched Tiger ZorChoco Milk, a milkbased chocolate drink for children in POLICY DECISION

Centre announces bonus of Rs 500 for pulses In order to woo the farmers in the pulses domain, to sell produce to the procurement agencies, the government has announced Rs 5-per kg incentive to the growers, in addition to the higher support price that it had announced recently.

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in 2007, is planning to double its turnover to Rs 500 crore by 2012. Paul Jordahl, Chairman & CEO, Orkla Brands International, said, “We aim to treble profits in that timeframe.” Orkla plans to make the MTR brand achieve a compounded annual growth rate of 20 per cent in the next few years. Sanjay Sharma, CEO, MTR Foods, said, “The company has decided to convert MTR from a regional to a national brand. In order to provide better focus, it has decided to restrict

the brand’s presence to 150 towns and cities in the Northern, Western and Eastern regions from 500 towns at present.” He further added, “MTR’s margins have been adversely affected by the sharp increase in the price of raw materials in the last couple of years. Raw material prices had increased by an average of 9 per cent in 2009 and by about 7 per cent in 2008. The company has a pricing and efficiency programme to deal with this.”

subsidy to eligible organisations for creation, modernisation, expansion of cold storage and controlled atmosphere storage at 25 per cent of the project cost. Under the National Horticulture Mission (NHM) scheme, financial assistance is provided for the development of post-harvest management including for cold storages and cold chain component. Subsidies at 40 per cent (for general

areas) and 55 per cent (for hilly and tribal areas) of capital cost of the project are available for both public and private sector enterprises.

Hyderabad. According to Vinita Bali, Managing Director, Britannia Industries, the produce (manufactured at its own unit in Vikarabad in Andhra Pradesh), is enriched with five active nutrients that help in the overall development of mind. She further added, “We are bringing to the market a new product and linking it with Tiger brand and launching it into the dairy section of the (Britannia) portfolio. Tiger ZorChoco Milk is a micro-nutrient

fortification drink, which was being launched simultaneously in Hyderabad and Bengaluru. We have launched it in two markets and will launch it in other markets over the course of this year.” Priced at Rs 17 per 150 ml bottle, the new drink is available in chocolate flavour with a shelf-life of four months. She said that another health drink Actimind, which the company had launched in Tamil Nadu last year, would be extended to other parts of the country soon.

The incentive of Rs 500 per quintal would be given to the farmers growing tur, urad and moong dals, sold during the two-month harvest period. The new sop would cost the Centre an additional outgo of Rs 2,000 crore this year. “This is likely to result in a subsidy payment of Rs 1,000 crore to Rs 2,000 crore,” said an official statement. Prices of pulses are sky-

rocketing in the retail market. Recently, the Cabinet Committee on Economic Affairs had announced a sharp increase of up to Rs 700 a quintal in the minimum support price of pulses.

Modern Food Processing | July 2010


WORLD NEWS PARTNERSHIP

Waters Corp and Maryland University to open food safety training lab

Waters Corporation and the University of Maryland have agreed to establish a facility to train scientists from foreign governmental bodies and manufacturers on the MARKET RESEARCH

Pastries market to grow 7.6 per cent in Asia-Pacific The cakes and pastries market in AsiaPacific is expected to grow at a CAGR of 7.6 per cent between 2008 and 2013, reaching a value of $ 35.2 billion in 2013, according to Datamonitor. The market was valued at $ 24.4 billion in 2008. “As cakes and pastries offer a quick snack alternative, replacing a full meal, further sales growth is expected in the Asia-Pacific region. This is SUPPLY CHAIN

Hershey to begin ‘Next Century’ project

The Hershey Co has announced its project ‘Next Century’ as a part of the company’s efforts to create an advantaged supply chain and competitive cost structure. ACQUISITION

Brazilian Marfrig acquires Keystone Foods Marfrig Alimento SA, a Brazilian meat processing company, has acquired Keystone Foods LLC, Pennsylvania, for $ 1.26 billion. Keystone Foods is among the leading meat processors in the US, with annual sales estimated at $ 6.4 billion. “The global food market is growing and Brazil has capitalised on

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state-of-the-art methods of analysis that will help them meet US food safety standards. Set to open next year, the International Food Safety Training Laboratory (IFSTL) will be operated by the Joint Institute for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (JIFSAN), a collaboration between the University of Maryland and US Food and Drug Administration (US-FDA). The IFSTL, to be located at the University of Maryland,

College Park, will provide year-round science-based, hands-on training that supports the US-FDA’s food safety goals. The laboratory will train scientists to detect both chemical and microbiological contaminants. The US imports more than $ 80 billion worth of food from 150 countries. Therefore, scientists have been seeking this kind of multifaceted training for years and the IFSTL is expected to fulfill this critical need.

because people in urban localities lead fast-paced lifestyles, leaving little or no time for proper meals,” said Nikhil Aggarwal, Senior Consumer Goods Analyst, Datamonitor. Studies indicate that Indian and Chinese consumers are likely to drive growth in this category. These consumers are expected to either maintain or increase their expenditure on biscuits & cakes over the next 3-6 months. “The growth in both cookies and crackers segments is

expected to come not only from changing snacking habits (eating more small meals during a day), but also from the growing trend of replacing a full breakfast with cookies or crackers,” added Aggarwal.

The project includes plant expansion of the West Hershey facility involving an investment worth $ 200 million to $ 225 million, and about $ 50 million to $ 75 million in distribution & administrative facilities in Hershey. “Next Century will ensure that we continue to make the world’s best chocolate and retain its strong position in the marketplace. Our investment will create a highly flexible, cost-effective manufacturing facility that

will enable us to satisfy the needs of retail customers and consumers,” said David J West, President & CEO, Hershey. The initiative is estimated to incur pre-tax charges and project implementation costs of $ 140 million to $ 170 million during the next three years. However, after the completion of the programme, the annual savings are expected to be between $ 60 million and $ 80 million.

this growth by strategically consolidating within the protein industry. By utilising the resources and expertise of Keystone Foods, we are expanding Marfrig’s business to meet the significant growth opportunities within the industry and attend the needs of our global clients,” said Marcos Molina, Chairman & President, Marfrig. Keystone Foods is a processor and distributor of beef, poultry, pork and seafood to the retail & food service

channels. “We are looking forward to tap the opportunities that this transaction creates for Keystone Foods and Marfrig,” said Jerry Dean, CEO, Keystone Foods.

Modern Food Processing | July 2010


WORLD NEWS ACQUISITION

ConAgra to acquire American Pie

ConAgra Foods Inc is planning to acquire the assets of American Pie, LLC, a manufacturer of frozen fruit pies, thaw-and-serve pies, fruit cobblers and pie crusts, under the licensed NEW LAB

BASF opens laboratory for ingredient innovations BASF has established a new laboratory for nutrition ingredients innovations at its technical centre in Tarrytown, NY. The laboratory will support nutrition and colouration applications in vitamin-enhanced waters, carbonated soft drinks, dairy products, instant beverages, nutrition bars and baked foods. “By increasing laboratory size STRATEGIC MOVE

Amcor hails strategic significance of Ball Plastics takeover

The Australia-based Amcor’s takeover of Ball Plastics Packaging Americas for $ 280 million is an important strategic EXPANSION

Cargill to set up chicken processing plant in Russia Cargill plans to build a $ 30 million chicken processing facility at its complex in Efremov, Russia. The facility will have the capacity to produce 18,000 tonne of additional processed chicken products per year for the Russian market, and will focus primarily on supplying Chicken McNuggets for McDonald’s restaurants in Russia. Construction

Marie Callender’s and Claim Jumper trade names, as well as frozen dinners, pot pies and appetisers under the Claim Jumper trade name. Once the acquisition is complete, American Pie will be managed as part of ConAgra Foods’ existing Marie Callender’s frozen business, within its consumer foods segment. ConAgra’s Marie Callender’s business includes pot pies and a range of single & multi-serve frozen dinners. According to ConAgra, the acquisition

fits its current strategy of adding strength to its existing product lines. “Acquiring the Marie Callender’s retail dessert pie business will allow us to establish a strong presence in frozen dessert market by leveraging the power of the Marie Callender’s brand across the frozen case to the fullest,” said Gary Rodkin, CEO, ConAgra Foods. In addition to the brand assets, ConAgra will acquire a production facility in Torrance, California.

and technical staff, this move will strengthen the performance of BASF vitamins, nature-identical carotenoids and other products in food & beverage applications,” said Martin Jager, Senior VP - Nutrition Ingredients, BASF. The new laboratory will be part of a 1,60,000-sq ft laboratory and office space that BASF obtained during the acquisition of Ciba Holding AG last year. The facility will house laboratories for other care chemicals division business

units, including personal care and pharma ingredients. BASF has other nutrition ingredient technical centres in Ludwigshafen (Germany), Ballerup (Denmark) and China.

move that will allow it to diversify packaging formats, as well as expand its manufacturing capabilities and marketshare, according to the company. The agreement to purchase the Ball Corporation subsidiary – an operation with five plants in North America and annual sales of $ 600 million – will also fuel its expansion in the US, Canada and Latin America. The acquisition is likely to boost Amcor’s ability to offer a ‘broader

range of innovation and technologybased solutions to customers’. Earlier this year, Peter Brues, President - Flexibles Europe & Americas, Amcor, revealed that its takeover of Alcan would give the company the opportunity to stay firm against competitors and the latest move appears to be in line with this strategy. Amcor supplies flexible packaging solutions to many of the world’s leading fresh and processed food suppliers.

is expected to begin very soon, with completion by the end of 2011. According to Cargill, the decision to invest in the new facility is in line with McDonald’s strategic choice of pursuing local supply in Russia. Until recently, Cargill had been supplying the bulk of McDonald’s chicken volume requirements in Russia from its facility in Orléans, France. Cargill will also use the Moscow facility to develop business opportunities with other customers in the

retail, wholesale and food service sectors in Russia. “This investment is a good fit with Cargill’s strategic objectives in Russia and enhances our ability to continue providing McDonald’s with specific solutions for its business,” said Jerry Rose, Corporate Vice President, Cargill.

July 2010 | Modern Food Processing

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WORLD NEWS NEW STRATEGY

Tate & Lyle to focus on specialty food ingredients

COLLABORATION

Monsanto and Dow tie up for soybean technology Monsanto Co has entered a licensing agreement with Dow Chemical Company’s Dow AgroSciences unit. Under this, Monsanto will license its Genuity Roundup Ready 2 Yield genetic trait for soybeans to Dow, giving it the right to combine the trait with other biotechnology. “Through our collaborative relationship with Dow AgroSciences, more farmers will be PACKAGING

Bosch unveils flexible and integrated packaging system on market demand

Increasing customer demand for integrated and flexible systems was one of the drivers behind developing new vertical flat pouch equipment for NOVEL PRODUCT

McDonald’s to add oatmeal in 2011 In the US, McDonald’s Corp is planning for a nationwide launch of oatmeal in 2011, as part of its effort to stretch its menu ‘smartly and strategically’. McDonald’s has been testing the oatmeal, which comes in brown maple sugar topped with apples, raisins and cranberries blended with cream, in Baltimore and Washington for

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Tate & Lyle PLC is all set to make its specialty food ingredients business the ‘key investment focus’ as a part of its initiative to build a platform for longterm growth. Reflecting on the change in its investment focus, Javed Ahmed, CEO, Tate & Lyle, said, “Over the past four years, approximately two-thirds of Tate & Lyle’s capital was invested in its commodity business with one third in

specialty business. Most of the investment focus had been on developed markets.” However, he added, the strategy would change going forward. “Over time, our investment focus will be realigned to our strategy: our engine of growth and the focus of acquisitions will be specialty food ingredients, with greater emphasis on emerging markets,” said Ahmed.

able to experience the higher yield opportunity of Roundup Ready 2 Yield in new trait combinations and soybean brands they prefer. This agreement is further validation that the Roundup Ready 2 Yield platform is a solid foundation for industry-leading soybean performance,” said Brett Begemann, Executive Vice President - Global Seeds and Traits, Monsanto. Antonio Galindez, President & CEO, Dow AgroSciences, said, “Dow’s experience in working with the trait gives

the company confidence that it will be able to expand the licensing agreement. The trait offers our customers the high-yield opportunity they look for in soybean seeds, and we are excited about the future trait combinations we will be able to offer our customers.”

packaging a range of free-flowing goods including granulates and powders, informed Bosch Packaging Technology. The company said the RNx integrated sachet system, developed by its subsidiary Sigpack, also offers high speed, a compact footprint and an efficient packaging technology for both food & pharmaceutical applications. The system for primary and secondary packaging enables sachet packing, sealing & cartoning for powders, granulates, pellets

& piece goods. “This development was a response to the market demand for integrated and flexible solutions, with few system interfaces and high system efficiency,” informed Holger Botsch, Product Manager, Sigpack Systems. He further added, “There is an increased need for system solutions from a single supplier. This means clients just need to deal with one supplier for issues related to spare parts or maintenance advice.”

several months. “We are committed to stretching our menu smartly and strategically, so that we always deliver the consumers favourites along with new offerings they want,” said Jim Skinner, CEO, McDonald’s. The introduction of oatmeal is in line with McDonald’s recent run of innovation in its breakfast menu. The restaurant chain earlier this year began selling five breakfast items for $ 1, including a sausage McMuffin, a sausage burrito, a

sausage biscuit, a small coffee and a hash brown. “We will soon be launching our real fruit smoothies with wild berry and strawberry banana,” Skinner added.

Modern Food Processing | July 2010


TECH UPDATES

New crate system for self-stacking belts

Vegetarian chicken-like product in the making

Ashworth Factory Service has shipped a complete ‘change out’ ExactaStack self-stacking belt utilising its new Rack & Roll crate system to reduce service costs and enable quick completion of installation. Ashworth has successfully installed the complete ‘change out’ for one of the world’s largest producers of frozen potato specialties. Rack & Roll is designed for easy crate handling, quick roll-out and roll-in belt replacements for selfstacking spirals. The combination of Rack & Roll and the ExactaStack turnkey belt replacement from Ashworth is an easy and cost-effective solution for food processors to keep their stackers constantly running at peak performance. ExactaStack belts are spooled onto Rack & Roll crates; each crate has a footprint and height of less than 4 ft, making the belt easy to stack, store and manoeuvre. Installation of a self-stacking belt with the Rack & Roll crate is simplified by rolling out the new ExactaStack belt directly from the crate to the infeed of the stacker. The old belt is conveniently rolled in an empty Rack & Roll crate from the out-feed.

Researchers from the University of Missouri (MU) may have finally cracked the code to realistic tasting fake chicken with the first soy product. A variety of meat substitutes are in the market right now, such as the ever-popular Tofurky. However, there is not even one that tastes like chicken or has the texture of real meat. Fu-Hung Hsieh, a Professor of Biological Engineering and Food Science at MU and his team has now created the first soy product that can be flavoured to taste like chicken. It also breaks apart in one’s mouth the way chicken does. The fake meat is prepared by mixing up a batter of soy protein, wheat flour and water, and then pushing the batter through a high-heat extruder. Hsieh informed that the mixture firms up and develops a stringy, chicken-like texture. Although the team has not perfected the taste yet, the texture seems to be right on. “But the way the fake meat broke across my teeth felt exactly how boneless chicken breast does,” Hsieh added. The research has been published in the Journal of Food and Agricultural Chemistry, Journal of Food Science, and Journal of the American Oil Chemists’ Society.

New technology to shift the sorting paradigm to self-learning

New X-ray transparent belt boosts performance of contaminant detection lines

A new smart laser sorter system uses state-of-the-art Apollys neural network technology to shift the sorting paradigm to self-learning, claims the manufacturers, Visys. Optical sorters are used in the food processing industry to ensure that contaminants are not included in packaged food products. Most of these optical sorters are limited in functionality as they can only distinguish one characteristic at a time, be it colour, structure or shape. “Five years ago, Visys revolutionised the sorting industry with the world première of the first fully digital laser sorters Lynx and Spyder, with uncompromised colour, structure and shape detection on a proprietary in-feed chute Chycane. This Visys innovation is now generally accepted as the quantum step forward to few false reject, revolutionising the global sorting industry,” the company said. Building on this legacy, Visys now takes sorting to the next level by introducing proprietary selflearning Apollys, technology to enable advanced shape recognition, leading to the world’s first smart optical laser sorter. The proprietary Apollys engine combines signals from two detection points, one on-chute (LED-shape) and the other in-air (lasers-structure).

Mettler Toledo Safeline has developed an X-ray system that helps detect contaminants in glass containers on food and pharmaceutical lines. The company’s new belt incorporates a slat band modular design to facilitate high-speed handling of glass containers of various sizes. The walls and bases of glass jars and bottles can vary by as much as 20 per cent, which makes the detection of foreign bodies in the containers challenging. One issue is that previously-used polyurethane (PU) conveyor belts wear out quickly when handling heavy glass containers at high speeds. Heavier belts with more weight capacities are more durable, but hinder the flow of X-ray beams and reduce the sensitivity of detection. “The new patented modular plastic belt combines the benefits of both belt types by boasting a low absorption, but durable material that does not result in any loss in sensitivity of detection,” opines Niall McRory, Product Development & Sales Manager, Mettler Toledo Safeline. The design also ensures that slat thickness is uniform and no metal is in the path of X-ray beam as the joining pins are external.

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TECH UPDATES

Tetra Pak’s OneStep technology cuts operation costs for milk processing

NC Hyperbaric hails design breakthrough for industrial HPP system

Tetra Pak has developed OneStep technology, a Tetra Lactenso Aseptic solution that incorporates UHT white milk production within a single, high-throughput process. OneStep technology eliminates the need for pasteurisation, pre-treatment and intermediate storage. In one unbroken step, raw milk is preheated, clarified, separated, standardised & homogenised, before undergoing UHT treatment & regenerative cooling, and then being transferred to two aseptic buffer tanks. This shortens processing time from as much as two days to just a few hours, cutting operating costs by up to 50 per cent compared to conventional solutions. In essence, OneStep technology combines heat treatment, separation and standardisation into a single step, significantly simplifying & accelerating the production process. In addition to shortening the time it takes to process raw milk, OneStep technology also incorporates aseptic buffering, enabling completely automated and continuous UHT operations, with few process steps. The whole process is more efficient than conventional solutions, creating significant savings when it comes to operating.

A design breakthrough on a new high pressure processing (HPP) machine has resulted in a compact, affordable and easy-to-install system for small & medium-sized producers, according to the manufacturer, NC Hyperbaric. The Spanish company claimed that its Wave 6000/120 HPP system, launched at the recent IFFA trade show, is the first industrial system in the world to fully integrate two independent intensifiers inside the equipment. This means the machine has no external cabinets or modules. Francisco Purroy, Technical Sales Manager, NC Hyperbaric, said, “The innovation enables the system to be integrated easily into existing production lines with less connective wires and tubing.” The Wave 6000/120 is designed as a more affordable option for small- and medium-sized companies where space is an issue. The company said the new equipment means it is now able to supply HPP systems across a full range of capacity needs - and for industry segments as diverse as meat, seafood, dairy, sandwich fillings & salads and spreads, as well as fruit preparations & juices. The new system is a combination of the established integrated Wave 6000/55 with an advanced industrial design.

Alfa Laval expands instrumentation range for processing tanks

In-line can leak tester detects nano-sized holes

Alfa Laval has developed a range of new tank equipment products for the food & beverage industry including weighing systems, conductivity sensors, level switches and a flow transmitter. All the new products are designed to improve the performance of tanks that perform tasks such as storage, blending and mixing in food & drink processing. The new range includes UltraPure weighing systems that are suitable for mixing, dosing, level regulation or batch tasks. Running through the stand-out features of the UltraPure, Alfa Laval said the technology eliminates the need for mounting kits, cutting costs and enabling a faster installation process. Among the selection of new tank instrumentation are also level switches that are used to see and check the levels of fluid in a tank. Particularly suited to smaller process tanks, the switches can handle both high and low viscosity liquids. The new range of products also includes conductivity sensors that measure a process liquid’s ability to carry electrical currents. As with the level switches, they are suitable for CIP & SIP and all wetted parts are made of AISI 316L stainless steel and PEEK.

Jorgensen Engineering A/S has come up with an innovative system to detect micro leaks in cans of milk powder. It is fully automated, with increased accuracy and integration into production lines. The Danish company claimed that this equipment represents a step change because it is able to detect the so-called ‘slow leaks’ in both full and empty cans at a nano level to help optimise shelf-life & ensure product quality. “Traditional systems are laboratory-based and detect slow leaks on a micron level. Jorgensen’s new leak tester measures on a nano level, which means the method is accurate and ensures that milk powder shelf-life is maintained. It is also fully automatic and designed to be fully integrated into a production line combined with functionality on a laboratory testing level,” revealed Jesper Johansen, Marketing Manager, Jorgensen Engineering A/S. The system uses inactive helium gas as tracer in the full cans in a non-destructive test. The cans are exposed to a strong vacuum and the equipment utilises the unique ability of helium to penetrate even the smallest cracks and flaws. Although developed for milk powder, the system could be used for other powdered goods as well as for can producers wanting to test empty containers.

July 2010 | Modern Food Processing

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LEADERS SPEAK

“Indian customers are looking for foods that can supplement their traditional eating habits” …observes Chitranjan Dar, CEO - Foods Division, ITC Ltd. During his stint in ITC, he has led several key assignments in sales & marketing, manufacturing, projects and supply chain management. Further, being at the helm of the Foods Division, he has taken the company to new heights. In an exclusive interview with Shivani Mody, the industry veteran shares his views on the processed food market and the future of Indian food industry.

Indian processed food industry vis-à-vis global market… Indians by habit prefer fresh food and home-cooked meals. Hence, readyto-eat foods have a relatively smaller market in India compared to other countries, resulting in less demand for the processed food industry. India’s contribution to the global exports is at a base level. Taking into account the potential of large and small players, the country holds bright prospects to cater to the global food market at large. To make this

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a possibility, there is need for proper infrastructure and internationally benchmarked technology and process. Also, the country needs to improve its reputation in terms of hygiene in food processing and this calls for investments. If these issues are addressed, the Indian food industry will be able to capture a major share of the export basket.

Emerging trends in the industry… The emerging trends in the food industry are centered on health


LEADERS SPEAK

& nutrition, convenience and fun aspects. Talking about India, people focus more on the nourishment factor when it comes to branded foods.

for certain products can cause a spike in the raw material cost and vice versa. Also, with the inflationary pressures in the food industry, we are losing our cost-competitiveness with time.

Latest technology in action… Since the last five years, the emergence of various technologies has changed the scenario of the industry. One important trend that is clearly visible in the market is the development in the area of packaging. There have been significant improvements right through the food chain, with a special focus on protection, convenience and communication. Automation is still not prevalent in the country and the batch sizes are small. There is a growing need for quality inspection systems to detect errors pertaining to colour, size & dimensions of food items and help deliver quality to the customers. There is need for automation for better process controls that will ensure better quality of endproducts. In addition, the technology related to enhancing the shelf-life of products and manufacturing products containing two or more textures & materials may also be relevant for India.

Challenges faced… A major challenge faced by the industry is the slow growth rate of demand for processed food. One of the factors responsible for this includes the small scale and size of the market. Moreover, India is a widespread country with varying economic ability. Considering the reach and services for distributing the products evenly and economically, the network needs to be a low-cost model. Besides, there are multiple laws and regulatory bodies – central and state authorities – that are outdated and unrealistic, posing various problems for the industry. The government does support the industry, but the policies are not implemented effectively. The demand

Government initiatives for the growth of this sector… The government is doing its part to support the food industry. However, it needs to address the issue pertaining to liberal taxation policy - levying the GST across the country. Another major issue to be resolved relates to the development of quality infrastructure such as creation of proper logistics network & facilities and cold chains especially the frozen chain systems. More investments should be planned for this purpose and there should be a focus on exports. Currently, due to the high cost of production, the customers are bearing most of the cost burden. This situation needs to be controlled. The imposition of 20 per cent tax on packaged foods acts as a hurdle to the growth of the industry.

Innovations in the food industry… Many innovations are coming up in the area of health foods, with the launch of many new products and value-addition to the existing ones. Some of our latest innovations are focussed on reducing the sugar, salt and fat content in snacks, which is a growing preference among customers. If we take the example of Bingo Mad Angles, we have made innovations in the taste and texture based on the Indian taste buds. Other important features for food products are a stable shelf-life and an emphasis on packaging. We have come up with large packs, which are also easy-to-use and convenient for customers.

USP of your products… Our USP lies in offering a large variety of quality food products, which

The market is shaping up for the ready-to-eat foods, confectionery and snack products. To tap the emerging opportunities, it is pivotal to develop an emotional connect with the customers, which will go a long way in the future growth of the industry. meet the growing demands of our consumers. To make this a reality, we focus a great deal on customer insights through market research. Our research has revealed that the Indian customers are looking for foods that can supplement their traditional eating habits. Hence, our products cater to their fundamental requirements of health, safety and hygiene. The market is shaping up for the ready-to-eat foods, confectionery and snack products. To tap the emerging opportunities, it is pivotal to develop an emotional connect with the customers, which will go a long way in the future growth of the industry.

Future outlook… The processed food industry is currently small, but is slated to mature in a decade or so. Though the Indian packaged food industry is fraught with challenges currently, efforts are focussed on creating demand for such food varieties. The industry is already showing signs of high growth in demand for processed foods. As part of the food industry, we too are working towards creating demand for the processed and packaged foods in the country. There is a need to strike a balance among different varieties of food and this has to be done optimally. One of the important strategies adopted by us is attractive pricing of our products, while maintaining the quality.

July 2010 | Modern Food Processing

31


ROUNDTABLE

Contract farming

Yet to make an impact… Though, India is witnessing a rise in contract farming, its impact is yet to be seen. Given its advantages as well as disadvantages, the government, which controls the agriculture sector, needs to play an important role in monitoring contract farming and facilitating its success. Shivani Mody interacts with some industry experts to find more about the scenario of contract farming in India. Courtesy: International Land Coalition

Balram Singh Yadav Managing Director, Godrej Agrovet Ltd Contract farming is essentially an agreement between a farmer and a company for production and supply of agricultural/horticultural produce at a predetermined/ agreed price. The main feature of contract farming is that the buyer/ contractor provides all the material inputs and technical advice required for the cultivation of a particular crop, with specified standards. As a result, the farmers are able to upgrade their skills and adopt latest management practices to improve productivity, thereby leading to rising incomes. Moreover, it ensures optimal capacity utilisation, as the company channelises its assets efficiently to make sure that it gets continued supplies. One of the major advantages for the companies is continuous supply of the product at almost constant prices. Companies are insulated from commodity cycle and have reasonably good control on production & prices. Contract farming also helps companies to build a rapport

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with farmers besides enabling them to disseminate new product technologies and management practices easily. On the negative side, the farmer is unable to gain from commodity upside cycle. In case, the company discontinues the contract, the farmer finds it difficult to manage working capital to restart the business. The downside of contract farming for companies is that they have to take the risk of fluctuation in the output prices. Companies receive poor support from government agencies in case the farmer defaults in meeting his obligations, and are also vulnerable to continuous deceit by farmers. They also find it difficult to enforce contracts and often farmers unite & ask for higher purchase price year after year. Contract farming is operational in several segments such as poultry and exotic vegetables like gherkin, etc. It can be successfully implemented in the area of main crops, if the practices followed become robust and enforceable. It is often seen that governments are reluctant to enforce contracts on farmers, and this is the greatest obstacle for large-scale contract farming. Formulating a contract farming law clearly outlining the obligations of farmers & companies will protect both the parties and ensure that contract farming grows in the country. Once the law is formulated, the government should play the role of a ‘facilitator’ rather than a ‘regulator.’


ROUNDTABLE

Devinder Sharma Food Policy Analyst Contract farming is actually a kind of Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) in agriculture. In countries where financial capital and access to land is inadequate, contract farming becomes a significant alternative route. Following the global trend, in India too, contract farming is growing. One of the earliest examples was Pepsico’s entry into Punjab in the late 1980s. Pepsico had aimed at introducing a second horticultural revolution in the trouble-torn Punjab. After undertaking a lot of studies, it ventured into crops where the financial viability was assured. Although there are still a number of industry-sponsored reports speaking of the ‘success’ of the Pepsico model, the fact remains that there has been no horticultural revolution that the company had intended to bring in. Subsequently, there have been several other attempts in Punjab to give a boost to contract farming as the mechanism to source agricultural commodities. Studies by Punjab Agricultural University (PAU), Ludhiana; and

Dr G V Ramanjaneyulu Executive Director, Centre for Sustainable Agriculture Contract farming is essentially an agreement between unequal parties – companies, government bodies or individual entrepreneurs on the one hand and economically weaker, socially unorganised farmers on the other. Though there are some advantages of contract farming, it is fraught with several demerits. In case of a breach of agreement from the company’s side, particularly when there is a decline in prices, farmers are always at loss. Several studies done in AP & Karnataka reveal that the contracting companies escape when there is price drop and do not help farmers. Often in the name of quality management, companies tend to reject a lot of goods. A robust dispute settlement system is essential before initiating contract farming. It would be helpful to have a tripartite agreement with government as a party. Organising farmers into producer co-operatives/ companies will also help in aggregating products and improving their bargaining power. Many-a-time, the crops promoted are exotic like gherkins, medicinal plants, etc and have no local market, which gives monopolistic control to the contracting companies. Farmers have no choice to bargain, as there would be no buyers in case the contracting company does not honour the contract. The production practices followed are intensive and often the high use of chemicals has an adverse impact on the natural resources. Standards are meant to safeguard the interests of the consumers, but there are no stringent norms to prevent

Punjabi University, Patiala clearly show that at least 65 per cent of farmers, who were engaged in contract farming at one stage or the other, do not want to venture into it again. With agriculture sector facing tremendous biotic & abiotic stresses, and contributing substantially to the global greenhouse gas emissions coupled with depleting groundwater levels, contract farming actually exacerbates the environmental crisis. Almost in all the contracts, the emphasis is on crops that have commercial importance, and therefore, literally use high amount of underground water and involve heavy application of chemical inputs. Rose cultivation, for instance, renders the land almost infertile after a couple of years and the companies return the leased out land to the farmers and move on to a better patch. This is ecologically devastating.

the adverse implications on the health of farmers/workers or their land. Of course, there are certain guidelines supposed to take care of negative effects of intensive cultivation of a crop like gherkins. However, it is an irony that such rules are either costly to comply with or not strictly enforced by the contracting companies. For instance, there are safety overcoats, trousers, gloves and masks that the farmers are supposed to wear during the application of pesticides, which most of them do not follow. In addition to earning a major share of profits from the output of contract farming, the companies also earn indirectly from the sale of seeds, plating materials and agrochemicals to the farmers. A study in Karnataka showed that out of the total cost of around Rs 164 crore incurred by the farmers in the production of gherkins almost 40 per cent, or Rs 66 crore to be precise, was paid to the companies, which gain handsome margins from that indirectly. On the positive side, contract farming can ensure a market for the farmers. Today, with high uncertainty in markets, any kind of assurance in terms of price and volume of purchase will help farmers to sustain their farming. Similarly, gaining knowledge on quality and productivity improvement methods as part of contract farming can help farmers in enhancing their production yield.

July 2010 | Modern Food Processing

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ROUNDTABLE

Dr Gyanendra Shukla Director, Monsanto (India) Contract farming has been in existence since many years as a means of organising the commercial agricultural production of both largescale and small-scale farmers. It is becoming an increasingly important aspect of agri-business, whether the products are purchased by large or small companies, government agencies, farmer co-operatives or individual entrepreneurs. Most of the commercial seeds, vegetables and herbs in the country are produced under contract farming arrangement in collaboration with companies interested in reliable & consistent supply of raw materials. In countries like India where small-scale agriculture continues to be widespread, the approach appears to have considerable potential. This is because in many cases small-scale farmers may not be able to compete without access to the services provided by contract farming companies. Well-organised contract farming provides such linkages and offers solutions to small farmers to undertake farming in a commercial manner.

Dr K Satheesh Babu Professor - Agricultural Market Intelligence Centre, Kerala Agricultural University Contract farming has both advantages and disadvantages. The biggest advantage to the farmers is that he/she gets an assured market for the output at an assured price. This price discovery will enable the farmer to plan acreage decisions better. This way, price and market risks are reduced considerably. One of the major disadvantages of contact farming for the farmer is that it is an unequal partnership of unorganised producers with a well-placed company. It can create an atmosphere of monopoly. The agri-business firm can indulge in unilateral default whenever market price falls below the contracted price. In the absence of a well-developed legal framework to deal with such situations, especially with transnational companies more in vogue, it can turn out to be a big disadvantage to the vast majority of Indian farmers, who are illiterate/semi-literate, and operating on small scale. Some of the advantages of contract farming for the company include an excellent opportunity to them to

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From the point of view of farmers, contractual arrangements can provide them with access to production services and credit as well as knowledge of new skills & technology. Pricing arrangements can reduce risk and uncertainty, resulting in assured & often higher returns. Some contract farming ventures give farmers the opportunity to diversify into new crops and new markets. It can also help them to avail of easy insurance facilities due to consolidation and presence of the credible partner company. As for the companies, contract farming provides access to land that would not be otherwise available to them, and the opportunity to organise a reliable supply of products of the desired quality, which probably could not be obtained in the open market. It not only assures quality and timeliness in delivery of farmers’ products, but also lowers transport costs, as co-ordinated and larger loads are planned, an important feature in the case of more dispersed producers. Indeed, with effective management, contract farming can be a means to develop markets and bring about the transfer of technical skills in a way that is profitable for both the companies and farmers. However, the government has to play an important role in making contract farming a profitable proposition in India. It should act as an enabler and developer to foster success by developing linkages between the companies & farmers.

overcome constraints of land and capital investments by gaining access to the producers’ land and production capital indirectly. Similarly, the company enjoys access to producers’ output devoid of all production risks. Contract farming usually offers a more advantageous position to the company. The only possible disadvantage to the company is the possibility of unilateral default by the farmers, when the market price far exceeds the contracted price. In spite of the multiplicity of regulations in India on different aspects of agriculture at large, we are still bound by the Indian Contract Act, 1872, passed by the British legacy, to govern and regulate contract farming. According to this act, any disputes are to be redressed in civil courts, which is a time-consuming process under the Indian judicial system. Agriculture, being a state subject, the legal departments of these professional companies can easily find loopholes in these medieval, archaic legislations. Only the Tamil Nadu Government has passed a comprehensive law on contract farming in India, with an enforcement officer with quasi-judicial powers. The absence of a uniform, well-defined regulatory authority will be the biggest challenge faced by policy-makers, planners, legislators and producers in the context of contract farming in India. The primary responsibility of the government is to provide a fair, smooth and speedy legal framework to all stakeholders.


ROUNDTABLE

Siddharth Maheshwari R&A Director, Company and Market Intelligence, Datamonitor India Contract farming is gaining prominence in India and the conditions are getting favourable for its growth, with the steady progress in the economy, rising food demand, organised retail boom and an increasing shift towards branded food consumption. It augurs well for agricultural performance improvement, which is suboptimal, along with the rural development. However, in a country comprising mainly small and marginal farmers, its real impact is yet to be seen. The concerns relating to ever-increasing corporatisation of agriculture coupled with mounting food inflation remains, which could potentially lead to socio-political unrest in the future. The advantages for farmers include price and revenue assurance, thereby reducing their dependence on poor realisation of sales to government agencies and exploitative traders. Managerial and technological input from the company with focus on yield management practices helps farmers to generate qualitative output. Even bigger support comes in the form of access to credit. Quality seeds & fertilisers, crop insurance and logistics support add to their

gains. On the flip side, farmers may get exposed to crop incompatibility and farm degradation risk due to unsuitable farming methods. The bigger risk arises from one party dependence that results in monopoly. Dealing with likely indebtedness and corruption issues also adds to the farmers’ woes. On the other hand, private companies gain via stable and steady supplies, price risk insulation, noninvestment in big resources like land, product risk-sharing, and political & social acceptance. However, often the company incurs losses on account of farmers’ discontent, coordination and monitoring problems & quality issues. Despite both bearing counter-party risks, farmers are relatively on the disadvantaged position due to poor legal recourse. The initial trends indicate encouraging signs for contract farming in India, with many companies entering this domain in a big way. Contract farming, earlier being restricted to cash crops only, has now expanded deeply to cover base crops and fruits & vegetables.

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BUSINESS & MARKETS

SECTOR WATCH Bakery & snack foods: Growth through healthy innovations ......................... 38 STATUS REVIEW Smart snacking options: Adding a tinge of wellness .................................... 42 MARKET TRENDS Baked foods: Vying for a bigger pie ............................................................. 46

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SECTOR WATCH

Bakery & snack foods

Growth through healthy innovations In a country where food habits are so diverse, and the variety of nutritional intake so high, it is an ongoing challenge for snack manufacturers to introduce products with new flavours and formats to cater to the consumers’ desire for experimentation. However, the changing perception of Indians on snacking and their focus on health & novelty are leading to numerous opportunities for these manufacturers. Courtesy: Inventables Technology

Rahul Ashok

T

he new Indian perspective on snacking is not only centered around taste and indulgence, but also on a generous serving of novelty and a dash of health as well. Given this change of interest towards snacking, it is not surprising that, over the years, the snacks

C AG R (2001-2004)

C AG R (2004-2009)

C AG R (2009-2013)

P opcorn Other s avoury s nacks C ookies (s weet bis cuits ) C ereal bars C akes & pas tries P roces s ed s nacks rackers (s avoury bis cuits ) Nuts & s eeds High growth categories

P otato chips C hocolate 0%

5%

10%

15%

20%

25%

30%

35%

C AG R (%) Note: ‘Other savoury snacks’ includes ethnic Indian snacks

Among all Indian snacking categories, chocolate, potato chips and nuts & seeds had the highest CAGR over the period 2004-09

Figure 1: Growth rate of various snacking categories

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Source: Datamonitor

market is witnessing rapid growth. According to Datamonitor estimates, as of 2009, the organised snacks market in India is worth $ 1.5 billion, and has registered a compounded annual growth rate (CAGR) of 15 per cent over the last three years. Moreover, as the Indian snacks market is highly fragmented, the organised sector constitutes only half of the total Indian snacks market size. The categories that have been driving the growth of branded snacks market include chocolates, potato chips, and nuts & seeds, as shown in Figure 1. According to a recent consumer insight report from Datamonitor, ‘Profiting from the changing snacking preferences of Indian consumers’, the difference in the consumer perception between fragmented meals and in-between meal snacks is fast blurring. This change in perception presents several new opportunities for the snack manufacturers. It is the gradual shift in the dietary regime of people in the urban areas, from rigid ‘three square meals a day’ to intake of convenienceled, smaller portions through the day, which has resulted in a demand for more nutritious and novel snacking options.


SECTOR WATCH

Snacks as ‘mini meals’ The change in the attitude towards snacking is reflected in the fact that snacking is no longer associated only with leisurely consumption. The people are turning to snacks to fight hunger pangs through the day, which is an outcome of having lighter or quick meals during the first half of the day, as shown in Figure 2. This scenario has given rise to a need for a quick snack, apart from the traditional evening snack. Further, more the number of snacking occasions, higher the guilt levels associated with it, since there is an inherent association of a sense of unhealthiness with snacking. In this context, the survey revealed that while Indian women make more conscious attempts to eat healthily and follow a viable diet plan, the levels of guilt women associate with snacking is same as that among men. This shows that Indians do not consider eating leafy vegetables, fresh fruits and low-fat food as compensatory for unhealthy, between-meal snacking. The notion of snacking as a replacement for a missed or deferred meal is catching up fast, especially among the young professionals, and thus the workplace is emerging as a snacking location. Few companies in India have even tailor-made their product communication to target the snacking needs of office goers and have positioned their product as a

healthier snack compared to other traditional snacking alternatives. The result of this trend is that some product categories such as biscuits and puddings have a newfound acceptance among the Indian consumers as snacks. The advantage from the companies’ perspective here is that, when consumers perceive these products as alternatives to a fullfledged meal, with comparable satiety and nutritive value, they are willing to pay a small premium for these snacks. This is evident in the case of products such as cereal or granola bars that are priced at Rs 20 and above, and are gaining popularity among several Indian consumers, as they offer the perfect blend of nutrition and convenience desired by them. Figure 3 illustrates a fast emerging archetype of consumers, who can be called ‘health seekers’, as they choose to eat healthy even when they snack.

‘Baked, not fried’: The current trend

One of the most common routes the Indian snack manufacturers have taken in the recent past to attract consumer interest is to offer baked/puffed snacks instead of fried ones. This has resulted in the creation of new product concepts. These could be a mix of flavours usually found in ethnic snacks, or in formats that are contemporary and healthy. Companies are also aggressively promoting these snacks as healthier food options, both through Meal time fragmentation Traditional meal occasion Time product packaging and 08:00 hr Breakfast is usually light or, at times, skipped Breakfast advertising campaigns. 10:00 hr Snacking occasion -1 For instance, the 12:00 hr Lunch product packaging Lunch might be a short meal or, at times, deferred 14:00 hr of baked snacks 16:00 hr Evening snack has claims such as, Snacking occasion -2 18:00 hr ‘trans-fat free’, ‘zero 20:00 hr Dinner times vary Dinner cholesterol’, etc, 22:00 hr on the front of the 00:00 hr package itself, in order Since the meals preceding the snacking occasions described above are consumed in a hurry and are not as satiating as they should be, there is a need for more elaborate & novel snacking products to create maximum Source: Datamonitor impact at the point of Figure 2: Changing snacking pattern purchase. The impact

Courtesy: Domestic Wonder Snacks

of such communication is evident from the consumer survey, where it was found that 60 per cent of men and women were regularly using the nutritional information on product packaging to make snacking choices. Further, this proportion was found to be significantly higher than the consumers, who were influenced by the aesthetics of packaging.

Evolution from the ‘we’ snack to the ‘me’ snack Earlier, Indian households were known for the consumption of ethnic, homemade snacks, which were made in relatively large quantities to cater to the entire family. However, this scenario is changing and is fast giving way to alternative food items that are purchased from the retail stores, and cater to the individual tastes & preferences of each family member. This, in spite of the increased accessibility and availability of ingredients required for snack preparation, can be attributed to the fact that most urban women do not have enough time or the skill required for preparing snacks that involve a labourious process.

Changing retail landscape The rising individualistic nature and the concept of ‘on-the-go’ snacking among Indians is well supported by the

July 2010 | Modern Food Processing

39


SECTOR WATCH

Health seekers Predominant purchase drivers R ‘Healthiness’ of a snack , through constituents of the formulation (eg, cereals) R Product claims such as ‘trans-fat free’, ‘low cholesterol’, ‘added whole grain’, etc Health: Prefer branded snacks and tend to look for apportioned SKUs. Keenly read and use nutritional information to aid their purchase decisions

Novelty: Not easily swayed by novel snacking flavours or ingredients, if there is no tangible health benefit. Therefore, they are not particularly impulsive consumers

Taste: Do not mind trading-off taste Price: Do not mind paying a premium for to an extent, for some health benefits health benefits. Also, if they cannot afford that may accrue from a snack a snack, they would rather eat fruits, than snack, trade-down to a less healthier product Snacking options which Newly positioned / are naturally good for repositioned snacks for health seekers health seekers

Future opportunities

Snack-cups (yogurt or pudding), roasted nuts, Horlicks NutriBar, Tiffany Baked savoury snacks such as fruit-based snacks digestive biscuits, fruits Aliva, Hippo and Smart Chips Healthier ingredients and positioning are driving the concept of snacking as a ‘guiltfree indulgence’ for most Indians Figure 3: Snacking options that health-conscious consumers are seeking

availability of ‘tear, eat and throw’-sized packages of most snacks in the market, which are priced in the range of Rs 5 to Rs 10 that is often considered to be the optimum level at which a purchase of this nature can be impulsive. This has opened up possibilities of snacks being stocked at the numerous stores, big and small, across the country. It proves the fact that with respect to snacking products, volumes can and does compensate for conservative pricing strategies in India. Apart from this, the role of organised retail in pushing the demand for novel and healthy snacking products has been vital. There are several regional snack manufacturers, whose products are stocked in organised retail stores alongside the national and in some cases, even international brands, thereby providing the consumers a wider range of flavours & snack concepts across several price points.

from several ethnic Indian snacks and cuisines, such as Rajasthani Chilli, Andhra Style, Rajma, etc. But the success of these products clearly depends on the consumer acceptance of the taste. Since ethnic Indian snacks belonging to a certain region are closely linked to locally procured ingredients and methods of preparation, it is a challenge to formulate products appealing to the palate. While Indians are not particular about buying locally produced food and drinks, claims such as ‘authentic’, ‘home-made’ and ‘original’ exert significant influence on purchase decisions, the Datamonitor survey revealed. This clearly shows that branded snacks do have an opportunity to effectively compete with the local or regional manufacturers for ethnic snacks, but consistently providing authentic taste and flavour emerges as a focus area for companies.

Building long-term brand preference

Here’s to more snacking

There is a scramble among the major snack brands in India to offer flavours

With an increasing number of categories coming under the purview

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Modern Food Processing | July 2010

of snacking, consumers assess their snacking options, critically taking into account the parameters of taste, health and novelty. While this opens up a lot of opportunities for the snack manufacturers, it also means that they have to carefully plan their product mix to cater to different consumer groups. They need to move away from the traditional ‘one-size-fits-all’ approach to align with the consumer desire for guilt-free indulgence. However, on a positive note, regional and local snack manufacturers are investing in better technology and processes to ensure that their products can compete with the national brands in terms of range and quality, while catering to the tastes & preferences of a certain ethnic group. This is evident in the case of products such as diet snacks, for example, the organised retail stores in most urban cities in India stock products such as diet chivda, diet khakhra, etc, which are not made by well-known companies with a pan-India presence, but comprise a majority of the available product range in that category. Another prospective area for Indian snack manufacturers lies in the area of domestic production of those snacks, which are imported from other countries. For instance, several imported fruit-based & corn-based snacks, nuts, etc, are available in most of the retail stores in urban India, but the price point is still a deterrent for mass adoption. These products present tremendous opportunities for Indian companies to explore in the years to come. Rahul Ashok is a Consultant in the Consumer Markets Team at Datamonitor India. He is currently involved in conceptualising and creating knowledge solutions targeted at supporting product development and marketing initiatives in the Consumer Packaged Goods (CPG) industry. For details, contact Aartee Sundheep on email: asundheep@datamonitor.com


STATUS REVIEW

Smart snacking options

Adding a tinge of wellness Today’s fast-paced life and changing eating habits have led to a shift in the consumption of formal meals. As a result, consumers tend to eat small snacks during the day. Snack manufacturers are tapping this growing market by introducing innovative products as well as offering some healthy options to the consumers. Rakesh Rao tracks the changes taking place in the snacking pattern. Courtesy: Ballreich Inc

I

ndia is known for its wide range of snacks, which vary from region to region and have unique flavour of their own. The snack food industry in India is highly fragmented, with made-at-home snacks or savouries sold by local vendors dominating the market. Major players in the organised snack sector are FritoLay, ITC Foods, Haldiram’s, Parle Agro, Con Agra, McCain Foods, Bikano, etc. Nadia Chauhan, Jt Managing Director & CMO, Parle Agro Pvt Ltd, explains, “The Indian snack market consists of both organised (branded) and unorganised (local/unbranded) players. Organised snack sector is one of the fastest growing segments in FMCG, with an estimated growth rate of 25 per cent annually. Today, the Indian snacks market is witnessing significant growth and has reached over Rs 6,500 crore-mark. However, the per capita consumption of branded snacks in India is relatively small and holds huge growth potential.”

Urban Rural

Table 1: Market for snacks in urban & rural area CAGR for last Contribution to total snacks market two years 67% 13.2% 33% 26.7% Source: The Nielsen Company

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Modern Food Processing | July 2010

It is snacking time With expanding nuclear families, increasing number of female professionals and changing food habits, India is all set to witness high demand for packaged snacks. Chauhan says, “Rising number of young urban professionals, working women, growing trend of nuclear families, etc, have led to a significant rise in the demand for ready-to-eat snacks.” K S Narayanan, Managing Director, McCain Foods India Pvt Ltd, adds, “With the change in the consumption pattern of formal meals, consumers increasingly tend to eat a variety of small snacks during the day rather than three full meals. Furthermore, in an increasingly fast-paced life, there is growing demand for snacks that are easily available, easy to store and eat, with an increasing number being eaten ‘on-the-move’.” The organised and unorganised snack sectors are likely to witness an annual growth of 15-20 per cent and 8 per cent, respectively. On factors driving the growth, Chauhan says, “The branded snacks segment is being driven by three major sub-categories. The first is the traditional segment consisting of namkeen, bhujia, etc. The next is the Western segment consisting of potato chips, wafers, cheese balls, etc. The third is the finger snacks segment, which is an adaptation


STATUS REVIEW

of traditional offerings to the Western format.”

Potato-based snack leads the pack Potato-based snacks, and in particular, potato chips, are the largest product segment, of the salty snack market, followed by snack nuts, chickpeas and other pulse-based savoury snacks. Narayanan opines, “The market for Indian salty snacks consists of a wide spectrum of processed potato-based products such as chips, aloo bhujia, French fries etc. However, it is estimated that potato chips alone constitute nearly 85 per cent of India’s total salty snack food market.” He further adds, “As per trade estimates, the total organised market for snack foods comprising Western salties and traditional snacks is about Rs 3,000 crore. Of the above, the bulk of it would be potato-based. In fact, the market for processed potato products is growing at the rate of 15-20 per cent per annum, which is still small as compared to the US or Europe. However, we believe that India

represents a huge opportunity in terms of different types of potato products, from fries to potato specialties, both international and ethnic.” The snacks market is quite cluttered and consumer purchase in this category is impulse-driven. So, it is a challenging task for a new brand to create a space for itself. “Snacks are no longer restricted to the traditional categories, so there is a need to constantly innovate to stay ahead and meet consumer requirements. India being a vast country with diverse food habits, consumer taste preferences differ across zones,” observes Chauhan. When consumers choose to snack, they mainly want to indulge themselves. Chauhan adds, “Fried snacks have a larger marketshare as consumers have the notion that they taste better. But fried snacks bring in health concerns along with it. The debate about obesity is having an increasingly negative impact on the snacking industry’s image and sales.” In order to handle some of these challenges, companies are developing snacks that are claimed to be healthy

IQF: A handy freezing technology For frozen snack manufacturers, technology plays an all-important role in freezing. Narayanan informs, “The rate at which the food product is frozen is a key factor to get the frozen food in right shape and texture. It is simple: The more slowly food is frozen, the more time it takes for the water molecules contained in the food to come together leading to formation of larger ice crystals. Large ice crystals have the tendency to cause rupture of cells and breakage of cell membranes, thereby leading to destruction of texture in meat, fish, vegetables and fruits, while also contributing to a significant loss of vitamins, nutrients and flavours.” In order to deal with this problem, frozen food manufacturers are adopting quick-freezing (Individually Quick Freezing or IQF) technology to preserve food. He says, “The method allows virtual preservation of all properties of food products. IQF is one of the few methods of freezing, which is used for increasing the shelf-life of perishable foods by subjecting them to temperatures of -18°C to inhibit the oxidative, enzymatic and microbial changes, which are responsible for the changes in the flavours and colours of foods.” The process involves direct immersion or indirect contacts of foods with the refrigerant, and air blasts over the foods being frozen. “The product after freezing, when thawed, tends to have a firm, more natural texture than is the case with most slow-frozen foods. The process also helps to capture the biological condition of the fresh food at a point at which it is frozen, and thereby presents the same flavour, colour and the taste of the frozen food on its de-freezing or thawing,” informs Narayanan.

Nadia Chauhan Jt Managing Director & CMO, Parle Agro Pvt Ltd

The premium snack segment is opening up with a focus on gourmet flavours, quality & natural ingredients and healthy processing methods. There is a focus on reducing the oil and salt content in snacks. Players are moving towards snacks made from healthy ingredients. and natural. Chauhan says, “Some of the major trends are focus on localised flavours, healthy snacks, baked snacks, etc. Food labelling has become an important aspect of snack food packaging. In India, there are many players that offer no onion, no garlic flavours to address the food habits of certain communities.”

Baked for health With growing awareness about health, consumers are becoming more conscious about what they eat. And snacks companies are gearing up to meet the demand for healthy snacks. Chauhan informs, “Though health is an important concern, consumers of snack items do not want to compromise on taste.” Last year saw the introduction of a number of products with some form of health positioning, including no trans-fats, high levels of whole grains or even natural & organic versions. “Baked snacks are becoming a trend, as they present a healthy snack option. Hippo was launched first in June 2009. Hippo’s launch is in line with Parle Agro’s distinct approach of pioneering growth of new categories that have never been experienced before. The response to Hippo has been encouraging. These delicious, baked wheat munchies have no added Monosodium Glutamate (MSG), no

July 2010 | Modern Food Processing

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STATUS REVIEW

K S Narayanan Managing Director, McCain Foods India Pvt Ltd

Today, frozen foods fulfill the needs of consumers, who seek a variety of convenient and great tasting food options. With changing consumer lifestyles in India, the home consumption of frozen food is growing fast and we see considerable scope for significant growth. Genetically Modified Organism (GMO), no cholesterol, and zero trans-fat,” claims Chauhan.

Frozen to perfection In the last couple of years, the frozen snacks market has attracted many new players, as the consumers demand more innovative products. Narayanan states, “The market for frozen foods (excluding frozen vegetables), which has penetrated only about 2 per cent of the consuming class, is at a nascent stage in India. Frozen food is a new category for Indian consumers; however, they are slowly getting familiar with it. McCain has worked in similar markets earlier. The key to grow such markets is to offer a range

of high-quality affordable frozen food products adapted to local taste and made available close to consumers.” One of the reasons for low penetration of frozen snacks is the perception that such products do not taste good and are not fresh. Narayanan says, “Our research has shown that consumers have certain misconceptions about frozen foods, particularly they are not aware of the benefits of using freezing as a method of preservation. The fact that freezing is a natural method of food preservation without the use of any preservatives or chemicals and that it locks freshness & maintains the nutritive value of food is not known to most consumers. The need of the hour is to spread awareness about the frozen food category and enhance consumers’ appreciation about the benefits of natural freshness and taste. Along with this, they must have access to quality frozen food products. Affordability, variety and availability will be the key strategies to grow the market.” He further explains, “Today, frozen foods fulfill the needs of consumers, who seek a variety of convenient and great tasting food options. With changing consumer lifestyles in India, the home consumption of frozen food is growing fast and we see considerable scope for significant growth.”

Flavours of success

Courtesy: Healthy Kitchen

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In order to allure the consumers, manufacturers are offering ethnicflavoured snacks. Localisation is a cornerstone of McCain’s India strategy, informs Narayanan. He adds, “We continuously work with our customers and keep track of the evolving trends and based on the requirements, we attempt to develop products & solutions addressing their needs & requirements. McCain’s ethnic range of frozen food offerings is registering good growth. For instance, Aloo Tikki and Tandoori Vege Nuggets introduced in 2008 are growing rapidly. Recently,

Modern Food Processing | July 2010

we have also introduced two new products – Masala French Fries and Chilli Garlic Potato Pops - in the ethnic range portfolio. The preference for local range cuts across the cities and the growth is as much in metros as in non-metros’ class A cities & towns.” Companies are also using innovative ways to develop flavours. For example, FritoLay, as part of its consumer engagement programme, has just introduced four consumer co-created flavours. Manufacturers targeting the upper end of the market are expected to increase the value of their products through the development of low-fat snacks and new flavour combinations. Chauhan says, “The premium snack segment is opening up with a focus on gourmet flavours, quality & natural ingredients and healthy processing methods. There is a focus on reducing the oil and salt content in snacks. Players are moving towards snacks made from ingredients that are healthy. To expand the market, snack players are launching different pack sizes.” While domestic snack market is witnessing a range of activities, some manufacturers are also targeting overseas markets. Narayanan says, “We have commenced exports of our products and they are being wellaccepted across countries. We get a large demand for Indian potato-based frozen specialties from markets like Middle East, the US, UK, Hong Kong where there is a large base of Indian expatriate population. Interestingly, it is not just the international range that is being exported, a large part of our exports include the Indian range comprising Aloo Tikki, Tandoori Vege Nuggets and Masala Fries.” While the snacks market is predicted to see high increase in sales, new categories like health, frozen, baked, etc are expected to fuel expansion of this industry in the country in near future. In a nutshell, demand for premium and regular snacks is all set for an explosive growth.


MARKET TRENDS

Baked foods

Vying for a bigger pie In India, bakery products account for a large percentage share in the consumer processed food sector. With biscuits and bread constituting a major market, cakes & pastries are fast catching up. Innovations and valueadditions resulting in new variants of bakery products are poised to open up new avenues for the bakery industry. Courtesy: Photo Bucket

Srividyaranjani V

T

he bakery market is one of the fastest growing segments of the Indian food processing industry today. Consumers are constantly looking for new bakery products that have better appeal, taste and convenience. The Indian bakery market is currently valued at approximately Rs 126 billion, and is growing at a rate of around 10 per cent per annum. The unorganised sector dominates the Indian bakery market with 70 per cent of the marketshare, while the organised sector accounts for the rest. The organised market comprises large, medium, and

Biscuits: Innovation is key

Base raw materials (Wheat flour, milk solids)

Raw material additives (Stabilisers, emulsifiers sweeteners)

Fermentation, dough making, moulding, baking

Baking companies (HUL, Britannia, Monginis, Milka Nutriments)

Baked goods

Distributors

End consumers Source: Frost & Sullivan

Figure 1: The value chain of the Indian bakery industry

46

small-scale branded manufacturers, who produce packaged biscuits & bread. The unorganised sector consists of small bakery units and cottage units manufacturing artisanal unpackaged bread for local distribution. Figure 1 illustrates the value chain of the Indian bakery industry. The per capita bakery produce consumption in India is about 900 gm, which is low compared to other developing countries (a few South Asian and Middle Eastern countries). Overall, biscuits and bread are the key products that constitute around 90 per cent and the remaining 10 per cent is shared between cakes and pastries in the Indian bakery market.

Modern Food Processing | July 2010

Biscuits, which constitute a major percentage of the total bakery market, is one of the fastest growing segments in the bakery industry – consumption being high among urbanites. The total production of biscuits was estimated at about 17 lakh MT for 2009, with cookies, chocolate-coated biscuits, sandwich biscuits, filled biscuits, savouries and crackers being the popular variants in retail outlets. This is not all. There is a wide range of products in this category, with increasing number of manufacturers involved in the development of variants such as cream,


MARKET TRENDS

fruit-filled, fibre-rich, functional and other types. Moreover, with innovations centered on formulations with exotic flavours, rich textures and packaging, consumers can expect for more varieties & value-additions in the future. Plain biscuits are generally made from wheat, milk solids, sugar, etc, while sandwich biscuits are typically creamfilled. Savoury and crackers are plain biscuit variants, where salt and spices replace the sweetening additive. Cookies are typically hard-baked biscuits made using an array of ingredients including sugar, spices, chocolate, butter, peanut butter, nuts and dried fruits. Health variants of biscuits have been launched recently, which include whole wheat and whole meal crackers, low-fat & sugar-free 2%

8%

50 %

40 % Biscuits

Bread

Cakes

Pastries Source: Frost & Sullivan

Figure 2: Product split among the total Indian bakery market (2009) 9% 12 %

61 %

18 % Plain biscuits Sandwich biscuits Savoury & crackers Cookies

Source: Frost & Sullivan

Figure 3: Product split among the various types of biscuits in the Indian market (2009) 3%

1%

20 %

Brown bread

Multigrain

Bread: Overcoming challenges Bread forms a staple breakfast ingredient for most Indians and is the second-largest product category within the bakery industry after biscuits. Bread is typically classified into white bread, brown bread, whole wheat bread, mixed grain bread and gluten-free bread. White bread is made from flour, which is devoid of bran and wheat germ. This imparts the characteristic white colour to the bread. Brown bread/ whole wheat or whole meal bread is a functional bread type made from flour, which contains bran and germ. Whole meal breads and other functional breads can also be made using oats, rye, maize, etc. The functional and health properties of such bread variants are attributed to the presence of bran, which increases fibre content in bread. The total Indian bread market was estimated at 4 million MT for 2009 and is fragmented with the presence of several small-scale and cottage industry players. Some of the key players in the organised sector are Hindustan Unilever Ltd (HUL), Monginis, Modern Foods, Milka Nutriments, etc. Even though it has a large consumer base, the Indian bread market is plagued by several constraints that hinder market growth such as low profit and operating margins, owing to rising prices of raw materials such as sugar, vegetable oil, milk and wheat flour.

Cakes & pastries

76 %

White bread

cream-filled biscuits, oatmeal cookies, high-fibre digestive biscuits, etc. Britannia, ITC, Surya Foods, Parle, Saj Foods, Dukes, Bisk Farm, etc, are some of the key players in the organised Indian biscuits market. Britannia is the leader with a marketshare of approximately 40 per cent.

Others

Source: Frost & Sullivan

Figure 4: Product split among the various bread types in the Indian market (2009)

Cakes and pastries are generally fastmoving baked commodities, since they are also sold as single portions. In India, sales of single portion cakes are higher than multi-portion cakes. Cakes and pastries are projected to witness

strong retail value growth, as increasing disposable incomes and busier lifestyles make these food options convenient and much desired. Furthermore, manufacturers are likely to introduce many new flavour variants to suit the Indian palate in the short-to-medium term. Changing consumer trends regarding health and wellness, demand for gourmet products and increased competition in the baked goods genre have influenced the performance of the cake market in recent times. The Indian cake market was estimated at Rs 300 crore for 2009, growing at a rate of about 9 per cent annually. The functional cake variants that have been launched recently in the market include sugar-free cakes, diabetic cakes, low-fat cream cakes, etc. Variants like high fibre cakes are expected to be launched soon.

Growth drivers Focussed marketing, increase in urban markets, remarkable increase in consumption in the rural areas, launch of new products, etc have been instrumental in the progress of bakery industry. The industry holds huge potential for functional foods segment, with quite a number of functional variant launches. Despite the evolution of the segment, it is facing a number of challenges like hike in the prices of raw materials, low profit margin of certain product lines, low penetration of the branded products and high dominance of the unorganised sector, which impact market growth. With some government initiatives such as introduction of subsidies on raw materials, abolishment of taxes on bread products, etc, manufacturers of bakery products can overcome the challenges and gain a better marketshare. Srividyaranjani V is a Research Associate for Chemicals, Materials and Foods at Frost & Sullivan - South Asia Middle East. For details, contact Anish Charles on email: anishc@frost.com

July 2010 | Modern Food Processing

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INDUSTRY UPDATE

Edible oil industry

On a refined path of success Being the world’s largest importer and the third-largest consumer of edible oil, India is undoubtedly a huge market for the oil manufacturers. The demand for edible oil has been constantly rising due to the increase in population & rate of consumption and growing per capita income. Geetha Jayaraman takes a look at the present market scenario and the impact of the shift in preferences of edible oils as a result of the growing health-consciousness among consumers on the industry. Courtesy: Condé Nast Digital

O

ilseeds and edible oils are widely used commodities the world over. India is one of the largest producers of oilseeds in the world, with productivity of about 1,000 kg/hectare. Ranked among the top five edible oil economies in the world, India accounts for a high amount of edible oil consumption, thus making it a net importer of edible oil. The Indian edible oil industry comprises around 15,000 oil mills, 600 solvent extraction units, 250 vanaspati units and about 400 refining units. Still, it imports more than 50 per cent of its domestic requirement of edible oils. As per AC Nielsen estimates, consumer-pack refined oil market stood at 12.8 million metric tonne in 2009-10. Dinesh Agrawal, COO - Dhara Division, Mother Dairy Fruit & Vegetable Pvt Ltd, avers, “The consumer-pack segment accounts for roughly 12 per cent of the total edible oil market in India. The category has witnessed a robust growth of 10 per cent during the last

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Modern Food Processing | July 2010

year, and this trend is likely to continue for the next three years.”

Consumption pattern According to the Solvent Extractors’ Association of India (SEAI), the country’s vegetable oil imports (comprising edible and non-edible oil) fell by 1 per cent to 6.32 lakh tonne in March 2010 compared to 6.41 lakh tonne in March 2009. However, the edible oil imports increased to 6.12 lakh tonne in March 2010 from 6.09 lakh tonne in March 2009. On the other hand, the overall import of vegetable oils rose by 4.3 per cent to 37.47 lakh tonne during November 2009 to March 2010 compared to 35.92 lakh tonne in the corresponding period of the previous year. From November 2009 to March 2010, non-edible oil imports rose by 2.5 per cent to 1.62 lakh tonne compared to 1.58 lakh tonne in the year-ago period, while edible oil imports increased to 35.85 lakh tonne from 34.34 lakh tonne.


INDUSTRY UPDATE

At the same time, the overall consumption pattern has been witnessing a steep rise over the years. The per capita income of India has risen substantially in the last decade. This was supported by robust growth in the economy resulting in changing food habits, with people getting more habituated to packaged oils. Dinesh Shahra, Managing Director, Ruchi Soya Industries, observes, “With the change in per capita income, the edible oil industry in India has also undergone significant changes. For example, today consumers have started giving more preference to packaged oil over loose ones due to the extra hygiene offered by these products and because they address health concerns.”

The presence of many organised retail outlets that sell packaged oil has strengthened this trend across the country. Adding to this, Sandeep Agrawal, Director, Suraj Group, states, “If we consider edible oils segment-wise, the major impact of health awareness has been on consumption of vanaspati (hydrogenated vegetable oil) due to higher trans-fats and saturated fats. As a result, the consumption of vanaspati is declining. This is more pronounced in urban areas.” Since the last two years, the use of soya oil that dominated the household consumption earlier, especially in Northern and Western India, is witnessing a decline. Sunflower and mustard oils Table 1: Estimate of domestic are gaining momentum due availability (in lakh tonne) of to reduced prices as compared vegetable oil during 2009-10 (Octto soya. The trend is likely to Nov) & comparison with 2008-09 continue due to large-scale (Oct-Nov) availability of sunflower in Total oil availability international markets and 2009-10 2008-09 abundance of mustard crop in Oilseeds Groundnut (In Shell) 6.1 8.2 India. D Agrawal states, “India Soya 12.8 13.3 consumes both exotic and refined oils. In exotic segment, mustard Rape/Mustard/Toria 20.5 20.3 and groundnut oils come under Sunflower 3.4 4 the largest consumption category. Sesame 2.1 1.7 The process of manufacturing Castor 4.2 4.4 exotic oil is relatively simpler. Oil Niger 0.2 0.1 seeds are cleaned, graded and Safflower 0.4 0.5 crushed to extract oil. However, Linseed 0.7 0.6 edible oil refining is complex, and Sub-total 50.4 53.1 in general, comprises degumming, Other oilseeds neutralisation, bleaching and Cottonseed 10.8 10.5 deodourisation. Winterisation is Copra 4.3 4.2 a new process that allows the Sub-total 15.1 14.7 removal of higher melting point Secondary source crystal from the refined oil that Rice bran 8 8.5 are responsible for turbidity of Rapseed cake 2.3 2.1 some edible oils.” Sunflowerseed cake 0.5 0.7 He further adds that, this Groundnut cake 0.6 0.8 technology is helping to increase Cottonseed & others 0.5 0.5 palm oil’s acceptance all over Minor oilseed (TBOs) 0.8 1 India. Earlier, palm oil had a Local palm oil 0.6 0.7 constraint due to its turbidity in Sub-total 13.3 14.3 cold climate. The process also Grand total 78.8 82.1 helps in low consumption of oil Source: SEAI for deep-frying.

Table 2: Total estimated production of nine major oilseeds* (in lakh tonne) 2009-10 2008-09 season season 150.3 Kharif 136.5 Rabi 94.6 92.3 Total 231.1 242.6 Source: SEAI *Nine major oilseeds are groundnut, soybean, rape/ mustard/toria, sunflowerseed, sesameseed, castorseed, nigerseed, safflowerseed (kardi) and linseed

Changing trends for staying healthy The health factor impacts a large number of purchase decisions in the marketplace. With evolving eating habits, consumers today have adequate knowledge about the food and food constituents that should form a part of their daily consumption, whether it is the consumption of probiotics, presence of antioxidants, dietary fibres, etc. These terms were relatively unheard of by the consumers till a few years ago. But today they find mention in monthly grocery lists. Similarly, the awareness about edible oils and their effect on health is increasing among people leading to changing consumption patterns. “There has been a shift in the preference of cooking medium from ghee and vanaspati to refined oils. This preference has compounded with the hectic lifestyles that have compelled people to review their oil consumption habits while exploring healthier options,” points out D Agrawal.

Dinesh Agrawal COO - Dhara Division, Mother Dairy Fruit & Vegetable Pvt Ltd

Rice bran oil constitutes a small portion of the total edible oil industry, but is now witnessing an extremely healthy growth rate. This variant is likely to grow much faster in the coming years due to its health benefits.

July 2010 | Modern Food Processing

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INDUSTRY UPDATE

While olive oil has been present in the market for quite some time, it was predominantly used for massage. It is only recently that the same is being used in the Indian kitchen on account of the changing Indian palate and exposure to different kinds of cuisines like Mediterranean, Italian and Continental among others. The increasing health-consciousness among consumers has led the edible oil industry to move towards use of new raw materials and products. The industry is now focussing on blended oil categories by mixing rice bran with sunflower and safflower oil. S Agrawal avers, “Olive oil/fortified oil being costly, the consumption is limited to elite class. Recent trend towards health-oriented products has increased the demand for rice bran oil in the industry. Rice bran oil is considered to be good for health as it contains orzonal - considered to be good for heart. It is mostly blended with sunflower oil. Although, it offers a health advantage, the price remains a major challenge, which limits its usage to a few people who can afford it. However, on a positive note, one can see a steady growth in rice bran oil consumption. But, since it is being sold at a premium price, it is not able to compete with cheaper refined oils like soya and palmolein.” Adding to this, D Agrawal, says, “Rice bran oil constitutes a small portion of the total edible oil

Dinesh Shahra Managing Director, Ruchi Soya Industries

With the change in per capita income, the edible oil industry in India has also undergone significant changes. For example, today consumers have started giving more preference to packaged oil over loose ones.

50

industry, but is now witnessing an extremely healthy growth rate. We consider this variant to grow much faster in the coming years due to its health benefits. Fortification of oils too has been in practice for some time, and is employed by quite a few manufacturers as a means to enhance the nutritional levels of oil.”

Hurdles on the way Domestic edible oil industry is facing major issues in terms of competing with international prices. As the government has abolished duty on imports of crude edible oil and has brought down the duty to 7.5 per cent on refined oil imports, the Indian industry is finding it difficult to compete. As a result, farmers suffer. D Agrawal says, “They are unable to get remunerative price for oil seeds. This trend is an area of concern and we hope government will take adequate steps to revive farmers’ interest in oil seeds. We need to ensure that our dependence on imported edible oils do not exceed further.” With the growing demandsupply gap and high dependence on imports, the major challenge for the edible oil industry remains in backward integration by way of palm plantation for securing production margins. To secure the growth momentum of the edible oil industry and attain a competitive edge in the global market, India has to concentrate on improving the yield to match international standards. Shahra avers, “This remains the core potential area to reduce dependency on imports of edible oil to some extent. Finally, the industry needs to make a transition from the sale of loose oil to that of the packaged oil products. As an immediate action, the Indian Government should speed up allotment or demarcation of land suitable for palm plantation and grant subsidy to farmers for palm plantation.”

Modern Food Processing | July 2010

Sandeep Agrawal Director, Suraj Group

The major impact of health awareness has been on vanaspati consumption of (hydrogenated vegetable oil) due to higher trans-fats and saturated fats. As a result, the consumption of vanaspati is declining. Since huge quantities of edible oils are being imported to India, as the oilseed production is lagging behind, refineries with huge capacities have come up near the ports. “Over a period of time these port-based units would control the refined edible oil segment in the country,” points out S Agrawal.

The way forward In the near future, demand for edible oil is expected to increase manifolds. This is likely to lead to a rise in productivity at the farm level, thus ensuring a reasonable price to the farmers. S Agrawal notes, “The edible oil industry is bound to grow as there would be constant growth in demand due to increase in the per capita consumption of consumers, due to a rise in the per capita income.” It is also the right time for an entrepreneur to venture into this industry, which is highly profitable. According to industry experts, the industry will be competitive and will grow faster than many FMCG categories. Packaged goods industry will witness further boost as there is a definite shift from loose oil consumption even in the rural India. The growth of packaged edible oil is likely to be triggered by rural India, which as of now largely consumes loose edible oil. In short, the edible oil industry is expected to reach new heights in the coming years.


QUALITY MANTRA

Fresh food safety

Need to handle contamination threats The food industry needs to adhere to a high level of safety measures to ensure that quality product reaches the end-consumer. Chemicals, micro-organisms and veterinary diseases pose as hazards to food safety. These threats make it imperative for producers, suppliers as well as food processing companies to strive to maximise the availability of safe food and minimise the occurrences of contamination & other food safetyrelated incidences. Courtesy:Kentucky Beef Council

R

esidual chemicals, microbial contamination and spoilage as well as veterinary diseases are the common threats that Asian markets face while managing fresh food safety (Figure 1). Although the dangers posed by these threats cannot be eliminated, they can be controlled to

Three primary threats cut across fresh food categories Level of retailer concern about food safety problems Frequency-Severity multiple* Meat/Poultry Residual chemicals

Fish/Seafood 5.2

3.3

Microbe contamination/ spoilage

4.1

Intentional poisoning

2.6 1.8

Other Average

5.2

4.8

4.6

Veterinary/plant diseases

Fruit/Vegetables

2.3

2.9

3.2

2.6

1.3

3.3

3.5

1.6 3.4

3.2

* Level of concern is evaluated as multiple of severity and frequency/ probability of occurrence, on a scale of 1-4 (1: Least severe/ frequent, 4: Most severe/ frequent) for possible food safety problems asked about in the food safety survey Source: CCRRC fresh food safety survey, Jan. 2009

Figure 1: Three most common treats to fresh food safety

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some extent by managing risks and improving incident response. Even a single failure across the entire supply chain can compromise fresh food safety. To effectively manage and improve fresh food safety on a continuous basis, retail leaders need to develop a management framework that covers the entire supply chain from farm to fork. A survey was conducted on fresh food safety concerns involving leading retailers across some countries and markets in Asia. The survey identified the primary concerns and areas of the food system representing the greatest risks. It also focussed on the practices being employed to manage these risk factors. The threats, be it residual chemicals, microbial contamination or veterinary diseases, not only harm consumers’ health but also the reputation of retailers (along with their profits).

Residual chemicals Health hazards caused by harmful chemical compounds (eg, the tainted infant formula


QUALITY MANTRA

scandal in China) or by overuse of approved insecticides can further escalate the problems of retailers. Retailers’ concerns include frequent use of harmful drugs, such as growth stimulants and antibiotics for fish/ seafood, and pesticides & fertilisers for fruits/vegetables, all of which may cause serious health problems. In some emerging countries, for instance, malachite green is commonly used as an antiseptic or as a treatment for parasites on farmed fish/seafood, despite being prohibited as a probable carcinogen.

Microbial contamination and spoilage This type of contamination is a recurring issue for meat/poultry and fish/seafood. Such products often contain micro-organisms at levels that can cause a host of illnesses. For example, in Japan, oysters infected with norovirus caused sickness in more than 27,000 people in 2006. Problems caused by microbial contamination are less severe than those caused by residual chemicals, but the frequency of such incidences is a cause for concern.

Veterinary disease The incidence of disease affected meat/poultry is infrequent, but even a single case of virulent diseases, eg, BSE, bird flu, and Foot & Mouth Disease can take a severe form, with

Country

Fish/Seafood Microbe Residual contamichemicals nation/ spoilage

Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) is an internationally recognised methodology for preventing food safety hazards R System for monitoring critical control points in a food production process where a potential hazard to food safety has been identified R Used at all stages of food production and preparation processes R

Best practices should focus on the entire supply chain. A natural tendency for people is to worry about problems that can be seen with the naked eye, though many hazards, such as presence of heavy metals in seafood, remain unseen. Visual inspection is clearly insufficient; thus, retailers should particularly take action on all possible failure points along the supply chain. In the meat/poultry category, for example, many potential failure points appear at different stages along the supply chain: farms may engage in improper feeding or lack proper methods for disease control, product mishandling or poor hygiene at the packaging house, or product spoilage may occur due to long waiting period or insufficient temperature control during transport.

Primary threats

Meat/Poultry

HACCP

End-to-end approach

The primary threats are common across Asia

Microbe contami- Veterinary Residual Intentional nation/ disease chemicals poisoning spoilage

Global standards, such as HACCP, ISO 22000 and GLOBALGAP, should guide food safety practices

a high risk. Moreover, consumers also become worried about occurrence of such incidences. Thus, panic among people arising from outbreaks is not uncommon. The survey showed that the aforementioned three fresh food safety concerns are relatively uniform across Asian countries, making it necessary for retailers to focus on the same problems, despite differences in eating habits and stages of economic development (Figure 2).

Top incident Secondary incident

ISO 22000 Specifies the requirements for a food safety management system to ensure food safety along the food chain, up to consumption: R Interactive communication R System management R Prerequisite programmes R HACCP principles

GLOBALGAP A global reference for Good Agricultural Practices (GAP), managed by the GLOBALGAP (EUREPGAP) Secretariat R Integrated Farm Assurance standard is a pre-farm gate standard that integrates the whole agricultural production process of the certified product into a single farm audit R

Prioritise actions using the food safety management framework

Fruit/Vegetables Microbe Intentional Veterinary Residual contamipoisoning disease chemicals nation/ spoilage

What to manage Plant disease

Intentional poisoning

Upstream A management

Australia

Description

Where retailers set standards and ensure compliance Responsible for executing against standards

Producer Supplier Logistics

In store

• Selection and management of producers and suppliers; enforcement of certification standards

• Management of producer practices, including use B

Japan

Growth control

Korea

Product C environment

Singapore Hong Kong

of chemicals, quality of feed and disease control

• Management of product storage environment, including temperature, humidity and hygiene

• Management of supply chain speed and efficiency

Taiwan

D

Product flow

E

Monitoring and inspection

Thailand China Indonesia

• Review of measures to avoid contamination and monitoring

• Embedding of fundamental food safety culture F System integrity

Philippines India

1

2

3 Source: CCRRC fresh food safety survey, Jan, 2009

Figure 2: Food safety problems in Asia

Issue G management

and management

• Actions taken once issues are reported and efficiency of those actions

Source: McKinsey analysis

Figure 3: A food safety management framework

July 2010 | Modern Food Processing

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QUALITY MANTRA

The existence of such large numbers of potential dangers to food safety at every point from producer to consumer demands a comprehensive control. There are three broad implications for retailers. First, all critical failure points must be controlled, as even one failure is capable of creating a food safety incident. Second, retailers must extend their influence over all participants in the supply chain, even where direct control is not possible. Also, there is a need for a pragmatic ‘rapid response’ and monitoring guidelines along with preventative measures. A simple, unified food safety management framework can be used for a comprehensive endto-end approach (Figure 3). This framework contains seven reinforcing practices that are relevant across the supply chain.

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The Food Safety Management Framework enables retailers to cover the practices followed by existing universal standards, eg HACCP, ISO 22000 and GLOBALGAP. Besides, it also helps keep the issues related to fresh food safety firmly on retailers’ top management agendas. The framework includes a simple, logical, one-page tool that could be easily understood and applied across the supply chain. Retailers can use this framework to assess current performance, compare the performance against other players and identify & prioritise the steps needed to achieve the highest level of food safety.

Call for action While all retailers need to adopt such an end-to-end framework and strive to control the whole food system, the reality in many parts of Asia indicates this as a long journey. Keeping the

Modern Food Processing | July 2010

goal in mind, however, retailers can adopt a comprehensive approach and focus on the most critical priorities for making a difference in fresh food safety today. A clear call to action is needed for Asian retailers to better adapt to their current context while also taking immediate steps towards shaping the context for a healthy tomorrow. Courtesy: Coca-Cola Council Asia (CCRRCA)

Retailing

Research

This article is based on a study commissioned by retail industry think tank CCRRCA and conducted by McKinsey & Company to encourage retailers to focus more on improving food safety standards. CCRRCA is a research body dedicated to indepth investigation of food retailing issues in a cooperative, noncompetitive environment. For details, email: gwalsha@apac.ko.com


TECH TRACK Automation

Managing quality in fragmented process

Integration is the key Fragmented processes and disconnected systems, each with their own specific data, pose problems for food processing companies. Many-a-time since these organisations use a paper-based approach, the personnel are overloaded with tasks that include tracking safety and quality processes. This results in inconsistencies and immense waste. An integrated quality management system can come to the rescue of these manufacturers and provide them a viable solution that offers maximum returns. Courtesy: Rockwell Automation

T

he proliferation of new information technologies has brought numerous benefits to the food processing industry, including improvements in overall productivity and efficiency. At the same time, the industry continues to experience major lapses in safety and quality, magnified in recent times by several highly publicised product recalls. Unconnected data sources and manually tracked quality processes lead to a lack of realtime information. Quality issues are not addressed, and the root causes for such a deviation are not identified. Moreover, critical production decisions are frequently based on assumptions instead of accurate and reliable information. These operational deficiencies may be key contributors to product recalls. They also highlight the need for improved management of the entire supply chain, implementation of tighter control & monitoring, and delivery of real-time information on production processes. To achieve optimum performance, manufacturers require timely information about the production process to effectively analyse and detect undesirable

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trends, so that they can take immediate corrective action when needed. Once these best practices are defined, manufacturers can enforce them and, where possible, build quality directly into the solution. This will ensure that the product is manufactured correctly the first time. An integrated quality management tool can provide substantial dividends in such a situation. Despite the natural hesitation of the industry to tinker with a proven, albeit cumbersome, paper-based system of quality management, the underlying benefits of this integrated solution have become too promising to ignore. The following steps provide insights on implementing an integrated quality management system.

Step 1: Turn data into intelligence At the core of a robust quality management system are tools that allow users to aggregate information from multiple applications and transform the data into highly visible, actionable, performance-oriented intelligence. Without defined measures & procedures that connect data sources, analyse performance and enforce


Automation TECH TRACK

processes, the identification & correction of root causes are nothing more than guess work. A central component in an effective quality management strategy is the ability to gather and correlate information from multiple sources, allowing decision-makers to consider diverse views and maintain key relationships. Reports, Key Performance Indicators (KPIs), and operational metrics can then be assembled quickly into dashboards, so that performance can be measured throughout the facility. By connecting disparate data sources, quality control staff can access information that provides exception alerts through live information connections, and managers can determine precisely where, when & why mistakes occur. This real-time intelligence will automatically highlight exception conditions, missed targets, and plan deviations. Operators use the intelligence dashboards to make quality improvements. By putting data into context, operators can make process corrections in real time, resulting in significant improvements in output, yield and first-pass quality. Since dashboards display metrics in rich graphics, operators understand more quickly how to respond to the data. For example, a quick glance at a trend-oriented graphic, as compared to raw numbers, can provide powerful insights into performance history and status. Users can effectively compare multiple data sources using the dimension of time or a production run.

Courtesy: Rockwell Automation

For carrying out food processing operations effectively, a manufacturing intelligence application allows a company to aggregate data from its control and historical systems. It provides KPI exception reporting and root cause analysis that can be shared in a Web portal. This capability presents one version of the truth for all quality information and provides a basis for better decision-making. Operators can easily view, for example, how varying the mixers, ovens, or ingredient suppliers will impact the final product. The manufacturers can also apply manufacturing intelligence to determine,

Food manufacturers increasingly see the inherent value and tangible returns of integrated quality management systems. for example, why one machine requires more time to dry a product. By looking at multiple data sources - from the humidity in the air to changes in raw material - and using the advanced analytics to determine correlation, they can calculate and compare process trends over time. Manufacturers can also use performance equations to derive information that was not obvious, which will enable the company to determine the root cause of a problem.

Step 2: Define and enforce the quality process The key to improving food quality lies in ensuring that the product is repeatedly made with the same quality process. Using the correlated information gathered during step one, it is possible to make improvements in the overall production process and establish best practices. Once the best practices are defined, their use must be enforced, so that the product is created the same way every time. A procedural control application will ensure the use of best practices related to raw materials,

processing equipment and manual & automatic operational procedures.

Step 3: Apply predictive quality The third step for improving food quality involves applying predictive quality. Predictive control technologies use advanced modelling techniques based on timely in-process measurements to simulate processes, run what-if scenarios, and determine how changes will impact output. Setting output variable targets and letting the models determine optimum input targets can also perform steady-state optimisations. For instance, one of the world’s leading dairy producers wanted to increase throughput to handle growing raw milk supplies. The company looked for ways to improve the operating efficiency of existing evaporators and dryers before making new capital investments. The wealth of historical data for the wide product mix produced in the dryer allowed for creation of a model that accurately reflected moisture ranges for each product. Installing an application that based the prediction hourly with in-process testing data from the online grading analysis system enhanced the simulation. The dairy producer successfully increased the yield and quality of its nutritional, whole milk, and skim milk powders.

Reaping benefits Food manufacturers increasingly see the inherent value and tangible returns of integrated quality management systems. The information derived not only empowers employees with improved vision, but also helps them correlate data and achieve marked improvements through prediction & control - all of which help reduce risk and improve profitability. Courtesy: Rockwell Automation For more details, contact Debashish Ghosh, Manager - Commercial Marketing, Rockwell Automation India Pvt Ltd. Email: dghosh@ra.rockwell.com

July 2010 | Modern Food Processing

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CASE STUDY IT Solutions

ERP assimilation

A wholesome solution A part of the Radhakrishna Group of Companies, Radhakrishna Foodland Pvt Ltd (RK Foodland) is one of the leaders in the design and delivery of cuttingedge supply chain solutions in India, through significant investments in latest technologies to meet the requirements of customers. It integrates key business processes and extends business capabilities to its customers with SAP ERP.

R

K Foodland, a back-end distribution & logistics company, supplies to a diverse set of clients, in the retail, food service and the hospitality industry. It provides services like warehousing, transport & distribution and supply chain consultancy. While broadening its base for business, RK Foodland had to encounter issues like business process integration, mix of various software packages unable to ‘communicate with each other’ as well as scalability issues related to opening new distribution centres in time. There was a need to invest in a relevant & latest technologies to meet the burgeoning requirements of customers and also extend its capabilities to manage customers’ inventories. In 2006, RK Foodland invested in SAP ERP application to integrate & streamline its key business operations and address scalability challenges. RK Foodland provides a distribution and logistics platform (wholesale) to service a wide range of retail formats. The aim of RK Foodland’s business model is to provide a ‘one-stop-shop’ solution to independent retailers at a competitive price. With an integrated supply chain already

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in place, RK Foodland can service all the requirements of the independent retailer, rather than the retailer having to individually interact with several vendors/distributors daily. Today, the company is one of the leading broadline food service distribution and logistics providers in the country. It encompasses the entire spectrum of supply chain management, starting from vendor development, sourcing, inventory, transportation until storage and distribution. RK Foodland provides value-added services to retail through merchandising and training. It also provides customised distribution & logistics services encompassing the entire supply chain, such as storage, handling and distribution solutions to various clients. The services are tailor-made to suit each client’s requirements, which include organisations such as McDonald’s, Radhakrishna Hospitality Services Pvt Ltd (RKHS), etc.

Challenges involved In India, modern food retail formats are still limited to a few cities or regions, as the food retail industry here is not supported by modern food distribution & logistics solutions.


IT Solutions CASE STUDY

There are inherent inadequacies and a disintegrated structure in the food supply chain. With maturing markets and increasing consumer expectations, strong supply chain solutions would become necessary for retailers in order to overcome distribution inadequacies & increase margin. RK Foodland, through its stateof-the-art distribution centres, offers food handling and storage solutions for perishables and other temperaturesensitive food products. These centres house chiller rooms, freezer rooms, blast freezers and a fleet of atmosphere (temperature & humidity)controlled vehicles for distribution. RK Foodland utilises these distribution centres to support the retailers/food service operators. Concurs Sumeet Kolhatkar, Senior Manager – Information Technology, RK Foodland, “Our business was becoming broader and addressed the requirements of cross-section of customers in the food value chain. Integration was a key issue that we were struggling with, as there was no communication between the various software used by the company. We were unable to obtain data/ information on time about various business activities, and billings issues kept occurring quite frequently.” Investment in a better solution was needed that would enable a wide-angle view of its extended business operations and also address process efficiency issue. He adds, “In 2005, after evaluating a string of solutions, we found that SAP was the only partner that offered a solution addressing key activities such as sales & distribution, merchandising, warehouse management and vehicle tracking.”

Implementation of SAP In June 2006, RK Foodland began its preparation for SAP deployment. In that period, the company invested in the then available SAP ERP solution and implemented modules such as warehouse management, finance & controlling,

sales & distribution and Challenges merchandising. R Broad-based business scalability challenges The implementation R Integration of key processes period was about six months R Timely availability of information after which the project went live in December 2006. RK Foodland is currently live on Objectives SAP ERP; it also went live R To invest in a globally proven ERP solution to on business intelligence (BI) build business scale and extend capabilities module in March 2007. Adds to customers Kolhatkar, “We bought 100 SAP user licences. We have a Benefits of SAP ERP application cross-section of users – from R Better control of business operations the data entry personnel at R Integration of key business processes the warehouses to category R Scalability issues addressed managers and merchandisers. Professionals in the sales and customer service department place. Moreover, SAP’s ERP solution has too comprise important SAP users. a good pricing engine, which addresses In Finance, there is a cross-section of all pricing-related issues like tax-based, users right up to the Chief Financial excise duties, pricing variations of food Officer (CFO) level. We are developing items in the country, etc. Furthermore, a management component that will SAP has enabled RK Foodland to make enable top management to individually the business processes more robust, and therefore the business itself is more scalable. We intend opening several new Better tracking has distribution centres/warehouses in the brought about a current financial year. Scalability will not streamlined and much be an issue in the future, as we are now in a position to address greater market faster replenishment demands for our solutions and services. methodology in place. SAP, which is based on trends and business requirements, can now help in access key SAP modules and related establishing a centre within a week – an business critical information.” activity that earlier used to involve months of planning alone.”

Advantage of integration The mission of RK Foodland is to offer ‘sustained customer delight through excellence in everything that it does’. Shoring up this mission now is the integration achieved through SAP throughout the enterprise. Kolhatkar reiterates that one of the major benefits has been better control of operations through integration of key business processes. He adds, “We can now track stocks all around, and at the customers’ end too – like those of Foodland Fresh and Apna Bazar stores. Better tracking has brought about a streamlined and much faster replenishment methodology in

Future outlook The company is now planning to expand the horizons and seems to be more confident about managing its clients’ inventories as well. “Once the processes are stabilised, we will begin researching different modules. We are planning to increase the SAP user licences to 250 in the near future to account for the growth in business,” concludes Kolhatkar. Courtesy: SAP AG For details, contact Mou Chakravorty on email: mou.chakravorty@sap.com

July 2010 | Modern Food Processing

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CASE STUDY Packaging

Modularised labeller

An effective marker for round bottles It is a rather special bottle, as round as a ball, unique and hence the name ‘Unicum’. Due to its distinctive design, labelling this type of bottle is difficult, and that too with five different labels & a tax strip. Although labelling such a bottle is a tough challenge, Krones AG has, nevertheless, accomplished this task by using a modularised labeller designed specifically for this job.

Laszlo Kerekes

Z

wack, a former ‘By Appointment’ supplier to the Austro-Hungarian Dual Monarchy, is one of Hungary’s most traditionsteeped companies, as the producer of Unicum Bitters. The firm’s origins date back to the bitters created in 1790 by the Court Physician Dr József Zwack, causing Emperor Franz Joseph after tasting it to exclaim, “This is unique.” The name for the bitters had thus been created. The entire corporate history of Zwack distillery is closely interwoven with Unicum. The industrial company itself was founded back in 1840 in Budapest by Joseph Max Zwack. With its Unicum product achieving excellent export sales, the firm expanded swiftly. After 50 years of being founded, the firm’s production output had grown substantially and the firm had to relocate to a new facility at Ninth District, in Budapest, on the banks of Danube, where the plant is currently operational.

Perfect product design in the spirits market The international spirits market is fiercely competitive. In Hungary, the growth opportunities for the Unicum brand are limited, thus efforts are

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Modern Food Processing | July 2010

increasingly focussed on the export markets. Sales of Unicum are currently increasing in the neighbouring countries. In the US, Zwack Liqueur is also being successfully marketed in the triedand-tested round bottle. In a competitive market, it is vital for a producer like Zwack to catch the consumer’s eye at the point of sale with a product design of consummate perfection. The distinctive design of the Unicum bottle poses a tough challenge for the labelling technology involved. At the front of the spherical bottle, the eye-catching golden Unicum cross on its red background has to be inserted in a medallion as a body label. Above and below the cross at the front are two more sickle-shaped labels bearing the inscriptions ‘Zwack’ and ‘Unicum anno 1790’. Zwack also uses the back of the bottle for labels featuring two product descriptions. Also, above the closure runs an L-shaped tax strip, which is folded down only at the rear, so as not to obtrude on the visual appeal of the front side.

Persistent problem of labelling The covering and appearance of the typical Unicum bottle has repeatedly undergone minor changes over the course of time. Originally, it was a red cross on a white background that


Packaging CASE STUDY

the physician who created Unicum had used, but (understandably enough) the International Red Cross asked Zwack to change this at the beginning of the last century. For a long time, the bottle was as round as a football, with a short neck. But the labelling was always problematic, never quite satisfactory, even though back then the bottle only had a cold-glued front and a back label. “For years, the problem we had was that the labels did not stick properly to the round bottle, because they buckled to two sides,” explains Frank Odzuck, CEO, Zwack Unicum. Therefore, in the 1990s, going a step further, Zwack separated the front label into three parts, one above the other, flattened the labelling surface, for the main label in the middle with the cross, designing it as a medallion. The back label was also divided into two, and a new cold-glue labeller installed for handling all this, but the problems still remained. “This interim step was not enough, because the other labels were still angled in two directions, vertically and horizontally,” said Odzuck. Therefore, the labelling results were inevitably imperfect. Actually, Zwack considered dressing all bottles in applied ceramic labels, which would have entailed enormous costs, particularly for designing the golden cross. “The alternative was to find a labeller that met all our requirements. Because with half-empty bottles, the dark cold-glue paper label stood out unattractively from

what was then a lighter background,” comments Odzuck.

Changeover to pressuresensitive labels with Krones Here, the role of Krones AG becomes clear. In a development and consultation process lasting more than a year, the new Unicum bottle was designed as a collaborative project. The major changes were that with immediate effect, only pressure-sensitive labels would be used, lending the bottle an enhanced aesthetic appeal. The bottle’s neck was lengthened, and the most significant modification was that the surfaces were almost imperceptibly flattened for the other labels as well. “For this purpose,

In the pressure-sensitive labelling operation, the labels are applied using a twisted applicator arm, as they have to be affixed to the slanting curve at an angle of 90°. Krones developed a labeller with optical orientation for us, which dresses up this complicated bottle really well,” informs Odzuck, satisfied with the labeller created by Krones.

Something rather special Odzuck says, “Unicum is rather special. Its distinctiveness is based on

The speciality of the pressure-sensitive labelling operation is that the labels are applied by means of a twisted applicator arm

three keystones: first, the recipe uses a large number of different herbs from more than 40 countries. Second, besides the extraction process for the fresh herbs, we distill the herbs also. Finally, the finished product is stored for at least another six months in oak barrels, where the extract and the distillate can meld at their leisure.” Unicum is the main brand, with a production output of approximately three million litre per year. In all, Zwack produces about 14 million litre of more than 200 different spirits. The two principal lines of business are herb liqueurs like Unicum, Unicum Next, St. Hubertus and fruit distillates like Vilmos, Fütyülös, Kosher and Zwack Nemes Palinka, which are produced and bottled in the fruit schnapps factory at Kecskemet. The vodka brand Kalinka has also been a success. These eight products account for 70 per cent of total sales. While the herb liqueurs are still produced at the original facility on the banks of the Danube in Budapest, they are bottled in the Dunaharaszti plant outside the city, which houses two bottling lines, each producing 10,000 bottles an hour. One of the two lines is specially equipped for bottling the Unicum product families (with five different container sizes, ranging from 0.2 ltr to 1 ltr), Unicum Next (with four different container sizes) and the American variant Zwack Liqueur.

The multimodule labeller is equipped with Autocol APS 3 pressuresensitive label applicators for handling self-adhesive reel-fed labels, plus a Taxomat unit for applying the L-shaped tax strip with hotmelt

July 2010 | Modern Food Processing

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CASE STUDY Packaging

Ultra-flexible multi-module labeller For dressing the bottles, Zwack installed a Krones multi-module labeller in the early summer of 2009. This machine is equipped with Autocol APS 3 applicators for handling pressure-sensitive reel-fed labels, and a Taxomat unit for applying the L-shaped tax strip with hotmelt. The enormous flexibility of the machine facilitates handling of nine different containers and 29 different labels. The containers arrive from the filler in a single lane, via an electrical synchronised feed to the labeller, and are orientated into the correct position optically under camera control at the bottle table with the help of a small symbol. The containers are continuously monitored throughout the entire labelling function. For this purpose, four cameras have been installed for coarse and fine orientation. This continuous monitoring is crucial for accurate positioning of all labels

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and the tax strip. The pressure-sensitive labels are then affixed with the aid of the five APS 3 applicators, and datecoded. Finally, the L-shaped tax strip is affixed over the closure with hotmelt by a separate Taxomat unit.

Twisted applicator arm In the pressure-sensitive labelling operation, the labels are applied using a twisted applicator arm, as they have to be affixed to the slanting curve at an angle of 90°, ie, angled from both below and above. For this purpose, the carrier web in which the pressure-sensitive labels are affixed are shifted from a vertical to an angled configuration, matching the container’s contour in the labelled area. “This Krones machine meets all our labelling requirements,” emphasises Odzuck. Supporting this statement, László Seprös, Technical Manager, Zwack Unicum, concurs, “Krones’ solution for labelling this difficult bottle is the first time we have been really satisfied.”

Modern Food Processing | July 2010

The taste of Zwack At Zwack, the next generation of the family has already taken a hand, true to the maxim “The world changes – but one thing doesn’t: Unicum.” Two of Péter Zwack’s seven children are involved in the business. Moreover, to ensure that the younger generation of consumers also acquires a taste for Zwack, since 2004 an alternative has been created called Unicum Next. It is a significantly milder liqueur, but with a dress similar to that of Unicum. This bottle is also being labelled by the Krones multi-module. As Péter Zwack puts it, “Success depends on a host of factors. Staying power is one of the most important.”

Laszlo Kerekes is a Manager in the Sales Department of Krones AG, Neutraubling, Germany. Email: laszlo.kerekes@krones.com


EVENTS CALENDAR

National

Pune

Ahmedabad

Indore

Chennai

Maharashtra

Gujarat

Madhya Pradesh

Tamil Nadu

Nov 19-22, 2010

Dec 10-13, 2010

Jan 7-10, 2011

Mar 11-13, 2011

India’s premier industrial trade fair on products and technologies from machine tools, fluid power, instrumentation & control, electrical & electronics, material handling, plastics, rubber, packaging, chemical, CAD/CAM, auto components, and general engineering.

For details contact:

Engineering Expo Infomedia 18 Ltd, Ruby House, 1st Floor, J K Sawant Marg, Dadar (W), Mumbai 400 028. Tel: 022-3003 4649, Fax: 022-3003 4499, Email: shamal@infomedia18.in

ARC Process Industry Forum A conference on automation and enterprise solutions in process and batch industries aimed at key decision makers; July 14-17, 2010; at Hyderabad For details contact: ARC Advisory Group 20, Annaswamy Mudaliar Road Bengaluru 560 042 Tel: 080-2554 7116; Fax: 080-2554 7116 Email: prakasha@arcweb.com

India Foodex 2010 An exhibition on food processing & packaging technology, and food & beverage products will be held concurrently with GrainTech India and AgriTech India; August 20-22, 2010; at Palace Ground, Bengaluru For details contact: Media Today Group - Exhibition Division T-30, Khirki Extension, Malviya Nagar, New Delhi 110 017 Tel: 011-2668 1671; Fax: 011-2668 2045 Email: indiafoodex@gmail.com

International Foodtec India 2010 An international exhibition and conference for food processing, packaging, ingredients, beverages, cooling & refrigeration; September 30-October 03, 2010; at Bombay Exhibition Centre, Mumbai For details contact: Cidex Trade Fairs Pvt Ltd 1, Commercial Complex

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Pocket H & J, Sarita Vihar New Delhi 110 076 Tel: 011-2697 1056; Fax: 011-2697 1746 Email: info@cidex-tradefairs.com

PROMACH 2010 An exclusive exhibition for the process plant & machinery industry; October 01-04, 2010; at Bangalore International Exhibition Centre, Bengaluru For details contact: Bangalore International Exhibition Service 10th Mile, Tumkur Road Madavara Post Bengaluru 562 123 Tel: 080-6583 3234 Email: dayanand@bies.co.in

Fi India 2010 An event that would feature companies showcasing ingredients for food & beverages, dietary supplements, functional/health foods, nutraceuticals, natural foods; October 22-23, 2010; at Bombay Exhibition Centre, Mumbai For details contact: UBM India Pvt Ltd Sagar Tech Plaza SakiNaka Junction Andheri (E), Mumbai 400 072 Tel: 022-6612 2600, Fax: 022-6612 2626 Email: bipins@ubmindia.com

Food & Bev Tech 2010 An exhibition & conference for the food and beverage processing industry; October 29-31, 2010; at Bombay exhibition Centre, Mumbai

For details contact: Anil Padwal, Head – Trade Fairs CII (Western Region) 105, Kakad Chambers, Dr A B Road, Worli, Mumbai 400 018 Tel: 022-2493 1790, Fax: 022-2493 9463 Email: anil.padwal@cii.in

International PackTech India An exhibition and conference for the packaging & processing industry that will be held along with drink technology India; November 18-20, 2010; at Bombay exhibition Centre, Mumbai For details contact: Messe Düsseldorf India Pvt Ltd 1, Commercial Complex 2nd Floor, Sarita Vihar New Delhi 110 076 Tel: 011-2697 1745, Fax: 011-2697 1746 Email: info@md-india.com

Food Technology Show 2010 To be held concurrently with PackPlus 2010, this event will focus on technologies, equipment, materials & services for food production & processing, brewing & distilling, baking, freezing, refrigeration & climatic engineering, etc; December 03-06, 2010; at Pragati Maidan, New Delhi For details contact: Print-Packaging.com Pvt Ltd International Infotech Park Vashi, Navi Mumbai 400 705 Tel: 022-2781 2093, Fax: 022-2781 2578 Email: info@indiapackagingshow.com


EVENTS CALENDAR

International MIFB 2010 A trade fair for international food and beverage industry; July 22-24, 2010; at Putra World Trade Centre (PWTC) in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia For details contact: Expomal International Sdn Bhd 7-2, Subang Business Centre Jalan USJ9/5Q, 47620 Subang Jaya Selangor Darul Ehsan, Malaysia Tel: +603 8024 6500 Fax: +603 8024 8740 Email: info@expomal.com

92058 Paris-La Défense, France Tel: +33 (0) 1 7677 1111 Fax: +33 (0) 1 7677 1212 Email: infos@exposium.fr

at Düsseldorf Exhibition Centre in Dusseldorf, Germany For details contact: Messe Düsseldorf GmbH Stockumer Kirchstrasse 61 D-40474 Düsseldorf, Germany Tel: +49 - 211 - 4560 900 Fax: +49 - 211 - 4560 668 Email: info@messe-duesseldorf.de

Food Processing & Packaging Indonesia 2010 International exhibition on food processing & packaging machinery, equipment, materials & services; October 27-30, 2010; at Jakarta International Expo in Jakarta, Indonesia

FI South America 2010 International food ingredients exhibition; September 21-23, 2010; at Transamérica Expo Center in Sao Paulo, Brazil

For details contact: Krista Exhibitions Jln.Blandongan 28 DG Jakarta 11220, Indonesia Tel: +62-21 6345861 Fax: +62-21 6340140 Email: info@krista-exhibitions.com

Ramadan Food Exhibition 2010 An exhibition focussing on new technologies in food processing industry; July 28 - August 10, 2010; at Kuwait International Fairs Ground, Kuwait For details contact: Kuwait International Fair PO Box 656 Safat - 13007, Kuwait Tel: +965 538 7100 Fax: +965 5393872 Email: info@kif.net

Western Foodservice & Hospitality Expo 2010 A trade fair showcasing latest trends in food processing, catering and hospitality industries; August 14-16, 2010; at Los Angeles Convention Centre, Los Angeles For details contact: Reed Exhibitions USA 383 Main Avenue Norwalk CT 06851, USA Tel: +1 (203) 840-4800 Fax: +1 (203) 840-5805 Email: inquiry@reedexpo.com

INTERMEAT 2010 An exhibition for meat, cold meats and sausage; September 12-15, 2010;

For details contact: United Business Media Industrieweg 54, PO Box 200 3600 AE Maarssen, The Netherlands Tel: +31 34 65 59 444 Fax: +44 (0) 20 7921 8059 Email: jblack@cmpinformation.com

Ingredients Russia 2010 An event for food ingredients, additives and flavours; November 2326, 2010; Crocus-Expo IEC, Moscow

Saudi Agro-Food Industries 2010 A trade fair showcasing the latest in food products, processing and packaging technologies; October 04-07, 2010; at Riyadh International Exhibition Centre in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia For details contact: Riyadh Exhibitions Co. Ltd Olaya Road Postfach, P O Box 56010 SA - 11554 Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Tel: +966 1 454 1448 Fax: +966 1 454 4846 Email: esales@recexpo.com

IPA 2010 International food processing and equipment week; October 17-21, 2010; at Paris Nord Villepinte in Paris, France For details contact: Comexposium Immeuble le Wilson 70, avenue du Général-de-Gaulle

For details contact: ITE Group Plc 105 Salusbury Road London, NW6 6RG, The UK Tel: +44 (0) 20 7596 5000 Fax: +44 (0) 20 7596 5111 Email: enquiry@ite-exhibitions.com

SIFSE 2010 Shanghai International Fisheries & Seafood Expo; December 10-13, 2010; at Shanghai Everbright Convention & Exhibition Center, Shanghai For details contact: Shanghai Gehua Exhibition Service Co Ltd Rm.1206-1208 Xin’an Building No. 99 Tianzhou Rd Shanghai 200233, China Tel: +86-21-54451166 Fax: +86-21-54451968 Email: info@gehuaexpo.com

The information published in this section is as per the details furnished by the respective organiser. In any case, it does not represent the views of Modern Food Processing

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TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER

Technology Offered As part of our endeavour to spread the technology culture, this section provides a means to promote and facilitate exchange of select technologies. We strive to bring together suppliers of such technologies with suitable users for negotiations and industrial collaboration.

Beverage maker An Indian firm is offering ‘threein-one’ beverage maker, which is a portable kit that allows the user to simultaneously make three functional beverages as per requirement. Using this, the consumer can set up three different types of fermentation simultaneously at one particular temperature. Areas of application Beverage industry Forms of transfer Technology licensing

Chocolate manufacturing technology An India firm provides chocolate manufacturing and snack extrusion technology with machinery. The firm supplies chocolate machines like chocolate conches, chocolate enrobers with cooling tunnel, one shot chocolate moulding machines, chocolate storage tanks, etc. The machines are manufactured using European technology. Areas of application Chocolate manufacturing Forms of transfer Consultancy, technical services and equipment supply

Food-paste moulding machine A Thailand-based firm offers a food-paste moulding machine

that produces cylindrical-shaped food paste with both ends sealed. This machine enables faster production of food-paste with consistent size and hygiene, which increase business potential in bigger markets both locally and abroad. Areas of application It is useful in food processing industries where the food products of cylindrical shape are required Forms of transfer Technology licensing

Food processing technology An Indian company provides technology for processing fruits & vegetables, biscuits, margarine, pickles, masalas, ready-to-eat foods, etc. Areas of application Aseptic processing, can processing, bottle processing, laminated pouch packing, tetra brick Forms of transfer Consultancy, turnkey

Natural extracts An Indian company provides assistance for manufacturing oleoresins / natural colour extracts using SCFE technology ensuring minimal material loss, less pollution improved yield and better quality of product. Areas of application It is useful in areas related and

making use of food colours and natural dyes Forms of transfer Consultancy, turnkey

Technology for milk, fruit and cereal-based products An Indian firm offers technology for processing milk products, fruit & vegetable products and ready-to-eat & ready-to-cook food products Areas of application Food processing industries Forms of transfer Consultancy, subcontracting, joint venture, technical services, capacity building, technology licensing, equipment supply, turnkey, others

Vacuum sealer and gas injection machine A Thailand-based company is providing technology for preserving and extending shelf life of food products. Proper packaging is critical for avoiding food spoilage. The vacuum sealing and gas injection technique prevents contaminating microbes to enter the container, thereby increasing the shelf life of the product. Areas of application Food processing industry, agro-based industry Forms of transfer Technology licensing

Share Your Technology Propositions The mission of Modern Food Processing is to spread the technology culture. We offer you an opportunity to participate in this endeavour by publishing the best technology ideas. Technology developers/sellers are invited to furnish the techno-commercial details (with environmental benefits, if any) for publication in the Technology Transfer column of Modern Food Processing. R&D organisations, technical consultancy organisations and individuals assisting small and medium enterprises may send the relevant literature, indicating the scope & services and the areas of specification. Contact: Modern Food Processing Infomedia 18 Limited, ‘A’ Wing, Ruby House, J K Sawant Marg, Dadar (W), Mumbai 400 028. Tel: 022-3024 5000, 3003 4672 z Fax: 022-3003 4499 z Email: spedit@infomedia18.in

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Technology Requested Coconut milk beverage

Food preservation

An Indian entrepreneur is interested in acquiring the technology for producing & processing coconut milk beverage. Areas of application Food processing industry Forms of transfer Consultancy

A Thailand-based food and fruit preserved trading firm is looking for efficient technology to extend the shelf-life and preserve food and fruit. Areas of application Food processing industry, confectionary industry, pastry industry Forms of transfer Others

Corn processing An Indian company is looking for a complete proposal/project report to set up a dry milling corn processing plant in Andhra Pradesh. Targeted finished product is tinned corn, pop corn, corn flakes etc. It is also interested to import similar kind of plant & machinery to set up the same in India. Areas of application Corn processing industry Forms of transfer Others

Extruder pilot plant An Indian company is seeking the extruder pilot plant for manufacturing processed cereal-based weaning food. Areas of Application Infant food, supplementary food, weaning food Forms of transfer Others

Food processing equipment An Indian company is seeking technology and equipment for processing of fruits, vegetables and other related products. Area of application Food processing industry Forms of transfer Others

Fruit drinks-doy pack A firm from UAE is interested in acquiring the technology for manufacturing fruit juices and drinks using optimum formulation technology. The firm needs technology providers, consultants and price quotes for the project based on turnkey & know-how. Areas of applications Food processing industry Forms of transfer Others

Juice and food processing A company based in the UAE proposes to establish a food processing plant that would help process fruit juices, jam/jelly, juice concentrates & pulp. Through this plant, the company also wishes to obtain valuable by-products like cattle feed, fertiliser and raw materials for plywood. Areas of application Food processing industry Forms of transfer Others

Rice husk ash to silica precipitates An Indian company is seeking the technology to convert rice husk ash

into some useful matter like silica precipitate, as the rice husk is rich in silica content. Areas of application Agro-based mills, which burn rice husk for internal purposes Forms of transfer Others

Spice grinding and processing plant An Indian firm is seeking to set up a spice plant and requires turnkey project consultants for the same. Areas of application Food processing industry Forms of transfer Others

Virgin coconut oil production A Thai entrepreneur is interested in acquiring the technology for production of virgin coconut oil. He has an abundant supply of coconuts and plans to set up a coconut oil production line with technical cooperation from technology providers. Areas of application Food processing industry Forms of transfer Others

Xylitol technology A company based in Thailand is seeking the technology for producing gum by utilising maize-waste. Areas of application Food industry Forms of transfer Others

Information courtesy: Dr Krishnan S Raghavan, In-Charge, Technology Transfer Services Group, United Nations - Asian and Pacific Centre for Transfer of Technology (APCTT), APCTT Building , C-2, Qutab Institutional Area, New Delhi 110 016 Tel: 011 - 2696 6509, Fax: 011 - 2685 6274, Email: krishnan@apctt.org, Website: www.apctt.org For more information on technology offers and requests, please log on to www.technology4sme.net and register with your contact details. This is a free of cost platform provided by APCTT for facilitating interaction between buyers and seekers of technologies across the globe. After submitting technology offer or request to this website, you are requested to wait for at least two weeks for receiving a response from a prospective buyer / seeker through this website, before contacting APCTT for further assistance.

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BOOK SHELF

Handbook of fruits and fruit processing Editors : Dr Y H Hui, Jozsef Barta, M Pilar Cano, Todd Gusek, Jiwan S Sidhu and Nirmal Sinha Price : Rs 995

This book describes the processing of fruits from four perspectives: a scientific basis, manufacturing & engineering principles, production techniques and processing of individual fruits. Over forty respected academicians and industry professionals have collaborated to create an indispensable resource for the handbook, with a focus on the scientific principles and technological methods for processing all types of fruits. The book also provides scientific knowledge on horticulture, biology, chemistry and nutrition of fruits. A presentation of technological and engineering principles involved in processing fruits is a prelude to their commercial production. As examples, the manufacturing processes of several categories of fruit products are discussed. The book has three parts namely processing technology, product manufacturing and commodity processing, with a total of 35 extensively covered chapters. Part I presents up-to-date information on the fundamental aspects and processing technology for fruits and fruit products. Part II covers the manufacturing aspects of processed fruit products like jams & jellies, fruit beverages, etc, while Part III deals with the commodity processing perspective, covering fruits such as apple, apricot, sweet cherries & tropical fruits (guava, lychee, mango and passion fruit), etc. The book also includes graphs and images for ensuring a clear understanding on the subject. It can be used as a reference book by professionals in the fruit industry.

This special Indian edition presents the latest methods in the manufacture and supply of grains, fruits, vegetables and spices – detailing the physiology, structure, composition and characteristics of grains & crops. It also provides insights into the recent cooling and preservation techniques to maintain quality and decrease spoilage & withering of agricultural products. The handbook outlines useful programmes like how to design the best handling, aeration & storage equipment and sustain optimal atmospheric composition, temperature & humidity in storage facilities. It also offers tips to select the most appropriate packaging and preservation procedures for extending shelf-life, reducing the occurrence of pests, insects, mold, disease & deterioration during food storage. Besides, it describes methods to prevent temperature variations, water loss, bruising and contamination during fruit & vegetable transportation. The book also covers topics like grading, classifying and evaluating fruits & vegetables and describes ways of converting biomass resources into food, feed, chemicals, energy and other value-added products. The components and functions of harvesting and drying machines & systems and volatile monitoring for early disease detection among other things are also discussed. Being a comprehensive handbook covering both fundamentals and present practice of post-harvest technology of grains, fruits and vegetables, the book serves as a valuable source of information to a worldwide audience concerned with agricultural sciences and engineering, food technology, and other allied subjects.

Handbook of postharvest technology Editors : Amalendu Chakraverty, Arun S Mujumdar, GS Vijaya Raghavan and Hosahalli S Ramaswamy Price : Rs 3,450

Mehul Book Sales, Shop No 1, Lokagutchh Jain Upashraya Building, W H Marg, Fort, Mumbai 400 001 For purchase inquiries, please contact, Tel: 022-2265 4657 / 2269 4145, Fax: 022-2265 4657

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PRODUCT UPDATE

Centrifuges United Engineering Enterprises offers full lid opening centrifuges, which conforms to GMP standards for active pharmaceutical ingredients, herbal extracts, flavours, colours, chemicals and allied process industries. These centrifuges are categorised under fourpoint suspension type in stainless steel construction. The entire body can be lifted & opened hydraulically. Thus the basket and drain platform are exposed, facilitating easy & quick cleaning. The body is hydraulically lowered into the closed position and clamped to the lower portion of the casing by means of quick clamps. These centrifuges are most suitable for manufacturing facilities that require frequent product change over. These centrifuges are available in various designs depending on cake characteristics and customer requirements, viz, standard top discharge, top discharge with bag lifting arrangement, bottom discharge with/without scrapper. These are available in vapour tight construction with nitrogen blanketing for hazardous chemicals. The CIP design with built in cleaning nozzles prevent no product cross-contamination. These centrifuges are manufactured in batch capacities ranging from 5 kg to 600 kg. United Engineering Enterprises Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-2308 3990 Email: uenggent@gmail.com

Sweet (mithai) making machine Solar Arks offers sweet (mithai) making machine. This machine is equipped with a continuously rotating vessel. A scrapper attached with a Teflon blade scrapes the bottom of the vessel, while the burners provide heat from beneath. The colour, taste and heat of the sweets can be controlled by control valves fixed in the machine. It is possible to adjust the rotation speed of the vessel, which allows the user to carry out the process as per the requirement. The product can be easily removed by tilting the vessel manually or automatically. These machines are also provided with digital temperature indicators and controllers, which could give a precise control over the product quality. This machine is used to make products such as khoa, rabadi/basundi, malai pedha/malai burfi, kaju katali/kaju roll, besan laddoo, etc. Solar Arks Kolhapur - Maharashtra Tel: 0231-2672486, Mob: 098222 06545 Email: info@solararks.com

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PRODUCT UPDATE

Bar code reader Banner Engineering India offers iVu bar code reader (BCR), which read eleven industrystandard bar codes to facilitate advanced traceability - a critical strategy for ensuring the highest product quality in packaging, material handling, automotive, pharmaceuticals and many industrial applications. The BCR with an integrated or remote touchscreen, and intuitive interface allows users to configure, monitor, modify and inspect without a PC or external controller. Its features include: even first-time users can have it up and running in minutes, without training; compact, rugged IP67-rated housing is available with or without an integrated ring light; RS-232 serial communication port is provided for exporting bar code data. Using the touch screen and intuitive interface, inspection parameters are easily configured and quickly deployed without a PC or external controller. The sensor is available with a remote touch screen for setup and inspection monitoring. The BCR is available with three different trigger modes to determine how the sensor captures and processes images. Banner Engineering India Pvt Ltd Pune - Maharashtra Tel: 020-6640 5624, Mob: 093223 39208 Fax: 020-6640 5623 Email: salesindia@bannerengineering.com

Food emulsifier Tricon offers continuous food emulsifier manufactured by Stephan, Germany. This high speed microcut emulsifier enables continuous process, and controlled & consistent size reduction. It is provided with easily removable, carbide tipped cutting rotors having no metal-to-metal contacts, thus providing long tool life, easy cleaning, and minimum product temperature rise. No pre-run or adjustments are required and the machine is almost maintenance free. The machine is ideal for fine pastes - wet spices (onions, ginger, chilli, garlic), peanuts, vegetables, fruit and confectioneries; meat emulsions for sausages, kababs, etc, where protein swelling is better. It is also useful for fish-head paste, flaking fish for refabrication into portions, grinding fish or chicken skin for fat recovery, sea moss, reduction for pet food, offal, feather for feed, etc. The emulsifier has an output of 600-1,000 kg/hr. Tricon Pune - Maharashtra Tel: 020 -2565 2205/2451, Mob: 098901 92832 Email: trivedi@pn2.vsnl.net.in

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Pasteurising dosing system JohnsonDiversey India offers intelligent programmable dosing system called pasteurising dosing system. This system is designed to feed both the chemicals (diver guard B810 - corrosion inhibitor and diver guard B400 – biocide gel for controlling microbes) with five tanks dosing system in the pasteurising machine. It is capable to handle toxic and highly corrosive chemicals in a safe way. This system comes with fully automated programmable system with secured inbuilt system, which allows the operator to operate using a password code. Daily dosing of the chemicals can be done at fixed intervals. It is provided with reverse chemical pumps mechanism that ensures safe handling during maintenance. This system is safe to handle due to better water flushing technique and low voltage usage. Feature include predefined quantity for each tank. Manual priming, flushing and dosing options allow checking the system status. This system helps save water wastage by increasing the life of the water from 7 days to 21 days. JohnsonDiversey India Pvt Ltd Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-5644 4222/4267, Mob: 098205 38478 Fax: 022-5644 4223 Email: boshudhara.m@johnsondiversey.com

Ice cream making plant Pal Engineers offers ice cream making plant. It comprises ageing vat, batch freezer, homogeniser and pasteuriser. The ageing vat machine is compact, has a rectangular mix tank for proper mixing of ice cream mix, all product contact parts made of SS-304 & is equipped with castors for easy movements. The glycol jacketed construction & stirrer gives even cooling and maintains temperature during power failure. Its features include less power consumption due to efficient refrigeration system and PUF insulation, bottom drive stirrer are easily removable for complete cleaning. All product contact parts of batch freezer are made of SS-304 or food grade material. The homogeniser is provided with specially designed pressure valve, which gives high-performance even at working time and diaphragm-type pressure gauge to maintain perfect hygienic conditions. All parts in direct contact with ice cream mix is made of either stainless steel or food grade material. The homogeniser is quick & easy to dismantle for perfect cleaning. The pasteuriser is robust and of sturdy construction. All the contact parts are made of SS-304. Its features include water jacket construction for even heating, less fuel/ power consumption due to proper insulation for external tank. Pal Engineers Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-2274 8877, 2277 2575 Email: info@palengineers.com

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PRODUCT UPDATE

PET & jar moulding machine Chaudhary Precision Moulding offers CP-1 PET & jar moulding machine. It is used to manufacture PET jars & bottles used in packaging of food materials & beverages. It is a maintenance-free machine that is user-friendly and easyto-operate. The machine does not emit fumes, burn or vibrate and pollute air or water. It has low-production cost, high-production rate and uniform conditioning. Quality controlled bottle/jar production is based on precision stretch motion. It has a two-step process for bottle/jar making through preforms with pneumatically/hydro-pneumatically controlled features. It is provided with specially designed heater for preferential heating & conditioning of any type of preform for uniform wall thickness. It has a foolproof system of platens, which allows easy access; fast interchanges of moulds & customised parts. This machine requires single-phase power connection and has a digitally controlled system. It is available in various models for manufacturing PET jars & bottles from 250 ml to 25,000 ml. Chaudhary Precision Moulding Ltd New Delhi Tel: 011- 2643 5578, Fax: 011-3052 4555 Email: chaudharypet@hotmail.com

Cutting, mixing and emulsifying machine Tricon offers cutting, mixing and emulsifying machine. This machine is employed if a single machine is required to execute reliably and quickly a wide range of processing functions, such as cutting, fine cutting, mixing, stirring, kneading, making purees, emulsifying and vacuum processing. It is ideal for use in all fields of food processing, eg, for the production of bread and bakery products, meat and sausages, delicatessen, confectionery and dairy products. The product contact parts of the bowl and cover are made of 1.4301 or similar V2A. The surface is bead blasted. The support is made of stainless steel. The working tools are made of stainless steel and consist of a knife shaft and two wide knives as well as a mixing baffle made of stainless steel with direct drive. The machine is equipped with a tilting device for easy product cleanout. The control of the main motor is made via the touch keyboard 3011. The readout appears in 2 lines in an illuminated LCD display. The operating keys are also illuminated. It is also available with double jacket bowl for indirect cooling and heating of the bowl content. Tricon Pune - Maharashtra Tel: 020 -2565 2205/2451, Mob: 098901 92832 Email: trivedi@pn2.vsnl.net.in

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PRODUCT UPDATE

Drum sieve machine Buhler (India) offers drum sieve machine. It is a pre-cleaning machine for rice, wheat, soybeans, corn and pulses, etc. It is used in the reception of granular, mealy & floury bulk materials in the grain mill, bulk storage system and other plants in the food processing and feed processing industries. The drum sieve separates coarse impurities such as pieces of straw, bag tapes, paper, pieces of wood and corn leaves and cobs, etc. This protects downstream processing and conveying equipment from malfunctions and damage. The rugged, overhung screening drum is divided into an inlet and outlet cylinder, made of sheet steel and provided with holes ranging from 10 to 60 mm. The screening drum is highly self-cleaning and is additionally supported in this function by a scraper brush. All components are installed inside an enclosed housing that is equipped with an aspiration connection. The material to be screened is fed through the inlet channel to the inside of the screening drum and turned over. The grain drops through the screen perforations and the coarse impurities are directed to the outlet by a guide screw. This ensures reliable separation of the course impurities. Buhler (India) Pvt Ltd Bengaluru - Karnataka Tel: 080- 2289 0000, Fax: 080- 2289 0001 Email: banglore.buhler@buhlergroup.com

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PRODUCT UPDATE

Lab homogenisers

Pulveriser

Quadro Engineering Corp offers ‘BT Series’ benchtop lab homogenisers. For formulators and lab-scale product developers, the lab homogeniser offers more user-friendly performances due to its quick connect generator design and tighter rotorstator clearances. Quick connect generator saves time on setup and cleaning with easy quarterturn installation, while close-fitting clearances produce higher shear rates and improved particle size reduction. These provides fine adjustment digital speed control with a separate control box for handheld models, along with an exclusive motorised benchtop stand for smooth, effortless and accurate homogeniser positioning. These lab homogenisers are manufactured in various options including a wide variety of sealed chamber assemblies to safely contain hazardous samples, and a unique generator deflector head to enhance sample movement for larger volume & higher viscosity formulations. These homogenisers are available in four different models ranging from ¾ to 1-¾ hp, with the capability to process sample volumes ranging from 5 ml to 40 litre at top speeds up to 60m/s depending on tooling selection.

Jas Enterprises offers impact pulveriser. It is a versatile grinding unit of heavy and rugged construction and built for continuous operation day after day. The unit is especially designed for the medium fine, and fine size reduction. It meets most capacity requirements and enables to a wide degree of adjustments with fineness of the finished product ranging from about 60 mesh to bulk passing through 325 mesh, depending on a considerable extent to the particular material being handled. The impact pulveriser combines grinding, classifying and conveying all in one single unit. It consists of an encased rotor carrying swing hammers, whizzer classifier for fineness regulation, and blower fan mounted on a solid shaft. Raw material to be pulverised enters the crushing chamber through the hopper and automatic rotary feeder. The impact of the hammer on the feed material against the liner plates reduces it into fine powder. The ground material is carried towards the whizzer classifier for classification and the oversize particles are rejected by the classifier and returns to the crushing chamber for further grinding. The classified material is then conveyed into the cyclone for collection and bagging. A dust collector is provided in the system for ensuring dust free operation and no loss of ground powder.

Quadro Engineering Corp Waterloo – Canada Tel: 519-884 9660, Fax: 519-884 0253 Email: sales@quadro.com

Jas Enterprises Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-2274 3454, Mob: 09427417384 Fax: 079-2274 5062 Email: info@jasenterprise.com

Potato chip making machinery Blaze Machinery offers potatochip making machinery. It provides a series of machinery for peeling, cutting, drying and frying of potatoes. The potatopeeler is provided with a drum, which can store up to 6-8 kg of potatoes. The potato skin is drained out with the help of special emery powder lining and continuous flow of water from the drum. The potato-cutter is a hand-pushed machinery with a thickness between 2 to 4 mm. It is provided with ½ HP motor, which has a capacity of 100 kg/hr. The sliced potatoes are washed and sent to the drying machinery, which is a centrifugal system, and approximately removes 30 to 40 per cent of its water. This enables the chip to consume less oil while frying. This machinery contains SS basket with storing capacities ranging from 8-10 kg of sliced potatoes. Blaze Machinery Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-2635 5366/3246 6341 Fax: 022-2678 3133 Email: manish@blazemac.com

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In-mould labelling system Neejtech India offers inmould labelling (IML) system manufactured by Hekuma GmbH. The advantages of the IML system include reduced costs, promotes hygienic production, increases decorative possibilities, offers resistance to heat & scratching, reduces in-house container inventory & overhead costs, better strain & squeeze resistance and improved sidewall strength & shelf life. The application areas of the IML system are injection moulding IML for cups & containers and thermoforming IML, blow moulding IML & BDA (blister decorating applications) for thermoformed PET/PVC blister packaging. The company provides complete systems for insert and take-out automation of injection moulding processes with up and downstream automation. The downstream automation turns complex customer’s requirements into simple, reliable and highly efficient solutions. Neejtech India Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-2656 1312 Mob: 098250 40231 Email: sales@neejtech.com

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PRODUCT UPDATE

Check weigher Technofour Electronics offers ‘CW 21K’ check weigher for online dynamic weighing for shipper. This device uses the stateof-the-art technology to achieve greater accuracy in dynamic weighing. The system provides 100 per cent online weighing, ensuring compliance with international standards of pharmaceutical, food, chemical and cosmetics industries. The check weigher also improves production line profitability through significant reduction in product give-away. This is an ideal system for shipper cartons. Some of salient features of the check weigher systems are height adjustment for ease of integration with existing line; variable conveyor speed control to match the inlet speed; facility for dynamic weight compensation; display of net weight; and statistical data of total accept, total reject, standard deviation, percentage of rejection, range value, etc on graphical LCD display. This system can be tailor-made and is available in wide range from 500 gm to 50 kg to suit the requirement. Technofour Electronics Pvt Ltd Pune - Maharashtra Tel: 020-2605 8063/4/5, Fax: 020-2605 8073 Email: sales@teplindia.com

Flexible screw conveyor Noida Fabcon Machines offers flexible screw conveyor for food, pharmaceuticals, chemicals, minerals, ceramics, plastic and rubber industry. It consists of electric motor driven spiral, which rotates within a food grade sealed tube. The material moves along the spiral within the tube. The unique action of the flexible spiral conveyor eliminates the risk of the product separation. The conveyor maximum length can be up to 15 metre for material bulk density of 0.6 kg/litre and may be increased or decreased inversely with bulk density. Feed hopper is available in standard size or according to customer’s specification. Its main features include dust free, easy to clean, high & low level control, safe & hygienic handling, accurate metering and high transfer capacity. The different sizes of conveyor are suitable for any capacity upto 15 tonne per hour and any length from 2 to 15 metre per conveyor. Distribution of product at more than one outlet is also possible. The flexible nature of conveyor allows bends to be incorporated while installing the conveyor & the same can be managed through walls & roofs with minimal problem to the existing layout. Noida Fabcon Machines Pvt Ltd New Delhi Mob: 098183 77111, 098112 09769 Email: nishantb@fabcon-india.com

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Modern Food Processing | July 2010


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PRODUCT UPDATE

Wrapping machine Pacwel Equipments offers Model PE 108 pillow pack wrapping machine for hard-boiled candy. It is used for packing foodstuff, and can pack up to 1,000 packs per minute depending on the product and its packing material. It can be connected to a single phase or three-phase power supply. It is provided with a vibratory feeder, which takes the candies from the SS hopper, then the chute removes the dust & broken pieces and feeds the desired candies to the detachable disc, which has the precise shape of candies and goes to the lug conveyor. The wrapping material released from the feed unit, passes through the rollers where the photocell mark is constantly monitored. The film makes a continuous tube in which the lug conveyor positions the candies. This continuous tube is sealed and guided by pairs of pulling and sealing rollers. After this process, the cross-sealer seals the individual packs and a zigzag knife (fixed inside the cross-sealer) separates the individual pack or gives perforation as desired. Pacwel Equipments Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-2560 3491, Fax: 022-2568 8916 Email: pacwel@bom7.vsnl.net.in

Flooring solutions Apurva India offers epoxy-and polyurethane-based flooring solutions, which are used in the pharmaceutical, food & beverage and hospitals industries. The polyurethane-based floorings (PU concrete) are recommended in dairy, breweries and meat processing industry due to their high resistance to lactic acid and steam cleaning. These flooring systems have good chemical- and thermal-resistant properties. In addition, they contain a powerful antimicrobial and antibacterial additive. By applying these resin-based floorings, companies can protect their base floor from deteriorating and prevent recurring repair and production shutdowns while making it a clean and healthy environment to work. The company also offers multi-coloured, selflevelling flooring. Apurva India Ltd Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-2447 5051, Fax: 022-2447 5056 Email: sales@apurvaindia.in

July 2010 | Modern Food Processing

79


PRODUCT UPDATE

Cold room Colpan Poly Panel Industries offers cold room. Its surface is made of GI pre-painted sheet, SS sheet, GI plain sheet and aluminium sheet. It is available in thicknesses ranging from 60, 80, 100, 125 and 150 mm. Its wall, floor, door frame, door leaf, tee walls, corners, ceilings and PVC gaskets are available in a variety of heights and widths. It is fitted with flush-type big door that could have a long-term heavy duty usage. Its window/hatch door comes with a frame and can be fitted anywhere on the installed cold room. The door accessories consist of an imported-make handle, closer and chromium-plated hinges. The door leaf is made of fibreglass reinforced plastic lining. This does not dent, rust, wrap or scratch and can easily bear the impact of roll-in trolleys/carts. The cold room comes with double toughened glass vacuum due to which it becomes transparent and there is no need to frequently open the door. Its advanced high-density 40 kg/m3 of Puf insulation ensures insulating efficiency and uniform celstructure or density that can be provided as per the user’s demand. Colpan Poly Panel Industries Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-6542 6394; Fax: 079-2297 1352 Email: panel@colpangroup.com

Vacuum pumps Acmevac Sales offers oil sealed rotary high vacuum pumps. These pumps are compact in size, and they can be directly mounted on the motor flange. These pumps are light-in-weight, well-balanced and have good size to performance ratio, have high pumping speeds and high water vapour tolerance. The oil consumption is extremely low and they are air cooled. These pumps are used in industries and laboratories for production of medium and high vacuum. The pumps can also be used for pumping of gases. These pumps are used as backing pumps in series with roots blowers, diffusion pumps, etc. These pumps find applications in vacuum coating, molecular distillation, vacuum metallurgy, freeze drying, vacuum impregnation, air conditioning and refrigeration, vacuum lifting devices, packaging machines, etc. These are offered in capacities up to 300 ltr/min and vacuum up to 0.002 Torr. Acmevac Sales Pvt Ltd Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-2837 5837, 2838 1053, Fax: 022-2836 4977 Email: acmevac@vsnl.com The information published in this section is as per the details furnished by the respective manufacturer/distributor. In any case, it does not represent the views of

Modern Food Processing

80

Modern Food Processing | July 2010


 Air coolers .................................................  Encoders....................................................  Liquid filling system ...................................  Almond cutting machine ...........................  Evaporating units for cold rooms ...............  Magnetic equipment..................................



 Animal feed technology .............................  Exhibition - Annapoorna India....................  Magnetic plate...........................................  AODD pumps ............................................  Exhibition - Fi India 2010 ...........................  Magnetic traps...........................................  ATEX compliant products...........................  Exhibition - India Foodex 2010...................  Market research .........................................  Automatic scrubber driers ..........................  Exhibition - Promach 2010.........................  Masala mills...............................................  Bag emptying equipment...........................  Extruded products......................................  Mathiya making machine...........................  Bag form fill and seal machines..................  Extruder .....................................................  Measuring & monitoring relay ...................  Bar code reader .........................................  Extruder for papad machine.......................  Metal detector ..........................................  Batching system.........................................  Feeders ......................................................  Metering pumps ........................................  Beverage packaging machine .....................  Filtration systems .......................................  Mini dal mill ..............................................  Big bag filling & emptying equipment ........  Flexible screw.............................................  Mini pulveriser with circulating system .......  Blower motors ...........................................  Flexible transparent PVC strip door.............  Mixer cooler...............................................  Brewing unit ..............................................  Flooring machine .......................................  Mixer grinder .............................................  Brine chillers ..............................................  Flour milling unit .......................................  Mixers........................................................

First Fold Here

 Bucket elevators .........................................  Fluid mixing dispersion system ...................  Mixture for papad machine........................  Burners for process air heating applications  Food analysing & testing machine ..............  Moisture analyser.......................................  Cap sealing machine ..................................  Food emulsifier ..........................................  Motion controls .........................................  Carpet cleaning machines ..........................  Foot sealer .................................................  Multi chamber pulveriser............................  Centrifugal pumps .....................................  Forced convection unit air cooler................  Nip Noodle making machine ....................  Centrifuges ................................................  Gas conditioning and fire protection unit...  Oil/coolant coolers .....................................  Chain conveyors.........................................  Grain handling system ...............................  Oil milling unit ...........................................  Chapati making machine ...........................  Granulators................................................  Online check weigher.................................  Check weigher ...........................................  Gravy making machine...............................  Online vacuum machine.............................



Fax.: +91-22-3003 4499 Email: b2b@infomedia18.in

 Blenders.....................................................  Flexible screw conveyor ..............................  Mini vacuum machine................................



 Chocolate/cocoa making machine ..............  Grill magnet...............................................  Packaging machinery .................................  Chorafali making machine..........................  Grinding & dispersion unit .........................  Pallet scale .................................................  Chow making machine ..............................  Gyratory screen ..........................................  Panel air-conditioners .................................  Circumferential piston pumps ....................  Hammer machine ......................................  Panipuri making machine ...........................  Cleaning section equipment .......................  Hand sealer................................................  Papad making machine ..............................  Cold room .................................................  Haul off .....................................................  Pasta making machine ...............................  Colour measuring instruments ...................  Heat resistant door ....................................  Pasteurising dosing system.........................  Colour sorting unit.....................................  Heavy-duty mixer grinder ...........................  Pasteurising machine..................................  Compressed air filters and regulators .........  High pressure cleaners ...............................  PET & jar moulding machine ......................

Tel.: +91-22-3003 4685



 Conveyor belts ...........................................  High pressure cleaning machine.................  Photo electric sensors.................................  Conveyor components ...............................  Hopper magnet .........................................  Piston pumps.............................................  Conveyors ..................................................  Ice cream making plant..............................  Plastic hose pipe ........................................

Second Fold Here

 Corrugated tube heat exchangers ..............  Impact pulveriser........................................  Plastic pellets .............................................  Counters & power supplies ........................  Industrial coatings......................................  Pneumatic conveying system components ..  Cutters.......................................................  Industrial control & sensing devices............  Pneumatic products ...................................  Cutting, mixing and emulsifying machine...  Industrial cooling systems ..........................  Potato chip making machinery ...................  Dairy enzymes............................................  Industrial door ...........................................  Pounding machine .....................................  Daliya making machine ..............................  Industrial hoses..........................................  Programmable logic controllers ..................  Dehumidifiers.............................................  Industrial inkjet printers .............................  Programmable terminals ............................  Doors.........................................................  Industrial type unit air cooler .....................  Proximity sensors .......................................  Double vacuum chamber ...........................  Infomedia18 B2B magazines ......................  Pulversier ...................................................  Drawer magnet..........................................  In-mould labelling system ..........................  Pumps .......................................................



Please tick against the box of product(s) you are interested in:  Mention specific product/service you need,  Complete all the details on this form.  Tear the form & mail it to us. (It is a prepaid mail)

 Beverage canning unit ...............................  Filtration equipment...................................  Milk processing unit...................................



 Drives ........................................................  Invertor/variable frequency drives ...............  Pumps/valves..............................................  Drum roller ................................................  Juicer .........................................................  PVC strip door ...........................................  Drum sieve machine...................................  Knife sharpner ...........................................  Rare earth tubes ........................................  Dry cum wet grinder ..................................  Lab homogenisers......................................  Ready to eat retort pouches (microvable &  Dust collectors ...........................................  Lab spray dryer ..........................................  non-microvable).........................................  Dust control door ......................................  Level & pressure monitoring & safety com-  Refrigeration equipment ............................  Electromagnetic feeder ..............................  ponents .....................................................  RFID Rice milling equipment.......................

Send your inquiries at: Tel: +91-22-3003 4685 Fax: +91-22-3003 4499 Email: b2b@infomedia18.in

GLUE

We will send your inquiries to the manufacturers and ask them to send you the details or contact you directly. Use this form for FREE additional Information on products published in this issue.How to use this form:

 Aerosol spray paint ....................................  Emulsification solutions..............................  Lipid food processing unit..........................

Third Fold Here

PRODUCT INQUIRY FORM

 Aero mechanical unit .................................  Electronic balance ......................................  Level controllers .........................................


Please complete the following & get a quick effective response from suppliers: 1. Your company’s business function is (one only)  Wholesalers  Manufacturer  Distributor  Agent  Other, please specify______________ 2. Your role in your company’s buying process can best be described as:  I buy  I identify potential suppliers  I approve purchases  I negotiate contracts  I select suppliers. 3. Your line of business Name: Designation: Company Name:

City:

Pin:

Tel:

Fax:

07 / 2010

Address:

Email:

 Roots blower .............................................  Stirrers .......................................................  Vacuum pumps..........................................  Rotary feeders (rotary valves)......................  Stretch wrapping machine .........................  Valve actuators ..........................................  Rotary lobe pumps.....................................  Sweepers ...................................................  Valves ........................................................  Safety doors...............................................  Sweet (mithai) making machine .................  Vegetable cutting machine.........................  Safety light curtains ...................................  Switching relays .........................................  Ventilators .................................................  Screw conveyors & feeders .........................  Takeup drum..............................................  Vermicelling machine .................................  Sealing machine.........................................  Tank weighing............................................  Vertical bagger...........................................  Self adhesive tapes.....................................  Temperature controllers..............................  Vertical form, fill and seal machine.............  Shrink wrapping machine ..........................  Thermal processes......................................  Vibration motor .........................................  Silo safety components ..............................  Timers........................................................  Vibrators & flow aids .................................  Single disc machines ..................................  Timing belts ...............................................  Viscometer.................................................  Solids discharging equipment ....................  Timing pulleys............................................  Vision sensors ............................................  Solids-liquid separation equipment ............  Tomato strainer..........................................  Water chillers .............................................  Spice mill ...................................................  Total integrated automation.......................  Water ring vacuum pumps.........................  Spray analysis.............................................  Turnkey systems for dust suppression .........  Weigh bridge.............................................  Spray control .............................................  Twin lobe roots blower...............................  Weigh scales ..............................................  Spray fabrication........................................  Two stage vacuum pump ...........................  Winder ......................................................  Spray nozzles and accessories ....................  Universal type unit air cooler ......................  Wrapping machine ....................................  Stainless steel equipment and fitting ..........  Vacuum cleaners........................................  X-ray inspection system ..............................  Steriliser .....................................................  Vacuum machine .......................................

Ruby House, ‘A’ Wing, J.K. Sawant Marg, Dadar (W), Mumbai 400 028, INDIA.

INFOMEDIA 18 LIMITED Special Projects POSTAGE WILL BE PAID BY ADDRESSEE

BR Permit No. 555 Bhavani Shankar Post Office, Mumbai 400 028.

Business Reply Inland

NO POSTAGE STAMP NECESSARY IF POSTED IN INDIA


ADVERTISER INQUIRY FORM

U 

se this form for FREE additional Information on advertisements published in this issue. We will send your inquiries to the advertisers and ask them to send you the details or contact you directly.



How to use this form:

Please tick against the box of advertiser(s) you are interested in:  Mention specific product/ service you need, against the advertiser’s name  Complete all the details on this form.  Tear the form & mail it to us. (It is a prepaid mail)

Tel.: +91-22-3003 4640



Fax.: +91-22-3003 4499 Email: b2b@infomedia18.in 

 A G Engineers ............................................................................. 

Modern Food Processing.............................................................

 Bangalore International Exhibition............................................... 

Media Today Pvt Ltd....................................................................

 Bonfiglioli Transmissions (Pvt) Ltd ................................................ 

Monarch Appliances ...................................................................

 Bosch Limited ............................................................................. 

New India Electric & Trading Co ..................................................

 Bry Air Asia Pvt Ltd...................................................................... 

Noida Fabcon Machines Pvt Ltd ..................................................

 Buhler (India) Pvt Ltd................................................................... 

Novozymes South Asia Pvt Ltd ....................................................

 Business Development Bureau India P Ltd.................................... 

Omron Automation Pvt Ltd .........................................................

 CNZH Technology Share Co., Ltd. ................................................ 

P.P.I. Pumps Pvt Ltd .....................................................................

 Danfoss Indus Pvt Ltd.................................................................. 

Paharpur - 3P..............................................................................

 Diversey India Pvt Ltd .................................................................. 

Plast World .................................................................................

 Eclipse Combustion Pvt Ltd ......................................................... 

Siemens Ltd ................................................................................

 FICCI ........................................................................................... 

Spraying Systems (India) Pvt Ltd ..................................................

 FX Multitech Pvt Ltd.................................................................... 

Sreelakshmi Traders.....................................................................

 Guan Yu Machinery Factory Co., Ltd............................................ 

Technical Trading & Services ........................................................

 HRS Process Systems Pvt Ltd........................................................ 

UBM India Private Limited ...........................................................

 IDEX India Pvt Ltd ....................................................................... 

Universal Corporation .................................................................

 Jas Enterprises............................................................................. 

WAM India Pvt Ltd......................................................................

 Jay Instruments & Systems Pvt Ltd............................................... 

Werner Finley Pvt Ltd ..................................................................



First Fold Here

 Jaykrishna Magnetics Pvt Ltd .......................................................

Second Fold Here Please complete the following & get a quick effective response from suppliers: 1. Your company’s business function is (one only)  Wholesalers  Manufacturer  Distributor  Agent  Other, please specify______________ 2. Your role in your company’s buying process can best be described as:  I buy  I identify potential suppliers  I approve purchases  I negotiate contracts  I select suppliers. 3. Your line of business Name: Designation: Company Name:

City:

Pin:

Tel:

Fax:

Email:

07 / 2010

Address:

Third Fold Here

GLUE



4. Specific product requirement


POSTAGE WILL BE PAID BY ADDRESSEE

Business Reply Inland BR Permit No. 555 Bhavani Shankar Post Office, Mumbai 400 028.

NO POSTAGE STAMP NECESSARY IF POSTED IN INDIA

Special Projects

INFOMEDIA 18 LIMITED Ruby House, ‘A’ Wing, J.K. Sawant Marg, Dadar (W), Mumbai 400 028, INDIA.


PRODUCT INDEX Product

Pg No

Aero mechanical unit................................. 45 Aerosol spray paint .......................................... 75 Air coolers ......................................................... 9 Almond cutting machine ................................. 73 Animal feed technology................................... 15 AODD pumps .................................................. 11 ATEX compliant products ................................ 75 Automatic scrubber driers................................ 41 Bag emptying equipment.......................... 75 Bag form fill and seal machines....................... 19 Bar code reader ............................................... 70 Batching system............................................... 55 Beverage canning unit ..................................... 17 Beverage packaging machine........................... 17 Big bag filling & emptying equipment ............. 75 Blenders........................................................... 75 Blower motors ................................................. 12 Brewing unit.................................................... 15 Brine chillers .................................................... 71 Bucket elevators.........................................45, 75 Burners for process air heating applications..... 62 Cap sealing machine.................................. 69 Carpet cleaning machines ................................ 41 Centrifugal pumps ........................................... 11 Centrifuges ...................................................... 69 Chain conveyors............................................... 75 Chapati making machine ................................. 73 Check weigher ................................................. 76 Chocolate/cocoa making machine.................... 15 Chorafali making machine ............................... 73 Chow making machine .................................... 73 Circumferential piston pumps .......................... 11 Cleaning section equipment............................. 15 Cold room ....................................................... 80 Colour measuring instruments ......................... 55 Colour sorting unit .......................................... 15 Compressed air filters and regulators.............. FIC Conveyor belts ................................................. 23 Conveyor components ..................................... 23 Conveyors ........................................................ 45 Corrugated tube heat exchangers ...................... 7 Counters & power supplies ................................ 3 Cutters............................................................. 12 Cutting, mixing and emulsifying machine ........ 72 Dairy enzymes ............................................ 21 Daliya making machine.................................... 73 Dehumidifiers................................................... 35 Doors............................................................... 79 Double vacuum chamber ................................. 69 Drawer magnet................................................ 76 Drives ................................................................ 4 Drum roller ...................................................... 12 Drum sieve machine ........................................ 73 Dry cum wet grinder ....................................... 73 Dust collectors ................................................. 75 Dust control door ............................................ 79 Electromagnetic feeder.............................. 76 Electronic balance............................................ 55 Emulsification solutions.................................... 11 Encoders............................................................ 3 Evaporating units for cold rooms....................... 9 Exhibition - Annapoorna India ........................... 6 Exhibition - Fi India 2010 .................................. 8 Exhibition - India Foodex 2010 ........................ 36 Exhibition - Promach 2010 .............................. 10 Extruded products ........................................... 15 Extruder ........................................................... 12 Extruder for papad machine ............................ 73 Feeders ....................................................... 12 Filtration equipment ........................................ BC Filtration systems ............................................. BC Flexible screw................................................... 45 Flexible screw conveyor.................................... 76 Flexible transparent PVC strip door .................. 79 Flooring machine ............................................. 79 Flour milling unit ............................................. 15 Fluid mixing dispersion system......................... 11

Product

Pg No

Food analysing & testing machine ................... BC Food emulsifier ................................................ 70 Foot sealer....................................................... 69 Forced convection unit air cooler ....................... 9 Gas conditioning and fire protection unit........ 51 Grain handling system ..................................... 15 Granulators...................................................... 75 Gravy making machine .................................... 73 Grill magnet .................................................... 76 Grinding & dispersion unit............................... 15 Gyratory screen................................................ 76 Hammer machine....................................... 73 Hand sealer ..................................................... 69 Haul off ........................................................... 12 Heat resistant door .......................................... 79 Heavy-duty mixer grinder ................................. 69 High pressure cleaners ..................................... 41 High pressure cleaning machine ...................... 71 Hopper magnet ............................................... 76 Ice cream making plant............................. 71 Impact pulveriser ............................................. 73 Industrial coatings ........................................... 71 Industrial control & sensing devices ................... 3 Industrial cooling systems ................................ 71 Industrial door ................................................. 79 Industrial hoses............................................... FIC Industrial inkjet printers ................................... 55 Industrial type unit air cooler ............................. 9 Infomedia18 B2B magazines............................ 63 In-mould labelling system ................................ 75 Invertor/variable frequency drives ....................... 3 Juicer ....................................................69, 73 Knife sharpner............................................ 69 Lab homogenisers...................................... 74 Lab spray dryer ................................................ 55 Level & pressure monitoring & safety components....75 Level controllers ................................................. 3 Lipid food processing unit ............................... BC Liquid filling system ......................................... 55 Magnetic equipment ................................. 76 Magnetic plate ................................................ 76 Magnetic traps ................................................ 76 Market research ................................................. 5 Masala mills..................................................... 73 Mathiya making machine................................. 73 Measuring & monitoring relay .......................... 3 Metal detector ................................................ 55 Metering pumps .............................................. 11 Milk processing unit ........................................ 17 Mini dal mill .................................................... 73 Mini pulveriser with circulating system............. 73 Mini vacuum machine ..................................... 69 Mixer cooler..................................................... 12 Mixer grinder ................................................... 73 Mixers.............................................................. 75 Mixture for papad machine ............................. 73 Moisture analyser............................................. 55 Motion controls ................................................. 3 Multi chamber pulveriser ................................. 73 Nip .............................................................. 12 Noodle making machine.................................. 73 Oil/coolant coolers ..................................... 71 Oil milling unit................................................. 15 Online check weigher ...................................... 55 Online vacuum machine .................................. 69 Packaging machinery ................................. 69 Pallet scale....................................................... 55 Panel air-conditioners ...................................... 71 Panipuri making machine ................................ 73 Papad making machine.................................... 73 Pasta making machine ...............................15, 69 Pasteurising dosing system .............................. 71 Pasteurising machine ....................................... 17 PET & jar moulding machine ........................... 72 Photo electric sensors ........................................ 3 Piston pumps..................................................... 7 Plastic hose pipe ............................................. FIC

Product

Pg No

Plastic pellets ................................................... 15 Pneumatic conveying system components........ 75 Pneumatic products ........................................ FIC Potato chip making machinery......................... 74 Pounding machine........................................... 73 Programmable logic controllers.......................... 3 Programmable terminals .................................... 3 Proximity sensors ............................................... 3 Pulversier ...................................................69, 74 Pumps ............................................................. 54 Pumps/valves.................................................... 17 PVC strip door ................................................. 79 Rare earth tubes ........................................ 76 Ready to eat retort pouches (microvable & non-microvable) ........................................... 27 Refrigeration equipment .................................. 71 RFID................................................................... 3 Rice milling equipment .................................... 15 Roots blower ................................................... 54 Rotary feeders (rotary valves) ........................... 75 Rotary lobe pumps .......................................... 11 Safety doors ............................................... 79 Safety light curtains ........................................... 3 Screw conveyors & feeders .............................. 75 Sealing machine .............................................. 69 Self adhesive tapes .......................................... 75 Shrink wrapping machine ................................ 69 Silo safety components .................................... 75 Single disc machines........................................ 41 Solids discharging equipment .......................... 75 Solids-liquid separation equipment .................. 75 Spice mill ......................................................... 73 Spray analysis .................................................. 51 Spray control ................................................... 51 Spray fabrication.............................................. 51 Spray nozzles and accessories .......................... 51 Stainless steel equipment and fitting ............... 17 Steriliser ........................................................... 17 Stirrers ............................................................. 73 Stretch wrapping machine ............................... 69 Sweepers ......................................................... 41 Sweet (mithai) making machine....................... 69 Switching relays ................................................. 3 Takeup drum .............................................. 12 Tank weighing ................................................. 55 Temperature controllers ..................................... 3 Thermal processes............................................ 15 Timers................................................................ 3 Timing belts..................................................... 23 Timing pulleys.................................................. 23 Tomato strainer ............................................... 69 Total integrated automation ........................... BIC Turnkey systems for dust suppression .............. 51 Twin lobe roots blower.................................... 54 Two stage vacuum pump ................................ 54 Universal type unit air cooler ...................... 9 Vacuum cleaners ........................................ 41 Vacuum machine............................................. 69 Vacuum pumps ............................................... 80 Valve actuators ................................................ 75 Valves .............................................................. 75 Vegetable cutting machine .............................. 73 Ventilators ....................................................... 75 Vermicelling machine....................................... 73 Vertical bagger ................................................ 19 Vertical form, fill and seal machine.................. 19 Vibration motor ............................................... 76 Vibrators & flow aids ....................................... 75 Viscometer....................................................... 55 Vision sensors .................................................... 3 Water chillers ............................................. 71 Water ring vacuum pumps .............................. 54 Weigh bridge................................................... 55 Weigh scales.................................................... 55 Winder ............................................................ 12 Wrapping machine .......................................... 79 X-ray inspection system............................. 55

BC - Back Cover, BIC - Back Inside Cover, FIC - Front Inside Cover July 2010 | Modern Food Processing

85


ADVERTISERS’ LIST

Advertisers’ Name & Contact Details

Pg No

Advertisers’ Name & Contact Details

A G Engineers T: +91-129-2866114 E: admin@agengineers.net W: www.agengineers.net

23

FX Multitech Pvt Ltd T: +91-79-27910993 E: fxmultitech@gmail.com W: www.frascold.it

Bangalore International Exhibition T: +91-124-4014060 E: amit.mehta@cii.in W: www.promach.co.in

10

Guan Yu Machinery Factory Co., Ltd. T: +886-4-896-5198 E: guanyeu@ms39.hinet.net W: www.gy-1000.com.tw

Pg No

9

BC

Bonfiglioli Transmissions (Pvt) Ltd 4 T: +91-44-24781035 E: sales@bonfiglioliin.com W: www.bonfiglioliindia.com

HRS Process Systems Pvt Ltd T: +91-20-25663581 E: cthe@hrsasia.co.in W: www.hrsasia.co.in

Bosch Limited T: +91-832-669-2004 E: Amol.Matkar@in.bosch.com W: www.boschpackaging.com

IDEX India Pvt Ltd T: +91-22-66755966 E: info.fmt@idexcorp.com W: www.idexfmt-asia.com

11

Jas Enterprises T: +91-79-22743454 E: info@jasenterprise.com W: www.jasenterprise.com

73

19

Bry Air Asia Pvt Ltd T: +91-11-23906777 E: bryairmarketing@pahwa.com W: www.bryair.com

35

Buhler (India) Pvt Ltd T: +91-80-22890000 E: sujit.pande@buhlergroup.com W: www.buhlergroup.com

15

Business Development Bureau India P Ltd T: +91-20-27010321 E: info@bdbmr.co.in W: www.bdbmr.co.in

5

CNZH Technology Share Co., Ltd. T: +86-577-2886-7008 E: tycnzh@tz-cnzh.com W: www.ty-cnzh.com

17

Danfoss Indus Pvt Ltd T: +91-44-66501555 E: danfoss.india@danfoss.com W: www.danfoss.com

12

Diversey India Pvt Ltd T: +91-22-66444222 W: www.diversey.com

41

Eclipse Combustion Pvt Ltd T: +91-20-32347612 E: vkulkarni@eclipsenet.com W: www.eclipseindia.com

62

FICCI T: +91-11-23316551 E: chandra.shekhar@ficci.com W: www.worldoffoodindia.com

6

7

Jay Instruments & Systems Pvt Ltd 55 T: +91-22-2352620 E: sales@jayinst.com W: www.jayinst.com

Advertisers’ Name & Contact Details

Pg No

Novozymes South Asia Pvt Ltd 21 T: +91-80-30506937 E: enquirymail@novozymes.com W: www.novozymes.com Omron Automation Pvt Ltd T: +91-80-40726400 E: srirams@ap.omron.com W: www.omron-ap.com

3

P.P.I. Pumps Pvt Ltd T: +91-79-25832273 E: sales@ppipumps.com W: www.ppipumps.com

54

Paharpur - 3P T: +91-120-4389102 E: anarmesh@pilpack.com W: www.pilpack.com

27

Plast World T: +91-9376128372 E: plastworld1@rediffmail.com W: www.stripdoor.co.in

79

Siemens Ltd T: +91-22-24987000 W: www.siemens.com/answers

BIC

Spraying Systems (India) Pvt Ltd T: +91-80-39853200 E: ssipl@sprayindia.com W: www.spray.com

51

Jaykrishna Magnetics Pvt Ltd T: +91-79-22970452 E: info@jkmagnetics.com W: www.jkmagnetics.com

76

Modern Food Processing T: +91-22-30245000 E: spmktg@infomedia18.in W: www.infomedia18.in

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