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INDUSTRY WATCH - Chemical World

July 2010


EDITORIAL

The ‘asset’ leverage

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nown for its capital-intensive nature, the process industry today needs to effectively respond to a myriad of market variables. Besides, there are increasingly complex global demand-supply equations, fluctuating feedstock prices and a continuously evolving regulatory environment, apart from several emerging opportunities. Given this scenario, the role of an organisaton-wide asset management seems to be the need of the hour. Far beyond the traditional focus of a manufacturing plant on the cost-quality-schedule triad, there is a need to extend the very definition of plant assets. It should encompass the entire manufacturing processes, people and supporting business processes. Moreover, a holistic asset optimisation strategy can maximise the utilisation, uptime and effectiveness of all plant assets, leading to better business performance. Amid the up and down economic cycles, the challenge before world-class process entities is to stay profitable by primarily leveraging real-time information and competitive adaptability. In this context, standardisation of the communication interface between field devices and systems becomes key to manufacturing facilities relying on a wide variety of devices. From the maintenance perspective, asset optimisation, as industry experts opine, offers

Business Insights Technologies Opportunities

Editor : Manas R Bastia Assistant Editor: Rakesh Rao Senior Features Writer: Prasenjit Chakraborty Features Writer: KTP Radhika Jinoy (Delhi) Senior Correspondent: Shivani Mody (Bengaluru) Correspondent: Geetha Jayaraman (Delhi) Copy Desk: Meghanadan Sudhakaran Products Desk: Sudheer Vathiyath Group Photo Editor & Creative Head: Shiresh R Karrale Design: Mahendra Varpe Production: Vikas Bobhate, Pravin Koyande, Dnyaneshwar Goythale, Ravikumar Potdar, Ravi Salian, Sanjay Shelar, Lovey Fernandes, Pukha Dhawan, Varsha Nawathe, Akshata Rane, Abhay Borkar Marketing & Branding: Jagruti Shah, Ganesh Mahale Chief Executive Officer: Lakshmi Narasimhan Associate Vice President: Sudhanva Jategaonkar Subscription: Sunder Thiyagarajan, General Manager - Copy Sales Sheetal Kotawadekar, Senior Manager, Tel: 91-22-3003 4631/4633 Email: customercare@infomedia18.in

proactive & predictive approach for plant maintenance. This focusses on elimination of the root cause of asset failure, thereby raising its reliability or extending its life. Also, it does away with the need for unwarranted preventive maintenance. Going forward, it will not be a surprise to see manufacturers combining multiple asset optimisation solutions on a single platform, in order to offer customers the flexibility to meet all asset management related requirements. For a multi-angle perspective on asset optimisation, turn to the ‘Business & Markets’ section. A quick glance at the paints industry in India shows how it has evolved - from an earlier focus on aesthetic values rather than on corrosion prevention - in the recent years. With the advent of lead-free paints, low VOCs, non-toxic products, etc, there is a surge in demand for high-performance paints that meet the required environmental compliances. The ‘Sector Watch’ and ‘Market Analysis’ throw more light on this. Read on…

Editorial Advisory Board Pothen Paul Executive Chairman, Aker Powergas Pvt Ltd D P Misra Director, TCE Consulting Engineers Ltd and Former Director General, ICC P D Samudra Executive Director (Sales) & Member of the Board, Uhde India Ltd

Manas R Bastia Editor manas@infomedia18.in

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July 2010 | Chemical World

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CONTENTS

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LEADERS SPEAK “Global competitiveness is essential for any international business to flourish” ...says, Dr Stan Higgins, CEO, North East Process Industry Cluster

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IN FOCUS Zydex Industries: Ushering in a green wave

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BUSINESS & MARKETS INDUSTRY UPDATE Asset optimisation: Unlocking the true potential

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INDUSTRY INSIGHT Remote plant asset monitoring: An apt strategy for today’s economy Wil Chin, Research Director - Automation, ARC Advisory Group

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34

MARKET SCOPE Asset performance management: Addressing the root cause Ravi Ramarao, Global Head - Integrated Asset Management (Engineering and Industrial Services), Tata Consultancy Services

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MARKET TRENDS Asset information management: Ensuring regulatory compliance

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SECTOR WATCH Decorative paints: Depicting ‘greener’ opportunities

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MARKET ANALYSIS Industrial paints: A windfall of possibilities

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ENERGY MANAGEMENT

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Thermocompressors: Boosting steam to further profits Sandip C Abhyankar, Senior Engineer – Marketing at Thermocompressor Division, Forbes Marshall

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CORROSION CONTROL Corrosion education: The need of the hour Prof A S Khanna, Corrosion Science & Engineering Deptt, IIT-Bombay

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MANAGEMENT MANTRAS SWOT analysis: Syncing corporate and market forces Suresh Lulla, MD, Qimpro Consultants Pvt Ltd, Mumbai

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58

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R EG U L A R S EC TI O N S Editorial ...................................................... 9 National News ......................................... 12 National News-Report............................. 14 World News............................................. 16 Events Calendar ....................................... 61 Technology Transfer ................................. 63 Product Update........................................ 65 Product Inquiry ........................................ 75 Advertisement Inquiry.............................. 77 Product Index........................................... 79 Advertisers’ List ....................................... 80

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Highlights of Next Issue SECTOR WATCH : Bulk/Base Chemicals INDUSTRY UPDATE : Logistics & Supply Chain Management BUSINESS DESTINATION : Singapore Note: $ stands for US dollar and £ stands for UK pound, unless mentioned otherwise


NATIONAL NEWS RECOGNITION

Clariant Chemicals receives Vasundhara Award

Clariant officials receiving the award

Clariant Chemicals (India) Ltd’s Roha site has recently won the ‘Vasundhara Award – 2009’ instituted by APPOINTMENT

Yeshwant Samant joins Finar Chemicals as Technical Director Yeshwant Samant, a well known name in the chemical industry, has joined the Ahmedabad-based Finar Chemicals Ltd as Technical Director. Samant has over 40 years of industry experience in R&D, drug development, quality assurance and production. Previously, he has EXPANSION

LANXESS invests in a new production facility in Jhagadia

Specialty chemicals group LANXESS is planning to expand its production site in India. The group is now set to build NEW FACILITY

DyStar launches CSI DyStar has installed the Color Solutions International (CSI) at its facility at Rabale, Navi Mumbai, to help keep the local brands and retailers abreast of world trends in colours and fashions. CSI is the leading service provider in colour communication for the entire supply chain. It provides reliable colour standards

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Maharashtra Pollution Control Board (MPCB) and Environment Department, Government of Maharashtra, in the ‘large scale industries’ category. “This award recognises exemplary work carried out by industries in Maharashtra. Besides, it also recognises various sectors for sustainable development while achieving business, service functions and societal objectives. The award aims at setting role models and inspire others to follow them,” said a company press release.

A trophy and cash award was handed over by Sachin Ahir, Minister of State for Environment, Government of Maharashtra, to Dr Satya Kumar, Head - Roha site, Clariant Chemicals (India) Ltd; Dr S Nakate, Head - Site ESHA, Clariant Chemicals (India) Ltd and Vaibhav Naik, WWTP, Roha, Clariant Chemicals (India), Ltd. Ashok Chavan, Chief Minister, Maharashtra, was also present at the occasion as Chief Guest.

worked with GSK Pharma in various capacities and was leading the entire manufacturing of Thermo Fisher Scientific until recently. “With Samant coming on board and lending his expertise to the upcoming manufacturing facility, we aim to create new benchmarks in quality & manufacturing. His vast experience shall enable us to deliver quality products with greater efficiency,” said

Girish Maheshwari, Managing Director & CEO, Finar Chemicals Ltd. With its expansion plans, Finar has been on the lookout for industry veterans to join its top team to steer the growth of the company and take it to the next level.

compounding facilities with an initial capacity of 20,000 metric tonne per year for the production of the engineering plastics Durethan and Pocan at Jhagadia in Gujarat. Construction of the new compounding facilities will begin this year and they are due to go on stream with a workforce of 60 at the start of 2012. “With an investment of over Euro 10 million, we will be strengthening our position as a premium supplier of high-technology plastics in the

Asia-Pacific region. As one of the fastestgrowing markets for hightechnology plastics, India offers the ideal environment for this,” said Hubert Fink, Head - Semi-crystalline Products Business Unit, LANXESS. Together with the compounding plant in Wuxi, China, the new facilities will supply the entire Asia-Pacific region with Durethan and Pocan. LANXESS recently announced that it would be expanding capacity for the production of these hightechnology plastics in Wuxi.

to major retailers and brands along with a variety of flexible colour options and services. The studio was inaugurated by Manish Kiri, CMD, DyStar Group. “The shifting market demands are pushing many local brands and retailers to review their method of colour communication. And, as a leading service provider in the field, CSI has pioneered the advances in colour communication

Manish Kiri (3rd from left) is flanked by other officials of DyStar

by providing international brands and retailers with accurate colour standards,” according to the company.


NATIONAL NEWS PRODUCT LAUNCH

KSB India launches MoviBoost

KSB India has recently launched the MoviBoost range of booster sets in PRODUCTION RESUMPTION

Gujarat Narmada resumes production of ammonia, urea and ANP Gujarat Narmada Valley Fertilizer Company, the only manufacturer of toluence di-isocyanate in South-East Asia, has resumed the production of ammonia, urea and ammonium nitrophosphate (ANP) after the production was stopped due to the failure of equipment E-703 of ammonia plant. All the plants of the MEGA PROJECT

Asian Paints inks pact with Maharashtra Government for paint project

Asian Paints Ltd has recently signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with Maharashtra Government to set up a mega project for manufacturing of paints and intermediates at Kesurdi MIDC area, in Satara district, Maharashtra. STRATEGIC DECISION

Reliance revives plan to build chemical plant Reliance Industries (RIL) may soon start work on a multi-billion-dollar chemical plant this year, reviving a project to meet India’s surging demand for the raw materials for plastics, drugs and textiles. RIL is close to deciding the final configuration of the plant, which will

Pune at a ceremony attended by select dealers and the company’s sales teams from its various branches and zones. The participants were given an insight into the strong features of the new KSB MoviBoost. With the objective to make the product basket to address the building services market comprehensively, new products in the form of MoviBoost and the Cora 75

submersible pumps were also launched at the same time. KSB MoviBoost pressure systems include up to six multistage vertical pumps, with controller and variable speed drives, to deliver constant water pressure for many applications like hotels, industrial plants, food processing units, water supply & treatment, mining and minerals processing plants.

company are now running smoothly and are operating at full load, said a company press release. Further, pending replacement of WHB E-703 by new procurement, with necessary repairs of WHB E-703, all the plants have been recommisioned recently. Earlier a partial shutdown of ammonia was taken for repairs of WHB E-703 as there was an explosion followed by fire in waste heat boiler (WHB E-703) of ammonia synthesis unit in ammonia plant in February this

year resulting in disruption of ammonia production. Consequently, there was a complete production loss of ammonia, urea, ANP and partial production loss of its down-stream plants. Calcium ammonium nitrate (CAN) plant was operated at a lower load and production in other plants was at higher input consumption.

The project will use the latest concepts in process automation, packing, conveying and storage to produce paints & intermediates in an environment-friendly manner with zero discharge of effluents. An amount of Rs 735 crore will be spent on the project in five years. The ultimate capacity of the project would be 4 lakh tonne. The MoU was signed by Azeez Khan, Principal Secretary - Industries, Government of Maharashtra, and P M Murty, Managing Director & CEO, Asian Paints Ltd. Ashok Chavan, Chief Minister, Maharashtra, was also present on the occasion.

Khan highlighted the fact that the company is pursuing its unit in backward area of the state and thereby supporting the objective of the government of achieving balanced growth. “This project would be engaged in the manufacturing of high quality paints & intermediates and the new plant is expected to contribute significantly in servicing the growing market,” said Murty. On the occasion, Chavan, said, “Maharashtra has always been at the forefront of industrial development and has provided superior infrastructure to industries”.

be capable of producing 1.6 million metric tonne a year of chemicals such as ethylene and propylene. The plant will get its feedstock from gases and other byproducts produced at RIL’s Jamnagar facility, one of the world’s largest oilrefining complexes, and will take about four years to build. RIL is restoring a project originally slated to start in 2011 as refiners,

including ExxonMobil, Royal Dutch Shell and Saudi Basic Industries, add petrochemical capacity to meet demand from Asia’s fast-growing economies.

July 2010 | Chemical World

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NATIONAL NEWS Report

Atul Ltd acquires Polygrip

A step in the right direction The acquisition of Polygrip is all set to provide Atul Ltd a ready access to rubber and PU-based adhesives market in India.

A

tul Ltd, a Lalbhai Group company, adhesives are popularly known as contact has recently acquired Polygrip, one of adhesives. Currently, rubber and PU-based the leading rubber and polyurethane adhesive market in India is estimated to be (PU)-based adhesive brands, through around Rs 500 crore (for these applications). one of its divisions, Polymers. The acquisition And, Polygrip has a marketshare of 10 per will provide a fillip to Atul as it would have a cent in the market segments that it operates ready access to rubber and PU-based adhesives in. Hence, the acquisition provides a ready market in India. platform for Atul to expand its business further. About the acquisition, Rajesh Bhasin, President Moreover, its strong R&D and manufacturing - Polymers, Atul Ltd said, “Polygrip compliments capabilities of all major chemical processes will the current LAPOX range of adhesives and there facilitate the process faster. will be no cannibalisation of any of our existing According to Kirti Mehta, Founder, Polygrip, products. We will focus on strengthening the the company had been scouting for a strategic Polygrip brand in the industrial/institutional partner to grow in Indian and overseas markets. business by enhanced focus “Atul will utilise the LAPOX sales and marketing network in various market segments to promote Polygrip in the such as automobile, footwear, retail markets across India. furniture, upholstery, ducting, There are plans to bring in carpet, luggage, OEMs more eco-friendly products and others by upgrading such as water-based rubber the product portfolio and and PU adhesives, which introducing customised Kirti Mehta (L) & Rajesh Bhasin cater to the stringent products for various industries. norms,” he said. On the retail front, we plan Currently, Atul has 20 brands, 30 products to focus on the hardware/foam retail markets, which offer immense potential for the growth and 93 SKUs. “We have over 250 distributors strategically located across India. In the next of Polygrip.” Polygrip is one of the top brands in India in three years, brand business of polymers division terms of reputation, sales and acceptance by the of Atul alone will cross sales of Rs 100 crore. consumers. “We wanted to expand our product Our product portfolio will have more than 50 portfolio and product basket as it makes a brands,” revealed Bhasin. This is an indication logical sense for us to look at our base adhesives that it is going to be aggressive in the market since we are expanding. This is the reason why in the days to come. The distributor network will be more than 700, and the number of sales we acquired Polygrip brand,” explained Bhasin. Polygrip has more than 50 different staff would be above 200. “We are expanding industrial grades making it one of the most our business to international markets as well. versatile and complete range of rubber & By 2013-14, LAPOX will be a dominant brand PU adhesives. Polychloroprene-based rubber in India,” said a confident Bhasin.

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WORLD NEWS NEW DISTRIBUTOR

WACKER appoints new distributor in Chile

WACKER, the Munich-based chemical company, has reorganised its distribution network for silicone and polymer products in Chile to improve efficiency PARTNERSHIP

Dow and Mitsui & Co form chlor-alkali JV Dow Chemical and Mitsui & Co have formed a 50:50 joint venture (JV) to build a chlor-alkali facility at Freeport, Texas. The JV will produce about 8,80,000 Tonne Per Annum (TPA) of caustic soda and about 8,00,000 TPA of chlorine. Construction is expected to begin in the fourth quarter and expected to be online in mid 2013. The new JV takes the place of Dow’s Chlorine 7 GREEN TECHNOLOGY

Biorefineries set to infuse $ 230 billion into global economy by 2020

A recent World Economic Forum (WEF) report has identified that biorefineries RESEARCH PROJECT

Total confirms methanol-toolefins process Total Petrochemicals has started a methanol-to-olefins (MTO) demonstration plant at its research centre at Feluy, Belgium. “The company has been producing monomers at the facility for a few weeks and has already produced industrial quality polypropylene (PP) using

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and to create cross-regional synergies. As part of an ongoing optimisation of WACKER’S distribution sales channels, Quimica Anders is to be entrusted with the distribution of WACKER’s polymer and silicone products in Chile. Effective July 1, 2010, Quimica Anders, who is already a WACKER partner in Peru and Bolivia, replaces the previous distribution partner Ingenieria Y Comercial Inge-Wag Ltd. Quimica Anders, a distribution partner with 45 years of experience in the regional

market and an established presence in Peru, Bolivia, Ecuador, Uruguay and Guatemala, already distributes selected WACKER products from the Group’s silicones & polymers portfolio in Peru and Bolivia. In Chile, the focus will be on dispersible polymer powders and dispersions as well as on silicone emulsions, silicone resins & anti-foam agents, mainly aiming at applications in the construction, cosmetics, textiles and pulp & paper processing sectors and in the process industry.

project, which was announced in January 2008 as a Dow-only venture. The project included building a longterm, reliable supply of chlorine for derivative products at the site, as well as the replacement of several older units, which were to be shut down over the course of three years. However, the project was postponed in February 2009 due to the economic downturn. “This joint venture with Mitsui is another meaningful example of our

strategy in action - enabling us to continue to supply building blocks to our downstream performance businesses at lower cost and with less capital. This strategic JV will bolster our integration strength,” stated Andrew Liveris, Chairman and CEO, Dow.

could help mitigate against climate change and that they have the potential to infuse up to $ 230 billion into the global economy by 2020 - with the majority of the value going into the US economy. The report, titled ‘The future of industrial biorefineries’, was authored by David King of Oxford University (UK) and commissioned by the WEF, with participation from Braskem, DSM, DuPont and Novozymes. The report suggested that

the production of bio-based chemicals is expected to grow significantly, increasing to an estimated 9 per cent of all chemicals produced by 2020. According to the report, it is estimated that the biomass conversion and the respective sale of end products will yield potential sales by 2020 of $ 80 billion from biofuels, $ 10-15 billion for bio-based bulk chemicals & bioplastics, and $ 65 billion for power & heat.

propylene from the demonstration facility. The technology, co-developed with UOP and Hydro, opens the way to a very efficient production of polyolefins based on methanol from alternative feedstocks such as coal, natural gas or biomass,“ said Eric Duchesne, Head - MTO Project. The Euro 45 million MTO demonstration plant, which is currently the Total Group’s second largest research project

next to a carbon capture and storage project in France, combines an Olefins Cracking Process (OCP) that is integrated in the MTO technology.


WORLD NEWS EXPANSION PLAN

LANXESS hikes butyl rubber capacity in Belgium

LANXESS will invest Euro 20 million to expand the capacity of its Zwijndrecht, BUSINESS STRATEGY

AkzoNobel targets $ 3 billion sales in China by 2015 AkzoNobel is planning to double its revenue in China within the next five years, and is targetting $ 3 billion sales in the country by 2015. AkzoNobel, which had revenues of $ 1.5 billion in China in 2009, employs around 6,500 people in the country. “The importance of Asia, particularly China, has long been emphasised by our company and we are committed to expanding in the region, as recent investments have shown,” GREEN PROCESS

Elevance to produce bio-based C18 dicarboxylic acids and esters

Elevance Renewable Sciences (Bolingbrook, IL) is planning to NEW TECHNOLOGY

Huntsman and Genecor develop eco-friendly bleach Huntsman and Genencor have claimed that Gentle Power Bleach (GPB), an enzymatic pre-bleaching technology for textiles co-developed by the companies, uses significantly less water than conventional bleaching systems. If GPB was applied to the 26 million metric

Belgium, butyl rubber plant by 14,000 tonne per year from the current capacity of about 1,35,000 tonne per year. The expansion will take place during a scheduled turnaround in the third quarter of 2011 with completion expected in the second quarter of 2012. “Overall demand for butyl rubber has returned to pre-slowdown levels already this year,” said Axel C Heitmann, Chairman, LANXESS.

In May, LANXESS broke ground for a new butyl rubber facility at Jurong Island, Singapore, which will be designed to produce 1,00,000 tonne per year and come on stream in the first quarter of 2013. The total cost of the plant will be about Euro 400 million. The company operates another butyl rubber plant at Sarnia, Canada, with a capacity of 1,50,000 tonne per year.

stated Hans Wijers, CEO, AkzoNobel. He further added, “Not only is China an important growth engine, but it is also rapidly establishing itself as a great centre of innovation. It is moving from ‘made in China’, via ‘developed in China’ to ‘innovated in China’, and we believe it will become a global powerhouse for science, technology and invention. AkzoNobel wants to make its contribution to that journey.” The company’s Euro 275-million Ningbo (China) site and other recent investments in new laboratory facilities

reflects its ambitions in the country, Wijers said. The Ningbo site, which has already started production of chelates, will be officially opened in November. In April, AkzoNobel confirmed plans to build an organic peroxide plant at the Ningbo site. The company will spend Euro 17 million on the plant.

produce commercial-scale quantities of C18 dicarboxylic acids and esters at its recently announced Surabaya (Indonesia) biorefinery site. Previously only made in development quantities and at low-purity via petrochemical routes & fermentation, Elevance informed that its metathesis technology platform can produce the C18 diacids & esters economically and at purity levels sufficient for applications in specialty nylons, powder coatings & polymers.

“The long-chain dicarboxylic acids and dibasic esters are produced by coupling 9-decenoic acid and esters, which will also be produced at the Surabaya site,” said Andy Shafer, Executive VP - Sales and Market Development, Elevance. The product also exhibits high linearity, with options for saturated or unsaturated monomer backbone. The high monomer purity lends the product to highly efficient use as a monomer in polymerisation systems.

tonne of cotton produced annually its usage compared to standard bleaching systems would save 10 trillion ltr of freshwater, the companies said. The findings were part of a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) GBP undertaken by the companies. “Other benefits of GBP include a ‘significant’ reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. The LCA is the first that relates to enzymatic bleaching

solutions for the textile processing industry. It is ISO 14044 compliant, as it has undergone an external expert peer review,” stated the companies in a press release.

July 2010 | Chemical World

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WORLD NEWS PROMOTION

The Reach Centre promotes Dr Matteo Dalla Valle

Officials of The Reach Centre

The Reach Centre, one of the leading global providers of chemicals regulatory management to industry, NOVEL REACTOR

PID ENG & Tech installs multipurpose automated catalysis lab at KAUST Process Integral Development Eng & Tech (PID ENG & Tech), a Spanish company specialising in the design and manufacture of reactors and plants on a pilot or laboratory scale, has claimed to have installed the first multi-catalysis and automated laboratory available in the world. The installation was at the King Abdullah University of Science and

NEW TECHNOLOGY

Zetasizer Nano supports charge optimisation in water treatment plants

TECHNOLOGICAL ADVANCEMENT

DSM introduces novel biofuels technology DSM has introduced a technology for generating biofuels from cellulosic materials including wood chips and agricultural residues. The technology features a pre-treatment phase, an enzymatic step to convert woody material to C5 and C6 sugars, and a 18

Chemical World | July 2010

has promoted Dr Matteo Dalla Valle to the position of Business Development Manager - Asia. The appointment comes shortly after Dr Valle was shortlisted for Chemical Northwest’s Young Achiever of the year award. Jonathan Lutwyche, CEO, The Reach Centre, said, “ I am delighted Dr Valle has taken up this important role at The Reach Centre. We have an enviable management team made up of internationally renowned scientific and regulatory experts and I look

forward to Dr Valle developing our Asian business activities.” In his previous role at The Reach Centre, Dr Valle provided technical and regulatory advice on REACH (Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of chemicals services) to businesses in the UK. He was instrumental in building a leading market position in Japan. REACH is the largest piece of legislation ever implemented in the EU and affects companies in all aspects of the chemical supply chain.

Technology (KAUST) and consists of 24 independent catalytic MicroactivityReference reactors for the KAUST Catalysis Center. The Microactivity-reference reactor supplied to KAUST includes the number of patented products, which make it unique in the world of catalysis, said PID ENG & Tech. The particular configuration of the Microactivity-Reference reactor allows it to be used for very different types of chemical reactions of any nature. Because of its universal design, it will

allow the KAUST Catalysis Center to quickly deal with the development needs prevailing in a country like Saudi Arabia, where the chemical industry increasingly demands an effort to develop catalysts with maximum energy savings.

An advanced particle characterisation system from Malvern Instruments is being used to support water treatment plant operators in their optimisation of treatment processes, and is removing the need to wait for external laboratory results. Saving valuable resources, the Zetasizer Nano enables operators to easily measure and track the zeta potential (charge) of inflowing waters on site - hourly, daily, or across cycles, according to seasonal needs.

These parameters are critical to final water quality and treatment plant efficiency. Gregory Dehmlow, Water Treatment Consultant, Dehmlow Optimisation, said, “The Malvern Zetasizer Nano allows operators to perform essential analyses in house, rather than having to rely on external laboratories. It is user-friendly, and treatment operators are comfortable with the functionality and reliability of the unit.”

yeast fermentation step for converting C5 and C6 sugars into bioethanol. The first process step features a hightemperature pre-treatment of biomass. This immediately liberates C5 sugars and the remaining cellulose - the source of C6 sugars - is made available for enzymatic hydrolysis. At this phase, the heated biomass is left to cool, causing a bottleneck in the

process. However, DSM claimed that it was able to use the hot biomass as it has developed a fungus which generates a ‘wealth’ of cellulose enzymes that are able to break down C6 sugars at temperatures of up to 65°C.


LEADERS SPEAK

“Global competitiveness is essential for any international business to flourish” …opines Dr Stan Higgins, CEO, North East Process Industry Cluster (NEPIC), which represents over 500 companies across North East England. With over 40 years of experience in the process industry, he helped establish the NEPIC in 2005. In conversation with Rakesh Rao, Dr Higgins highlights the advantages offered by North East England for the process industry, and some of the interesting projects coming up in the region.

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Chemical World | July 2010


LEADERS SPEAK

About NEPIC… NEPIC is a stand-alone company, limited by guarantee, created and owned by its member entities to represent the companies and supply chain of the process industry in the North East of England. Through a high level of engagement with its member companies and the credibility & support NEPIC receives from both public & private sector stakeholders, it has become a unified voice for the process industry in North East England, where a substantial part of the UK’s chemical, petrochemical, specialty chemical, pharmaceutical, polymer and biotechnology industries are based.

Advantages offered by North East England… It is home to over 500 companies, catering to the process industry, and has a long tradition of chemical & pharmaceutical manufacturing. An extensive and skilled supply chain has grown alongside the manufacturing sector, and the local & national governments also recognise the importance of the sector. These factors provide a unique offering to a potential investor: available green and brownfield land on which to develop; potential to link to the existing infrastructure; supportive regulatory regime, potential grant support; presence of local suppliers & consumers; extensive supply chain, and presence of several support organisations such as NEPIC.

Segments witnessing high investments… North East England has seen more than £ 2 billion investment in the process industry in the last five years. Examples include building of the largest bioethanol facility in Europe by Ensus, a new LDPE plant built by SABIC, a biomass power station by Sembcorp, building of the national centre for printable electronics, and numerous investments in fine & specialty chemical production units.

The most recent activity is in the area of high-technology waste recycling processes (for example, pyrolysis units to convert used rubber tyres back to their component parts of carbon black, oil, gas and steel) as well as waste to energy or fuel plants (for example, conversion of household waste to bioethanol via gassification and bacterial treatment of the gas). These investments are reaching North East England due to the availability of skills & resources needed to develop and operate these plants as well as the supportive environment from both local government & people.

Parameters to consider while investing in North East England… NEPIC can assist any process company looking for investment. Key parameters that NEPIC can help with include: identifying the best location for investment; helping a company complete the planning & regulatory approval processes; assisting in grant applications; introduction across the whole supply chain; advice on recruitment; training of personnel; and general business support. NEPIC is managed by a staff, which is experienced in operating in North East England. This assistance has proved invaluable to many companies set up in the region.

Challenges from emerging economies like India and China… Global competitiveness is essential for any international business to flourish. The region has a global reputation of productivity and efficiency. Part of this efficiency focusses on high valueadded, technology-based processes and products. However, some products do not fit in with the model. To be globally competitive, these need to be manufactured in countries like India, because of the low cost of production or better access to rapidly growing

markets. This trend has been witnessed in the industry for over 30 years creating challenges and opportunities to focus on our strengths, viz, R&D, new technologies, bio-based science, renewables, etc. The shift in focus creates even more opportunities for inward investment in the region from countries like India.

Indian companies in North East England… NEPIC is working towards attracting investment to North East England. In the past decade, a significant number of companies from around the world has invested in our region, particularly in the chemicals, pharmaceutical and process sectors, which is a large and important part of the region’s economy. There have been notable investments from India; Piramal Healthcare and Shasun being examples of successful and thriving Indian investments here. We continue to attract investors from India, who are welcome to North East England, and NEPIC would help them in the process.

Key projects in the region… Ineos Bio is investing in a new £ 52 million facility that gassifies 100 ktes of biodegradable municipal & industrial waste, and uses bacteria to convert the resulting gases into bioethanol. PYReco will be investing £ 80 million in a new continuous pyrolysis facility to pyrolise 60 ktes of used tyre shred to produce carbon black, oil, gas and steel. They have further plans to expand the operation in the North East, and expand across Europe & into other markets. In addition to advanced recovery and recycling processes, North East England has several biomass-to-power projects. At the other end of the scale, Centre for Process Innovation (CPI) is building the National Industrial Biotechnical facility to provide scaleup and offer facilities for a myriad of biotechnology companies being attracted to the region.

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LEADERS SPEAK

The NEPIC cluster and its thrust teams offer the companies an opportunity to have a voice within the industry. It also provides a unique network where smaller companies can meet and connect with larger entities, particularly through the numerous networking events that NEPIC hosts & participates in nationally and internationally. Significance of the MoU between NEPIC and Gujarat Chemical Association (GCA)… NEPIC has been a regular visitor to India, and our staff members have over 20 years of experience in working with Indian companies. We are encouraging our companies in the region to increase trade with India, and also with Indian companies to look at North East England as a place to do business. Our MoU with GCA is the third in a series with Indian organisations; Indian Chemical Council (ICC) and Vapi Centre of Excellence (VCE) being the others. We find GCA well-connected in a rapidly growing/dynamic region and also enthusiastic to co-operate to increase trade and investment. Last year, ICC and VCE visited our region to meet over 30 business leaders & support organisations to build relationships, leading to business opportunities. ICC and VCE reciprocated in April this year when NEPIC led a team of member companies to visits in Mumbai and Gujarat where a significant number of important business projects emerged. With GCA, we expect to plan similar exchanges, which will lead to mutual benefits to the organisations involved.

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Steps taken by NEPIC to promote eco-friendly projects… The process industry, due to its nature of business, is energy-intensive, and the production of chemicals results in the co-production of CO2. The industry in North East England is looking into viable solutions that address environmental issues. There is a greater use of bio-based renewable raw materials in the region’s chemical processes, though there is a need for suitable infrastructure to deliver huge quantities of feedstock needed for large-scale production of chemicals. Carbon Capture & Storage (CCS) has the potential to reduce CO2 emitted by an industrial plant by up to 90 per cent. Power station developers on Teesside’s North Sea coast are teaming up with neighbouring energyintensive industries to take forward a ‘CCS cluster’ project. Meanwhile, Teesside now boasts of Europe’s largest cereal grain biorefinery, Ensus. Annual production from the £ 300 million plant in Teesside is expected to meet about a third of the UK’s bioethanol demand under the government’s ‘Renewable Transport Fuels Obligation’ - equivalent to taking 3,00,000 cars off the road. The North East England’s Integrated Biomass to Syngas (IBS) project is merging its activity with a Thermochemical Working Group national initiative. The group’s longterm goal is to build significant synthetic fuels & chemicals business in the North East, together with a demonstrator programme to upscale implementation of the technology and develop a local biomass supply chain. NEPIC’s Productivity and Efficiency Team, comprising member companies, has helped identify efficiency improvements totalling £ 60 million over the last three years. This improvement comes from a group of about twenty companies that have fully engaged with this cluster’s activities.

Opportunities offered to SMEs… NEPIC has built its business model around developing and integrating the supply chain into a cluster. This cluster aims to represent the whole supply chain including its many SMEs ranging from niche specialty chemical companies through to instrumentation, software and business support companies. The NEPIC cluster and its thrust teams offer the companies an opportunity to have a voice within the industry. It also provides a unique network where smaller companies can meet and connect with larger entities, particularly through the numerous networking events that NEPIC hosts & participates in nationally and internationally. The SMEs not only have access to all services of major member companies, but have been further supported by additional European funded programmes specifically designed to assist the SMEs. These programmes offer one-to-one support to individual SMEs and can include bespoke assistance in logistics, technology transfer, developing business plans, etc.

Plans to grow investments in the region… The move to the low-carbon economy, the need for the UK to improve its industrial base, and a need to increase its knowledge-based operations, provide huge opportunities for NEPIC and its members. NEPIC will continue to assist both existing members, help SMEs become established & grow their business, and attract new companies to the region. NEPIC will target those companies involved in the key growth areas, as well as working with other regions through associations such as the GCA and VCE to identify opportunities for investment and co-operation.


IN FOCUS

Zydex Industries

Ushering in a green wave Zydex Industries, with its eye on the future and foot grounded in technological innovations, is fast becoming a trendsetter in the eco-friendly specialty chemicals segment. Also, with its futuristic approach, the company strives to lead the industry by introducing several ‘green’ products that are high on performance and light on the environment. Rachita Jha profiles its green crusade…

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n the new millennium, Zydex Industries embodies the spirit of working on the anticipated needs of tomorrow. It has a diverse product range that includes textile chemicals, construction chemicals, paints, waterproofing nanotechnology of roads & soil and industrial products. The company is a pioneer in advanced polymer chemistry, and has grown popular globally with its launch of nanotechnology-based waterproofing products. As market demand for novel, high-performance and green products rise, the company aims to position itself among the top ten specialty chemical manufacturers in the area of surface coating, adhesives, waterproofing and textile chemicals.

Journey so far Zydex Industries was incorporated in 1999 with the principle of man-machine symphony as the trade secret for high productivity and success. “Zydex has a unique distinction that its products were marketed in the US, Europe, etc against stiff competition from leading multinationals, within a year of its operation. We established our credentials as a globally competitive player in the domain of textile polymers,” says Ajay Ranka, CEO, Zydex Industries.

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Elaborating on the journey of the company, he adds, “Today, we manufacture and market water-based polymers (replacing solvents for pigment printing), water-based high-solid pigmented inks (in place of harmful PVC inks), and polyester polymers (substituting PVA), which are faster in biodegradability. Our products are free from Alkylphenol Ethoxylates (APEO), and hence eco-friendly. Focus has always been on sustainability, durability and long life.” The other important factor for the rapid growth of Zydex is its emphasis on a specific solution to meet individual customer needs. The basic philosophy of the company is to offer worldclass technology & quality at competitive prices and good after-sales service. This established it as a niche manufacturer in the global textile polymer space, moving away from being a commodity textile chemical manufacturing company.

Global marketshare The philosophy behind the development of all Zydex products is eco-friendliness. With the successful establishment of textile polymers, as a part of diversification strategy, the company has launched the world’s first nanotechnology water-based waterproofing product for


IN FOCUS

buildings and roads. The product is being patented worldwide and wellreceived in the US, Canada, Nigeria, Mexico, Russia, Korea and India. Reflecting on the marketshare of the products, Ranka says, “Our products are being exported to more than 20 countries in the European & ASEAN countries and the US. This is significant, as more than 25 per cent of our turnover comes from exports.”

Green facility The manufacturing facility of the company is located on the outskirts of Vadodara, Gujarat, with the manufacturing area spread over 30,000 sq m, with a built-up area of 10,000 sq m. The facility is equipped with the latest utilities like steam boilers, thermic fluid boilers, chilling plant, compressed air system, cooling tower system, etc. “Our state-of-the-art fully computerised manufacturing plant has a production capacity in the order of 25,000 metric tonne. The facility is fully equipped with advanced PLC instrument control system to guarantee consistent quality. The plant is comparable to any multinational polymer manufacturing facility around the world,” avers Ranka. The plant is also equipped with the latest effluent treatment technology and has been designed to be a zeroeffluent discharge facility, making it a responsible corporate entity.

Emphasis on quality Zydex has a declared objective of making the world a safer and sustainable place for the future generation. The company accords the highest priority to both raw material and finished product quality checks.

“Our company is in the business of specialty performance polymers, and the products are expected to give the declared attributes. Hence, quality has been given paramount importance not only in the procurement of raw materials and machinery but also in finished products. This aspect has never been ignored, and the company would rather forsake business than damaging reputation,” says Ranka. Zydex is committed to high safety standards, with excellent house keeping.

Eye for innovation Zydex has fast caught up with the growing demand for quality eco-friendly products through its innovative approach

Ajay Ranka CEO

We have come a long way in the first decade of our existence from where we have emerged strong in manufacturing and R&D. We will strive to change the world by providing the latest technologies to extend resources, increase food production and reduce our carbon footprints while achieving our goals.

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Nanotechnology-waterproofing of soil and asphalt for roads

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Print pigment like reactives

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PVC-free water based inks

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High-mesh printing background

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PVA-free sizing

The company continues to set benchmark novel applications in the specialty chemicals segment along with several breakthrough products for the textile processors and other industrial applications globally. “We have come a long way in the first decade of our existence from where we have emerged strong in manufacturing and R&D. We will strive to change the world by providing the latest technologies to extend resources, increase food production and reduce our carbon footprints while achieving these goals,” envisions Ranka.

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Concentrated methanol-free anti microbial silane

Future focus

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Water emulsion for fuel (FO) efficiency improvement (8-10 per cent)

Innovations R Nanotechnology-waterproofing

of concrete

on

dark

and commitment towards research and new product development. It is a global pioneer in advanced polymer chemistry for PVC-free printing inks for automatic machines, fuel efficiency enhancer that reduce black smoke combustion, and nanotechnology for waterproofing.

Figure 1: Production of textile chemicals in progress

Making the R&D segment the epicentre for all its activities, Zydex has equipped itself with all modern equipment and technological solutions to tackle issues of any complexity and magnitude. Elaborating on the expansion plans, Ranka says, “A 25-acre greenfield plant is being set up at Gavasad, 25 km away from the Vadodara city, exclusively to manufacture nanotechnology products, and to meet the increasing demand for our products in India as well as abroad. Also, a trading company has been established recently in Guangzhou, China. Further, we will be outsourcing raw materials as well as marketing our products there.” With environment-friendly products catching up in the chemicals industry, the future is encouraging for Zydex to realise its vision of being ranked among the top10 chemical companies in the world.

July 2010 | Chemical World

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Business Insights Technologies Opportunities

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BUSINESS & MARKETS

INDUSTRY UPDATE Asset optimisation: Unlocking the true potential .......................................... 30 INDUSTRY INSIGHT Remote plant asset monitoring: An apt strategy for today’s economy ......... 34 MARKET SCOPE Asset performance management: Addressing the root cause........................ 37 MARKET TRENDS Asset information management: Ensuring regulatory compliance ................. 40

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INDUSTRY UPDATE

Asset optimisation

Unlocking the true potential An organisation’s hidden assets present in each of its physical equipment has the potential to increase the plant’s profitability. In order to achieve this, optimised utilisation of equipment assets is essential. By adopting appropriate asset management strategy, companies can reduce the cost of operations and maintenance, while increasing quality, throughput and availability. Rakesh Rao highlights the benefits of asset optimisation and ways to achieve it. Courtesy: Emerson Process Management

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raditionally, the focus of a manufacturing plant is on the cost-quality-schedule triad, with manufacturing assets (plant equipment) being considered as supportive infrastructure. However, with parameters already being pushed to their limits, manufacturing companies are beginning to focus on deriving value from their plant assets and improving their performance. “The very definition of plant assets needs to be extended beyond the plant equipment to incorporate entire manufacturing processes, people and supporting business processes. A holistic asset optimisation strategy will maximise its utilisation, uptime and effectiveness of all plant assets to maximise business performance,” opines Shripad Lale, Vice President - Product Portfolio (Asia Pacific), Invensys India Pvt Ltd. Identifying & defining what constitute an ‘asset’ is imperative for a successful asset optimisation strategy. Ravi Kumar, Operation Manager - Customer Support & Maintenance, Rockwell Automation India Pvt Ltd, elaborates, “When one refers to asset optimisation, he must first define ‘asset’. In our programmes,

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we focus on Maintenance, Repair & Operations (MRO) assets that support equipment in production. These assets reside in a storeroom or maintenance crib. Asset optimisation, as defined in this context, is the right sizing of inventory to meet maintenance needs. Possessing the right assets in hand is critical. Having the wrong assets is costly.”

Importance of optimising The process industry is a high-capital cost industry, and the asset performance has a direct impact on the bottom line of this industry. “Having an asset performance management strategy that is integrated with the overall production process ensures that the production process can be optimised with a full view of asset availability and performance. In its absence, the production process makes assumptions about asset availability and performance, which may not be true, leading to sub-optimal production performance,” informs Lale. Kumar adds, “Excess spares, unmanaged storerooms, and inefficient MRO processes make it a challenge to establish a stable production


INDUSTRY UPDATE

environment and maintenance budget. Intelligent field instruments have been individually configured through applications specific to the device. This becomes complex, especially in large facilities, and increases the Mean Time To Repair (MTTR), not to mention the added installation costs.” Individual protocol disturbances and separate integration & configuration methods also create a high-learning curve for operations and maintenance staff. “As a result, many facilities have designated personnel responsible for specific instruments. This creates the need for separate laptops, login credentials and applications that have to be managed & tracked, making it difficult to determine the configuration of all plant assets at any given time,” opines Naveen Kumar Vashist, Business Development Manager - Process Solutions, Rockwell Automation India Pvt Ltd.

Benefits of asset optimisation R Real-time

monitoring and alarming of Key Performance Indicators (KPIs), facilitating fast and reliable implementation of corrective actions

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Aggregation and analysis of real-time information to provide advanced warning of degrading asset performance and impending failure, enabling costeffective predictive maintenance

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Root cause analysis of failures and condition changes

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Reduction in downtime and increase in Mean Time Between Failures (MTBF) through integration of Computerised Maintenance Management Systems (CMMS), Document Management System (DMS) and control system

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A single interface for operations, maintenance, engineering and management to monitor the condition of all assets, enabling optimisation Source: ABB

Many times there is only one person in a facility who has to troubleshoot or provide corrective action within a particular process area or specific control loop. It is important to standardise the communication interface between field devices and systems because manufacturing facilities rely on a wide variety of devices. “One of the key ways for manufacturers to monitor production conditions is through asset management software, which gives manufacturers the tools to record and document the configuration of each instrument, as well as track & report on any device changes. Providing this information helps endusers and OEMs increase the reliability of their instrumentation and validate their processes,” informs Vashist. G N V Subba Rao, President & Head - Process Automation Division, ABB India, says, “Asset optimisation combines control system with advanced information technologies, including integrated fieldbus solutions to monitor and optimise all plant assets in real time. It significantly reduces costly production interruptions by enabling proactive maintenance.” However, adopting asset optimisation strategy is not always easy. Kumar explains, “The first challenge is acknowledging that an issue exists. Stock-outs, part deficiencies, asset reliability and high carrying costs are all indicators that a problem may exist. Upon finding and implementing a solution brings us to the next major challenge of sustainability. Process changes within an organisation are difficult and require commitment from many levels. Once the commitment is clear, a sustainable process can be implemented.”

Tools in hand Asset performance is now considered an integral part of ‘cost of production’, and hence efficient management of these assets is inevitable. Lale says, “Optimisation of assets, ensure that the right asset is employed for the

Shripad Lale Vice President - Product Portfolio (Asia Pacific), Invensys India Pvt Ltd

The very definition of plant assets needs to be extended beyond the plant equipment to incorporate entire manufacturing processes, people and supporting business processes. A holistic asset optimisation strategy will maximise the utilisation, uptime and effectiveness of all plant assets to maximise business performance. right job, and is always in the right condition (from the point of view of availability and maintenance). A common tenet of any process is ‘You cannot control what you cannot measure and you cannot optimise what you cannot control’. Thus, to optimise the performance of an asset, one needs to first measure its performance, and take timely action to control its availability & usage.” There are several asset optimisation used philosophies to achieve this, and several tools to enable these philosophies. According to Lale, some of the commonly used asset management philosophies are: R Scheduled maintenance: This ensures that an asset is maintained regularly whether or not it needs maintenance. This is done when the cost of maintenance is not high R Breakdown maintenance: The asset is maintained only when it is broken. This philosophy is used when the impact of taking an asset down is minimal and an inherent asset redundancy built into system by design R Predictive maintenance: The potential breakdown of an asset is predicted, based on its operating parameters (like run hours), and

July 2010 | Chemical World

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INDUSTRY UPDATE

Ravi Kumar Operation Manager - Customer Support & Maintenance, Rockwell Automation India Pvt Ltd

The first challenge is acknowledging that an issue exists. Stock-outs, part deficiencies, asset reliability and high carrying costs are all indicators that a problem may exist. Upon finding and implementing a solution brings us to the next major challenge of sustainability. maintenance is carried out before it is likely to break down R Condition-based maintenance: The condition of an asset is continuously monitored for indications of a problem, and a judgment call is made on when the equipment should be maintained R Economics-based maintenance: Maintenance is done not on a schedule or condition but rather on the business improvement potential as a result of the maintenance action There are several tools available to enable the above philosophies. According to Lale, most of them fall under one or more of the following categories: R Recording & tracking asset usage and utilisation R Planning, scheduling, execution and tracking maintenance activities R Recording equipment condition, and triggering maintenance activity R Analytics dashboard, which gives an overview of asset performance (with metrics like Overall Equipment Effectiveness or OEE), and acts as a decision support system for improving asset performance

Need to avoid plant failures Experts believe that asset optimisation is key to improved profitability as

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it recognises that assets – from mechanical, electrical and process equipment, to instruments, valves and process automation systems – have a huge impact on uptime, throughput, product quality and production costs. When the assets perform well, the return goes up. “A well-executed asset optimisation strategy can reduce unnecessary maintenance and process downtime, track causes of failures, identify ‘repeat’ offenders, provide root cause analysis & fault diagnosis, and recommend corrective actions. It also detects failure conditions in advance, eliminates manual actions, handoffs & paperwork and reduces latent time between problem identification and resolution,” avers Rao.

Asset optimisation programme helps plant maintenance strategy by: R Keeping a close track on failure

incident tracking R

Having warranty tracking

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Tracking expenses made on reactive services like repair and exchange

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Failure analysis as preventive action Source: Rockwell Automation

Kumar opines, “Today, asset management solution is more focussed on predicting the equipment and machine failures for proactive actions, which can maximise the return on automation assets. With MRO process & spare parts management, asset management solution provides a proven methodology, and a designated asset management professional can optimise the inventory, simplify repair transactions and drive cost savings.”

Preventive vs proactive maintenance Today, the process industry is forced to continuously re-evaluate business models and implement continuous

improvement initiatives, which include cost optimisation by consolidating, restructuring and downsizing. Rao says, “Maintenance activities are considered as one of the prime targets of management’s cost-control strategies. However, cutting maintenance budgets helps achieve short-term cost objectives but may negatively impact longterm revenue through unexpected equipment failures.” Traditionally, the process industry followed preventive maintenance schedule to keep plant health in good condition. However, he says, as per studies by a leading oil, gas & petrochemical company, 63 per cent of preventive maintenance efforts do not yield in any improvement. “Asset optimisation offers proactive & predictive approach for plant maintenance, which concentrates on elimination of the root cause of asset failure to fundamentally raise its reliability or to extend its life. This approach also eliminates the need for uncalled preventive maintenance. The wealth of information already available in smart field devices can be communicated to the control system to enable predictive maintenance programmes, thereby minimising process losses, maximising plant availability and improving overall plant efficiency,” opines Rao.

G N V Subba Rao President & Head Process Automation Division, ABB India

Asset optimisation combines control system with advanced information technologies, including integrated fieldbus solutions to monitor and optimise all plant assets in real time. It significantly reduces costly production interruptions by enabling proactive maintenance.


INDUSTRY UPDATE

Vashist says that asset optimisation is a step forward from plant maintenance where it is about plantwide adoption of predictive and proactive maintenance strategies to minimise unscheduled downtimes and optimise product quality. “This also means that by proactively managing the MRO process, spare parts inventory can reduce unplanned downtime, extend equipment life, and minimise repair & carrying costs - increasing the Return On Net Assets (RONA) and OEE or operational excellence,” he adds.

On an integrated growth path Today, manufacturers are increasingly looking at combining multiple asset optimisation solutions on a single platform to provide customers the flexibility to meet all asset management related requirements. “This is based on real-time asset monitoring, reporting and availability status of assets. The merging technologies include – asset condition monitoring, Computerised Maintenance Management System (CMMS) and instrument asset management system, which consist of device diagnostic information, device calibration, disaster recovery solutions for control systems, change management, etc,” avers Kumar. According to Lale, some of the latest asset optimisation systems take

Courtesy: Emerson Process Management

a holistic view of maintenance, and integrate all functions (such as data acquisition, planning, scheduling, execution, workflow, analytics and decision support) into a single system, which is responsible for ensuring maximised overall asset performance. Aiding this integration is the development in the area of field devices. Kumar informs, “Most of the instrumentation and control vendors are now adopting the Foundation Fieldbus, Hart or Profibus-based device integration so that the operators in the control room can collect any devicerelated problems and inform the maintenance person with a pin-point information, so that he can attend the problem at the earliest with minimum shutdown of plant operations.”

Asset optimisation recognises that assets – from mechanical, electrical and process equipment, to instruments, valves and process automation systems – have a huge impact on uptime, throughput, product quality and production costs. By applying technologies and working methodologies, asset optimisation can harness the power of field intelligence to improve reliability and efficiency of plant assets. “Fieldbus technologies have provided necessary thrust and boosted customer confidence to adopt these new technologies, which provide advance diagnostics from intelligent field instruments without additional wiring, thereby bringing benefits in terms of plant efficiencies, reliability, safe operation, cost savings, etc,” opines Rao. He further adds, “We expect that the upcoming common standard for

Sunil Khanna Managing Director, Emerson Process Management India Pvt Ltd

Every data from the field is important, but the criticality and severity of the information is different at different levels in the enterprise. It is all about using this data effectively to have greater confidence to operate the plant or start-up the plant after a turnaround. device integration and management by including strong features (and eliminating weakness) of both Electronic Device Description Language (EDDL) & Field Device Tool/Device Type Manager (FDT/DTM) technologies will simplify implementation, and further bring more benefits to the end-user.” Wireless technology is also aiding the developments in asset optimisation. Rao informs, “Wireless technology is fast gaining acceptability, which eases wiring and reduces project implementation time. WirelessHART technology will gain ground, as it is backwardly compatible with currently installed Hart devices, and provides additional capabilities to access asset management information in both existing and new monitoring & control applications.”

Way to enhanced efficiency A variety of asset optimisation technologies and supporting services have evolved in the last few years to help companies manage their plant’s assets in a way that will pay off in the long run and provide a substantial return on investment. As manufacturers face immense pressure to achieve maximum efficiency, the winners will be those who will utilise their people and equipment assets most effectively.

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INDUSTRY INSIGHT

Remote plant asset monitoring

An apt strategy for today’s economy Remote Plant Asset Management (RPAM), a third-party service provided by Plant Asset Management (PAM) system suppliers, will be extensively adopted during an economic slowdown. Since doing nothing is not an option, RPAM provides a practical solution. With RPAM, end-users can outsource the predictive assessment of plant equipment health and receive specific recommendations for corrective actions that enable the remaining workforce to do more with little upfront cost. Courtesy: Proteus Advisors

Wil Chin

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PAM, a third-party service provided by a number of different PAM system suppliers, has been around for many years. It has gained some success as wireless, IT, and Internet technologies reduced application costs and provided a means to securely transfer equipment health information. Despite huge, double-digit growth of PAM systems during the expansion stage of the past few years, adoption will slow down to less than half of that figure, going forward. The value that PAM systems can provide has not changed; only the funding needed to implement them. The need for PAM systems is even greater during an economic slowdown: plant equipment must still run efficiently, and unexpected failures must be avoided to be profitable, but there are only a few people

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around to perform the needed tasks. PAM systems are deployed in a variety of automation and production assets (Table 1),particularly expensive complex assets where protection systems are required to prevent consequential equipment damage. Managing plant assets essential in production is important too, and because these assets are diverse with complex components, PAM systems are deployed to help workers cope with the rapid changes in technology. The economic downturn and the resulting massive workforce reductions to date (and the expectation of more to come) are driving endusers to go beyond their organisations for help with their maintenance initiatives.

The heavy lift End-users who no longer have the available staff should look to RPAM service-based business solutions during the recession. Outsourcing


INDUSTRY INSIGHT

maintenance intelligence activities to third parties enables companies to focus their limited resources on core manufacturing activities. This makes it a practical survival strategy for today. RPAM helps end-users to quickly develop and deploy a PAM system across all project phases: assessment, deployment, operation and maintenance. Faced by other critical needs, small- to medium-sized organisations with limited internal resources need to carefully consider taking on programmes such as PAM systems where expertise is limited. RPAM removes these issues, and if desired, can provide a complete turnkey solution. End-users facing declining demand for their products and other pressures will find the initial & ongoing subscription costs of RPAM to be attractive. Advances in wireless and Internet technologies are making RPAM solutions an economical way to collect data and communicate predictive asset health information to the appropriate people. Deploying a remote solution can often provide end-users a lowcost but effective PAM solution with a small upfront investment and minimal disruption to plant operations. Although RPAM can be appropriate for any plant automation or production asset, the major growth to date has been for monitoring rotating and reciprocating equipment in the oil & gas and power industries. Accurately evaluating the health of, and early prediction of problems

Table 2: Sample of RPAM solutions Supplier RPAM service Key asset category Remote Diagnostic Services (RDS) Production and automation ABB Azima DLI Watchman reliability services Production Emerson Process Diagnostic and support services Production and automation Management asset reliability services GE Bently Nevada Asset condition monitoring service Production Honeywell QCS remote monitoring service Production and automation Rockwell Automation In-site services Production Integrated Maintenance Solutions (IMS) Production SKF Source: ARC Advisory Group

in complex turbo machinery, can be a daunting task; one that should be performed by an expert. The best RPAM suppliers for these applications should employ vibration experts certified to category IV. RPAM is also available

The flexibility of RPAM solutions allows RPAM suppliers to configure an appropriate programme that can support a mix of different automation and/or information requirements in a manufacturing plant. for many other applications, such as field devices, control valves, analysers, DCS, machinery, pumps, electrical equipment and complete production units. End-users should look for specific expertise in these areas as well from potential RPAM suppliers.

Table 1: RPAM asset categories Electrical Mechanical Pressure, temperature, flow, level, Control valves, positioners and Automation assets miscellaneous sensors, analytical, associated equipment switches and networks Turbines, compressors, fans, gear boxes, conveyors, grinding Motors, switchgear, transformers, mills, extruders, dryers, pumps, Production assets drives, wiring and miscellaneous pipes, heat exchangers, electrical equipment tanks, boilers, furnaces and production units Asset class

Source: ARC Advisory Group

An array of solutions A wide variety of RPAM solutions are available and end-users can choose specific offerings depending on their needs, budget and plant resources. An RPAM solution can start as small as outsourcing the analysis of enduser collected data, or providing personnel to manually collect and then remotely analyse the asset data (Table 2). On the other end of the scale, a comprehensive RPAM solution can include installation of the sensors and networking infrastructure to allow automated data collection and uploading to a central facility for analysis by either end-user specialists or RPAM supplier experts. Problem alerts and suggested remedial actions can be sent to appropriate plant personnel via phone, SMS, portal or e-mail. This provides the benefits of PAM systems without the concerns and frees up the workforce to concentrate on core objectives. Compared to a conventional PAM implementation, RPAM reduces end-user training requirements and application support requirements. Unlike end-user-owned PAM systems that may be dedicated to a specific category of assets, the flexibility of RPAM solutions allows RPAM suppliers to configure an appropriate programme that can support a mix of different automation and/or information requirements in a manufacturing plant.

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Future of RPAM ARC expects adoption of RPAM solutions to accelerate during an economic slowdown. There is a strong value proposition associated with turning over the function of identifying equipment issues to a third party. However, in many organisations, cultural issues must first be overcome. Web, wireless, VPN and other well-accepted technologies eliminate many, if not all, of the speed, bandwidth and security issues previously associated with remote access. RPAM systems can peer into connected equipment, capture data, and remotely analyse information in near real-time, and alert the customer so that they can take appropriate action before a failure occurs. RPAM suppliers maintain the system 24x7 and allow the resource-constrained organisation to focus on more value-added activities. By deploying

Dear Reader, ‘Chemical World’ solicits original, well-written, application-oriented, unpublished articles that reflect your valuable experience and expertise in the chemical process industry. You can send us Technical Articles, Case Studies and Product Write-ups. The length of the article should not exceed 3000 words, while that of a product write-up should not exceed 200 words. The articles should preferably reach us in soft copy (either E-mail or a CD). The text should be in MS Word format and images in 300 DPI resolution & JPG format. The final decision regarding the selection and publication of the articles shall rest solely with ‘Chemical World’. Authors whose articles are published will receive a

technology to remotely connect assets of a large number of customers all over the world, RPAM suppliers can keep their monthly subscription costs attractive compared to the total user cost of purchasing, operating and supporting a PAM system. This can be very compelling in today’s landscape.

Suppliers should complement their PAM systems by offering RPAM service solutions that offer a robust architecture, incorporate processes that can reduce costs while increasing productivity for their client, and provide domain expertise that might no longer be resident at the end-user level.

Conclusion

Wil Chin is Research Director - Automation at ARC Advisory Group. He has nearly 30 years of experience in the areas of sales management, product marketing, and engineering experience in industrial field instruments that utilise a vast array of technologies including magnetic, coriolis, radar, capacitance, vortex, vibration, DP and ultrasonic. Chin holds an AS in Mechanical Power Engineering from Wentworth Institute, a BS in Mechanical Engineering from Northeastern University, and an MBA from Bryant College. Email: wchin@arcweb.com

Manufacturers with limited resources to manage a user-owned PAM solution should consider a RPAM solution. As concerns regarding loss of competence, risk of losing data, and denial of service attacks subside, acceptance is growing for outsourced solutions in the automation area. Initially, manufacturers should deploy RPAM solutions for their most critical assets and/or where they have lost expertise due to retirements or recessionrelated workforce reductions.

A n i nv

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MARKET SCOPE

Asset performance management

Addressing the root cause A properly and adequately designed asset performance management framework can bring a cohesive approach to manage assets, monitor equipment health, and ensure the compliance of critical operational & business processes. Such a framework has to leverage the established asset management capabilities provided by the best-in-class systems. Courtesy: PCM Ltd

Ravi Ramarao

I

n the 1980s, the world was awakened by two major disasters that signified the vitality of engineering assets and the importance to manage their performance. The first event was a lethal methyl isocyanate (MIC) leak in Bhopal on December 2, 1984, and the second the catastrophic Chernobyl nuclear disaster on April 26, 1986. Over 20,000 were killed, and half a million victims maimed, disabled or otherwise affected in the Bhopal gas tragedy. Criminal cases were filed against the then corporate Chairman. In the Chernobyl reactor, the accident happened because of a combination of basic engineering deficiencies in the reactor and faulty actions of the operators (as per UN Chernobyl Forum report, the safety systems had been switched off, and the reactor was being operated under improper, unstable conditions, a situation which allowed an uncontrollable power surge to occur). More than 20 years have passed since the tragedy occurred, and it is difficult to tell precisely the number of deaths – past and future – attributable to the Chernobyl accident. Since the accident happened, surface contamination has decreased; however, now and for decades to come, contamination with longer-lived

radioactive caesium is the main concern, as its impact on environment is irrecoverable. If Bhopal gas leak highlighted the lack of safety, the Chernobyl incident reflects on choosing risky procedures in operations as the major cause that has resulted in tragic consequences. These incidents have a direct correlation towards assets and managing their performance.

Challenges & current trends Organisations in the process industry are by and large managing enterprises that are global, asset-intensive and face both low margins & high variability. It is a challenge for the process industry to maximise the asset effectiveness, availability, reliability and decommission an asset, mostly a high-valued critical one, besides the ageing workforce. Today, the industry is increasingly focussing on maximising the Return on Assets (RoA) and achieving operational excellence. Besides, regulatory compliance, furthering Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE), delay in Capex expenditure and reduction in unscheduled asset downtime, Y-O-Y maintenance costs and maintenance budgets are other current market trends. Institutionalisation of acquired knowledge in the area of maintenance and repairs that

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MARKET SCOPE

ensures business continuity with less dependency on resources is another key area of focus.

in streamlining the procurement functions across the enterprise.

Plant maintenance Asset performance & utilisation Research data indicates that several huge offshore drilling rigs employed to extract natural gas or the massive plants built to generate electricity often takes $ 2-3 of assets to produce $ 1 of annual revenue. Why is there such a skewed and disproportionate relationship observed between the spending on the assets and the annual revenues? A closer look at the operation and maintenance practices in the process industries is necessary to understand this. Several modern day process plants have the suitable level of automation to monitor the health of critical equipment. Almost all follow basic maintenance activities such as preventive, predictive and breakdown maintenance. Asset management is not only maintenance management, but in its true sense, it is also a culmination of several subjects such as maintenance, inventory, technology, IT, etc. It is this amalgamation that offers benefits and challenges to the process industry. One of the main reasons for a wasteful expenditure could be due to the lack of a comprehensive collaborative outlook - a common view of assets shared across the vital internal functions within the organisation viz, maintenance, operations, delivery and planning (it may be due to the fact that multiple systems at the back-end functioning in silo without integration). At an operational level, this translates into inability to realise key assets in a holistic manner, improper tracking of maintenance costs, work order history, inventory management, work flow management, shutdown plan, to mention a few. At a strategic level, it is also difficult to introduce standardisation, benchmarking Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) or

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A properly and adequately designed asset performance management framework would address the management of assets from a lifecycle perspective and across the supply chain partners, offering significant scope to improve operational efficiencies and minimising risks. The framework should offer the capability to drill-down and monitor the overall health of operations such as production/manufacturing, equipment performance and support collaboration across owner operators, asset owners, service providers, suppliers and regulators.

Benefits for the process industry A well-designed asset performance management system should address the routine operational aspects facilitating business, as usual with minimal disturbance. When disturbances do get registered, the system would offer a proper methodology to tackle the primary cause of the problem. Identification of the correct cause would drive the organisation to devise the right set of processes in place and help towards contriving adequate maintenance policies to implement. The said event may further trigger a series of measures including re-run of the risk models to arrive at the revised/updated risk status of the asset. The most updated risk matrix (perform detailed FMEA) shall facilitate prioritisation of the investment planning on assets resulting in optimisation of Capex/Opex spending yielding improved ROA.

At an operational level, this results in the following improvements: R Reduction in downtime, maintenance, asset lifecycle & MRO inventory carrying costs R Reliable visibility of critical information R Increased planned maintenance; shift to true preventive, condition based and predictive maintenance R Improved labour utilisation R Institutionalisation of acquired knowledge

Analysis procedure Asset management can be broadly classified into the following categories: Asset lifecycle investment planning: Assets can rapidly turn into white elephants if companies fail to strike the right balance between cost, risk and reliability. Hence, organisations must increasingly start focussing on this portfolio more closely and can be the key area that may begin to undergo significant transformation. Only lifecycle costing can identify the best trade-off between operational and capital investment options. The complexity of performing this analysis has driven companies to apply it only to large opportunities. However, mathematical modelling solutions will play a formidable role in devising a business strategy for capital planning expenditure areas, which is not necessarily restricted to only large opportunities.

Courtesy: Delaware Valley Engineers Week Council


MARKET SCOPE

Engineering design: Engineers are constantly reminded of the necessity & mandatory need to address the plant engineering design in a comprehensive manner and not exclusively looking at keeping the cost of design price competitive. With increasing pressure from the safety and regulatory bodies (Sarbanes Oxley & OSHA), the engineering design shall address several safety and regulatory compliance features as a built-in function as part of inherent plant design. Operation & maintenance: The process industry should converge towards standardisation, proactive/ preventive maintenance strategies and mathematical modelbased solutions.

Standardisation Currently, even in large corporations, non-standard maintenance policies and multiple legacy systems can be seen as a common issue. In the immediate future, corporate initiatives will be more towards a standardised operational & maintenance philosophies and mature CMMS across the enterprise.

Proactive/preventive maintenance strategies In the long run, organisations will vigorously implement proactive strategies aimed at increasing the preventive/ proactive maintenance compared to reactive maintenance. Solution concepts like Condition Based Monitoring (CBM) aimed at running equipment, Risk Based Inspection (RBI), Reliability Centred Maintenance (RCM) would begin to govern this area. Reliability as a concept shall also gain importance and wider acceptability.

Mathematical model-based solutions Model-based solutions combining mathematics with asset management concepts may become attractive to industries and more common. This could help in offering, performancebenchmarking solutions to determine the relative performance of different facilities. Intelligent management of spurious alarms using modelling techniques (in an effort to reduce wasteful expenditure) also would make significant inroads in shaping up this space. Overall, the process industry would have to face the challenge of performing the balancing act of meeting the shareholder expectations, contractual, environmental & regulatory compliances and the long-term sustainability. A well-devised strategic asset performance management portfolio should certainly help the cause to a larger extent. Ravi Ramarao is Global Head of Integrated Asset Management (Engineering and Industrial Services) at Tata Consultancy Services. For further details, contact Ashish Babu on email: ashish.babu@tcs.com

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MARKET TRENDS

Asset information management

Ensuring regulatory compliance While organisations look at ways for optimum utilisation of physical and human assets, they often do not give due importance to virtual assets (information data). However, this casual attitude towards information management can have a staggering impact on performance throughout the lifecycle and across every stakeholder in the asset management value chain. Rakesh Rao finds out how Asset Information Management (AIM) system can be of help in overcoming an issue. Courtesy: Emerson Process Management

T

he safe, reliable and productive use of physical assets is a paramount objective of asset-intensive industries like chemicals, power, etc. Operators use a variety of methods including wellestablished Enterprise Asset Management (EAM) systems for the management of data and maintenance scheduling. “Users of these systems rely on validated and auditable asset documentation to perform their tasks and ensure regulations are being met. Many companies rely on the storage of documentation in file systems and better still in a document management system. The drawback of these approaches is the need to rely on complex customisations to meet intricate business processes required to ensure as-built documentation that can be easily validated for planned & unplanned plant shutdowns and to satisfy regulators,” informs Tim Taylor, Chief Business Development Officer, McLaren Software Ltd. In many companies, the information surrounding their physical assets is stored in many different systems of record, which is the responsibility of different departments within the organisation. “For example, the Engineering

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Data Warehouse (EDW) is the system of record for engineering data and is the responsibility of the engineering organisation. The Reliability Centred Maintenance (RCM) data is in a separate system and is in the domain of reliability engineers. For maintenance data, the Computerised Maintenance Management System (CMMS) or Enterprise Asset Management (EAM) system is the system of record, which is managed within the maintenance organisation. Maintenance, Repair and Operations (MRO) are in the materials management system, and is the responsibility of the supply chain organisation. Manuals and other documents may be hardcopies or managed within a document management system. For data that does not fit anywhere else, spreadsheets are utilised,” opines Richard Neidert, Senior Vice President - Global Sales, Services & Marketing, NRX Global Inc. The challenge is to keep these different systems of record across different functional organisations synchronised, as changes occur to the equipment throughout its life. Hence, there is a need to have an overarching governance process to ensure that a physical change to equipment is


MARKET TRENDS

accurately reflected in each system of record. Neidert explains, “Without good governance of asset data, companies are exposing themselves to enormous operational risk. Anytime a company is operating and maintaining assets without being absolutely sure that the right data is being used, the risk of safety incidents, environmental disasters and large financial losses rises significantly.” Many organisations are now realising that their IT landscapes lack an overall information architecture that supports execution of their enterprise asset management strategies. That is where Asset Information Management (AIM) has a role to play.

business processes are important to the operators in chemical and similar asset-intensive industries. The challenge related to the documentation has a material effect on the efficiency of operations. It helps minimise planned and unplanned plant shutdowns by ensuring that the documentation has followed both consistent & auditable processes to provide engineers of all disciplines with the traceable evidence and confidence that the information they are using is current and validated for the purpose. Regulators are not only concerned whether asset documentation is correct and up to date, but also the processes used are compliant to help operators avoid fines, suspensions or enforced shutdowns.”

Managing asset data AIM is a management discipline that can be defined as a set of policies, procedures and tools for defining, collecting, transforming, deploying and sustaining accurate & complete information related to the design, build, operate & maintain, and decommissioning & disposal lifecycle stages of physical assets. Taylor says, “There are a number of definitions of AIM, most of which cover the management of asset, tag data and related processes. Control of documentation and related

Tim Taylor Chief Business Development Officer, McLaren Software Ltd

The ability to manage documentation between one or more active projects enables maintenance to be carried out parallelly. Also, validated and auditable documentation help ensure regulations are being adhered to consistently.

There is a need to have an overarching governance process to ensure that a physical change to equipment is accurately reflected in each system of record. For organisations with high demands on uptime for production assets, like 24x7 operations, an asset lifecycle perspective is crucial for profitability. Lifecycle management of physical assets provides continuous information on assets, from design or redesign through operations and maintenance to decommissioning. The key challenge in this case is to drive interoperability across all AIM silos and across all asset lifecycle stages. Neidert informs, “At NRX, we have moved from the use of AIM to Asset Lifecycle Information Management (ALIM) to highlight the need to consider the information associated with an asset over its entire life from design through to disposal. Information is defined as data & documents, and

Richard Neidert Senior Vice President - Global Sales, Services & Marketing, NRX Global Inc

Accurate information about the installed state of the equipment allows maintenance tasks to be planned and co-ordinated accurately and efficiently. Well-planned maintenance work results in more efficient execution of the task. includes everything from engineering design documents to bills of material & maintenance plans. A core component of ALIM is Asset Data Governance (ADG). This ensures all systems of record remain synchronised, and all changes are subject to the organisations’ approval processes. This auditable process provides the transparency to show why each piece of information is what it is (ie, who changed and/or approved it, when and why).”

Transformation phase The biggest challenge facing the companies that wish to get started with AIM is the poor quality of the legacy data. “The best solution is to avoid this by employing ADG during the capital project data collection phase. In a brownfield situation, this means a data remediation project. The issue is that several Lean organisations, which barely have the resources to keep the plant running never mind to staff a data remediation project. By installing a modern ALIM system with ADG, the data from the legacy system can be extracted as it is, and cleansed & enriched over time. EAM system upgrades or migrations are opportunities to introduce ALIM and ADG. These projects have service teams in place, and introducing ALIM at this time is only a minor increase in the overall scope,” avers Neidert.

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MARKET TRENDS

While many operators place emphasis on data and maintenance management system, control of documentation receives less attention. Taylor says, “Often they rely on general document management systems and basic file systems, some with extensive customisations. McLaren Enterprise Engineer is an example of specialist asset information suite of applications designed to meet documentation and business process requirements through an asset lifecycle built on industry-leading document management platforms.”

‘Aim’ for high efficiency If an engineer or maintenance team uses incorrect documentation, it can result in project overruns, engineering rework and increased waste; all contributing to plant downtime. “The ability to manage documentation between one or more active projects enables maintenance to be carried out parallelly. Also, validated and auditable documentation help ensure regulations are being adhered to consistently,” observes Taylor. ALIM is critical for plant maintenance, states Neidert. He further adds, “Accurate information about the installed state of the equipment allows maintenance tasks to be planned & co-ordinated accurately and efficiently. Well-planned maintenance work results in more efficient execution of the task. Having access to the history of the equipment allows analysis that feeds continuous improvement of the preventative maintenance processes.” By using AIM and ADG, one can ensure availability of accurate asset information to maintenance employees for ensuring that the work is being conducted in accordance with the latest safe-work processes. Since maintenance is often responsible for performing periodic inspections in accordance with regulatory requirements, AIM is essential in ensuring this. “The latest development in AIM is the recognition of the need for ADG. Solutions to ensure accountability for the accuracy of critical asset information will improve the environmental and safety compliance of asset-intensive industries,” points out Neidert. Long-term investment and long asset lifecycle can lead to considerable lifetime costs for maintenance, human resources & spare parts, not least for the continuous modifications that are required to optimise asset availability and operations. A comprehensive AIM strategy can help companies in asset-optimisation generating conditions for continuous enhancement of lifecycle profit, ie, lower costs, greater availability, and increased workforce efficiency.

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SECTOR WATCH

Decorative paints

Depicting ‘greener’ opportunities Decorative paints industry in India has undergone a metamorphosis in the recent years. Currently, the segment (which constitutes around 75 per cent of the total paint market) has been witnessing strong demand across categories and geographies. Increase in disposable income, growth of the construction industry, demand from rural India, etc have fuelled the growth of the segment. Also, the performance of SMEs in fulfilling the customers’ demand is laudable, finds Prasenjit Chakraborty. Courtesy: Boston Decorative Painting Service

P

aints and colours have remained an integral part throughout the human existence, and the domain has evolved rapidly over a period. The decorative paints industry, one of the main two categories (the other being industrial paints), constitutes a significant part of the total paint market in India, and been making rapid strides too. “There is a great silver lining for the industry. With the boom in the construction industry, the demand for decorative paint is growing approximately at 17-18 per cent per annum,” says Nirav Raveshia, President, Indian Small Scale Paint Association (ISSPA). He further adds that the figure sounds challenging, but this is the fact.

In tonne Y0Y percentage

Currently, two types of demand are witnessed in decorative paints sector - from new projects and recoating. With the revival of the economy in India, both segments are thriving, and hence the growth rate is high too. According to Raveshia, interior paint sector (in decorative segment) has been witnessing a significant change in the coating system. “Previously, interior paint constituted various paint processes like putty, primer coat, emulsion coat/enamels coat, etc. Today, the whole putty application is changing: on top coat, the enamel (coat) is no more popular with the customers, rather they prefer emulsion coat more,” he points out.

Table 1: Production of paints & varnishes February ‘09 February ‘10 April-February 2009-10 April-February 2010-11 (Estimated) 63,526 86,200 753,289 9,43,324 -4.7 35.7 -0.4 25.2 Source: Central Statistical Organisation

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SECTOR WATCH

Similarly, exterior paints segment has undergone several changes as well. Innovation, value addition, etc make the segment a vibrant one. Today, painting a house is no more considered a luxury, rather it has become a necessity. “There has been a significant growth in the exterior coatings segment, and paint manufacturers have introduced premium products having superior quality with increased durability,” says Tej Dialani, Head - Sales (Coating Business), India Sub Region, BU Pigments, Clariant Chemicals (India) Ltd. Echoing a similar sentiment, Raveshia says, “The exterior coatings market is also growing fast. There exists a high margin in this segment, and the customers’ perception about the quality of major companies helps them realise a higher margin.” Like many other segments, SMEs are also not far behind, as they have emerged competitive and offer good quality. “However, we are not visible in the media, hence our volume in this segment is not as high as major companies,” says Raveshia. The changes certainly augur well. However, the industry has to traverse a long distance. The per capita paint consumption in India is only around 1.5 ltr. The industry is less than half the size compared to the Chinese

Nirav Raveshia President, Indian Small Scale Paint Association

There is a great silver lining for the decorative paint industry. With the boom in the construction industry, the demand for decorative paint is growing approximately at 17-18 per cent per annum. The growth has just begun, and the demand will rise in 2015.

market, and about one fifth of the US market by volume. “Even Sri Lanka and Pakistan have higher per capita paint consumption. This is surely a strong reason to be optimistic about the continued growth potential of this sector,” says an optimistic Dr Mosongo Moukwa, Vice President - Technology, Asian Paints Ltd.

Recent trends Lately, the dynamics of many industries have changed due to the increase in disposable income of the people. It is because they seek innovative products. It has been reflected in the paint industry as well. For example, paint companies in the past were supplying only their products, whereas now they offer a complete solution (ie, material and labour) to paint a house. The new concept, ‘Home Solution’, is likened by the customers though they have to spend more. “Designer and textured finishes, coupled with washable & scratch resistance properties are in vogue. Besides, feature walls in deep shades are now preferred,” says Dialani. Points out Abhijit Roy, Senior Vice President, Berger Paints India Ltd, “Today, consumers are ready to experiment with choice of shades. One may select Mediterranean yellow on the outside of a building, accentuated by red on parapets. In the interiors, metallic shades are used and so are gold and copper.” Further, trends are shifting from conventional painting to aluminium/glass exteriors, especially in commercial complexes. “This could affect and impact exterior coatings market,” opines Dialani. Another important change is the growth of darker shades vis-à-vis white and pastels. This is a sign of changing decor styles and consumers’ willingness to experiment. “The increasing popularity of textures and fashion finishes further illustrates this point,” explains Dr Moukwa. It has been observed that painting of houses is generally done during the

Tej Dialani Head - Sales (Coating Business), India Sub Region, BU Pigments, Clariant Chemicals (India) Ltd

There is a need for increasing awareness of safe and ecofriendly paints. People do not have any knowledge of what paints they opt for, or whether it could become a potential hazard affecting their health. While spending on such products, customers tend to prefer low-quality paints. festive season, and mostly for an available budget. “Hence, a very small segment of customers use high and expensive paints (with high value addition). In smaller cities, products manufactured by SMEs are more popular,” claims Raveshia.

Environment-friendly option Of late, companies have taken several measures to promote environmentfriendly paints. For example, Clariant is offering solutions and products for lead-free and low-Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) coatings. “This in turn is helping our key customers to formulate and provide eco-friendly decorative paints in the market,” says Dialani. Value split by country 14 %

46 %

5% 9% 9%

China

Japan

Korea

17 %

India

Australia

Others *

* Others include Indonesia (3%), Taiwan (2%), Malaysia (2%), Thailand (2%), Singapore (1%), Hong Kong (1%), Phillipines (1%), New Zealand (1%) and Vietnam (1%) Source: Frost & Sullivan

Figure 1: Asia-Pacific paints & coatings market split country-wise

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SECTOR WATCH

He avers that there is a need for increasing awareness of safe and ecofriendly paints. “People do not have any knowledge of what paints they opt for, or whether it could become a potential hazard affecting their health. While spending on such products, customers tend to prefer low-quality paints. However, there are some who are prepared to pay a higher price for quality,” he adds. Taking due cognizance of the fact, all household or decorative products of Asian Paints no more contain any added lead, mercury, arsenic and chromium. This was done with effect from April 2008. “Our technologists are continually researching on ‘greener’ technologies, so that the products are safer for human beings and the environment at large,” says Dr Mosongo. SMEs are also leaving no stone unturned to play a significant role in making environment-friendly paints. According to Raveshia, the SME sector is the market leader in the water-based segment (environment-friendly paint). “Last year, growth of the SMEs in waterbased paints was above 20 per cent, and it was more than 5 per cent in the case of solvent-based paints. Growth in large companies comes mainly from the solvent-based sector,” he says. Like countries in the West, people in India are moving towards water-based paints

Dr Mosongo Moukwa Vice President Technology, Asian Paints

Before buying green products, consumers must know that there exist such products in the market, which live up to their expectations. A few consumers buy these only because they are green, which comes with many advantages.

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for both interiors and exteriors. Thus, in all probability, the demand for waterbased products should remain robust in the coming years.

Cost factor In a recent survey published by McKinsey, it summarised the consumer behaviour, with respect to green products. It identified five barriers preventing consumers from purchasing green products - lack of awareness, negative perceptions, distrust, high prices and low availability. Says Dr Moukwa, “Before buying green products, consumers must know that there exist such products in the market, which live up to their expectations. A few consumers buy these only because they are green, which comes with many advantages.” The survey also states that price is one of the largest obstacles in purchasing green products. These are not necessarily more expensive than the so-called standard products. Cost is commensurate to the value provided. “Perhaps, the paint industry has not been successful in convincing the consumers that these are good products worth the expense. We have to work towards this,” he exhorts.

Outlook for the industry Companies are unanimous in saying that the future of the industry is bright. “The Indian paint industry has grown by 1.5-2 times of India’s GDP growth on a year-on-year basis. With the revival and upswing of economic activities in the country, the paint industry is expected to witness double digit growth in the current fiscal,” predicts Dr Moukwa. According to Raveshia, the growth has just begun, and the demand will rise in 2015. He further adds, “The per capita consumption of paint in India is estimated to be more than 800 gm compared to 10 kg in other Asian countries, and above 20 kg in the developed countries. Against the backdrop of a rapidly changing scenario, even if the per capita consumption is 2 kg, which in all probability is likely to

Abhijit Roy Senior Vice President, Berger Paints India Ltd

Today, consumers are ready to experiment with choice of shades. One may select Mediterranean yellow on the outside of a building accentuated by red on parapets. In the interiors, metallic shades are used and so are gold and copper. happen in the coming five years, the industry should witness 100 per cent growth from approximately Rs 25,000 crore to Rs 50,000 crore by 2015. Further, the marketshare of SMEs will remain approximately 50 per cent, as the customers are gradually recognising their quality.” The prospect of the industry further brightens with setting up of shops by prospective global paint manufacturers in India. “The outlook is promising, and the industry is estimated to grow by 15 per cent on an annual basis,” says Dialani. Prediction of normal monsoon has provided further momentum to the sector. “The industry should continue to grow handsomely, as the monsoon is projected to be normal, and GDP is being projected to grow in excess of 8 per cent in the coming months,” says Roy. However, there exists a risk factor due to sharp increase in raw material prices from the beginning of the current financial year. “This could affect the margins of paint companies substantially,” cautions Dr Moukwa. Going by the current trend and customers’ attitude, the future augurs well for the industry. What is positive for the industry is that today people in rural India also feels it a necessity rather than a luxury to paint their houses every year, which is indeed a significant change of thought.


MARKET ANALYSIS

Industrial paints

A windfall of possibilities Encouraging growth of automobile sector and renewed thrust on infrastructure in india are driving the demand for industrial paints in India. Of late, the segment has witnessed important developments in terms of new product launches, adoption of new technologies, more thrust on eco-friendly products, etc. Prasenjit Chakraborty discusses the factors that may help usher in a new era for industrial paints industry in the country. Courtesy: Transcontinental Media Inc

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he industrial paint segment is dominated by the organised sector due to its hightechnology orientation. Most of the organised players have nationwide presence with multi-location manufacturing facilities. The companies in the unorganised sector are mostly regional, spread in and around their manufacturing facilities only. The performance of Indian paint industry by and large seems to be satisfactory, and that too against the backdrop of economic slowdown. “The industry is growing steadily for the past five years at an average rate of 15 per cent per annum and is projected to grow at the same rate for the next five years,” says Harnish D Juthani, President, Indian Paint Association. However, the per capita consumption of paints in India is still low as compared to other countries. Hence, there is enough scope for the industry to grow. The industrial segment comprises mainly products customised for particular application, which are industry-specific, and the products are formulated on the basis of application requirement of the customer. “Indian climatic conditions are not conducive for foreign

formulations to be used, and modification & localisation needs to be done. This is sometimes time consuming and at times costly as well,” says Hardev Singh S B, President IU, Nippon Paint India Pvt Ltd. In the case of industrial paints, major players already have a tie-up with global players for the latest technology. Competition is also increasing as most of the global players are increasing their presence in India.

Significant changes A decade ago, paint consumers were not aware of the terms like lead-free paints, low VOCs, non-toxic products, etc. The focus was more on aesthetic values rather than on corrosion prevention. “Now, with multinationals, especially automobile manufacturers entering India, have brought in the latest technological advancements. So, the demand of highperformance paints, which meet the required environmental compliances are high,” says Juthani. In the case of industrial paints, the segments are different and so are the applications. For example, in the auto segment, besides aesthetic

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MARKET ANALYSIS

values, durability and economy are important. “High-solid and water-based paints are increasingly being sought by customers,” points out Singh. Similarly, in the coil coating segment, demand for premium-category paints like PVDF/SMP coatings will find increasing usage due to the rise in construction of commercial infrastructure.

Key segments for growth The auto segment is the key, which is the largest in industrial paints segment. Besides, industrial paints are used in various sectors like power, steel, petrochemicals, oil refineries and gas pipelines, to name a few. “The renewed thrust on infrastructure in the Budget for 2010-11 will create substantial investment opportunities in the coming months. For example, the coatings segment can expect a surge of new projects in the power, road & road transport, port & airport, and other projects,” points out Singh. The Society of Indian Automobile Manufacturers (SIAM) sees positive signs for the automobile industry to register a double-digit growth during the current financial year. According to SIAM, the automobile sector in India is showing positive signs of growth when compared to markets in other countries that are stagnating. The sector has witnessed 10-12 per cent growth during the

Harnish D Juthani President, Indian Paint Association

India is witnessing an unprecedented growth in the automotive sector for the past decade, which is instrumental in keeping the growth figures of the paint industry in high gear, which is projected to grow at the same rate for the next five years.

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current fiscal, which will certainly infuse growth for industrial paints in India. Says Juthani, “Any country’s economy is judged by the performance of its automotive sector. If the automotive sector is growing, the economy also follows suit. India is witnessing an unprecedented growth in the sector for the past decade, which is instrumental in keeping the growth figures of the paint industry in high gear.”

Market characteristics

Hardev Singh S B President IU, Nippon Paint India Pvt Ltd

Indian climatic conditions are not conducive for foreign formulations to be used, and modification & localisation needs to be done. This is sometimes time consuming and at times costly as well.

R The

demand for paints is relatively price-elastic and is linked to the industrial & economical growth

R

Demonstration of the price-value relationship is important

R

Global strategic tie-ups take place in technology and R&D

R

Cannot be treated as one market across the country

R

Healthy marketshare between local and MNC players

R

Industry majors have a vast dealership network, and are required to maintain highinventory levels

R

The industry has more than 2,500 paint manufacturers, with majority catering to the decorative paints segment

R

Industry presents a high-growth opportunity

R

Features of the Indian industry include raw material intensiveness, working capital intensiveness, seasonality of demand, price elasticity of demand and low entry barriers Source: AkzoNobel

This, coupled with the infrastructural projects undertaken by the government, and the new contracts envisaged for the next five years, would ensure not only the growth of the paint industry, but also provide a slew of demandgenerated innovations and diverse application potential.

Emerging trends There is no dearth of exhibiting new products by the paint manufacturers. As automobile and construction sectors are likley to drive the growth, manufacturers are either adding value to their existing products or introducing new products to live up to the expectations of their customers. Industry experts strongly believe that demand will continue to grow in the next few years. “Increasing focus of the government on infrastructure and automobile would continue to drive growth in the next few years. Consumers are looking forward to new products like waterborne applications in some areas,” says Singh. Looking at the prospects, companies are also increasing value-added services available to customers by offering a variety of finishes through specialised applicators, well-supported by back-end support of specialised service. Throwing light on one of the important future aspects, he says that supply chain management will be the key focus area, and deliveries at short notice will be an important parameter to measure. Technologically also paint manufacturers are gearing up to provide more value added products.

Eco-friendly paints Eco-friendly paint is the buzzword in the paint industry in India. The issue is


MARKET ANALYSIS

Novel coatings in India R

R R R R R R

3C1B waterborne coating technology from 3C 2B solvent borne technology for automotives 3C 1B solvent borne coating for auto segment High solid/ low temperature curing technology High mar resistance and self healing coatings Radiation (UV, NIR, IR, etc) curable coatings High solar reflective index coating Super durable product (PVDF) with warranty

relatively new in the country compared to that of the developed world. However, it is gaining momentum each day. In order to meet the demands, reputed companies are proactively

working towards the elimination of lead-based raw materials and have substituted non-toxic raw materials. “However, this has increased the cost of input raw materials,” points out Singh. Other significant advances are use of nanotechnology and biobased products. “In keeping with the environmental norms prescribed world over, several paint manufacturers have initiated/implemented measures to curtail the use of components of hazardous nature, notably heavy metal contents. The significant fallout of the environmental concern is the shift in demand from the conventional solvent based paints to water-based paints and powder coating,” says Juthani. Any market demands new products when competition increases. And the paint market is no exception. In the recent past the segment too has witnessed the launch of some new products.

Future outlook According to Singh, rising demand from the construction and automobile sectors, has made the paint companies hopeful of witnessing steady business during the current financial year. He further adds, “Early signs of economic revival and mounting demand from key user industries are tipping the scales in favour of the paint industry.” Buoyed by these developments, paint manufacturers are charting out expansion plans cautiously. Sources closely monitoring the industry say that the strategic tie-ups and alliances are also in the offing. And, new and innovative products will soon find their way into the market. “There are clear signs of the economy stabilising in India. Experts say that in a few years the ratio between decorative and industrial paint marketshare will narrow down considerably and will reflect broad global trends,” avers Singh.

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ENERGY MANAGEMENT

Thermocompressors

Boosting steam to further profits Steam is the common source of heat in many process industries. The generating cost of steam is also rapidly escalating in a scenario where fossil fuels are scarce. It is therefore imperative that process industries focus on steam utilisation and initiate action to minimise or optimise the use of steam. One of the direct ways of reducing steam consumption is to maximise the use of low-pressure flash steam. Thermocompressors offer an energy efficient solution to recover or reclaim low-grade or low-pressure steam. Courtesy: Scientific Design Pty Ltd

Sandip C Abhyankar

T

hermocompressor is a fluid jet device that enables low-pressure steam to be compressed to high pressure using the principle of energy conversion. High-pressure motive steam is sped to high velocity through a converging nozzle where it meets the slow-moving low-pressure steam resulting in entrainment and mixing. This mixed jet is then pushed through a diffuser where the kinetic energy is converted into potential energy. Thus, compression of steam is achieved through converting potential or pressure energy into kinetic energy and later back to pressure energy. The name thermocompressor is derived from the process of using thermal energy or enthalpy of steam to achieve compression. Several industries vent low-pressure steam to the atmosphere, as this steam is at low temperature and cannot be usefully redeployed in the process. However, with thermocompressor technology, one can easily increase the pressure and temperature of flash

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steam, and thereby reclaim all energy that was earlier being vented. A thermocompressor consists of three main parts viz, nozzle, suction chamber and diffuser. Thermocompressors have three connections (Figure 1). High-pressure steam that enters the nozzle is referred to as ‘motive steam’. Flash steam or LP steam that is recovered is known as ‘suction steam’ and the steam that exits the thermocompressor from the diffuser is called ‘discharge steam’.

Is motive steam ‘extra’ consumption? The most common misconception while understanding the economics of a thermocompressor is that the motive steam is an extra burden on the steam system and it does not make sense to recover suction steam using three to four times the quantity as motive steam. This can be best explained by an example. This is a case of a heat exchanger that uses 1,000 kg/h of steam at 3 bar to heat oil. The steam is condensed inside the heat exchanger. The


ENERGY MANAGEMENT

Nozzle Pressure energy of the motive steam is converted to high velocity energy

Motive steam

Discharge steam (Medium pressure)

(High pressure)

Suction chamber Suction steam is entrained by high velocity of motive steam in the suction chamber

Diffuser

Suction steam

Velocity energy of mixture (motive and suction steam) is converted to pressure energy

(Low pressure)

Figure 1: Operating principle of thermocompressors

condensate is routed to a flash vessel from where it is pumped back to the boiler house. The flash steam formed is vented to the atmosphere, and for the sake of simplifying calculations can be assumed to be approximately 100 kg/h. The steam is sourced from a 10 barg boiler and the load seen by the boiler is 1,000 kg/h. In another scenario, the flash steam is recovered and put back into the heat exchanger at 3 barg. The entrainment ratio being 3.97, the motive steam required by the thermocompressor at 9 barg would be 397 kg/h. The total output of the thermocompressor would be 497 kg/h. The process consumption has not changed inherently. Since the thermocompressor is supplying 497 kg/h, the balance steam of 503 kg/h would be made up through the pressure reducing station. If one looks at the load on the boiler, it would now be 900 kg/h. This would mean that the boiler needs to consume that much less fuel. Thus, the installation of the thermocompressor results in direct fuel savings. The motive steam used by the thermocompressor is not an extra flow but simply a diversion of steam from the already existing pressure reducing station.

Applications Thermocompressors can be used in various industries that use steam as their heating medium or as a power

generating utility. Industries that have used thermocompressors to successfully reduce their steam bills are paper, sugar, textiles, food processing, petrochemical complexes, refineries, iron & steel, edible oil, synthetic fibre, tobacco, rubber & tyre, distilleries, bottling, dairies, chemical producing organic and inorganic chemicals, etc. The most common application in these industries is to flash condensate to a low pressure & temperature, recover the flash, and compress it back to high pressure. The flash steam recovered will depend on the condensate pressure, temperature and quantity as well as the pressure to which it will be flashed. With an increasing trend towards Combined Heat and Power (CHP) systems also known as Cogeneration, or the use of steam turbines as prime movers, thermocompressors can be used to increase the pressure of turbine exhaust steam without needing to extract at high pressure. This would mean that the turbine can be exhausted to low pressure, and this low-pressure exhaust steam can then be recompressed to high pressure, which can be utilised by the process. The feasibility of such applications depends on factors such as boiler capacity, process steam requirements, economics of exhaust steam recovery against power generation, since motive steam at high pressure is required for compression.

The paper industry mainly uses thermocompressors. This has been largely due to the multiple benefits offered by thermocompressors when applied to paper machines. When installed on paper machine steam and condensate systems, thermocompressors not only recover the vent steam but also help condensate evacuation and improve machine productivity as a result of machine speedups. Thus, thermocompressors improve energy economics and also paper machine productivity & quality.

An estimated payback calculation R Flash steam venting has been

estimated to be around 300 kg/h at 1.0 barg. It is required to compress this steam to 3 barg using motive steam at 9 barg. R Cost

of steam Rs 1 per kg

R

per kg: ……….A

Annual savings from flash steam recovery: 300 x 8000 x 1.0 = Rs 24,00,000 ……….B (Assuming 8,000 hr of annual plant operation)

R

Estimated investment in thermocompressors: Rs 15,00,000 ……….C

R

Estimated payback period: (C/B) x 12 = 7.5 months The investment figures shown in box are estimates only and should be confirmed

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ENERGY MANAGEMENT

Requisite data to design

Figure 2: An example of how a control system can be designed to meet process needs

Payback calculations

Advantages

It is common for most thermocompressors to payback in less than one year. Thermocompressors have been applied from flows as low as 50 kg/h to large flows in the range of 20,000 kg/h. The payback period will depend on how much flash steam is being recovered and the cost of steam, which in turn depends on the type of fuel, being fired. Payback periods range from three months to two years.

Thermocompressors have been used in a large number of process industries as they have immense potential to save energy. Some of the advantages are listed below:

A recommended approach is to first study the complete steam and condensate system in the plant, plot all steam mass balance and identify areas where LP steam is being vented or being condensed.

Control system The control system (Figure 2) enables reliable, efficient and safe operation of the thermocompressor and also integrates with the rest of the process, which is a critical need for every plant. Providing the recovered steam at the right pressure and temperature is the final objective of any thermocompressor, and the control system enables the attainment of this prime objective. The need for every process that uses steam is to maintain the right pressure and temperature of steam (temperature becomes critical in case of superheat requirements). This therefore requires that the thermocompressor maintains the outlet discharge pressure as required by the process.

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R R R

R

R R

Have no moving parts, and hence no maintenance required Occupy less floor space, and can be installed in any orientation Do not tend to foul or clog, as fluid velocities are high, with a tendency to disgorge any contaminant Are cheaper compared to mechanical vapour pumps, and are easier to maintain Are also reliable if designed for the right set of parameters Need no extra energy to operate, and therefore incur no operational cost

The following data need to be furnished to enable a proposal to be made: R Motive steam pressure; temperature (at thermocompressor inlet) R Flash steam pressure, temperature and flowrate to be recovered R Discharge pressure (maximum and minimum), temperature R Process consumption that receives output from thermocompressor R Material of construction R Choice of end connections/flange standard A recommended approach to understanding the feasibility of thermocompressors in a plant is to first study the complete steam and condensate system in the plant, plot all steam mass balance and identify areas where LP steam is being vented or being condensed. This can be followed by identifying the processes where the thermocompressor steam can be utilised. A detailed analysis before freezing the thermocompressor design parameters can go a long way in a quick and successful installation.

Conclusion Thermocompressors provide direct means of saving steam, and have the potential to substantially boost the profits of the plant. The effort to trigger the feasibility of these in a plant can be started off by a quick study of the plant by experienced engineers who can guide one through feasibility, sizing, selection, and finally commissioning these systems quickly. Sandip C Abhyankar is Senior Engineer - Marketing at Thermocompressor Division, Forbes Marshall. For further details, contact Belinda Gaikwad on email: bgaikwad@forbesmarshall.com


CORROSION CONTROL

Corrosion education

The need of the hour Corrosion leads to the deterioration of materials, loss of its aesthetics, resulting in metal loss, and thereby decreasing the load bearing capability of the supporting structure. Corrosion cannot be avoided but can be minimised by a number of corrosion protection methods. In India, it is high time that a national funding be made available to carry out a systematic study on corrosion losses. Courtesy: Nord-West Oelleitung GmbH

Prof A S Khanna

T

oday, heated discussions happen in many national and international conferences/symposia and seminars in the country to ascertain the exact loss due to corrosion in India. Everyone has a different figure to offer. This is because there is hardly any study carried out in the country to estimate how much the industry loses due to corrosion. Approximate values, ranging from Rs 50,000-1,00,000 crore a year, are based on independent interpretation from the 3 per cent of GNP of any developed country - analysis by a study in the US in the year 2002. NACE India section directly calculates the annual losses in India by giving 3 per cent of Indian GNP, that is the figure quoted by them is relatively as high as Rs 1,00,000 crore. However, if one carefully studies the growth of Indian Gross National Product (GNP) in the last decade, it cannot be mainly due to strong industrial activity as is there in many developed countries or in China. Major contribution to India’s GNP is done by IT industry, which lends less towards corrosion losses. Hence, while calculating corrosion losses, it will be wrong to put 3 per cent

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of Indian GNP, but a more conservative figure may be half of this value. According to SSPC India, a value of Rs 50,000 crore is more reasonable for corrosion losses in India than Rs 1,00,000 crore. However, it is a necessity to verify this value by carrying out a systematic study on corrosion losses.

Advantages on the offer The industries in India should know what mistakes they make in not implementing the proper corrosion protection policies. It will intend to use the latest methods of corrosion protection, corrosion monitoring, etc, which will result in minimising corrosion losses and in turn accidents & plant shutdowns. Corrosion management scenario in India is not up to the mark. In the case of education, only IIT Bombay offers a Master’s Programme in Corrosion Science & Engineering. Though it has great demand, there are efforts to merge it with other programmes, which is unfortunate. In some universities and other IITs, corrosion is taught as an elective course in the fourth year. It is not surprising that we are lacking in propagating the knowledge of the subject due to which more than Rs 50,000 crore is lost every year.


CORROSION CONTROL

That is why the knowledge of corrosion is mostly imparted by professional bodies or by experts who organise courses for industries and other users. NACE India Section and SSPC are the main professional bodies who organise these courses. There are, however, several institutes where R&D in corrosion is pursued. The main ones being Atomic Energy, DRDO, and a few CSIR labs such as Karaikudi and NML Jamshedpur. Corrosion laboratories at Karaikudi are equipped with the latest technologies, but many companies are unable to utilise it because of its remote location. Out of various IITs, IIT Bombay has the best corrosion facility in all aspects. And, research on large areas such as coatings, aqueous corrosion, high-temperature corrosion and surface modification is carried out.

Main organs of corrosion The main components of corrosion are control, monitor and maintenance. Today, a better term called corrosion management is applied, which involves three stages: corrosion control by coatings, cathodic protection or use of inhibitors, and corrosion monitoring by various online methods & periodic maintenance. An additional component is failure analysis and understanding which input is utilised to improve the corrosion protection. Many oil & gas industries are spending millions of rupees to control the corrosion at offshores, refineries, and in transportation of crude/gas to respective sites. Millions of rupees are spent to protect underground pipelines from soil corrosion, monitoring of the pipes by intelligent pigs from inside, and by cathodic potential from outside. Many of the coatings used for these pipelines are imported. In the same way, the monitoring pigs are rented for supervising by spending a huge cost. This situation is similar in many refineries, offshore structures and petrochemical plants.

Hence, it is necessary to develop several institutions for corrosion education, supplemented by industrial courses and training programmes by professional bodies, in the development

Preventive strategies in non-technical areas R Increase

awareness of the significant corrosion costs and the potential savings

R

Change policies, regulations, standards and management practices to increase costsavings through sound corrosion management

R

Improve education and training of staff in the recognition and control of corrosion

Preventive strategies in technical areas R

Advance design practices for better corrosion management

R

Advance life prediction and performance assessment methods

R

Advance corrosion technology through research, development and implementation

and manufacturing of highly corrosion resistant materials such as special alloys, duplex stainless steels, hastelloys, special plastics, FRPs, new corrosion control coatings, cathodic protection monitoring systems, etc.

Scenario in India There are a number of refineries in various parts of the country, from Kashmir to Kanyakumari and Aasam to Mumbai, with the biggest refinery now in Jamnagar of Reliance Industries. Such refineries convert the crude oil extracted from offshore into petrol, diesel and many other important hydrocarbons & petroleum products. Petrochemical and chemical processing plants are another category of industries working successfully in the country. Fertiliser plants and a large number of power plants are the heartbeat of the country, which provide important ingredient (urea) to the farmers in the country. Other industries, which are corrosion-prone are steel, copper, zinc and aluminium. As per Chem-Pro-Tech India, the Indian chemical industry size’s is over Rs 1,750 billion, with a growth rate of 12.5 per cent. It is the twelfth largest in the world and third largest in Asia. Good corrosion protection technologies are not employed in the country. The concept of corrosion management in the chemical industry is still a far dream. Hence, it is accepted that the annual losses can be over Rs 50 billion (approximately 3 per cent of the total value). Another most corrosion-prone area is the oil & gas exploration and distribution, shipping, ports & coast surveillance and safety of ports. Today, India has more than 250 offshore platforms, 25,000 km underground

Courtesy: Bushman & Associates Inc

July 2010 | Chemical World

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CORROSION CONTROL

pipelines, more than a dozen ports, and hundreds of ships including luxury cruise ships, warships, barges, coast guard and cargo ships. In order to meet the demand of these industries, we have various companies like L&T, BHEL, etc who have gained expertise in machine building, design and execution. Knowledge of corrosionresistant materials, their evaluation and performance optimisation is of great concern. Many companies such as Wellspun, Jindal, PSL, Punj Llyods, etc manufacture pipes, applycoatings and lay down large lengths of pipelines. Infrastructure is another area that is growing at a strong pace. Constant development of roads, flyovers, bridges, dams, airports, multi-storied buildings, malls, multiplexes, housing complexes, railway stations has resulted in better corrosion resistant materials. Transportation is perhaps another area where India is growing at a fast pace. Metro railways are coming in all major cities, which require sophisticated vibration-free design with best concrete technology. Better materials for rails and racks are one of the requirements. Superfast trains, multipurpose railway stations, with marketing facilities are being planned. Usage of steel structure, well protected by a long-lasting coating and longlife claddings such as PVDF coated aluminium composites are being used. Airplanes with high speeds and long travelling time require a host of better corrosion-resistant materials. Metal and alloy manufacturing industries are also quite big and are corrosion prone. In India, there are several steel plants under the government and private sectors. Today, India is an industrial state in the true sense, and most of the industries mentioned are corrosion prone. Corrosion management has become a necessity to minimise corrosion losses, avoid accidents, plant shutdowns, death of workers, and finally to sustain growth.

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Corrosion protection in India The four important methods of corrosion protection are: better materials, protection by coatings, cathodic protection and protection by inhibitor chemicals. Protection by coatings is perhaps well represented in the country. According to Frost and Sullivon, the total coating market in India is about Rs 13,000 crore, out of which 50 per cent is decorative and the balance is industrial. The industrial coating is further subdivided into auto, protective and marine. The share in auto is again about Rs 2,500 crore, and the balance is in protective and marine sements. The sector that is still lacking in India is the high-performance coating market, especially for functional applications such as splash zone, underwater paints, insulation paints, paints for high-temperature applications, fluoride

The industry and academicians have to work together to create better awareness of basic corrosion and promote R&D, in the latest corrosion protection technology and corrosion modelling & management. based paint systems, etc. Powder coatings for underground cross country pipelines are completely imported. Many adhesives used in pipe coatings are also imported. There are more than 500 paint manufacturing companies in India. Further, there are several multinational companies which offer a lot of good protective coating systems in the Indian market. Cathodic protection is another area that is owned by a group of private sector companies. Expertise in developing basic equipment such as rectifiers, anodes and installing them at the site is also available.

Courtesy: Integrity Engineering

Protection by inhibitors is a quite discrete business. One set of business deals only by selling the inhibitor chemicals to the user industries and the other set takes turnkey order of supply and maintenance of the inhibitor systems for the plants. Manufacturing of corrosion-resistant materials, especially special metals and alloys are generally imported. Even a large quantity of stainless steel used in India is imported.

The basic awareness A survey of many engineering colleges and science colleges in India has revealed that corrosion engineering is not a prescribed course in the curriculum of most bachelor’s degree programmes. It is available only in those institutions where Metallurgy/Materials Science is available as core discipline and is not available in other institutes. Even in materials & metallurgy departments, corrosion is not a core subject but an elective, and mostly taught in the last semester. Thus, most under-graduates have an inadequate background in corrosion engineering principles and practices. Many industries such as chemical, petrochemical, oil & gas need employees with competence in corrosion engineering. Their principal concern is that those making design decisions do not know much about corrosion. This lack of knowledge and awareness ultimately jeopardises the health, wealth & security of a plant, and also the security of our country. Another matter of great concern is the availability of experts to teach the subject. This in


CORROSION CONTROL

turn depends on the quantum of the corrosion research community. If corrosion engineering education is to flourish, the number of materials science engineering faculty specialising in corrosion must be increased. The industry, therefore, will need to support university-based corrosion specialists. Today India is marching ahead in a big way in oil & gas exploration, distribution & refining, chemical & petrochemical, power plants and shipping. In this context, the industry and academicians have to work together to create better awareness of basic corrosion and promote R&D, in the latest corrosion protection technology and corrosion modelling & management. All materials degrade with time in their environments. A basic understanding of this process is crucial to the education of the nation’s scientists and engineers. Any industry requires the need of corrosion engineers right from the design stage – for the selection of materials, corrosion allowance and corrosion protection technique to be applied, proper strategy of corrosion monitoring and periodic maintenance. Along with this, there should be a planned R&D and failure-analysis approach to reduce future issues. Though late, the University of Akron has introduced Bachelors of Corrosion Engineering from July 2010. The country must follow this approach and start similar specialised programmes in corrosion science & engineering and/or surface engineering, which imparts the basic knowledge of engineering with a focus on material design, protection & failure, corrosion management, methodology for oil drilling, making corrosion-free components plants or structures. Along with post-graduate progarmmes on corrosion modelling, corrosion related issues in oil drilling, under-sea crude transportation, development of new materials for highly aggresive environments must be also included.

Pioneers of corrosion education in India Some of the leading institutes offering corrosion education in India include: R Central Electrochemical Research Institute (CECRI): It is perhaps the

pioneer in corrosion research, a systematic study of corrosion, leading to a degree in Corrosion Science started in 1982 at the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT), Bombay. CECRI is a CSIR laboratory working only on corrosion related issues, covering all facets of electrochemical science and technology: Corrosion Science and Engineering, Electrochemical Materials Science, Functional Materials and Nanoscale Electrochemistry, Electrochemical Power Sources, Electrochemical Pollution Control, Electrochemicals, Electrodics and Electrocatalysis, Electrometallurgy, Industrial Metal Finishing, and Computer Networking & Instrumentation. R Corrosion Science & Engineering, IIT Bombay: It is a unique academic

programme, specialising in corrosion and its control. It is a two-year programme, offering degree in Master of Technology (MTech) in Corrosion Science & Engineering and also a PhD programme. R

NACE India Section: Its India Section has made significant contributions through International and national conferences, conventions, technical programmes, training courses, workshops, etc.

R Society for Surface Protective Coatings India: Established in 2003,

it aims to create a common platform for paint manufacturers, suppliers, contractors, applicators, R&D personnels from the industry and educational institutions to discuss the latest in paint technology, new formulations, new applications, etc. It also discusses how to use International standards for various industrial paint applications. R National Corrosion Council of India (NCCI): It organises National

Congress on Corrosion Control every year at important venues, covering all aspects of Corrosion Science & Engineering, for enlightening and increasing the awareness about corrosion of metals and the appropriate remedial measures to control it. Corrosion education is perhaps the only way that can create a better awareness of corrosion protection, which in turn can help minimise the losses due to corrosion. It will also help in overcoming a common myth that nothing can be done about corrosion.

This is the time to not only strengthen the existing curriculum in certain institutes, but also create more avenues for the same. New approaches of corrosion management, repair & rehabilitation techniques, and life extension of existing structure is necessary in today’s scenario.

Summary

Prof A S Khanna is with the Corrosion Science & Engineering Dept of IIT-Bombay. In his 26 years of experience, he has published more than 150 papers and written a book on corrosion. Prof Khanna is a Fellow of Humbodt Foundation, Bonn and Royal Norwegian Society for Science & Technology. He has been the past Chairman of NACE - Asia Pacific Region, and at present is the Chairman of SSPC India Chapter. Email: khanna@met.iitb.ac.in

Knowledge of degradation due to corrosion and various methods of corrosion protection is a must not only for high-end industries like oil & gas, petrochemical, refineries, chemical processing, power plants, railway and infrastructure creation industries but also for protecting materials in day-today use. Annual losses are huge, and the only way to minimise these are by creating better awareness about corrosion and its protection methods.

July 2010 | Chemical World

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MANAGEMENT MANTRAS

SWOT analysis

Syncing corporate and market forces Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats (SWOT) analysis is a critical element of strategy development. Successful organisations develop their strengths, rectify their weaknesses, exploit available opportunities and shield against external threats. Failed businesses are often lacking in one or more of these areas and have been found to conduct only basic SWOT analysis. A detailed and effective SWOT analysis is the key differentiator that determines business success and failure.

Suresh Lulla

S

WOT analysis helps top managements of successful organisations to balance idealism and pragmatism, and to acquire a balanced perspective of the organisation’s internal strengths and weaknesses as well as external opportunities and threats. The conventional approach to SWOT analysis involves understanding the core aspects of each of the four elements by asking and answering the correct questions.

Getting started As every business graduate would point out, the purpose of using SWOT analysis is to create a plan or strategy by considering several internal and external factors, which maximises the potential of the organisation’s strengths & opportunities, and minimises the adversity of its weaknesses & threats. What is often not understood, and even less appreciated, is its importance to top management, and asking the right questions is half the battle won.

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Strengths The top managements of successful organisations focus on understanding their core competencies, capabilities & available resources for the purpose of leveraging and capitalising on them. Some questions that they ask themselves and try to answer are: R What are our strongest business assets? R What do we offer that clearly differentiates us from our competitors? R What unique resources are available with us? How much? R Do we have a strong team of professionals? R Do we have an innovative product or service? R Do we have specific expertise? R Is our customer base substantially broad?

Weaknesses The focus is on understanding the critical areas of the business where they are weak or their competitors are stronger. The aim is to rectify such areas or convert them into strengths or cover them sufficiently to neutralise the adverse effects. Some questions that need to be addressed are:


MANAGEMENT MANTRAS

R R

R R R

What are the critical aspects of the business that need improvement? What are the strengths of our competitors where they score over us? Is there any specific expertise or resource that we must acquire? Do we have any financial problems or cash flow issues? Are we focussing on few customers or narrow market segments?

Opportunities These refer to possibilities of what can be achieved and identifying areas of maximum effectiveness. Opportunities may be abundant in the external business environment. These may be in terms of a new product/service, target markets, expertise & resources, risks involved & returns expected, etc. Competitors’ weaknesses are also opportunities that can be exploited. Some critical issues are: R What are the current industry trends? R What are the likely future trends or possible changes? R How do trends impact the industry scenario? R What type of changes present new interesting opportunities? R Which industry news or event is likely to present a new opportunity? Several organisations may be able to spot opportunities in the external environment but successful organisations always map them to their strengths to assess the effectiveness before tapping those opportunities. The key is to define a formula with the above ingredients that enables the organisation to determine what constitutes an opportunity and whether it is worth pursuing, based on its possible effectiveness.

Threats These are deviations, variations, exceptions, dangers and pitfalls that could be caused by changes in the business environment. Such changes could transform the organisation’s strengths into weaknesses, adversely

impacting positive situations. Threats are considered external and may arise due to Political, Economic, Social or Technological (PEST) factors. The political scenario determines government regulations, policies and taxation issues. Market changes could be a consequence of changing customer preferences, competitors’ activities or demographic shifts. Rapid technology developments could result in product or service obsolescence. Some key questions to answer for countering threats are: R What are the obstacles in our path? How different is our competitors’ approach from ours? R What hurdles can be converted to opportunities? R Are external economic factors adversely impacting our revenues and profit margins?

The key is to define a formula that enables an organisation to determine what constitutes an opportunity and whether it is worth pursuing, based on its possible effectiveness. Beyond basic SWOT The above analysis is important but highly simplistic. Most successful organisations venture beyond basic SWOT to delve deeper into their business environment, aiming to gain a better understanding of their industry dynamics and competitive scenario. This involves conducting a detailed analysis of the competitors or Internetrelated initiatives such as search engine inclusion, external links to websites, trade organisation participation, etc. Such activities help organisations to identify potential opportunities and threats.

Opportunities are sometimes created as a consequence of changes in the business environment and impact SWOT analysis. A few examples are given below: R A new trend emerges, resulting in the demand for a specific product/ service, far outstripping supply. New car models with innovative features introduced in the market by a particular manufacturer gained instant popularity, resulting in the demand far outstripping their production capacity. R A particular customer segment gains in significance suddenly and the competitors are unable to meet their specific needs fully. For example, the rising incomes of working individuals in their 20s and 30s resulted in significant increase in demand for quality housing in mid-2000. However, there were few projects by leading builders, creating an opportunity for relatively lesser known builders to tap into. R A competitor, vendor or customer shuts shop or is acquired by another company. The meltdown of several ‘dotcoms’ in early 2000 created opportunities for their competitors to acquire their customers. Another successful way of extending the scope of SWOT analysis is ‘surveys’. Organisations can gain a deeper insight about themselves and their competitor’s business & activities. Well-conducted surveys focus on gauging: R Customer awareness levels, preferences, usage patterns, etc

Courtesy: KD Frost Llc

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MANAGEMENT MANTRAS

A SWOT analysis of the Indian pharmaceuticals industry Strengths R The Indian market with a population exceeding one billion is mostly untapped. The penetration of contemporary medicine is less than 30 per cent. The per capita healthcare expense in India is $ 93, as compared to Brazil at $ 453 and Malaysia at $ 189. R

The recent spurt in growth of the middle-class has induced rapid lifestyle changes in urban & semi-urban areas, and to a certain extent in rural areas. This has created a vast market for lifestyle drugs, which have a significantly smaller presence.

R

The cost of drug production in India is among the lowest in the world - almost 40 per cent to 50 per cent less - and in some cases is up to 90 per cent, providing a sharp competitive edge to Indian manufacturers.

R

The Indian pharma industry has an abundant workforce, highly skilled in chemistry & process reengineering, leading to cost-effective processes, and adding to its competitive edge.

Weaknesses R

R

Improper price regulation has hampered the pricing capability of Indian pharma companies. The National Pharma Pricing Authority (NPPA) sets the price for various drugs, often resulting in reduced profit margins for pharma companies. Lowest cost producers tend to gain but others get negligible margins or incur losses. Despite the Indian market having lowest penetration compared to world markets, growth is slow. Consequentially, Indian pharma companies focus on exports for rapid growth. India constitutes 16 per cent of the world population; however, the Indian pharma industry constitutes just 1 per cent of global industry size.

R

Brand image of the company, product/service/website, etc R Importance and relevance of product/service/website attributes to the targeted customers R Product/service/website performance Such in-depth information provides a new dimension to the SWOT analysis and improves its accuracy.

Industry perspective The Indian pharmaceuticals industry is considered free of any cyclical or seasonal factors since the demand for medicines and drugs is expected to grow steadily

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R

Low entry barriers have led to high fragmentation with approximately 300 large manufacturers and 18,000+ small ones located across India; hence, there is intense competition. Price wars are common, stunting industry growth in value terms.

Opportunities R

New product patents will encourage R&D and result in the discovery of innovative drugs. MNC pharma companies will reap more profits, and the industry will witness a consolidation, with smaller players being acquired by bigger ones.

R

Being the lowest cost producers globally, Indian manufacturers have the competitive edge, as generic drugs usually become commoditised.

R

Liberalisation of the health insurance sector in India and rise in per capita incomes will be the main growth drivers in the long term. Indian pharma, an integral part of India’s healthcare industry, is poised for rapid expansion.

R

Indian firms are expected to become the hub for global outsourcing of pharmaceuticals, owing to the lowest production costs combined with FDA approvals for their manufacturing facilities.

Threats R

The present structure of the patents regime is unstable, with certain unresolved issues. Changes in government could result in corresponding changes in the Patent Act.

R

Other low-cost producers like China and Israel pose a serious threat. But India has an edge in terms of better quality.

R

VAT implementation uncertainty could be a short-term threat. But in the long term, it will have a positive impact.

in the long term. Hence, ups and downs in the economy do not have any serious impact on this industry. A SWOT analysis of the industry is shown in box.

Conclusion SWOT analysis is an effective tool that must be wielded efficiently at the beginning of any business venture and periodically thereafter to keep in sync with the changing market conditions. It is the responsibility of the top management to ensure that SWOT analysis is conducted in the best manner for effective strategic planning. Organisational success depends on the organisational convoy moving

in the right direction, steadily and at times with varying speeds, towards organisational goals. Suresh Lulla is the Managing Director of Qimpro Consultants Pvt Ltd, Founder of the BestPrax Club, and Chairman of the IMC Quality Awards Committee. In 2005, he was awarded the distinguished Alumnus Award by the Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay, in recognition of his outstanding achievements in quality management consultancy. Email: consultancy@qimpro.com


EVENTS CALENDAR

National

Pune

Ahmedabad

Indore

Chennai

Maharashtra

Gujarat

Madhya Pradesh

Tamil Nadu

Nov 19-22, 2010

Dec 10-13, 2010

Jan 7-10, 2011

Mar 11-13, 2011

India’s premier industrial trade fair on products and technologies from machine tools, fluid power, instrumentation & control, electrical & electronics, material handling, plastics, rubber, packaging, chemical, CAD/CAM, auto components, and general engineering.

For details contact:

Engineering Expo Infomedia 18 Ltd, Ruby House, 1st Floor, J K Sawant Marg, Dadar (W), Mumbai 400 028. Tel: 022-3003 4649, Fax: 022-3003 4499, Email: shamal@infomedia18.in

Asia Coat+Ink Show The exhibition will showcase the latest innovations & products for coating industry, and will provide an international platform to all suppliers of pigments, resins, oils, chemicals, machinery & equipment and manufacturers of inks & coating to explore new business opportunity; September 30-October 03, 2010; at the Bombay Exhibition Centre, Mumbai For details contact: Koelnmesse YA Tradefair B-501/502 Kemp Plaza, Mind Space Chincholi Bunder Off Link Road, Malad (West) Mumbai 400064 Tel: 022-4210 7866 Fax: 022-4003 4433 Email: s.rajawat@koelnmesse-india.com Website: www.asiacoatandink.com

PROMACH 2010 An exclusive exhibition for the process plant & machinery industry; October 01-04, 2010; at Bangalore International Exhibition Centre, Bengaluru For details contact: Bangalore International Exhibition Service 10th Mile, Tumkur Road, Madavara Post Bengaluru 562 123 Tel: 080-6583 3234 Email: dayanand@bies.co.in

India Chem 2010 The 6th edition of this international exhibition will have on display a wide range of products, services & technologies concerning chemicals, petrochemicals, pharmaceuticals, process plant machinery and control & automation system; October 28-30,

2010; at Bombay Exhibition Centre, Mumbai For details contact: Manoj Mehta, Assistant Director Trade Fair Secretariat Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce and Industry (FICCI) Federation House, Tansen Marg New Delhi 110 001 Tel: 011-2373 8760 Fax: 011-2335 9734 Email: manojmehta@ficci.com Website: www.indiachem.in

Indian Petrochem Conference 2010

Everything About Water Expo 2010 An international exhibition and conference on water & wastewater management; January 06-08, 2011; at Bombay Exhibition Centre, Mumbai For details contact: Aarti Chopra EA Water Pvt Ltd A1/152, IGNOU Road, Neb Sarai New Delhi 110 030 Tel: 011-4310 0500, Fax: 011-4310 0599 Email: aarti@ewgroup.in

Chemtech World Expo 2011

Annual petrochemicals conference providing an exclusive forum for interaction between the global petrochemical fraternity; November 1819, 2010, Renaissance Hotel, Mumbai

International exhibition & conference on process plant, equipment & services for environment management, biotechnology, oil & gas and chemicals; February 23-26, 2011; at Bombay Exhibition Centre, Mumbai

For details contact: Elite Conferences Pvt Ltd 606, Bhagyalaxmi, Kennedy Bridge Mumbai 400 004 Tel: 022-2385 1430 Fax: 022-2385 1431 Email: info@eliteconferences.com

For details contact: Chemtech Foundation 26, Maker Chambers VI Nariman Point, Mumbai 400 021 Tel: 022-287 4758, Fax: 022-287 0525 Email: info@chemtechwe.com

IPVS 2010 Industrial trade fair for pumps, valves and systems; December 09 –11, 2010; at Chennai Trade & Convention Centre, Chennai For details contact: Orbit Tours & Trade Fairs 201, Navyug Industrial Estate T J Road, Sewri (W) Mumbai 400 015 Tel: 022-2410 2801 Fax: 022-2410 2805 Email: info@pumpsandsystemsindia.com

PVC - PUMPS VALVES & COMPRESSORS EXPO 2011 The event will display the latest innovations in PVC pumps, valves and compressors for various industries; May 06-08, 2011; at Bombay Exhibition Centre, Mumbai For details contact: Conventions & Fairs (India) Pvt Ltd E 519, Floral Deck Plaza Central MIDC Road, Opp SEEPZ Andheri (East), Mumbai 400 093 Tel: 022-2839 8000, Fax: 022-2839 0502 Email: conventions@mtnl.net.in

July 2010 | Chemical World

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EVENTS CALENDAR

International DYE+CHEM BANGLADESH 2010 An international exhibition devoted to all kinds of dyes and fine & specialty chemicals for the industry in Bangladesh; July 28-31, 2010, at Bangabandhu International Conference Centre, Dhaka For details contact: CEMS Bangladesh House 119, Unit A3 Road-1, Banani Block F Dhaka-1213 Bangladesh Tel: +880 2 8812713 Fax: +880 2 9894573 Email: cems@cemsonline.com

AGROCHEMEX 2010 An annual symposium and exhibition for the global agrochemical industry; September 20-22, 2010; at Shanghai Everbright Convention & Exhibition Center, Shanghai For details contact: China Crop Protection Industry Association Room 913, Building 16 Anhuili, 4th Area, Chaoyang District Beijing 100723, China Tel: +86 (10) 84885918 Fax: +86 (10) 84885255 Email: ccpia_lijuan@126.com

ICIF China 2010 An international chemical industry fair; September 21-23, 2010; at Shanghai New International Expo Centre, Shanghai, China For details contact: China National Chemical Information Center (CNCIC) No. 53, Xiaoguanjie Anwai, Beijing 100029, China Tel: +86 10 64444114 Fax: +86 10 64415052 Email: market@cncic.gov.cn

Chemical Industry 2010 An international exhibition of chemical industry; September 27 – October 02,

2010; at International Fair Plovdiv, Bulgaria For details contact: International Fair Plovdiv 37, Tzar Boris III - Obedinitel Blv 4003, Plovdiv, Bulgaria Tel: +359 (0) 32 903 600 Fax: +359 (0) 32 902 432 Email: fairinfo@fair.bg

APCCHE Congress & Exhibition 2010 The 13th Asia Pacific Confederation of Chemical Engineering (APCCHE) congress with a theme of ‘Innovation and sustainability in new chemical engineering era’; October 5-8, 2010; at Howard International House, Taipei, Taiwan For details contact: Asian-Pacific Confederation of Chemical Engineering Australia 11, National Circuit Barton ACT 2600, Australia Tel: +61 02 6270 6539 Fax: +61 02 6273 2358 Email: jarmstrong@engineersaustralia.org.au

Pumps & Valves 2010 An exhibition on pumps, control valves and seals in the process industry; October 13-15, 2010; at Antwerp, Belgium For details contact: Fairtec Autolei 337 2160 Wommelgem / Antwerp Belgium Tel: +32 (0)3 354 08 80 Fax: +32 (0) 354 08 10 Email: info@fairtec.com

DYE+CHEM Asia International Expo 2010 An exclusive international exhibition on all kinds of dyes and fine & specialty chemicals for the South & South-East Asian industry; November 10-13, 2010; at Singapore Expo, Singapore

For details contact: CEMS India Pvt Ltd 74, Satya Niketan, Ground Floor New Delhi 110 021 Tel: 011-2410 5201-4 Fax: 011-2410 5205 Email: cems@cemsindia.com

CIL Indonesia 2010 An exhibition showcasing new trends in chemical & process engineering, instrumentation and laboratory equipment; December 01-04, 2010; at Jakarta International Expo, Indonesia For details contact: Allworld Exhibitions 12th Floor, Westminster Tower 3 Albert Embankment, London, The UK Tel: +44 (0) 20 7840 2100 Fax: +44 (0) 20 7840 2111 Email: info@oesallworld.com

InformexUSA 2011 An expo that provides a meeting point for buyers and sellers of high-value chemicals; February 07-10, 2011; Charlotte Convention Center, Charlotte, The US For details contact: United Business Media Industrieweg 54, PO Box 200 3600 AE Maarssen The Netherlands Tel: +31 34 65 59 444 Fax: +44 (0) 20 7921 8059 Email: jblack@cmpinformation.com

CIPPE 2011 An exhibition for petroleum & petrochemical technology and equipment; March 22-24, 2011, N e w China International Exhibition Center, Beijing, China For details contact: ITE Group Plc 105 Salusbury Road London, NW6 6RG, The UK Tel: +44 (0) 20 7596 5000 Fax: +44 (0) 20 7596 5111 Email: enquiry@ite-exhibitions.com

The information published in this section is as per the details furnished by the respective organiser. In any case, it does not represent the views of Chemical World

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TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER

Technology Offered As part of our endeavour to spread the technology culture, this section provides a means to promote and facilitate exchange of select technologies. We strive to bring together suppliers of such technologies with suitable users for negotiations and industrial collaboration. Activated carbon An Iranian firm is willing to offer activated carbon from coconut shells. Areas of application Food processing, pharmaceuticals, etc Forms of transfer Technology licensing

Cresyl phosphate / tri phenyl An Indian firm is offering consultancy for manufacturing plasticisers. Area of application Photo films, chemicals, plastic industry, etc Forms of transfer Consultancy

Ethanol An Iranian company is offering ethanol from molasses using the fermentation of sacharomyces cerevisiae. Ethyl alcohol is widely used for making many organic chemicals. Areas of application Chemical industry, energy industry Forms of transfer Technology licensing

Furfuryl alcohol technology An Indian firm offers technology for producing furfuryl alcohol from furfural by liquid hydrogenation as well as vapour hydrogenation, with a capacity of 6,000 tpa to 24,000 tpa. Areas of application Furan polymers, sealants & cements,

urea-formaldehyde, & phenolic resins and foundry cores Forms of transfer Consultancy, technical services, technology licensing

Phosphate esters An Indian firm is offering technology for manufacturing phosphate esters like tri butyl phosphate. Area of application Specialty chemicals Forms of transfer Joint venture

Sodium hydrosulfite An Iranian company is willing to manufacture sodium hydrosulfite using chemical compounds. It is widely used as a stripping agent in dyes and in chemical industry. Areas of application Chemical industry Forms of transfer Technology licensing

Sodium sulfide An Iranian firm is willing to offer sodium sulfide, which is used mainly in textile industry, paper mill, artificial silk and curriery. Areas of application Leather industry, textiles, curriery industries, paper mills, etc Forms of transfer Turnkey

Synthesis routes for organic chemicals An Indian firm is offering consultancy in design of synthesis routes for organic chemicals. Areas of application Pharma industry, speciality chemicals, plant protection chemicals, etc Forms of transfer Consultancy

Transformer oil unit An Indian company is willing to offer consultancy for making a transformer oil unit with domestic coal from its wastes. Area of application Transformers Forms of transfer Consultancy, technical services

Wasteless processing techniques An Indian company is willing to offer consultancy for waste-less processing techniques for the chemical & packaging industries. Area of Application Packaging industry, transformer oil manufacturing industry, chlor alkali projects Forms of transfer Consultancy, technical services

Share Your Technology Propositions The mission of Chemical World is to spread the technology culture. We offer you an opportunity to participate in this endeavour by publishing the best technology ideas. Technology developers/sellers are invited to furnish the techno-commercial details (with environmental benefits, if any) for publication in the Technology Transfer column of Chemical World. R&D organisations, technical consultancy organisations and individuals assisting small and medium enterprises may send the relevant literature, indicating the scope & services and the areas of specification. Contact: Chemical World Infomedia 18 Ltd, ‘A’ Wing, Ruby House, J K Sawant Marg, Dadar (W), Mumbai 400 028. Tel: 022-3024 5000, 3003 4672, Fax: 022-3003 4499, Email: chemedit@infomedia18.in

July 2010 | Chemical World

63


TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER

Technology Requested Calcium carbonate

Lime plant

A Saudi Arabian company needs the technical know-how for producing calcium carbonate from limestone. Areas of application Industries like chemical, textile, etc Forms of transfer Others

A group of businessmen in Zambia is interested in setting up an 800 t/d of quick lime and 200 t/d of hydrated lime plant. Areas of application Mining Forms of transfer Others

Glyoxal An Indian company is looking to switch the production technique for manufacturing 40 per cent glyoxal from its existing acetaldehyde based method to the MEG based glyoxal production. Area of application Pharma & textile Forms of transfer Others

Inorganic chemicals An Indian company is interested in seeking the technology & process know-how for production of potassium nitrate, chromium acetate, and magnesium hydroxide suspension. The company already produces inorganic chemicals and wants to add several other items. Areas of application Chemical industry Forms of transfer Others

Lime An Indian company seeks to adopt new cost-effective technologies, which can reduce carbon emissions and earn carbon credits, for manufacturing lime. Area of applications Quick lime and hydrated lime Forms of transfer Others

Manufacture of sodium hydrosulfite A company based in Pakistan is interested in establishing a joint venture for the manufacture of sodium hydrosulfite in Pakistan with either a Chinese or European manufacturer, who has the technological know-how and expertise in the field. Areas of application Industries like textile, paper and food Forms of transfer Others

Quaternary ammonium chloride An Indonesia-based company, is planning to diversify into manufacturing of quaternary ammonium chloride. It is seeking technology along with the supply of critical plant and machinery for the manufacture of the chemical 3-chloro-2hydroxypropyl trimethyl ammonium chloride that is produced from epichhlorohydrin. Areas of application Chemical industry Forms of transfer Technical knowhow, consultancy

Small-scale environmentfriendly chemical technology An Indian company is looking out for an economically viable smallscale environment-friendly chemical

technology useful in the textile sector as well as in pharmaceutical sector. Area of application Textile and pharmaceutical industry Forms of transfer Others

Solvent dyes An Indian company has recently installed a manufacturing capacity of 2,400 mtpa and is looking to diversify its product range by including various solvent dyes in its product portfolio. The company is seeking process consultancy for this project. Areas of application Plastics, petroleum, solvents, etc Forms of transfer Others

Sodium silicate and activated carbon A company from Thailand requires technology for manufacturing sodium silicate and activated carbon from rice husk & rice husk ash. Areas of application Manufacturing and construction industry Forms of transfer Others

Treatment of pollutants discharged during PTA production A Chinese organisation is looking for a recycling and pollution-free treatment technology to tackle the wastewater, exhaust gas, waste slag and noises generated in PTA production, thereby shifting from reduction of pollutant discharge to zero-discharge. Areas of application Chemical industry Forms of transfer Consultancy, technical services, etc

Information courtesy: Information courtesy: Dr Krishnan S Raghavan, In-Charge, Technology Transfer Services Group, United Nations Asian and Pacific Centre for Transfer of Technology (APCTT), APCTT Building , C-2, Qutab Institutional Area, New Delhi 110 016, Tel: 011 - 2696 6509, Fax: 011 - 2685 6274, Email: krishnan@apctt.org, Website: www.apctt.org

For more information on technology offers and requests, please log on to www.technology4sme.net and register with your contact details. This is a free of cost platform provided by APCTT for facilitating interaction between buyers and seekers of technologies across the globe. After submitting technology offer or request to this website, you are requested to wait for at least two weeks for receiving a response from a prospective buyer / seeker through this website, before contacting APCTT for further assistance.

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Chemical World | July 2010


PRODUCT UPDATE

OD clamping end prep tool

Air heater blower

Esco Tool offers the Esco ‘C-HOG MILLHOG’ OD clamping end prep tool. This is three times faster than ID clamping welding end prep tools for bevelling, facing, and boring highly alloyed small bore heavy-wall steam header tubes. Featuring a large steel-reinforced solid aluminium clamp with e a s y - t o - c h a n g e blocks for gripping 12.7 mm to 63.5 mm tubes, this tool mounts rigidly to the outside of these hard tubes and sets up quickly. Equipped with an attached wrench providing over 25.4 mm of stroke with a ratchet feed, this tool is ideal for tube squaring and ‘j’ prepping for orbital welding. Providing chatter-free operation without cutting fluids, this tool can bevel and face small bore heavy-wall tubes where there is unobstructed access to the ID.

Sasmith Engineering Corporation offers air heater blower units of various capacities. The equipment is available for different capacities ranging from 500 to 50,000 CFM of airflow. The temperature of air can be raised from ambient temperature to 120oC in normal cases. Higher capacities are available on request. Air heaters are also available with hot water or thermic fluid oil. The heater section is being pressure-tested hydrostatically for leak-free operation. Various types of extended surface tubes are being used as heat transfer elements, depending on the temperature and pressure of the application. The material of construction is carbon steel or stainless steel. The airside flanges can be made suitable for online connection with duct flange in circular or rectangular shape as per customer needs. The impeller of the blowers is statically and dynamically balanced for vibration-free operation. The shaft cooling is provided for hightemperature application. The data like airflow rate, air pressure, air temperature required, heat source etc, are required for design purpose. Accessories like blowers, electric motor, airflow control valves, air filters, temperature indicators, steam trap, steam flow valve, etc are provided as optional components.

ESCO Tool Massachusetts - USA Tel: +508-359-4311, Fax: +508-359-4145 Email: matt@escotool.com

Sasmith Engineering Corporation Thane - Maharashtra Tel: 022-2173 1355, Fax: 022-2173 1356 Email: sasmith@mtnl.net.in

July 2010 | Chemical World

65


PRODUCT UPDATE

Portable gas detector Kusam Electrical Industries offers a multipurpose gas detector, ‘KM-5480’. This device uses high-speed low power consumption semiconductor processor, characterised by high sensitivity, strong interference resistance, and intelligence simulation. It has three (red, yellow & green) LED displays. This device detects R11, R113, R134A, R409A, R410A, Freon, alcohol, toluene and acetone gases. Startup preheating time is 60 sec. Operating temperature is 20°C~70°C with <90 per cent RH. This gas detector is widely used for the detection of halogen gases in industrial & civil workplaces. It is widely used in generation & storage of Freon, alcohol, toluene and acetone in refrigeration; automobile refrigerating, chemical engineering & pharmaceutical industries; and repair maintenance, refilling & leakage detection of civil use products such as air-conditioners, refrigerators and automobiles. Kusam Electrical Industries Ltd Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-2412 4540 Fax: 022-2414 9659 Email: kusam_meco@vsnl.net

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Chemical World | July 2010


PRODUCT UPDATE

Particle size & shape analyser TTL Technologies offers the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;DIPA 2000â&#x20AC;&#x2122; particle size and shape analyser from Donner Technologies. This instrument combines two complementary measurement techniques by integrating laser and video channels. It provides complete sample information on particle size distribution and numerous particle shape parameters. This analyser has a wide measurement range of 0.1-5000 Âľm. High analytical resolution (analysing each sampled particle individually) and real time sample visualisation capabilities are its important features. In addition to its advanced hardware capabilities, this analyser uses state-of-the-art groundbreaking software, that allows comprehensive data analysis and report generation among many other useful features. It can be fitted with a variety of modular measurement cells allowing user-friendly measurement of many different types of materials within the same instrument. Other unique accessories provide efficient and easier material handling and/or sample preparation. TTL Technologies Pvt Ltd Bengaluru - Karnataka Tel: 080-2525 1859, Fax: 080-2529 1285 Email: analyticaldirect@ttlindia.com

July 2010 | Chemical World

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PRODUCT UPDATE

Blue LED displays Kwality Photonics offers a wide range of blue LED displays, which include: single-digit, multi-digit, dotmatrix, lightbars, etc. The expanded range now includes: single-digit seven segment displays (SSDs) from 7.6 to 200 mm character height; dual, triple and quad SSDs in 7.6, 10 and 14 mm variants. Blue dot matrix displays are available in a wide range of alternatives with the traditional 30 and 50 mm 5x7 modules proving particularly popular. There is a choice of intensity and wavelength in the range, with new variants being constantly introduced. The brilliant, 470 nm wavelength LED displays are visible in a bright ambient lighting, but draw less than 0.5 W (85 mA) from a single +5 V supply, which is less than most standard red LED displays. The â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;KLSXXXBâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; series LED digital meter displays are offered as units to employ silicon carbide super bright blue LEDs. Kwality Photonics Pvt Ltd Hyderabad - Andhra Pradesh Tel: 040-2712 3555 Fax: 040-2712 4762 Email: kwality@kwalityindia.com

Chemical pumps Taha Pumps & Valves offers sealless magnetic drive chemical pumps (series PMD). These are available with a host of design features and have a wide range of applications to meet the demand of different industries. All liquid contact parts are made of PP, ceramic, Teflon, Viton, etc, which enable the pumps to be used in handling any kind of chemicals. The use of magnetic drive system with high power rare earth magnets eliminates the use of conventional sealing methods. These pumps are ideally suitable for transfer of corrosive liquids, acids, dyes, solvents, toxic & fuming liquids, petrol, kerosene, water, etc. They also find application in chemical industries, dyeing & printing houses, electroplating plants, photo processing, etc. Different models are available in the capacities of 15, 30, 50, 85 and 125 LPM with materials of construction like polypropylene or PVDF. Taha Pumps & Valves Surendranagar - Gujarat Tel: 02752-240 233 Fax: 02752-240 908 Email: tahapv@yahoo.co.in

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Chemical World | July 2010


PRODUCT UPDATE

Aluminium profile sections Kirpekar Engineering offers a variety of aluminium profile sections along with all the connecting accessories a designer requires. These sections and profiles allow the designer the various options and possibilities of frames to be manufactured for industrial applications like Fifo storage racks, display boards, enclosures, machine guards & fencing, robotic and automation systems, conveyors, work-test & assembly line benches and tables, assembly in packaging machines, etc. These specially extruded aluminium profiles are designed and manufactured with close tolerances and maximum strengths with anodised to a depth of 15 micron ensuring the structures are accurate and resistant to corrosion, hence long life and these can be used for any application. The standard sizes available are 30 x 30, 40 x 40, 40 x 80, 80 x 80 and 80 x 160. Kirpekar Engineering Pvt Ltd Pune - Maharashtra Tel: 020-6674 1600, Fax: 020-6674 1601 Email: sales@kirpekarengg.com

July 2010 | Chemical World

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PRODUCT UPDATE

Sewage treatment plants

Centrifuges

Ti Anode Fabricators offers sewage treatment plants using electrolytic techniques. Electrolysis has proven effective in the removal of contaminants from water by destabilising and by electrocoagulating the suspended organic and inorganic solids within the sewage waste. This electrochemical sewage treatment system is noiseless, clean and significantly reduces COD, BOD, turbidity, suspended solids, colour, odour and pathogenic bacteria count. The electrolytic sewage water treatment system is environmental, user & operator-friendly and compact in space. These electrolytic STP comprise the electro-coagulation, electro-oxidation, filtration and electrochlorination. This system is unique, non-biological, and chemically free. Advantages of this system include: no need of sludge management, less space, barest civil construction, no CO2 emission. It gives more than 95 per cent elimination of oil & grease, SS, COD and BOD.

United Engineering Enterprises offers full lid opening centrifuges, which conform to GMP standards for active pharmaceutical ingredients, herbal extracts, flavours, colours, chemicals and allied process industries. These centrifuges are of four-point suspension type in stainless steel construction. The entire body can be lifted & opened hydraulically. Thus the basket and drain platform are exposed facilitating easy & quick cleaning. The body is hydraulically lowered into the closed position and clamped to the lower portion of the casing by means of quick clamps. These centrifuges are most suitable for manufacturing facilities that require frequent product change over. These are available in various designs depending on cake characteristics and customer requirements, viz, standard top discharge, top discharge with bag lifting arrangement, and bottom discharge with/without scrapper. The centrifuges can be offered in vapour tight construction with nitrogen blanketing for hazardous chemicals. The CIP design with built-in cleaning nozzles ensures no product cross-contamination. These centrifuges are manufactured in batch capacities ranging from 5 kg to 600 kg.

Ti Anode Fabricators Pvt Ltd Chennai - Tamil Nadu Tel: 044-2278 1148, Fax: 044-2278 1362 Email: info@tianode.com

United Engineering Enterprises Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-2308 3990 Email: uenggent@gmail.com

Hybrid stepping motor Nippon Pulse Motor offers lineartype hybrid stepping motor, ‘PJPL’ series. This motor enables linear motion of motor shaft with a combination of threaded shaft and inner threaded rotor. It does not require any outside mechanical parts such as lead screw, wire or belt for linear motion, so the customers can design their system with simple mechanism. ‘PJPL’ series is available in two sizes: 28 mm2 and 42 mm2. The maximum stroke is 40 mm and resolution 5 µm in standard specification. Both unipolar and bipolar windings are available. Typical applications of the motor are X-Y stage, syringe system or any other linear motion systems. The company also offers various controllers, drivers and motors to cover almost any stepper motor application. Nippon Pulse Motor Co Ltd Tokyo - Japan Tel: +81-3-3813 8841 Fax: +81-3-3813 8665 Email: s-hagimoto@npm.co.jp

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Chemical World | July 2010


PRODUCT UPDATE

Humidity-cum-temperature transmitters Katlax Enterprises offers h u m i d i t y- c u m - t e m p e r a t u r e transmitters. These are available in two models: wall mount with display and duct mount without display. The sensor continuously monitors temperature and humidity. The conditioning/ control circuit can be supplied in PCB form or in enclosure (IP-55) as per requirement. These transmitters are used in HVAC, automotive, consumer goods, weather stations, humidifiers, dehumidifiers, test & measurement, data logging, automation, white goods and medical. Important features of these transmitters include: temperature range from -50°C to +150°C, accuracy: ±1.5°C, operating range: 0 to 75°C, humidity range from 0 to 100 per cent RH and response time: < 15 sec. Katlax Enterprises Pvt Ltd Gandhinagar - Gujarat Tel: 02764-286 784 Fax: 02764-286 793 Email: info@katlax.com

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PRODUCT UPDATE

Technopolymer hinges Elesa and Ganter India offers CFS technopolymer hinge with built-in safety switch. This hinge with built-in safety device has been designed to offer the operator a safer working environment. In case of accidental opening of doors, it automatically breaks off the power supply. There is no elastic connection between the mobile contacts and the actuator on which the working force is applied. The stroke feed of the contactholder slider does not depend on the working speed. If the door is opened slowly, the contacts are released quickly (when the contact holder slider is released, the electrical arc is broken off). Both the fitter and the end-user cannot interfere with the hinge because the switch is built in a completely closed housing with ultrasonically welded cover. The built-in safety switch and the hinge come in one piece. This offers an easy and fast assembly. The traditional systems require a separate assembly. The hinge and the safety switch are eventually connected by a special pin, which replaces the standard pin of the hinge supplied. The hinge is available with the switch on the left or on the right body and the connector places on the top or on the rear side. Elesa and Ganter India Pvt Ltd Noida - Uttar Pradesh Tel: 0120-472 6666, Fax: 0120-472 6600 Email: info@elesaganter-india.com

Monoblock water-ring vacuum pumps Joyam Engineers & Consultants offers monoblock water-ring vacuum pumps. These are compact, easy to install & assemble, mobile and simple design with smooth operation. These pumps are connected to the motor shaft. The pumps develop maximum vacuum of 680 mm of hg when the sealing water temperature is around 30째C (755 mm of hg barometric pressure & suction temperature of 30째C). These pumps, which operate at low water consumption, are suitable for laboratory usage, priming purposes, pilot plants, etc. Simple in construction with trouble-free operation, these pumps are available in capacities ranging from 14 to 123 m3/hr. Joyam Engineers & Consultants Ahmedabad - Gujarat Tel: 079-2656 9533, Fax: 079-2642 3061 Email: joyam@wilnetonline.com

72

Chemical World | July 2010


PRODUCT UPDATE

Pressure relief valves Diamond Engineering Works offers enclosed spring loaded pressure relief valves for relieving excess pressure from piping, receivers, laboratory autoclaves, sterilisers, pilot plants, filters, instrumentation circuits, pumps and hydraulic/pneumatic systems. These compact and economic valves are suitable for safety precaution against over-pressure. The set pressure range is from 10-2,000 psig in sizes ¼” x ¼” and ½” x ½” with BSP/NPT connections. The valves consist of maximum integral guide area in the housing, which gives perfect alignment to the disc movement. It is above the seating area providing unobstructed seat bore and high lift capacity. Positive reseating is achieved by resilient disc in the standard valve, which is suitable for air, gas, vapours or liquid duties up to 200°C while providing greater resistance to chemical attack. The design consists of minimum components for smooth function and longer life. Angle-type solid housing has provision for panel mounting systems. These valves are manufactured from materials such as AISI 316, AISI 304 and alloys. Diamond Engineering Works Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-2685 3317, Fax: 022-2685 3601 Email: diamondengg@rediffmail.com

July 2010 | Chemical World

73


PRODUCT UPDATE

Vacuum pumps Toshniwal Systems & Instruments offers â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;TMSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; series vacuum pumps. These are single-stage oil-lubricated rotary vane vacuum pumps with oil re-circulation system. These pumps come in capacities 15 m3/hr, 35 m3/hr, 65 m3/hr and 100 m3/hr. Features of these pumps include: high pumping speed over the range of absolute pressure of 1,000 mbar to 0.5 mbar, high water vapour tolerance and low noise level, air-cooled, no pollution, and built-in anti-suckback system. Designed for continuous operation at high-intake pressure, the pump is used in various applications like pick & place, packaging, degassing, low boil distillation, solvent recovery, heat treatment, bottle filling, vacuum drying, etc. The company also offers special B series oil lubricated pump for highpressure (rough vacuum) application on request. Toshniwal Systems & Instruments (P) Ltd Chennai - Tamil Nadu Tel: 044-2644 5626/8983, Fax: 044-2644 1820 Email: sales@toshniwal.net

Hydraulic couplings Dixon Asia Pacific offers H-series hydraulic couplings. These are fully compliant with the parameters outlined in ISO 7241 series B. A wide variety of body and seal materials are available to maximise compatibility in various applications. Large diameter heavyduty knurled sleeves are designed to resist brinelling and maximise performance under impulse conditions. Wide selections of thread configurations are available to ensure compatibility in a variety of installations. Dixon Asia Pacific Pvt Ltd Mumbai - Maharashtra Tel: 022-4093 1555, Fax: 022-2685 4748 Email: salesindia@dixonvalve.com.au

The information published in this section is as per the details furnished by the respective manufacturer/ distributor. In any case, it does not represent the views of Chemical World

74

Chemical World | July 2010


 







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Acoustic hoods...................................................... Aerosol spray paint................................................ Air blowers ............................................................ Air breathing apparatus......................................... Air heater blower................................................... Air pollution control equipment............................. Air receiver ............................................................ Aluma coat............................................................ Aluminium oxide ceramic composite...................... Aluminium profile sections .................................... Analytical instruments............................................ Analytical solution for aflatoxins ............................ Analytical solution for ELV & reach directives ......... Analytical solution for environmental safety ........... Analytical solution for furanes ............................... Analytical solution for residual antibiotics/pesticides Autoclave gaskets .................................................. Bag emptying equipment ...................................... First Fold Here Ball valves - Teflon-lined......................................... Bellows & dip-pipes ............................................... Blenders ................................................................ Blowers ................................................................. Blue LED displays ................................................... Boilers ................................................................... Booster gear pumps .............................................. Bucket elevators..................................................... Burners.................................................................. Butterfly valves - Teflon-lined ................................. Cables ................................................................... Centrifuges ............................................................ Ceramic adhesive cement....................................... Ceramic electrical heater parts ............................... Ceramic tiles .......................................................... Chain conveyors .................................................... Check valves - Teflon-lined ..................................... Chemical dosing pump .......................................... Chemical pumps.................................................... Chlorination plant.................................................. Chlorine gas cylinder ............................................. Chlorine gas mask ................................................. Chloroscope .......................................................... Columns & chemistries .......................................... Compressors, vacuum pumpsSecond & air motors ............ Fold Here Condensers............................................................ Conditioners .......................................................... Cone screw mixer .................................................. Conical screw dryers .............................................. Cords .................................................................... Corona treater sleeves............................................ Crystallisers............................................................ Dairy equipment .................................................... Dampers................................................................ Drawer magnet ..................................................... Drives .................................................................... Drum-type magnetic seprator ................................ Dry vane pumps .................................................... Ducts..................................................................... Dust collectors....................................................... Exhibition - Engineering Expo ................................ Exhibition - India Chem 2010 ................................ Exhibition - Promach 2010 ....................................

                                                            

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Pollution monitoring machines .................... Poly gear pumps.......................................... Polymer - Alu-cera ....................................... Polypropylene filter plates ............................ Polypropylene process pumps ...................... Polypropylene recess plates .......................... Portable gas detector................................... Power plant condensing packages ............... Pressure & flow control instruments............. Pressure measurement products .................. Pressure relief valves .................................... Process automation ..................................... Process heat exchangers .............................. Process reactors ........................................... Profiles ........................................................ PTFE-lined valves & pipe fittings ................... Pumps ......................................................... PVDF pumps................................................ Reactors ...................................................... Re-crystallised alumina tubes ....................... Rotary feeders ............................................ Rotary gear pumps ...................................... Rotary vacuum dryers .................................. Rotocone dryers........................................... Safety components ...................................... Sampling valves - Teflon-lined ......................

                          

Screening machine ...................................... Screw conveyors & feeders........................... Sections....................................................... Self-adhesive tapes ...................................... Self-priming mud pump .............................. Self-priming sewage pump .......................... Sensors Service control valves ................................... Sewage treatment plants ............................. Sheets ......................................................... Silicone carbide heat exchangers.................. Silicone rubber sleeves ................................. Silicone transparent platinum cured tubings Simultaneous thermal analyser..................... Solid discharging equipment ....................... Solid-liquid separation equipment ............... Spherical paddle chopper dryers .................. Spray dryer project ...................................... Squares ....................................................... Stacks.......................................................... Steam boilers............................................... Steam jet ejector vacuum systems................ Strainers - Teflon-lined ................................. Strips........................................................... Suspension magnet ..................................... TC gaskets ................................................... Technopolymer hinges .................................

                          

Teflon-lined valves & pipe fittings................. Temperature measuring solution .................. Thermic fluid heater .................................... Transmitters ................................................. Transparent tubing ...................................... Trap magnet ................................................ Tri-lobe blowers ........................................... Turbidity meter ............................................ Turbine bypass valves ................................... Turnkey projects........................................... UPLC ........................................................... Vacuum boosters......................................... Vacuum pumps ........................................... Vacuum systems .......................................... Valve actuators ............................................ Valves.......................................................... Ventilators ................................................... Vertical glandless pumps ............................. Vertical non-IBR oil-fired steam boiler .......... Vibration motor........................................... Vibrators & flow aids ................................... Water treatment.......................................... Water wall membrane panel IBR steam boiler ..... Water-cooled blowers .................................. Wireless instrumentation ............................. Wood-fired thermic fluid heater................... Zirconia polycrystal ceramic .........................

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PRODUCT INDEX Product

Pg No

Acoustic hoods........................................... 15 Aerosol spray paint .......................................... 71 Air blowers ...................................................... 15 Air breathing apparatus................................... 71 Air heater blower............................................. 65 Air pollution control equipment.................19, 69 Air receiver ...................................................... 19 Aluma coat..................................................... BIC Aluminium oxide ceramic composite............... BIC Aluminium profile sections .............................. 69 Analytical instruments...................................... 25 Analytical solution for aflatoxins ...................... 67 Analytical solution for ELV & reach directives... 67 Analytical solution for environmental safety..... 67 Analytical solution for furanes ......................... 67 Analytical solution for residual antibiotics/pesticides ......67 Autoclave gaskets ............................................ 71 Bag emptying equipment.......................... 39 Ball valves - Teflon-lined .................................... 5 Bellows & dip-pipes ........................................... 5 Blenders........................................................... 39 Blowers............................................................ 15 Blue LED displays ............................................. 68 Boilers.............................................................. 68 Booster gear pumps .......................................... 8 Bucket elevators............................................... 39 Burners ............................................................ 68 Butterfly valves - Teflon-lined ............................. 5 Cables ......................................................... 71 Centrifuges ...................................................... 70 Ceramic adhesive cement................................ BIC Ceramic electrical heater parts ........................ BIC Ceramic tiles ................................................... BIC Chain conveyors............................................... 39 Check valves - Teflon-lined................................. 5 Chemical dosing pump .................................... 71 Chemical pumps ........................................66, 68 Chlorination plant............................................ 71 Chlorine gas cylinder........................................ 71 Chlorine gas mask ........................................... 71 Chloroscope..................................................... 71 Columns & chemistries..................................... 25 Compressors, vacuum pumps & air motors...... 49 Condensers ...................................................... 19 Conditioners .................................................... 39 Cone screw mixer ............................................ 19 Conical screw dryers .......................................... 1 Cords............................................................... 71 Corona treater sleeves...................................... 71 Crystallisers ...................................................... 69 Dairy equipment ........................................ 19 Dampers .......................................................... 19 Drawer magnet................................................ 66 Drives ................................................................ 3 Drum-type magnetic seprator .......................... 66 Dry vane pumps .............................................. 15 Ducts ............................................................... 43 Dust collectors ................................................. 39 Exhibition - Engineering Expo ..................... 6 Exhibition - India Chem 2010 ............................ 4 Exhibition - Promach 2010 ................................ 2 Extrusion pumps ................................................ 8 Failure analysis of components................. 67 Feed water heaters .......................................... 69 Feeding & metering equipment ....................... 39 Filling & emptying equipment.......................... 39 Filter press ....................................................... 73 Fine chemicals ................................................... 7

Product

Pg No

Finishing machines........................................... 66 Fire tube-type package IBR steam boiler .......... 68 Fittings ............................................................ 43 Flowmeters ............................................ 24a, 24b Gas blowers ............................................... 15 Gas detectors................................................... 53 Gaskets ............................................................ 71 Gear pumps...............................................42, 65 Granulators...................................................... 39 Grinding media............................................... BIC Headers ...................................................... 43 Heat exchangers ................................... FIC, 1, 19 Heavy metals ................................................... 67 Hot air & water generator ............................... 68 HPLC................................................................ 25 HRC fuse bodies ............................................. BIC Humidity-cum-temperature transmitters........... 71 Hybrid stepping motor..................................... 70 Hydraulic couplings.......................................... 74 Hydrogenator/autoclaves.................................... 1 Igniting electrodes ....................................BIC Import express worldwide................................ BC Industrial ceramics .......................................... BIC Industrial hygiene audit ................................... 67 Inflatable gaskets ............................................. 71 Informatics ...................................................... 25 Instrumentation products ...................... 24a, 24b Launders..................................................... 43 Level pressure monitoring & safety components .......39 Lined valves & pipe fittings ................................ 5 Magnetic drum pulley ............................... 66 Magnetic separator.......................................... 66 Measurement products .......................... 24a, 24b Mechanical vibratory feeder ............................. 66 Micro milling beads ........................................ BIC Mill lining blocks............................................. BIC Mineral processing........................................... 11 Mixers.............................................................. 39 Monoblock pumps........................................... 66 Monoblock water-ring vacuum pumps ............ 72 Multifuel-fired IBR steam boiler........................ 68 Multiple effect evaporators .............................. 69 Non-metallic pumps................................... 66 Non-return valves............................................... 5 OD clamping end prep tool ...................... 65 Oil seals ........................................................... 71 O-rings ............................................................ 71 Paints and coatings ................................... 11 Paper ............................................................... 11 Particle size & shape analyser........................... 67 pH meter ......................................................... 71 Pipes................................................................ 43 Piston pumps................................................... 49 Pneumatic conveying system components........ 39 Pollution monitoring machines ........................ 53 Poly gear pumps................................................ 8 Polymer - Alu-cera .......................................... BIC Polypropylene filter plates ................................ 73 Polypropylene process pumps .......................... 66 Polypropylene recess plates .............................. 73 Portable gas detector....................................... 66 Power plant condensing packages ................... 69 Pressure & flow control instruments ................ 73 Pressure measurement products ............ 24a, 24b Pressure relief valves ........................................ 73 Process automation ............................... 24a, 24b Process heat exchangers .................................... 1

Product

Pg No

Process reactors ................................................. 1 Profiles............................................................. 71 PTFE-lined valves & pipe fittings......................... 5 Pumps .......................................................65, 66 PVDF pumps .................................................... 66 Reactors..................................................1, 19 Re-crystallised alumina tubes .......................... BIC Rotary feeders ................................................ 39 Rotary gear pumps ....................................65, 66 Rotary vacuum dryers ........................................ 1 Rotocone dryers................................................. 1 Safety components .................................... 39 Sampling valves - Teflon-lined............................ 5 Screening machine........................................... 66 Screw conveyors & feeders .............................. 39 Sections ........................................................... 71 Self-adhesive tapes .......................................... 71 Self-priming mud pump .................................. 66 Self-priming sewage pump .............................. 66 Sensors .................................................. 24a, 24b Service control valves ....................................... 69 Sewage treatment plants ................................. 70 Sheets.............................................................. 71 Silicone carbide heat exchangers........................ 1 Silicone rubber sleeves ..................................... 71 Silicone transparent platinum cured tubings .... 71 Simultaneous thermal analyser....................20-21 Solid discharging equipment............................ 39 Solid-liquid separation equipment.................... 39 Spherical paddle chopper dryers ........................ 1 Spray dryer project........................................... 19 Squares............................................................ 71 Stacks .............................................................. 43 Steam boilers................................................... 68 Steam jet ejector vacuum systems ................... 69 Strainers - Teflon-lined....................................... 5 Strips ............................................................... 71 Suspension magnet ......................................... 66 TC gaskets .................................................. 71 Technopolymer hinges ..................................... 72 Teflon-lined valves & pipe fittings ...................... 5 Temperature measuring solution............ 24a, 24b Thermic fluid heater......................................... 68 Transmitters ........................................... 24a, 24b Transparent tubing .......................................... 71 Trap magnet.................................................... 66 Tri-lobe blowers ............................................... 15 Turbidity meter ................................................ 71 Turbine bypass valves....................................... 69 Turnkey projects ................................................ 1 UPLC ........................................................... 25 Vacuum boosters ....................................... 15 Vacuum pumps ............................................... 74 Vacuum systems .............................................. 15 Valve actuators ................................................ 39 Valves .............................................................. 39 Ventilators ....................................................... 71 Vertical glandless pumps ................................. 66 Vertical non-IBR oil-fired steam boiler .............. 68 Vibration motor ............................................... 66 Vibrators & flow aids ....................................... 39 Water treatment ........................................ 11 Water wall membrane panel IBR steam boiler ..... 68 Water-cooled blowers...................................... 15 Wireless instrumentation........................ 24a, 24b Wood-fired thermic fluid heater ...................... 68 Zirconia polycrystal ceramic .....................BIC

BC - Back Cover, BIC - Back Inside Cover, FIC - Front Inside Cover July 2010 | Chemical World

79


ADVERTISERS’ LIST

Advertisers’ Name & Contact Details

Pg No

Advertisers’ Name & Contact Details

Ani Engineers T: +91-2752-241479 E: anivarya@sancharnet.in W: www.anivaryapumps.com

65

Everest Blowers T: +91-11-4545 7777 E: info@everestblowers.com W: www.everestblowers.com

Aqua Services T: +91-265-2331748 E: aquaas@sify.com W: www.aquaservicesindia.com

71

Balkrishna Boilers Pvt Ltd T: +91-79-25894701 E: info@balkrishn.com W: www.balkrishn.com

68

Pg No

Advertisers’ Name & Contact Details

Pg No

15

Netzsch Technologies India Pvt Ltd 20-21 T: +91-44-42965111 E: yasotha.palanisamy@netzsch.com W: www.netzsch.com

FICCI - India Chem 2010 T: +91-11-32910411 E: mehul@ficci.com W: www.indiachem.in

4

Pressure & Flow Control Industries 73 T: +91-265-2643838 E: info@preconvalves.com W: www.preconvalves.com

Goodie Enterprises T: +91-11-41613643 E: witte@goodiesons.com W: www.witte-pumps.de

8

Raj Process Eqpts & Systems(P) Ltd 19 T: +91-20-40710010 E: rajindustries@vsnl.net W: www.rajprocessequipment.com

Bangalore International Exhibition 2 T: +91-124-4014060 E: amit.mehta@cii.in W: www.promach.co.in

Heattrans Equipments Pvt Ltd T: +91-79-25840105 E: info@heattrans.com W: www.heattrans.com

Bonfiglioli Transmissions (Pvt) Ltd 3 T: +91-44-24781035 E: sales@bonfiglioliin.com W: www.bonfiglioliindia.com

Hi Tech Applicator T: +91-79-25833040 E: hitech@ptfeindia.com W: www.ptfeindia.com

Chemical Process Piping Pvt Ltd T: +91-22-67230600 E: sales@cppiping.com W: www.cppiping.com

43

HRS Process Systems Pvt Ltd T: +91-20-25663581 E: cthe@hrsasia.co.in W: www.hrsasia.co.in

FIC

Sigma Aldrich Chemicals Pvt Ltd 7 T: +91-80-66219400 E: hardik.joshipura@sial.com W: www.safcpharma.com

Dev Engineers T: +91-79-26403839 E: info@devpumps.com W: www.devpumps.com

66

Jaykrishna Magnetics Pvt Ltd T: +91-79-22870071 E: info@jkmagnetics.com W: www.jkmagnetics.com

66

Sreelakshmi Traders 71 T: +91-44-24343343 E: sreelakshmitraders@gmail.com W: www.sreelakshmitraders.com

DHL Express (India) Pvt Ltd T: +91-22-66789186 E: girish.meghnani@dhl.com W: www.dhl.com

BC

Jyoti Ceramic Industries Pvt Ltd BIC T: +91-253-2350120 E: info@jyoticeramic.com W: www.jyoticeramic.com

Suresh Enterprises T: +91-2762-224814 / 224240 E: info@sevitsil.com W: www.sevitsil.com

71

1

Kimberlite Chemicals India Pvt Ltd 11 T: +91-80-22187300 E: info@kimberliteindia.com W: www.kimberlitechemicals.com

United Phosphorus Ltd T: +91-22-24930681 E: singhrv@unipos.com W: www.uniphos-she.com

53

Lan Marketing Pvt Ltd T: +91-22-27893645 E: jai@lanengg.com W: www.maag.com

42

Wam India Pvt Ltd T: +91-22-27618091 E: pinaki.mandal@wamgroup.in W: www.wamgroup.in

39

Mazda Ltd T: +91-79-40007000 E: vacuum@mazdalimited.com W: www.mazdalimited.com

69

Waters (India) Pvt Ltd T: +91-80-28371900 E: waters_india@waters.com W: www.waters.com

25

Dipesh Engineering Works T: +91-22-26743719 E: sales@dipeshengg.net

Emerson Process Management (India) 24A, 24B T: +91-22-66620566 E: info@emersonprocess.com W: www.emersonprocess.com Engineering Expo T: +91-9819430607 E: engexpo@infomedia18.in W: www.eng-expo.com

6

73

Shavo Technologies Pvt Ltd T: +91-20-26059641 E: shavogroup@vsnl.com W: www.shavogroup.com

49

5

Shiva Analyticals (India) Ltd T: +91-80-27971322 E: gupta@shivatec-india.com W: www.shivatec-india.com

67

Our consistent advertisers

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Chemical World | July 2010



Chemical World - July 2010