Page 1

SOUTH Winter 2014

Indy’s southside magazine

Cindy & Kerry

Prather

Also inside:

Holiday traditions, an adoption story, vegetarian fare, high school standouts


CANCER DOESN’T

DEFINE

YOU.

And it doesn’t control you either. Before beginning treatment, take a second and consider getting a second

opinion. An accurate diagnosis is critical and you need to make sure you’re getting the latest, and most advanced, cancer treatment – from research trials to innovative surgery. Even when you’re told you have no other options.

Call the Second Opinion Clinic at (317) 528-1420 to schedule a review of your cancer treatment options.

FranciscanStFrancis.org/cancer Inspiring Health


Bet nobody regifts these. Get in on a holiday tradition that’s slightly more original. Visit Tom Wood Lexus and receive some of the year’s best values on our entire selection of Lexus vehicles.

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contents Home of Tony Alderson

on the cover

Feature Stories

88

82

Academic Aces

88

Modern Marvel

98

An Adoption Journey

Talented southside teens

Tony Alderson’s Bargersville home

One southside couple travels to China

Cindy and Kerry Prather, page 74. Photos by JOsh Marshall

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contents Barrel warehouse at Woodford Reserve

Departments

15

This & That

Southside news and views

21 In Style

Born-again decor

25 Taste

Vegetarian fare

32 Worth the trip Cerulean

38 Authentic Indiana

Homespun Modern Handmade

42 Home trends Filtered light

48 Health Hospice care

66

52 Arts & Lifestyles 66 Travel

Kentucky Bourbon Trail

Celebrate the season

60 Community Holiday traditions

In Every Issue

8 Welcome 104 South weddings 6

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74 Profile The Prathers

110 119 130

Our side of town

21

Calendar of events A look back


Primavera Collection


welcome

T

In the Company of Stars

There are some days when I feel like a star. Even if I’m only a star in my head. We’ve been feeling pretty good about our work here at SOUTH magazine lately. We received some high praise at the Indiana Newspaper Advertising Executives Association & Hoosier State Press Association Foundation conference that was held this fall. SOUTH won first place as the Best Magazine in the state of Indiana for layout and design, and it took the Best of Show award, given to the overall winner for 2013. Those are some pretty high honors, and we were thrilled to accept them. I wasn’t even surprised we won them. Though I’d like to take credit for these wins, the truth is I didn’t have anything to do with them. Margo Wininger, SOUTH magazine’s senior graphic artist, is the real star here. Under her job title, Margo does, well, pretty much everything when it comes to design for SOUTH. She creates special sections, she designs the editorial pages (and makes them look stunning, I must say), she directs photo shoots, and she even occasionally takes a camera out to photograph food and folks for these pages. Margo also works closely with another of our magazine’s stars, Miranda Stockdall, SOUTH’s advertising account executive, to create the advertisements that you see throughout each issue. The advertisements are what earned SOUTH these awards. It was because of their collaboration that SOUTH took the top honors. I hope you’ll enjoy this issue. Not only are we celebrating our own accomplishments, but coinci-

dentally, we’re also showcasing several stars of the southside. Our personality profile (p. 74) features a man you may have heard of before: Kerry Prather, the basketball coach and athletic director at Franklin College, who, too, has experienced a number of personal and team wins. We also get to know several academic aces in this issue. We asked around at each of the schools, and we came up with a short list of talented whiz kids who, we’re sure, have bright futures ahead of them. And that’s how I’m feeling today: A little bit like a star who is blessed with talent. Even if it isn’t my own.

sdugger@indysouthmag.com

Keep up with SOUTH happenings on Facebook.

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@

SOUTH

winter warm-ups

Indy’s Southside Magazine

mallow run

Winter 2014 | Vol. 9 | No. 3 Warm-your-belly meals,

come & enjoy...

live music & your favorite wine every Saturday and

Sunday from January - March.

Publisher Home News Enterprises Chuck Wells

Editorial Editor

Sherri Dugger

Mallow Run

Copy Editor

Katharine Smith Contributing Writers

WINERY

stay cozy by the fire in our tasting room - complimentary tasting daily 6964 W. Whiteland Rd. | Bargersville, IN | mallowrun.com | open daily 12-6pm 317.422.1556 | call today to order gift baskets - gift certificates available

Alisa Advani Caroline Mosey Amy Norman Ashley Petry Jon Shoulders Clint Smith Ed Wenck

Art Senior Graphic artist

Margo Wininger

Expert investment management for portfolios of $500,000 or more.

contributing advertising Designer

Amanda Waltz Contributing Photographers

Andrew Laker Josh Marshall Joe Saba Melinda Secord Christopher Whonsetler Stock images provided by ©Thinkstock

Advertising

317-261-1900 Not FDIC Insured

No Bank Guarantee

May Lose Value

2232 DCM_500000_4.75x4.75.indd 1 SOU T H | indysouthmag .com

10

Client/Filename:

NBI

Advertising Director

www.dmdcap.com

2232 DCM_500000_4.75x4.75

Christina Cosner

© 2013 Diamond Capital Management

1/28/13 3:27 PM

ACCOUNT Executive

Miranda J. Stockdall


in the


SOUTH Indy’s Southside Magazine

reader services mailing address 2575 N. Morton St., Franklin, IN 46131

phone

(317) 736-7101

fax

(317) 736-2713

SUBSCRIPTION INQUIRIES subscribe@indysouthmag.com (800) 435-5601

advertising inquiries southmail@indysouthmag.com (317) 736-2769

story ideas

info@indysouthmag.com (317) 736-2732

web site

www.indysouthmag.com

Single copy sales

Copies of South magazine are available at southside Kroger, Marsh and Barnes and Noble locations.

Subscriptions

To subscribe to SOUTH magazine, please send $12 for 4 issues, or $24 for 8 issues to the mailing address above. Call (800) 435-5601 to subscribe by phone or place your subscription request online at indysouthmag.com.

Address Change

Please send any address changes to the address or e-mail address listed above.

Back issues

To order back issues of SOUTH magazine, please send $5 per issue (includes S&H) to the mailing address above or call (800) 435-5601 to order by phone. Š2013 by Home News Enterprises All rights reserved. Reproduction of stories, photographs and advertisements without permission is prohibited.

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Compiled by Ashley Petry

this & that

Keeping It Natural The Indiana Department of Natural Resources has designated more than 150 nature preserves statewide, but Johnson County just got its first one. Open since mid-November, the Hare Preserve at Blossom Hollow — known informally as the Blossom Hollow Preserve — is a 109-acre tract of hardwood forest near Trafalgar. As a nature preserve (the highest level of protection the DNR can provide), Blossom Hollow Preserve doesn’t have structures like bathrooms or picnic shelters, but it does have a hiking trail, which will be maintained by the Central Indiana Land Trust. Hikers in the Nature Preserve might spot Eastern box turtles or rare migratory birds, such as hooded and worm-eating warblers. (317) 631-5263, www.conservingindiana.org

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this & that

Alternatives Analysis: Recommended Alternative

Q&A:

The Red Line As early as 2017, Greenwood residents may be able to hop a rapid transit bus to downtown Indianapolis or even as far north as Carmel. But the route, known as the Red Line, still has to overcome several hurdles, including funding issues and environmental and engineering studies. The Indianapolis Metropolitan Planning Organization will finalize the route plan, and the Central Indiana Transit Study Committee will issue funding recommendations for the Indiana General Assembly to consider during the upcoming legislative session. In the meantime, we caught up with two key players at the IMPO: Sean Northup, assistant director, and Jennifer Higginbotham, the project manager for the Red Line.

Tell us about the proposed Red Line route. SN: South of Indianapolis, the Red Line is proposed to run from the new downtown transit center to Fountain Square, then down Shelby Street to the University of Indianapolis. Then it follows Madison Avenue past Stop 11, the mall and Main Street, and it ends just south of Smith Valley Road. What exactly is bus rapid transit (BRT)? JH: Bus rapid transit is the best of bus and light rail. It’s built to mimic the characteristics of rail, so it has things like level boarding so you can roll a wheelchair, stroller or bike right onto the bus and not have to carry it up stairs. It has big doors on the 16

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sides, and we do off-board fare collection so you can buy your ticket on the platform. It’s a quick stop, and this allows us to stay on schedule more easily. And the bus will be very frequent, so it will come often enough that people can show up at the station without worrying about time tables. SN: We’re talking every 10 minutes during peak hours and every 15 minutes at other times. JH: And riders will have real-time information, so they can see on their smartphones or on screens at the stations when the bus is going to arrive.

How is it different from the current bus system? SN: It is a rapid service that only stops at bigger, more substantial stations. The

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buses have wireless Internet access, and they are built to mimic light rail in feel and operation. It is more of a premium service than we’ve seen before in the region.

How would the project benefit southside communities? SN: This is really a key spine through the city. It will connect everyone from the southside to the downtown transit center, where nearly every bus will go, so there will be an easy transfer to anywhere else in the

region. And it connects the southside to the University of Indianapolis, to Garfield Park, to Fountain Square, to Eli Lilly, to the heart of downtown with the government complex, to the Children’s Museum, to Methodist Hospital, to the State Fairgrounds, and to Broad Ripple and Carmel to the north. There are a lot of pieces that are connected just on this line alone that southside residents will have really easy access to. For more information, visit www.indyconnect.org.


this & that

Do a Latte Good It’s a church, it’s a counseling center, and it’s a coffeehouse. The nonprofit Coffeehouse Five — a ministry of the church of the same name, which we profiled in this year’s summer issue of SOUTH — is now in a new Greenwood location. “Our intention is to be a full-service coffee shop with coffee, pastries and baked goods, but all of the profits from that operation support our counseling services,” said pastor Brian Peters, who offers free marriage and addiction counseling. » 323 Market Plaza, Greenwood, (317) 300-4330, www. coffeehousefive.com

Brian Peters outside the new location

Give a Helping Hand » Mount Pleasant Christian Church has opened a new Community Ministry Center, housing both its In His Name clothing ministry and its Living Bread food pantry. Previously located in separate spaces, the two programs now share a 15,000-square-foot facility designed with a retail atmosphere in mind. “It is nice to offer someone a box of food, but it is so much better to help them shop for the food products they prefer,” coordinator Crystal Thompson said in a statement. Both programs provide assistance to more than 200 local families each week. The Community Ministry Center will also serve as an extension of the Midwest Food Bank, sharing resources with smaller food pantries when their shelves are bare. 381 N. Bluff Road, Greenwood, (317) 889-9650, www.mpcc.info/localmissions.html

Put a Bird on It Earlier this fall, Bird on a Wire held a grand reopening at its new location in downtown Franklin. The boutique, which specializes in upcycled salvage, had been in temporary digs for six months after losing the lease on its former storefront. “Everybody is thrilled that we’re finally reopened, and the energy has been extremely good,” says employee Janna Long. Tricia Bechman, executive director of the Franklin Chamber of Commerce, said shopping at Bird on a Wire is like seeing the best of Pinterest in person. “I like the unique items and use of local vendors for products sold in the store,” she says. “I’ve already purchased several gifts there.” For more on upcycled and architectural salvage, see our Style story in this issue of SOUTH (p. 21). 108 W. Jefferson St., Franklin, (317) 739-0472, www. birdonawireboutique.com

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this & that

Book Nook

Provided by Greenwood Public Library

“The Ghost Bride”

“The Gilly Salt Sisters”

“Burial Rites”

by Yangsze Choo

by Tiffany Baker

by Hannah Kent

Li Lan’s genteel father is bankrupt, and her prospects for marriage are nearly nonexistent. She is approached by a powerful family looking for a “ghost bride” to appease the spirit of their recently deceased son, but upon visiting them she falls in love with Tian Bai, the living heir. The deceased son refuses to accept this and visits her in dreams, dragging her into the world of the dead. This is an enchanting read with rich historical and cultural elements. It has a dense, Gothic atmosphere that makes it easy to fall into. The characters are well-drawn, and many are utterly despicable. If you like Chinese folklore and culture or are interested in historical details about colonial Malaya, this book is for you.

The Gilly sisters were never very much alike. Jo embraces the family’s salt farm, while younger sister Claire resents the family business and is eager to separate herself from her family’s past. The salt farm holds a mystery of its own though, which pulls the sisters together in ways they couldn’t imagine. Family secrets are shared, and relationships are broken. The strength of this novel is in the beautifully described setting of a small New England town, which is painted with just a touch of magic. I would recommend this novel to fans of novelists Aimee Bender, Alice Hoffman or Sarah Addison Allen.

Agnes, a servant living in Iceland in 1829, is charged with the brutal murder of her former master. She is forced to await the date of her execution at a remote farm, living amongst those who despise her for her crime. The atmosphere of this novel is dense and melancholy with a frigid setting so richly described you’ll be reaching for your blanket. This literary blend of historical fiction and mystery was powerfully written with gorgeous yet disturbing imagery. The character of Agnes was easy to empathize with despite the horrific picture we’re drawn of her crime and her near-silence at the farm. You can’t help but hope there is some way out of her fate. If you love a story that unravels slowly with dark themes and a focus on setting, pick this book up.

Reviewed by Becky Preston, teen services librarian, Greenwood Public Library

Reviewed by Valerie Moore, reference librarian, Greenwood Public Library

Reviewed by Becky Preston, teen services librarian, Greenwood Public Library

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Roncalli SaluteS ouR

national meRit ScholaRS Thomas Schulse Robby Kile

Joey Erickson

Beth McKay

Alex Blankenberger Michael O’Connor

Craig Connors Stephanie Asdell

Lucas LaRosa

Grace DeMoss

Cam Smock

the college Board announced that 11 members of Roncalli’s senior class scored high enough on the PSat, taken during one’s junior year in high school, to earn the distinction of being a national merit Scholar. this places them in the top 3% of the best and brightest high school students in the united States.

Prepare for Success. now Registering! call 317-787-8277 ext 243 or visit RONCALLI.ORG


in style

Born-again dĂŠcor September saw the opening of Franklin Heritage Inc. Architectural Salvage, a nonprofit that specializes in saving architectural elements from the landfill and selling them to homeowners looking for period-correct pieces to finish their restoration projects. Add to that the already-thriving stores along Jefferson Street that offer sundry upcycled, recycled and repurposed pieces, and Franklin, you might say, is a growing force in secondhand style. Here, a look at several interesting items that carry equal weight in the ongoing battle between form and function.

For more information on

Franklin Heritage Inc. Architectural Salvage, call (317) 736-6823.

Clipboard, $12, Salvage Sisters Antique Market, 398 E. Jefferson St., Franklin, (317) 736-4353

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in style

1

2

3

4

1

2

Holy Night Sign Made from Barn Wood, $15, Vintage Whimsy, 462 E. Jefferson St., Franklin, (317) 736-9446

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Vintage Frame Turned Chalkboard, $42, Salvage Sisters Antique Market, 398 E. Jefferson St., Franklin, (317) 736-4353

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3 Edison Light Bulb, $8, Roller Skate Lamp, $38, Bird on a Wire Boutique, 108 W. Jefferson St., Franklin, (317) 739-0472

4 Blue Mantel with Hooks, $79, Bird on a Wire Boutique, 108 W. Jefferson St., Franklin, (317) 739-0472


in style

5

6

7

5 White Barn Door with Wreath, $45, Vintage Whimsy, 462 E. Jefferson St., Franklin, (317) 736-9446

photography by andrew laker

6 Vintage Sled, $46, Vintage Whimsy, 462 E. Jefferson St., Franklin, (317) 736-9446

7 Sewing Machine Drawers, $10 each, Vintage Whimsy, 462 E. Jefferson St., Franklin, (317) 736-9446

8

8 Shutter Key Holder/Chalkboard, $38, Bird on a Wire Boutique, 108 W. Jefferson St., Franklin, (317) 739-0472

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By caroline mosey // Photography by Josh marshall

taste

Meat-free and Magnificent Not a meat lover? Not a problem. The southside is covered with kitchens that know a thing or two about preparing spectacular vegetarian dishes. Read on to discover some of our favorite meatless munchies (and no, salads didn’t make the cut).

Chef’s Veggie Burger, $8.99 Wally Bolinger, owner of Fountain Square’s Red Lion Grog House, wanted to be sure there was a dynamite vegetarian option on his menu (a menu where fish ’n’ chips and other pub grub generally steal the spotlight). So he created the Chef’s Veggie Burger, a dense and flavor-packed mix of black and garbanzo beans, carrots, celery, herbs and panko bread crumbs, served on an egg bun. “I’m a meat eater myself,” Bolinger says, “but I eat a lot of the veggie burgers. They’re really flavorful.” Red Lion Grog House, 1043 Virginia Ave., Indianapolis, (317) 822-4764, www.redliongroghouse.com

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taste Linguini con Portobello, $17.95 La Trattoria owner Tom Trotter may sell plenty of sizzling steaks at his Greenwood eatery, but there’s a meat-free showstopper on the menu that’s garnering a long list of devotees: stuffed portobello mushrooms. “We sell hundreds a week,” Trotter says. The dish starts with saucer-sized portobello mushrooms. “We stuff and bake them with a variety of cheeses, then toss noodles with oil, herbs and wine sauce and serve with the portobello on top.” La Trattoria, 201 N. Madison Ave., Greenwood, (317) 859-0487

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taste Spinach Calzone, $8.49 Who doesn’t love a calzone? You can’t go wrong stuffing cheese and veggies into a flaky pizza crust. Brozinni Pizzeria folds its homemade pizza dough over a blend of spinach, mozzarella and ricotta cheese before sprinkling the whole package with garlic and baking. The golden result is served with special house marinara sauce for dunking. (“People come just for the marinara,” adds James Cross, owner. It’s that good). Bonus: Brozinni just launched a mobile food truck, making it even easier to get your pizza and calzone fix. Brozinni Pizzeria, 8810 S. Emerson Ave., Indianapolis, (317) 865-0911, www.brozinni.net

Can’t do gluten?

Chefs are starting to include delicious options (and even entire menu sections) that are gloriously gluten-free. Here, some of our favorite GF picks.

GF Gnocchi, $9 Cerulean, 339 S. Delaware St., Indianapolis.

Quesadillas de Huitlachoche, $7.99 Adobo Grill, 110 E. Washington St., Indianapolis.

Broken Yolk Pizza (on GF crust), $12 Napolese, 30 S. Meridian St., Indianapolis.

Chilean Sea Bass with Chimichurri, $23

GF Buffalo Chicken Burger, $11

Bonefish Grill, 1001 N. State Road 135, Greenwood.

Scotty’s Brewhouse, 1 Virginia Ave., Indianapolis.

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taste Pate o’ the South What is pate of the South, you ask? Pimento cheese, of course, according to Karen Hewett, owner of the Indigo Duck in Franklin. This spreadable indulgence is a heavenly mixture of cheddar, Parmesan and cream cheeses laced with roasted red peppers and a hint of cayenne. Paired with crackers and benne seed wafers, it’s a true and tasty dose of the South on a plate. “It’s definitely a favorite on our menu,” says Hewett, “and I think it was imperative that we paid homage to a Southern staple.” Indigo Duck, 39 E. Court St., Franklin, (317) 560-5805, www.theindigoduck.com

Spinach Mushroom Etouffee Yats has established itself as a universal crowd-pleaser, and we get it: the laid-back vibe, great prices and soul-comforting Cajun dishes seem to make just about everyone happy, including vegetarians. “Our Spinach Mushroom Etouffee is a twist on our regular Cajun dishes,” owner Joe Vuskovich says. “It’s great comfort food.” The rich mixture is served over white rice alongside buttered bread, making it one of the tastiest bargains in town. Yats, 1280 U.S. 31, Greenwood, (317) 865-9971, www.yatscajuncreole.com

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groceries laundry soccer practice dinner

Jill is one BUSY mom! Her to-do list is NEVER ending.

taste

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taste French Onion Soup Contributed by Richard’s Kitchen, 229 S. Main St., Franklin

3 tablespoons butter 4 yellow onions, thinly sliced 2 teaspoons salt 2 cups chicken broth 4 cups beef broth 1 cup red wine 2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme or ¾ teaspoon dried 1 bay leaf 1 tablespoon freshly ground pepper Salt to taste 4 thick slices crusty bread 8 slices Gruyere or Swiss cheese Chopped parsley (for garnish)

Simmer Down Cool weather is the season for soul-warming soups, and we’ve rounded up recipes for some of our favorites. Here, some tasty ideas for stove-top simmering. By Caroline Mosey

prep tip

Melt butter in large pot over medium high heat; add onions and salt and cook, stirring frequently until onions are well caramelized, about 30 to 40 minutes. Add chicken broth, beef broth, wine, thyme, bay leaf and pepper; bring to a boil then reduce heat to simmer. Cook 20 to 30 minutes, stirring occasionally, until reduced by one-quarter. Season to taste with salt. Remove bay leaf. Toast bread rounds until golden. Arrange oven-safe bowls on baking sheet. Fill three-quarters of the way with soup, place one bread round on each and top with two slices of cheese each. Place under broiler 3 to 4 minutes until golden brown and bubbly. Garnish with chopped parsley.

Chicken Velvet Soup Contributed by Jockamo Pizza, 401 Market Plaza,

Greenwood

2 cups milk 2 cups half-and-half 12 cups chicken broth ¾ pound butter 1½ cups all-purpose flour 3 cups chopped, cooked chicken 4 cups corn 1 tablespoon pepper 1 teaspoon salt Heat (but don’t boil) in a large pot, milk, half-and-half and 4 cups of the chicken broth. In a separate saucepan, heat (but don’t boil) the other 8 cups of chicken broth. In a third saucepan melt butter, stir in flour. Cook over medium heat one minute to make a roux. Add butter/flour roux to hot milk/half-andhalf/broth mixture. Stir until mixture begins to thicken. Add remaining 8 cups chicken broth, chopped chicken, corn, salt and pepper. Let soup simmer until hot and serve.

Making chicken stock

At Franklin’s Indigo Duck, flavor is packed into every square inch of its Southern-inspired dishes. How do the chefs achieve such unbelievable depth of flavor in their soups and sauces? Chicken stock! “We make it ourselves,” says owner Karen Hewett. Follow these easy tips from the Indigo Duck kitchen to make your own stock. (It’s easier than you think, trust us.) You can use raw or roasted chicken bones, depending whether you’d like light or dark stock.

» For light stock, cover raw chicken bones with water in a large pot and bring to a boil. Remove bones, discard water and cover blanched bones with fresh water. Add herbs (parsley stems, bay leaf or thyme) and vegetables (onion, carrots and celery). Simmer stock for six to eight hours. Strain and cool.

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» For dark stock, use previously roasted chicken carcass or roast your own bones on a baking tray first, then follow stock directions. » Do not use the leaves of carrots or celery, as they make the stock bitter.

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» Simmer, rather than boil stock. Boiling causes the stock to be cloudy. » Don’t salt your stock to allow for more control when using it for recipes. » Stock will stay fresh for four to five days refrigerated or six months frozen.

» Use as a base for sauces, in place of water for cooking grains like rice or quinoa, as a braising liquid or in soups for added flavor.


taste

WINE

DINE

If you’re hosting (or attending) an elegant holiday party this season, make it memorable with the perfect bottle of wine. If there’s ever a time to splurge, the holiday meal would be it. Paul Jacquin, owner of Vino Villa, recommends a 2010 Siduri Sierra Mar Vineyard Pinot Noir ($49.99). “There are times when a wine just tastes so good that ‘Wow!’ sums it up,” says Jacquin of the offering. Layers of dark red fruit and floral notes have earned this bottle its fair share of acclaim from wine enthusiasts, making it the perfect choice for a holiday meal accompaniment or gift. 200 N. Madison Ave., Greenwood, (317) 882-9463, www.vinovilla.com

Got a craving for Asian fusion? Visit southside newcomer China Bistro, which opened this past June and offers plates of Thai, Chinese and Vietnamese dishes galore. Red curry shrimp, pineapple fried rice and tom yum soup are a few menu standouts, and owner Lenny Lang, brother-in-law to beloved Ichiban Sushi Bar owner Sammy Li just down the street, recommends his favorite to new customers. “Try our Orange Beef,” Lang urges—it’s one of the house specialties. 7327 S. U.S. 31, Indianapolis, (317) 888-2888, www.chinabistroindy.com

FIND Downtown Franklin’s beloved candy shop, M.W. Wadsworth’s & Co. Fine Chocolates, has been delighting customers with candy since 2009. Stocked with both new and old favorites, the selection expands around the holidays with carefully crafted seasonal flavors. Chocolate lovers will go crazy for the Dark Chocolate Candy Cane Truffles, with a creamy chocolate center and crushed candy cane coating. Savor your sweets at the shop, where nostalgic games and classic movies on the TV make for an endearing experience that kids and adults alike can enjoy. “It’s an experience, not just a candy shop,” says Barb Kinsey, manager. 154 E. Jefferson St., Franklin, (317) 560-5624

Fine dining.

With a comfortable feel.

Serving everything from amazing Indiana grown beef and pork, to mouth watering seafood. Striving to give you the best service, accompanied by the finest meats and produce we can find. Wonderful Wine Selections • Full Bar • Outdoor Dining Area

Chef Owned & Operated At the Crossroads of SR 144 and SR 135 in Bargersville

317.422.4226

Monday-Thursday 4-9pm, Friday 4-11pm and Saturday Lunch 11am-2pm and Dinner 4-11pm

www.INBistro226.com

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worth the trip

Go Blue 32

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Cerulean turns one year at its Indy location By Clint Smith Photos provided by Cerulean

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worth the trip

O

Over a year has passed since Cerulean welcomed guests to its Indianapolis venue on the northeast corner of Delaware and South streets, emerging as an epicurean destination on the ever-evolving downtown dining map. But even before its opening in November 2012, Cerulean was far from a new kid on the block—new to the city, sure, but not to the trends and rhythms of the restaurant industry. For the past seven years, Cerulean’s owners, Caleb and Courtney France, have enjoyed the success of the original Winona Lake restaurant, which bears the same sky-blueinspired namesake as their Indianapolis location. Yet their Indy iteration—in terms of both aesthetics and menu execution—required a slight shift in medium.

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worth the trip

Though some atmospheric echoes exist of the cozy, cottage accents of the Winona Lake forerunner, the Indy site has subscribed to an urban braiding of sleek minimalism and inviting opulence. Beneath exposed ductwork crisscrossing the ceiling is a softly lighted dining room cooled by hard-lined steely tints of gray and warmed by touches of teak, russet and chocolate, with a lounge-mellow soundtrack further softening the space. A wood-planked wall dividing the bar area and restaurant is painted with horizontal streaks of blue— no doubt a stylish signature to the establishment’s title. And included as a centerpiece to the restaurant is the “nest,” an intimate, semi-secluded dome (not unlike an upturned bird’s nest) composed of a latticework of mix-matched wooden planks. But one of the integral adjustments comes in the delivery method of the dishes themselves, and the solution was the bento box. Japanese in origin, these square, wooden devices (whose translation is associated with the term “convenient”) provide Cerulean with a platform to re-

Arni’s TM

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worth the trip

arrange pairings of entrees and accompaniments, while offering a framework to showcase ingredients. Here’s how it works: guests select one main entrÊe item before choosing three sides. All four items are then presented in separate, ceramic dishes within the elegant wooden bento box. As the menu at Cerulean changes quarterly, the available offerings are frequently altered to honor what is fresh and seasonally suited. One bento box might feature an entrÊe of wild salmon paired with pineapple chutney and Fresno chili peppers, with sides that include a pear and papaya salad (a 36

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sweet-and-spicy mixture of shredded carrot and chipotle vinaigrette); Bibb lettuce with Indiana apples, cherries and roasted shallot vinaigrette; and homemade noodles with sunflower seeds, cabbage, jalapeno and citrus vinegar. Yet another bento permutation also results in a study in contrasts: skirt steak with crispy potatoes and sorrel chimichurri (a bright-green, herb-and-vinegar condiment popular in South America, often served with grilled meat). The sides include English cucumber tossed with sesame seeds and sweet vinaigrette; goat cheese custard: a silky and savory concoction garnished with crumbled, herbed shortbread; and Brussels sprouts lightly coated with maple syrup and topped with smoky bacon and fried sage. Yet amid all the aesthetic adjustments, and among all the international influence on the menu, one component remains steadfast in this Indy venture: a spotlight on local food, its farmers and its producers.


Just as the masterminds of Cerulean were magnetized to Indy’s growing restaurant scene, so too was Craig Gareiss, sous chef with Cerulean in Indianapolis. “There are a lot of like-minded folks in the city, and it’s a great feeling,” he says. “The chefs in town have a sense of responsibility to work with the local farmers and food producers here, and I enjoy the fact that we can share information with one another.” Gareiss also has a personal interest in working in the Hoosier state. Hailing from Centerville, he began working in the restaurant industry in his early teens. A dishwashing gig led to line-cooking responsibilities, and the skills learned on “the line” later became refined after he enrolled in culinary school at Mercyhurst University in Pennsylvania. From there, Gareiss began a lengthy culinary sojourn. When asked about where he’s gained his experience, it’s clear that naming the numerous locales would be an exhaustive exercise. He simply laughs, shakes his head and replies: “Everywhere.” Gareiss served a stint in Las Vegas before returning to Indiana with the ambitious intention of joining Cerulean. The food and culture that the owners, along with executive chef Chase Hilton, were devising for the Indianapolis offshoot were an ideal fit for Gareiss. “We like to take risks with the food and really try to pair things that a lot of folks wouldn’t normally think go together.” Returning to a discussion on the strengths of the Indianapolis market, he believes that Indy residents share an appreciation for local foods, and he enjoys the fact that Cerulean strives to use as many homegrown products as possible. “We focus on local ingredients, and this is what drives our creativity in the kitchen.” All one has to do is glance over the menu or eye the massive, concave dry-erase wall in the bar area that applauds nearly two dozen Hoosier farmers, food producers and wineries that contribute to Cerulean’s menu. Among them are Maple Leaf Farms (Milford), Seven Sons Family Farms and Co. (Roanoke), Capshaw Cellars (Lanesville) and Viking Lamb (Morristown). While success is never inevitable for any restaurant, it seems likely for Cerulean, owing to its partnership with the local community and its creative team of chefs— all of whom hold Midwestern culture and cuisine in esteem. “Indiana is where I was raised, and it has this draw to it,” Gareiss says. “You can leave, but never feel like you’re at home when you’re not here.”

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Local producers, merchants and entrepreneurs By Sherri Lynn Dugger

Homegrown Homespun Modern Handmade moves to a larger, Mass Ave. store

W

When Amanda Mauer Taflinger had an idea to open a brick-and-mortar store that featured the creations and handmade goods from local and regional artisans, it didn’t take long to get her husband, Neal Taflinger, on board. After all, the swift growth of the INDIEana Handicraft Exchange contemporary craft fairs that the couple had been hosting since 2007 was testament to the emerging demand for local goods and services. It also helped that Amanda needed a job. In early 2010, she had been laid off from her position as an elementary school art teacher, and though she’d looked around for another gig in the art field, none was to be found. Opening a shop then—located close to home in their Irvington neighborhood—seemed like an ideal situation. “Both of us were pretty excited about it,” Amanda recalls. “It was

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Homespun’s new location at 869 Mass Ave. in Indianapolis.

a big step. It was a scary step, but we were ready to do it. Besides I didn’t have anything else that was right there ready for me. It just made sense.” Enter the sense-maker: Homespun Modern Handmade. With about 75 artists on board to turn over products to populate the store at 5624 E. Washington St., the Taflingers were off and running by July 2010. They built their business from as much cash as they could scrape together—approximately $6,000—and a really good idea. The 850-square-foot shop quickly became the go-to boutique to find homemade crafts and kitsch, oftentimes with local flair and a cheeky sense of humor. Greeting cards, necklaces, T-shirts, candy, homemade soaps and artworks filled the store, and almost immediately, people were buying, new artists were trying to get a space on store shelves, and Homespun was making a name for itself in the city. The attention to the shop, as well as the draw of the 40

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handicraft exchanges, was also helping to make a name for crafting in Indianapolis, which had been the Taflingers’ goal all along. They’d originally started the craft fairs to “introduce Indianapolis to other crafty items from across the country while also spotlighting Indianapolis on the craft scene,” Amanda explains. “It goes both ways. We wanted to expose more people to what Indianapolis has to offer and expose Indianapolis to people and their works from across the country.” Which they have done. And done. And done. Now, their thrice-yearly craft fairs feature anywhere from 30 (at their “mini” fairs) to 100 vendors, with thousands of shoppers streaming through the doors.

And the tiny shop on Washington Street is nearly bursting at its proverbial (and clearly hand-sewn) seams. By early 2013, the store was selling the works of approximately 250 vendors. Amanda and Neal knew they either had to phase out some of the shop’s oldest showcased artists (which they didn’t want to do) in order to make room for new ones, or they needed to move. “We knew about six months before we even looked anywhere


“We wanted to expose more people to what Indianapolis has to offer and expose Indianapolis to people and their works from across the country.” —Amanda Mauer Taflinger Neal Taflinger with son, Zeke, looking at plans with contractor, Jim Arnoldt

The new venue will allow for a more user-friendly atmosphere, Amanda says. “This space will have a break room for my employees; they’ll have a place to do inventory. We’ll be able to have workshops, tastings and classes in the store. It provides good opportunities for us and for the artists to market their crafts.” For more information on Homespun Modern Handmade or the INDIEana Handicraft Exchange, visit www.home spunindy.com or www.indieanahandicraftexchange.com.

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BLuFF

doubtedly some soul-searching on Amanda’s part, the couple made the decision to dive in … and move. A grand opening for the Homespun shop in its new 2,000-square-foot space at 869 Mass Ave. is planned for late February or early March, though a soft opening is scheduled for the first week of February. A weekends-only “preview” boutique will give customers an opportunity to shop at a pared-down version of the store in November and December, just in time for the holiday season.

harding St.

outside of Irvington that a move into a larger space was inevitable,” she says. “We scoured the neighborhood first. I was still adamantly against leaving the eastside and our neighborhood.” But staying close to home wasn’t really an option. “We looked at silly places (in Irvington) that didn’t make business sense; we looked at anything that anybody would suggest,” she says. “Ultimately it came down to the fact that we needed the foot traffic. We needed a bigger space just where we were at. And there was nothing available.” She says she was driving along Massachusetts Avenue in downtown Indy one day and saw the Trail Side Building had spaces for rent. The multistory property had just what they needed: a street-level storefront, customizable space and enough square footage to house their expanding business. After several discussions about the possibilities for the space there and un-

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home trends

Contemporary Art Galleries, Indianapolis Museum of Art

Shine On

Local experts weigh in on artful ways to illuminate your home

I

By Teresa Nicodemus

If you are standing on the top

floor of the Indianapolis Museum of Art, one sweeping glance will have you soaking up layers of light and art that will make your mind swoon. The fluorescent tubes of Robert Irwin’s “Light and Space III” exhibit weave an aura of white beside the escalators. Natural light streams from a strategically placed atrium window. Track lighting beams on sleek and edgy art. The Contemporary Art Gallery comes to life, shimmering forth in a synchronized view of crisp light—a striking reminder of the power of light in both the art world and the world of interior design.

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Carol Cody, lighting designer for the IMA, uses her wealth of knowledge about the nuances of light from her years of experience as an art handler, coupled with her 15-year tenure with the museum, to create dramatic lighted backdrops for the striking galleries. It’s easy to take light for granted, but to Cody, “Light sets the tone. It creates a mood for each of the galleries and a mood in the home as well,” she says. Artistry of Light “A blank canvas,” according to Cody, “is the complete absence of light. Instead of mixing color, think about mixing patterns Image courtesy of the Indianapolis Museum of Art.


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home trends

LED lighting is another choice for case lighting, as well as for under and inside cabinets. This form of lighting produces a soft, energyefficient light that can be controlled with dimmers.

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of light. The impact of light is the same whether you are in a gallery or at home,” she says. For instance, more traditional forms of lighting are used in the museum’s galleries, as well as focused track lighting and fiber optic case lighting. “Fiber optic lighting is excellent to use for case lighting,” Cody explains. Mini tracks are hidden in the sides of the cases with fixtures to focus light on individual objects. “While more expensive, the advantage is it keeps the heat away from the displayed items,” she explains. LED lighting is another choice for case lighting, as well as for under and inside cabinets. This form of lighting produces a soft, energy-efficient light that can be controlled with dimmers. LED track lighting also provides a nice glow for a flood of light or overall wash of light on a wall. LED lighting can provide color choices, and while interesting and creative for home de-

sign, Cody prefers white light that renders the true color of artwork. “The overarching theme of lighting the interior of your home is the idea of layering the light,” Cody says. “Think of how you move through the home and where you want warm light in one area or cooler light in another. Layers or various types of lighting should be found in the home rather than one continuous form of lighting. You can vary your ambient theme with task lighting in the kitchen, a reading lamp in the living room and accent lighting for your art collection.” Beaming in Style Although track lighting positioned at the ceiling level offers plenty of variety in directional and filtered lighting, it is often seen more in contemporary homes and lofts and may not be feasible in all homes. “Every space in the home has general light,


Lighting Strategies As you consider lighting your home in new and artistic ways, remember that textiles, paper drawings, prints, photographs and paintings are sensitive to light. “Safety of the artwork is our first priority,” explains Carol Cody, lighting designer for the Indianapolis Museum of Art. “These items will fade in direct sunlight and should not be displayed in a room full of windows and natural sunlight, unless it’s filtered. This strategy goes hand in hand with artificial lighting, “which also can emit UV (ultraviolet) rays,” Cody says. “If a wall in your home gets strong light exposure, it’s not the place to hang your favorite drawing. LED lighting produces the least amount of ultraviolet output.” Light can be controlled, specifically in modern track lighting with various forms of lenses that can be inserted into the track heads to produce interesting light effects. For example, use a waffle lens to widen the beam for a flood of light in which the beam is not as strongly centered. For directional lighting, consider using a reflector to shine the light to certain areas of a room or toward a piece of art. Cody offers four more lighting tricks to highlight your prized sculpture or embossed work of art: » Consider the angles on all sides of a sculpture or three-dimensional object and don’t hesitate to reposition a piece so that all angles are enhanced with light. » Use directional track lighting and aim light from different angles. » Don’t leave the back of the object in shadow. » For embossed pieces, illuminate the art with side lights or a raking light to emphasize the texture and definition of the art.

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“Consider your task lighting in the kitchen or your reading light in the living room or office. Then you have accent lighting, which is the ‘wow’ factor of the room. And that’s where your personality enters the scene.” —Merissa Ripley

such as recessed ceiling lights or a main source of light,” says Merissa Ripley, interior designer of Cornerstone Interiors. “But to add a layer of light to that, consider your task lighting in the kitchen or your reading light in the living room or office. Then you have accent lighting, which is the ‘wow’ factor of the room. And that’s where your personality enters the scene.” Lighting stores offer plenty of choices to light your home in style. Trending now, according to Karen Mercer, interior designer and owner of Karen Mercer Interiors and Other Fabulous Finds, is the chandelier. We are not talking about the glittering chandelier that hovers over the formal dining room like a sentinel, however. Instead, today’s chandelier finds a home almost anywhere, from the kitchen to the bedroom, and it brims with eclectic fashion, looking classy in iron and crystal or contemporary in blown glass lamps of bright turquoise or orange. “The industrial look is ‘in,’ and that’s a style that gives a retro ’20s and ’30s flair to light fixtures,”

Mercer says. Also consider the large Edison bulbs used with pendant lights that feature a single bulb “easily seen through metal basket shades or clear glass shades,” she adds. Not only does lighting serve a fashionable role in home décor, it could even provide health benefits for those struggling with the winter blues. Light therapy has been touted as one way to combat winter depression. Getting as much light as possible during the winter months or during a long expanse of cloudy days can be done in simple ways, says Mercer. Add additional lamps in your home during winter and change your lampshades to lighter colors to let as much light as possible filter into your home. Special bulbs and lamps are available to mimic natural sunlight and lift your spirits. “Lighting is integral to the décor of your home,” Mercer says. “It softens a room and helps create focal points in different areas of your home. It can also be a mood changer.”

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home trends

Holiday Lights: Take the Scenic Route Once you’ve decked your halls with lights, take a minute to take in the colorful scenes around town. Here, a list of local seasonal celebrations of light.

Festive Lights at Indiana Masonic Home

Greenwood Lights and Sights

When: Dec. 7 to Jan. 1

Tree lighting on the corner of Main Street and Madison Avenue, 5 p.m. Nov. 23 (1,000 lights)

Where: Indiana Masonic Home,

690 S. State St., Franklin Details: The Indiana Masonic

Home sports a 1/3-mile lighted circular drive with a decorative fountain. Lighted scenes from carousels, horses and sleighs, and sheep and shepherds will put you in the holiday spirit. Old-fashioned light posts will be wrapped in colorful lights along the drive, and evergreens and trees will be glittering.

Pedestrian Bridge over Smith Valley Road (1,000 lights) Children’s Garden on Main Street, just east of the fire station (1,300 lights) Old Farmers Market, located west of the library (3,800 lights) The Point, located between U.S. 31 and Meridian Street (3,700 lights) Community Center, located at 100 Surina Way (1,000 lights) City Building, located at 2 N. Madison Ave. (1,500 lights)

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health

Hospice Care Local providers give quality-of-life care to terminally ill patients By Alisa Advani

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C

Cyndi Payne has lost both of her parents. Her mother, Sharyn Neibert, passed away in September after a long fight with bulbar amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Richard Neibert, Payne’s father, suffered from leukemia and died in 2010. In both of these cases, Payne’s family called upon hospice to guide them through the dizzying labyrinth of caring for their terminally ill loved ones. “Toward the end of her life, my mom needed help 24 hours a day,” says Payne. “She had lost the ability to communicate, and her breathing was labored. Hospice gave us a chance to sit down and breathe. It gave us a moment to relax so we could go on to the next day.” Hospice provided the same care during Payne’s father’s final days. “During Dad’s cancer, his nurses got him to laugh no matter how horribly he was feeling,” she re-

calls. “They were compassionate and kind. He needed humor, and his laughter made us feel better, too.” Hospice nurses, doctors, and social workers provide comfort and care to patients with terminal illnesses. These workers focus on helping the sick remain free from pain and discomfort, maintain their mental awareness, and live life as independently as possible. Hospice workers also provide support to surviving family and friends. When to ask for help

Making the decision to switch a loved one’s care to hospice does not mean giving up. Choosing hospice means accepting that a person’s medical needs have changed, and the decision often comes after much introspection and several realistic conversations between families and physicians.


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“Sometimes we educate, sometimes we counsel for grief, and sometimes we socialize. But all hospice workers have a mission to ease suffering.” —Karen Zielinski

“Hospice is for patients with a terminal diagnosis that are no longer going to pursue a curative treatment,” explains Carol Brackin, hospice manager at Franciscan St. Francis Hospice. Brackin oversees 35 full-time staffers who attend to about 500 area patients and their families annually. When a cure is not possible, hospice affords patients the chance to maximize the remainder of their lives. In terms of finances, it is 100 percent covered by Medicare and Medicaid and at least partially covered by most commercial insurances. “Once the decision is made, the patient’s doctor will write a referral order,” Brackin says. “This order allows a hospice provider to evaluate the patient to make sure that they meet hospice criteria, which is a life expectancy of six months or less.” A different kind of care

Hospice differs from hospital care in that hospice is a philosophy—not a place. Care can be given in the patient’s home, in a nursing home, in an assisted living environment or at a family member’s home.

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Brackin says hospice is about quality of life and not quantity of life. A hospice team will educate the patient and family on the disease process, care giving and symptom management. The team of doctors, nurses, chaplains and social workers will support the whole patient, mind, body and spirit.  Karen Zielinski, a hospice nurse at St. Francis’ Greenwood location, has spent the last seven years providing holistic care to her patients. “Nurses fill many roles,” she explains. “Sometimes we educate, sometimes we counsel for grief, and sometimes we socialize. But all hospice workers have a mission to ease suffering.” Primarily, hospice caregivers assess symptoms and utilize pain and anti-anxiety medications, oxygen, anti-emetics and relaxation techniques to help patients “live their lives fully until the very last minute,” Zielinski says. “Social workers counsel the bereaved, and dedicated volunteers provide a host of assistances, like massage, haircuts and companionship.” Because patients forgo hospital treatments and are allowed high-dose narcotics to combat pain, there is a general fear


health

Hospice House

that hospice care may hasten death. Actual studies, conversely, suggest otherwise. In one study reviewed by the U.S. Government for Medicare, researchers followed 4,493 patients with either terminal cancer or congestive heart failure. They found no difference in survival time between hospice and non-hospice patients with breast cancer, prostate cancer and colon cancer. Interestingly, hospice care seemed to extend survival for some patients; those with pancreatic cancer gained an average of three weeks, those with lung cancer gained six weeks and those with congestive heart failure gained three months.

A new center

Groundbreaking for a new Hospice House, to be operated by Franciscan St. Francis Health, will take place in the spring. Hospice House will be a comprehensive inpatient, nonprofit facility on Indy’s southside that will complement the health network’s existing home care program. The project has been in the planning stages for the past two years, while Greg Williamson, executive director of the capital care campaign, worked to raise the money. Its doors will be open to all—even those strapped to find resources to pay for these vital services. “The vast majority of people want to be

at home,” says Zielinski. But when home is not available, Hospice House will provide yet another option. Richard Neibert spent his final days at home with his family while receiving care from his nurse, Thom Horn, who did everything he could to make his remaining time special. “My dad was a baseball talent scout,” Payne says. “We were going to take him to St. Louis for a game, but he fell and broke his hip. Instead of giving up, Thom contacted an agency that helps grant the wishes of the elderly. They arranged for him to see an Indians game here in Indianapolis. It was a beautiful day.”

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arts & lifestyles

Home for the Holidays 52

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Indianapolis offers something to keep you and your loved ones busy on every one of the 12 days of Christmas. By Ashley Petry

Photos Provided


arts & lifestyles

To create priceless memories with your family this Christmas, look no farther than Indianapolis. The city celebrates the holidays with museum exhibits, musical performances, merry street festivals and memorable light displays.

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Visit the world’s largest Christmas tree. Every year, nearly 5,000 twinkling lights cascade from the 242-foot Soldiers and Sailors Monument on Monument Circle, creating the world’s largest Christmas tree. The annual Circle of Lights treelighting, which takes place the day after Thanksgiving, draws more than 100,000 spectators, but the real magic happens on quieter evenings, when the illuminated trees twinkle and snow falls softly on the hushed holiday tableau. The tree stays lighted through Jan. 11. www.indydt.com

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Stroll through a winter wonderland. For three days, Dec. 13 to 15, the recently revamped Georgia Street corridor becomes a haven for holiday activities. Street vendors sell hot chocolate and roasted nuts, Indiana artisans sell unique gift items and local choirs sing traditional carols. Don’t miss the chance to visit Santa Claus, decorate cookies or tour the historic St. John Catholic Church. www.georgiastreetindy.com/citysidewalks

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See a Christmas play or musical. For many families, the Indiana Repertory Theatre’s annual production of “A Christmas Carol” is a holiday tradition. But the IRT isn’t the only theater that offers holiday performances. Beef & Boards, one of the nation’s longest-running dinner theaters, presents “A Beef & Boards Christmas,” a show full of holiday music and dance numbers. Footlite Musicals is performing “White Christmas” this year, and the Phoenix Theatre is once again producing its irreverent holiday show, “A Very Phoenix Xmas: Angels We Have Heard While High.” No matter what your theatrical tastes, you’ll find a show to suit your interests. Beef & Boards: 9301 Michigan Road, (317) 8729664, www.beefandboards.com; Footlite Musicals: 1847 N. Alabama St., (317) 926-6630, www.footlite.org; Indiana Repertory Theatre: 140 W. Washington St., (317) 635-5252, www.irtlive.com; Phoenix Theatre: 749 N. Park Ave., (317) 635-7529, www.phoenixtheatre.org

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See how the other half decorates for the holidays.

For a peek at one of the city’s historic mansions, head to Oldfields — the Lilly House and Gardens — on the grounds of the Indianapolis Museum of Art. Celebrating its 100th anniversary this year, the 22-room Lilly House gets dressed up for the holidays with decorations that are authentic to its 1913 origins, such as blooming plants and cut greenery. Tours continue through Jan. 5. 4000 N. Michigan Road, (317) 923-1331, www.imamuseum.org

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Experience a country Christmas. During the sixth annual Christmas on the Farm event at Traders Point Creamery, held Dec. 14, you can meet live elk, take a sleigh hayride, sing carols and shop for gifts and food items at the farmers market. Santa Claus will be there, too, sitting on a throne made of hay bales. At the Loft Restaurant, which is decorated with fresh greenery, you can sample farm-fresh treats like hot chocolate and eggnog. 9101 Moore Road, Zionsville; (317) 733-1700; www.traderspointcreamery.com

Take a step back in time.

In the evening stillness, 1836 Prairietown at Conner Prairie looks more real than ever. Bundle up for a stroll in the village during Conner Prairie by Candlelight, where costumed interpreters discuss historic holiday traditions — including a wacky new fad of giving gifts at Christmas. Along the way, you can sample cookies at the town doctor’s holiday party and sing carols around a bonfire. Afterward, head back inside to view the winning gingerbread houses from Conner Prairie’s annual competition. 13400 Allisonville Road, Fishers; (317) 776-6006; www.connerprairie.org

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Have a cup of tea.

For most of the year, the historic L.S. Ayres Tea Room at the Indiana State Museum is open by reservation only for group events. But during the holidays, the tradition comes alive once again, with a menu of favorites like chicken velvet soup and pot pie. Afterward, join the Celebration Crossing festivities, including musical performances and train rides; search for your county’s ornament on the museum’s 92-county ornament tree; or watch the Legacy Theater Troupe perform “Hoosier Radio Hour: A 1940s Christmas.” 650 W. Washington St., (317) 232-1637, www.indianamuseum.org

8

Tap your toes to beloved holiday tunes.

The Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra’s Yuletide Celebration features headlining performers like Sandi Patty and the Von Trapp Family Singers, not to mention the orchestra itself. This year’s show includes songs from “A Christmas Story: The Musical” and “’Twas the Night Before Christmas,” as well as a visit from the Tap Dancing Santas. Don’t miss the reindeer grazing outside the Hilbert Circle Theatre on Monument Circle. 32 E. Washington St., (317) 6394300, www.indianapolissymphony.org

9

Explore Jolly Days at the Children’s Museum of Indianapolis. Who needs a sleigh? At this annual event, Santa Claus makes his grand entrance in a race car. Through Jan. 5, the Jolly Days celebration includes a giant slide, a holiday train, simulated ice fishing and even a simulated ice skating rink, where children can slide around in their socks. Bonus: The gift shop doubles as one of the best toy stores in the city, so you can get some last-minute holiday shopping done while the children are visiting with Santa. 3000 N. Meridian St., (317) 334-3322, www.childrensmuseum.org


arts & lifestyles

An Angelic Holiday Tradition

Every year between Thanksgiving and Christmas, the historic L.S. Ayres cherub takes its seat above the clock at the corner of Washington and Meridian streets. The 3-foot bronze sculpture first appeared on the clock during the 1947 holiday season, partly to commemorate the department store’s 75th anniversary, and immediately became a holiday icon. The cherub disappeared in 1992, after the May Department Stores Co. bought L.S. Ayres and shuttered the downtown store. But after a public outcry, the company returned the cherub to the city in time for the 1994 holiday season. It is now under the care of Indianapolis Downtown Inc., and spotting it on its clock perch is once again a holiday tradition.

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Go west, young man (or woman). If your little ones love trains, the annual Jingle Rails exhibit at the Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art is the perfect spot to make holiday memories. They’ll love watching the seven model trains chug across bridges, over trestles and through tunnels. In between, they’ll spot models of more than 30 U.S. destinations, including Mount Rushmore, the Golden Gate Bridge and the Old Faithful geyser (yes, it actually erupts). 500 W. Washington St., (317) 636-9378, www.eiteljorg.org


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Hitch a ride on a horse-drawn carriage. Companies like Yellow Rose Carriages offer horse-drawn carriage rides year-round, weather permitting. Snuggle under a pile of warm blankets as your horse clip-clops slowly through the decorated downtown streets — surely the best way to enjoy sights like the Circle of Lights. A one-hour grand tour for up to four passengers will set you back $100; reservations are recommended. (317) 634-3400, www.indycarriage.com

Martinsville 765-342-6695

SINCE 1890

Now in its 45th year, the Christmas at the Zoo event is one of the city’s best displays of holiday lights. Visitors can also meet some of the hardier animals, such as seals and polar bears, decorate cookies with Mrs. Claus and sip hot chocolate around a campfire. Don’t miss the treats at Santa’s Sweet Shop or the holiday-themed dolphin shows. 1200 W. Washington St., (317) 630-2001, www.indianapoliszoo.com

Grand Valley

Mooresville

765-342-6695

317-834-4663

Let's dance!

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community

I

In an ever-growing and diverse

world, there is no better way to experience a new culture than to observe one of its celebrations, says Billie Fouts, vice president of marketing and development at the International Center in Indianapolis. “Holidays can be an effective time to soften cultural barriers and raise awareness and appreciation for cultural diversity,” Fouts explains. “This is particularly true when activities staged in observance of such holidays are welcoming, inclusive and designed to share and celebrate with others outside their immediate circles.” In that spirit, we decided to look into how the holidays are celebrated from places as far away as Mexico and India and as close to home as south central Indiana. Mexico and Guatemala In Mexico, Christmas festivities are in full swing with the beginning of the posadas — celebrated each evening from Dec. 16 to 24. In Spanish, posadas means “lodging,” and a big part of the holiday centers around the re-enactment of Mary and Joseph’s cold and difficult journey from Nazareth to Bethlehem in search of shelter. Las posadas encompasses nine days of religious observance, based on the nine months that Mary carried Jesus in her womb. Traditionally, a party is held each night in a neighborhood home to celebrate. At dusk, guests gather outside the house with children dressed as shepherds, angels and sometimes, Mary and Joseph. An angel leads the procession, followed by Mary and Joseph or by guests carrying their images. The adults follow, carrying lighted candles. First Stop |

On Holiday Different cultures celebrate the season in unique ways By Alisa Advani

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community The “pilgrims” sing a song asking for shelter, which is refused, explains Dan Alsop, assistant professor of Spanish and education at Franklin College. The hosts sing a reply, finally opening the doors to the guests. “That is when the real party begins,” he explains. Hot ponche (tropical fruit punch), fried rosette cookies and other sweets are offered, and party attendees pray around a Nativity scene, play games and socialize. The last posada, held on Dec. 24, is followed by midnight Mass, a tradition that lives on in countless Mexican towns and cities. | Germany In many places across Europe and the Americas, St. Nicholas is considered the main gift giver, and a feast is held in his honor on Dec. 6, St. Nicholas Day. Where St. Nicholas is prominent, his day, rather than Christmas, is considered the primary gift-giving day of the year. “St. Nicholas is observed within family Photos of traditional German cookies and decorations. Bottom circles,” says right, Chicago Christkindl Market. Provided by Anna Baxter. Claudia GrossNext Stop

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community man, interim director at Max Kade German-American Center in Indianapolis. “Gifts on this day are small. I still buy a chocolate St. Nick for my children, who are in their 20s.” Parties may be held on Dec. 5, and children often leave boots or stockings out for St. Nicholas to fill during the night. Children will awaken to find treats, fruit or nuts, and special Nicholas candies and cookies. As for Christmas itself, the holiday “commands two official holidays—Dec. 25 and 26,” Grossman says. “People stay home on those days and visit close family members. It is a time for family, reflection and children.” | China The Chinese Spring Festival, also called the Lunar New Year, carries more than 4,000 years of history. A traditional Chinese festival that originated during the Shang Dynasty (around the 17th to the 11th century B.C.), the Spring Festival is the grandest and most important festival in Chinese culture. It, too, offers a chance for families to come together. Next Stop

Above, Chinese rice dumpling balls stuffed with mung bean paste. Left, traditional Indian sweets.

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“In the Chinese calendar, January is the beginning of the New Year,” explains Haixai Zhao, a Chinese teacher at The Confucius Institute of IUPUI. “Chinese people believe that at this time, we start anew and get rid of the old problems of the past year.” The celebration represents an important rest from work and a chance to reunite with loved ones. “We gather with family and friends and focus on each other,” Zhao says. “Many people go home and have a family reunion dinner. Often, it is the only time each year that we get to see our close friends from home.” Family meals are lavish. Dishes such as chicken, fish and bean curd cannot be excluded, for in Chinese, their pronunciations, respectively “ji”, “yu” and “doufu,” mean auspiciousness, abundance and richness.

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Last Stop | India Diwali is India’s biggest and most important holiday of the year. The festival gets its name from the row (avali) of clay lamps (deepa) that Indians light outside their homes to symbolize the inner light that protects them from spiritual darkness. As important to Hindus as the Christmas holiday is to Christians, Diwali is celebrated in October or November of each year. The holiday got its start as a celebration that marked the last harvest of the year before winter, but today the practice extends to businesses all over the Indian subcontinent, which mark the day after Diwali as the first day of the new financial year. Indians celebrate with family gatherings, glittering clay lamps, festive fireworks, strings of electric lights, bonfires, flowers and worship to Lakshmi, the goddess of wealth. Some believe that Lakshmi wanders the Earth looking for homes where she will be welcomed. People often open their doors and windows and light lamps to invite her inside. Sree Paleru, a cardiologist with Indiana Heart Physicians, lives on Indy’s southside with her family, and she looks forward to this celebration each year, because it reminds her of celebrations from her childhood in India. “Back home, we used to meet with our family members and grandparents for the holidays,” she says. “Ladies in the family cook traditional Indian sweets, and the children used to enjoy meeting friends and seeing the fireworks. We still celebrate every year with my children. As a family, I make sure we pray to God, eat dinner and light firecrackers together.”


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Trail Blazers

Take flight to Kentucky for the best bourbon in city or country By Ashley Petry

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The aging process at Wild Turkey Distillery Photos Submitted by Kentucky Bourbon Trail and Louisville Convention & Visitors Bureau

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Clockwise from top: Jimmy Russell, master distiller at Wild Turkey Distillery. Earn a Kentucky Bourbon Trail T-shirt by having a passport stamped at all eight distilleries. Jim Beam American Stillhouse. Four Roses Distillery. Town Branch Bourbon Distillery in Lexington.

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Every time you order an old-fash-

ioned or a mint julep, the bourbon in your glass likely comes from right next door in Kentucky. The Bluegrass State invented the corn-based whiskey more than 200 years ago, and it still produces 95 percent of the world’s supply. Tuscany has its wine, Portland has its beer, and Kentucky — just as famously — has its bourbon. Distillers both large and small are celebrated on the statewide Kentucky Bourbon Trail and the Louisville Urban Bourbon Trail. Separately or in combination, the two trails are an easy weekend getaway. And the perfect time to visit is now, when the distilleries are decked out in holiday finery and twinkling lights. A warming nip

of bourbon will soon make you forget the cold outside. “I think it is a perfect three-day weekend,” says Stacey Yates, vice president of communications for the Louisville Convention and Visitors Bureau. “We like to say visit the Kentucky Bourbon Trail by day and the Urban Bourbon Trail by night.” If you have time, you might stretch your visit to four or five days, says Adam Johnson, director of the Kentucky Bourbon Trail. “We want people to experience everything Kentucky has to offer and not feel rushed,” he says. “It just makes it so much easier when you’re not stressed, and it allows you to take in dining options and special events.”


Willett Distillery in Bardstown is part of the small craft distilleries tour. Right, bottling at Woodford Reserve. Below, tasting at Maker’s Mark.

By Day: The Kentucky Bourbon Trail www.kybourbontrail.com Last year, more than 500,000 people toured at least one distillery on the Kentucky Bourbon Trail. The loop starts in Louisville and winds southeast through Clermont, Bardstown and Loretto before turning northeast toward Lawrenceburg, Versailles and Lexington. Along the way, the trail encompasses eight distilleries: Evan Williams Bourbon, Four Roses, Heaven Hill, Jim Beam, Maker’s Mark, Town Branch, Wild Turkey and Woodford Reserve. All eight distilleries offer tours and tastings. Admission is around $10 per person but typically includes a commemorative tasting glass or other souvenir.

travel huge like Jim Beam but then also see something smaller,” Johnson says. “People like to see how each distillery skins the bourbon cat a little bit differently.” Likewise, trail organizers recently partnered with the Bluegrass Cycling Club to identify safe, scenic routes for bourbon-imbibing cyclists. » Where to Stay and Eat: Louisville and Lexington are the primary overnight stops, but Kentucky offers plenty of small-town lodging along the way. “Big cities like Lexington and Louisville have the nightlife,” Johnson says, “but it’s also nice to see some historic towns that have B&Bs and things of that nature.” One top choice is the Beaumont Inn in Harrodsburg, where personalized bourbon tasting sessions book up months in advance. Its tavern stocks more than 75 bourbons, and its restaurant serves dishes like bread pudding with warm bourbon sauce. The Gratz Park Inn — located in Lexington’s picturesque where to stay historic district — is another Beaumont Inn 638 Beaumont Inn favorite among overnight travDrive, Harrodsburg, elers. Its restaurant, Jonathan (859) 734-3381, www. beaumontinn.com at Gratz Park, has a reputation Gratz Park Inn for rethinking classic Southern 120 W. Second St., foods. Old-fashioned country Lexington, (859) 231-1777, www.gratzparkinn.com ham, for example, becomes a Holly Hill Inn stuffing for pot stickers served 426 N. Winter St., Midway, (859) 846-4732, with bourbon-soy dipping www.hollyhillinn.com sauce. The bourbon menu has more than 100 offerings and is a who’s who of Kentucky distilleries. Nearby, in horse country, the Holly Hill Inn is a fine-dining favorite. (Despite the name, it’s just a restaurant, not a hotel.) Owners Chris and Ouita Michel are both graduates of the Culinary Institute of America, and the menu offers seasonal entrees » What’s New: Jim Beam recently over- like oven-roasted chicken with bourbonhauled its distillery tour to offer a more in- sorghum glaze. Ouita is also the chef in residence at the Woodford Reserve Distillery, depth look at the art and science of making bourbon. The interactive facility offers up- so you can sample her cooking at its themed close views of the manufacturing process, tasting dinners and other special events. as well as a decanter museum, gift shop and tasting room. At the cooperage demonstra- » How to Stay Safe: Bourbon tastings tion, guests learn why (and how) Jim Beam and driving tours aren’t an ideal mix, especially if you’re planning to visit multistill makes its bourbon barrels by hand. ple distilleries on the same day. If no one Responding to demand, Kentucky in your group volunteers to be the desigBourbon Trail organizers recently created a sister trail highlighting small craft distill- nated driver, you may want to call Mint eries. The list includes seven destinations, Julep Tours. The company has several such as the Limestone Branch Distillery in standard Kentucky Bourbon Trail itineraries or will design a custom tour to suit Lebanon and the Old Pogue Distillery in your interests. (502) 583-1433, www.mint Maysville. “We’re seeing a lot of tandem juleptours.com trips where people like to see something SOU T H

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Brown Hotel. Below, Haymarket Whiskey Bar

By Night: The Urban Bourbon Trail www.bourboncountry.com Louisville has been the international bourbon capital since the 1780s, when Evan Williams Bourbon sold its first whiskey here. Before Prohibition, the portion of Main Street known as Whiskey Row was home to as many as 50 distilleries, many of which have since been revived. The Urban Bourbon Trail celebrates that legacy. Developed in 2008, it highlights Louisville restaurants and bars that stock at least 50 types of bourbon. A few have 150 or more. “We started with eight restaurants on the trail, and we’re now at 26 spots,” Yates says. “The interest in bourbon continues to buzz globally, but especially in Louisville, which we think of as the center of the bourbon universe.” Urban Bourbon Trail destinations range from dive bars to white-tablecloth restaurants, with something to fit where to stay every budget. Before you get started, Brown Hotel 335 W. Broadway, head to the visitor center to pick up Louisville, (502) 583-1234, a free trail passport, also available www.brownhotel.com as a smartphone app. If you visit at Seelbach Hotel 500 S. Fourth St., least six Urban Bourbon Trail destiLouisville, (502) 585-3200, www.seelbachhilton.com nations, you earn a free T-shirt. » What’s New: The latest addition to

the Urban Bourbon Trail (and the statewide Kentucky Bourbon Trail) is the Evan Williams Bourbon Experience. It offers distillery tours and tasting flights in several themed tasting rooms, including a vintage speakeasy. Evan Williams Bourbon is the world’s second-best-selling Kentucky bourbon, and its primary facility is in Bardstown, but the downtown distillery focuses on artisanal small batches. “After touring all of the other distilleries in our state, this one stands out as something completely different,” Yates says. “It follows not only the timeline of Evan Williams Bourbon, who is legendarily Louisville’s first commercial distiller, but it also follows Louisville history. Even if you’re not a bourbon lover but are interested in American history, this distillery has a story to tell.” But it will soon have some stiff competition: bourbon brands Michter’s and Angel’s Envy are both slated to open their own downtown distillery experiences in 2014. 528 W. Main St., Louisville, www.evanwilliams.com/visit.php Where to Eat: In Louisville, even breakfast is an opportunity to celebrate bourbon.

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Start your day at Dish on Market, which is best known for its Truman’s Breakfast — eggs, bacon and a shot of bourbon on the side, just like President Harry Truman used to demand. For a farm-to-fork dining experience highlighting local, seasonal ingredients, try Harvest, which offers bourbon tasting flights alongside dishes like steak with apple-bourbon sauce. Or, for Italian favorites with a bourbon twist, book a table at Vincenzo’s. “In any other city, you’d scratch your head about an Italian restaurant participating in this,” Yates says. “But they sell a lot of bourbon, and they infuse it into some of their entrees.” For after-dinner drinks (bourbon, of course), head to the Haymar-


where to eat

Dish on Market

434 W. Market St., Louisville, (502) 315-0669, www.dishonmarket.com

Harvest

624 E. Market St., Louisville, (502) 384-9090, www.harvestlouisville.com

Haymarket Whiskey Bar

331 E. Market St., Louisville, (502) 442-0523, www.haymarketwhiskeybar.com

Silver Dollar

1761 Frankfort Ave., Louisville, (502) 259-9540, www.whiskeybythedrink.com

Vincenzo’s

150 S. Fifth St., Louisville, (502) 580-1350, www.vincenzos italianrestaurant.com

Repeal Day class at the Distilled Spirits Epicenter

ket Whiskey Bar or the Silver Dollar, where all 100 of the Kentucky bourbons in stock are available in tasting pours. to Stay: The Urban Bourbon Trail includes six hotels, all of which have fully stocked bourbon bars. For a glamorous experience reminiscent of “The Great Gatsby,” book a room at the Seelbach Hotel, where writer F. Scott Fitzgerald set the fictional wedding of Tom and Daisy Buchanan. Open since 1905, the Seelbach has hosted celebrities, politicians and even gangsters like Al Capone. Another classic choice is the ornate Brown Hotel, known for its lavish lobby bar and its legendary Hot Brown

» Where

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University. Its Moonshine class is a one-day overview of the distilling process, while its two-hour Bourbon Enthusiast class offers a guided tasting flight complete with history, legends and little-known facts about Kentucky’s signature spirit. History buffs may enjoy the Repeal Day class, focused on how both drinkers and distillers skirted the law during Prohibition. 801 S. Eighth St., Louisville, (502) 3018130, www.ds-epicenter.com to Sober Up: When you need a break from the booze, take a walking tour of historic Old Louisville, one of the largest historic districts in the nation. Or hitch a ride on the Belle of Louisville, the nation’s oldest operating steamboat. Two-hour sightseeing cruises include lunch or dinner and performances by a local bluegrass band. Of course, you could always sign up for the bourbon cruise, instead. Belle of Louisville: 401 W. River Road, Louisville, (866) 832-0011, www.belle oflouisville.org

» Where

sandwich. Invented in the 1920s as a latenight snack for hotel guests, the dish is an open-faced turkey sandwich topped with bacon and Mornay sauce. to Learn: No matter how much you think you know about bourbon, visit the Distilled Spirits Epicenter, home to the artisanal Grease Monkey Distillery and — more importantly — Moonshine

» Where

Family is

Imagine what our families can be together. Aspen Trace is CarDon’s newest family-first senior living community coming to your area. To learn about assisted living or healthcare options available at Aspen Trace, call us at (812) 332-2265 or download Power of Family resources at www.aspentrace.us. 3154 S. SR 135, Greenwood, Indiana 46143 72

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INDIANAPOLIS SOUTHSIDE

HARLEY-DAVIDSON

Closer to Home

Indiana Distilleries You don’t have to leave the Hoosier state to discover distilleries with an artisan appeal. They are starting to spring up everywhere, much as microbreweries have done in recent years. One reason for the recent boom: Before this year, Indiana law said distillers could only sell their products to distributors. But a new law that took effect July 1 allows small-scale distillers to sell liquor directly to customers, just as breweries and wineries do. Here are three Indiana distilleries that are jumping on the artisan trend:

Starlight Distillery

Part of the Huber’s Orchard, Winery and Vineyards farm complex in southern Indiana, Starlight Distillery pushed hard for the new law so the farm could expand its product offerings. The product list includes ports, infusions and several varieties of brandy. www.huberwinery.com

Cardinal Spirits

gIVE THE

gIfT Of HARLEY-

DAVIDSON

®

YOU cAN’T gO wRONg.

Slated to open in Bloomington in 2014, this craft distillery aims to specialize in whiskey, gin, vodka and fruit liqueurs. blog.cardinalspirits.com

Heartland Distillers

Based in Indianapolis, this distillery is known for its award-winning vodka and gin. It also partners with Colglazier & Hobson Distilling Co. to produce artisan bourbon and Sorgrhum, the nation’s first sweet sorghumbased liquor. www.heartlanddistillers.com

SouthsideHarley.com • 317-885-5180 I-65 & Southport Rd. Exit 103


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Right at Home Kerry Prather came to Franklin College on a whim. Thirty years later, he still has no plans to leave. By Ed Wenck | Photography by Josh Marshall

Coaching Photo provided by the daily Journal

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Photos of the Prathers’ Franklin College heritage are displayed in their home. The largest photo in the above grouping celebrates Prather’s 100th win at Franklin College in 1990.

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In the early 1980s, one of Kerry Prather’s closest pals was a man named Mike DeBord. They were both coaches; Kerry was then the head man for the South Decatur High School boys basketball squad in Greensburg, and Mike was coaching football. Mike told his friend he was heading to Franklin College to take an assistant coaching job on the football team. “I just jumped in the car and came with him,” Kerry says. It was a turning point. Kerry struck up a conversation with then-head hoops coach Len Orr, and by the time the next season rolled around, Kerry was on the sidelines as an assistant. When Orr stepped away, Kerry was named interim head coach, and then the interim prefix dissolved halfway through his first season at the helm. He was all of 27 years old. Seven years later, he became the athletic director. Kerry hadn’t planned to be at Franklin College for that long; in fact, he’d been warned by some of his colleagues there: “This place gets into you.” The town and the school have gotten into him, all right. It’s been 30-plus years, and he has no plans to leave. Be advised: Kerry isn’t misty about it. He has a calm demeanor, a genteel tone that seems to conjure the very image of a town like Franklin. You can hear how easily a man like


“Our life together started here at Franklin.” — Cindy Prather

him fits among the bucolic tree-lined streets, the town square, the diners and shops along the quaint main drag. Not to mention the college. “(My family and I) just love Franklin,” he says. “It’s the ideal place for us. The proximity to Indianapolis is wonderful, but really, it’s a ‘bigger small town.’ “I don’t think we appreciate that—as a college and a town—since it’s always been this way. … It’s such a great relationship between the college and the community, and it’s not that way every place. I think it’s because a lot of alums choose to stay here.”

Kerry met his wife, Cindy, at the school after friends set them up on a blind date. “Our life together started here at Franklin,” she says. They were to be married during the summer of 1985, but the fire in April of that year that consumed Old Main, the iconic clock tower at the campus entrance, squeezed them out of Franklin’s chapel. Other groups simply needed the space, and the couple adjusted. That willingness to be flexible—to do what the community needed when it needed it—didn’t go unnoticed. ‘The SOU T H

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“There’s a basketball culture in Franklin—the high school had a lot of success, the college had a lot of success...” — Cindy Prather

Robbie Prather, left, grew up around the Franklin College program, led by his father for 31 years. They were photographed together in March when Robbie announced he would play for his father at Franklin College.

Prather is congratulated by Franklin College President James Moseley on his 400th career win in a ceremony before a Jan. 23 game against visiting Hanover College. At center is Jim Oxley, who was an honorary captain for the Hanover game.

“I’ve got a chance right now to coach my son. And I think as that plays out, that will probably trump all those other experiences.” — Kerry Prather

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Photos provided by the daily Journal


community’s really, really embraced us,” says Cindy, fondly. “Franklin is full of friendly people, people who pitch in. Our kids’ baby sitters were college students.” Both Kerry and his wife are small town folk who knew hoops well. “I was raised in Cloverdale; he was raised in Loogootee,” says Cindy. “There’s a basketball culture in Franklin—the high school had a lot of success, the college had a lot of success—both he and I were raised in towns that had a lot of success in basketball. “I think if you were as interested in basketball as we were, you had some of that acceptance already.” Did Kerry ever have offers to leave? “Interest, yes, but you know, this is me,” Kerry says. “I love Division III; I love the kind of kids that are attracted to this kind of school. There’s not big money here and big crowds, but this is about the only level where you can coach kids who are primarily focused on their academic work and still be really passionate about their sport.” If George Bailey had coached basketball in “It’s a Wonderful Life,” this is how his character would sound. “He turned down offers so we would not have to uproot our family,” says Cindy. “We’re within a couple hours drive of his family and my family. “We also felt an obligation to give back,” she adds. “Franklin College took him in at a time when he was the youngest college basketball coach in Indiana.” Through the years, the Indiana University grad who majored in English and education has seen his job first as coach and later as athletic director become ever more complex as Franklin has added sports, including more women’s athletics. “The fall is a crazy time,” Kerry says. “I sometimes have pangs about not having as much face time with my players because we’ve got so many things starting at that time of year, but it kind of evens out. Basketball season is a time when we’ve really only got basketball and swimming going on. “People think I’m sitting around X-ing and O-ing all day long. There’s a good chance that right before I hit the practice court I’m having a conversation about women’s lacrosse or whatever’s come up.” Of course, there are advantages to recruiting for a Division III basketball program—especially in the state of Indiana. SOU T H

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Kerry plays piano before games to relax. Right, the ‘Tis the Season sign goes up on the porch every fall.

“There are so many kids so close to us,” he says. “You look at our roster; it doesn’t extend very far geographically. I’m blessed in terms of basketball. Our kids have been Indiana kids.” Kids who love the sport, yes, but who had no real shot of wearing IU’s cream and crimson or the Butler blue. “Division III is a step slow and an inch small,” he explains. “The really good players that we have had are … late bloomers who finally got it together. We had two-time All-American Jason Sibley that I’m quite sure by the end of his career here could’ve been on any of a number of Division I teams, but none of those teams would have been interested in him as a high school senior because he hadn’t developed yet.” So how does he identify that future great player? “I’d like to say it’s scientific, but it really isn’t,” Kerry says, with a laugh. 80

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“A lot of it is luck,” he explains. “You can go looking for some skill sets that may not completely convert into great scoring averages. I coached another All-American, John Holden from Martinsville, and he just played on bad teams. He was kind of hidden.” So what’s the biggest thrill for Kerry? “Championship teams, playing in the national tournament, advancing in the national tournament—those are all just enormous thrills,” he says. “But I’ve got a chance right now to coach my son. And I think as that plays out, that will probably trump all those other experiences.” Kerry’s son, Robbie, is now a freshman on the Grizzlies squad. When Robbie was younger, he had eyeballed other schools. It made Dad a little nervous that his only boy would break tradition, but it all worked out. “I was hopeful he would stay small,”

Kerry says. “That would mean he’d end up in Division III, and I knew if he ended up in Division III, he’d end up here.” That notion of Franklin as a once-andfuture home extended to the Prathers’ daughter, Katie, too. In a strange bit of symmetry, Kerry’s wife is the director of elementary education at Franklin, while their daughter, Katie, is a graduate of Franklin’s school of elementary education. (Katie now teaches kindergarten at St. Barnabas on Indy’s southside.) When Katie was considering where to attend college, Cindy took her to visit her alma mater, DePauw University. “We got over there, and she said, ‘Mom, I’m not getting out of the car. If I wanted to go someplace besides Franklin, I would’ve let you know,’” Cindy recalls. “Robbie felt the same way,” Cindy adds. “Franklin will always be where the kids feel most at home.”


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Academic

Aces Their stories are varied. Their successes are many. Here, we salute five of the southside’s scholastic all stars. By Ashley Petry Photos by Photography by melinda

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Joel Flynn Senior, Center Grove High School

» As soon as he could walk, Joel Flynn started dancing his way toward Broadway. He was dancing competitively by the age of 4, and at Center Grove he is a standout in both the drama and choir programs, performing in productions of “Footloose” and “Cinderella” and singing with the top-ranked CG Sound System, CG Singers and Surround Sound choirs. “I’ve been performing ever since I can remember,” Flynn said. “I want to pursue it as a career for the rest of my life, and it’s something I can’t live without.” That commitment may soon pay off. Flynn recently auditioned for the touring production of “Newsies,” making it all the way to the final audition in New Report Card York City. He is keeping his fingers crossed for good news, GPA: 3.97 but he said the audition was a Favorite teachers: Jennifer positive experience either way. Dice and Christopher Pratt, “It definitely gave me a his current and former positive outlook and gave choir directors. “Both of them have been very me reassurance that I will influential on my journey be able to pursue a career through high school, and in the performing arts, on I’m really thankful that Broadway and in musical they’ve been there to support me and teach me.” theater,” he said, “just being Favorite recent read: able to be comparable to men The Divergent series and boys who are already by Veronica Roth working in New York.” What’s playing on the Meanwhile, Flynn has his iPod: James Blake eye on a college degree in musical theater, so he hasn’t neglected his studies. He takes AP and honors classes and is a member of National Honor Society and Spanish Honor Society. One of his best academic subjects is English. “We wrote a statement about something positive that we believe in,” he said. “My statement was believing in the power of overcoming obstacles and not letting anything get in your way.” For students like Flynn, time management may be the most significant obstacle of high school. (He also serves in student government and volunteers at a residential facility for atrisk teens.) Despite the scheduling hassles, Flynn said, extracurricular activities are an essential part of the high school experience. “You get to surround yourself with people who love the same things you do,” he said. “Find people you’re going to be friends with forever and find a niche that can help you get through any tough times you may have.” SOU T H

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Austin Montgomery Senior, Greenwood High School Austin Montgomery knows exactly what he wants to do when he grows up: serve his country. He is already a member of the Civil Air Patrol, an auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force, and has applied to the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. This past summer he attended West Point’s Summer Leaders Experience, where he spent a week living the life of a West Point cadet. Report Card “I never really looked into the military until last year, and GPA: 4.56 once I started looking into the Favorite teacher: Becky Kehler, his science teacher. academics, I really liked what “She always pushes us, and I saw,” said Montgomery, she’s always prepared.” who hopes to major in Favorite recent read: “Unwind” business at the academy. by Neal Shusterman Montgomery already has What’s playing on the lots of practice serving his iPod: “Everything. community. At Greenwood Imagine Dragons. A lot of country music.” High School, he is president of the National Honor Society and active in the group’s community service efforts — including volunteering for Special Olympics events and helping with community cleanup projects. He also serves as a school ambassador, helping new students get acclimated to the building. The physical rigor of West Point will be no challenge for Montgomery, a middle linebacker and fullback for the football team. (He is also a team captain and four-time winner of the scholar-athlete award, meaning he had the highest GPA on the team each year.) This spring he’ll be back in action on the track team, focusing on shot put and discus. “My proudest accomplishment for sports was our football team,” he said. “We really came together as a family, and we all got along.” Montgomery balances those activities with his academic achievements, which include several years of scientific research. This year he is studying the effects of adrenaline on memory. During his sophomore year he studied the effects of nicotine on memory, and his test subject was an octopus who lived in the school lab. Meanwhile, Montgomery runs his own lawn care and snow removal business and sometimes works at his father’s southside shop, Kam Hydraulics. “My dad is probably my role model,” he said. “I think he’s a really good man, and he’s set a good example for me in life.” Although time management is a challenge for Montgomery, he encourages younger students to follow in his footsteps and get involved in lots of activities. “High school is more fun when you’re involved in stuff, and it’s easier to make friends and enjoy school,” he said. “I like to be on the go and have things to do.”

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Amy Tam Senior, Center Grove High School

» Sometimes high school is all about finding the right fit. Amy Tam found it, but only in a roundabout way. When she joined Center Grove High School’s awardwinning robotics team, 1741 Red Alert Robotics, she first tried to help out with the physics and engineering of designing the robots — 5-foot-tall machines that compete in designated tasks, like throwing Frisbees. Although the team has made it to the world championship three years in a row, Tam eventually discovered that the technical aspects of robotics weren’t a good fit for her skills. Instead, one of the mentors steered her toward the team’s social media and graphic design efforts. “The mentors push me really hard, and I really appreciate that. Report Card They don’t take no for an answer,” she said. “I really appreciated how GPA: 4.1 loving the mentors were with Favorite teacher: Amy Lapka, helping me find my strengths.” her art teacher. “I just The graphic design role was really like how supportive a perfect fit for Tam, who excels she is of everybody. She’s a wonderful person, in her art classes. This year she is and she is really giving. taking an Advanced Placement I love her for that.” class in studio art, which requires Favorite recent read: “Alice her to create a large portfolio of in Wonderland” by Lewis her artwork — primarily pencil Carroll. “Lewis Carroll was one of the most sketches and oil paintings. At the creative people that I’ve same time she juggles AP classes, ever read about. I really such as economics and calculus, enjoy his writing and all with online courses in astronomy, of the adaptations that have come out of it.” government and creative writing. What’s playing on the iPod: “A “It’s tough because you lot of indie. A lot of pop. have to manage your time The Killers. The Fratellis. really well,” she said. And there’s a bit of Justin Tam also participates in Timberlake in there.” community service activities, often through the robotics team. For example, the team recently arranged a robotics competition for middle school students, and the high school team planned the logistics, staffed the event and served as mentors. For Tam, finding her niche on the robotics team also shifted the focus of her career path, steering her away from a career in studio art. Although she hasn’t yet selected a college, she now plans to pursue a degree in industrial design, where she might design anything from cellphones to cars. “What it’s all about is designing how the world looks, because the world is run by artists nowadays,” she said. “I think it’s a worthwhile thing to pursue, and robotics had a lot to do with pushing me in that direction.”

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Madeline Wolf Junior, Greenwood High School

»The first time Madeline Wolf played basketball in elementary school, she hated it. When a classmate passed her the ball, she dropped it on the court and ran off, crying. But Wolf is nothing if not versatile. These days, she is a key player on the Greenwood High School basketball team, and she also plays on the volleyball team — where she just switched from the hitter position to the setter position. “That was new to me and very different, but it was what the team needed, and I wanted to help my team,” she said. For the naturally independent Wolf, the chief lesson of school Report Card athletics is that it’s OK — even necessary — to GPA: 4.37 rely on other people and Favorite teacher: Holly Wippermann, her English teacher. “She just makes collaborate with them to everything fun. We’re reading ‘The achieve a common goal. Scarlet Letter,’ and with everything She applies that lesson she does she incorporates to other extracurricular something fun and modern to make everything seem relevant, even activities, such as Spell when it feels like the most boring Bowl and the academic thing you’ve ever read. And she has teams for English literature, a lot of enthusiasm for what we’re history and art. doing, which affects everyone else.” “Mainly, I just really Favorite recent read: The Harry Potter series, by J.K. Rowling. “I grew like to read, so that up with those books and those drew me to the English characters. It makes me feel like a kid academic team,” she again, and that’s a good thing. You said. “Each season they grow up and get stressed out, but you have that to fall back on.” have a different theme, What’s playing on the iPod: “Just this and last year’s was year I started listening to One mythology, so we read the Direction, and all my friends make ‘Odyssey’ and ‘Antigone’ fun of me. I also love Taylor Swift and different plays.” and Ed Sheeran, and I have a lot of country music, too.” Not surprisingly, Wolf racks up volunteer hours at the library, where she helps out in the children’s section. And her class schedule is packed with opportunities for reading and writing, from literature courses to yearbook workshops. But, ever versatile, Wolf also challenges herself to excel in the sciences, such as biology and physics. “That has been a definite challenge,” she said. “But I think it’s good to have a competitive atmosphere and be challenged by your teacher and school to be a better student. That was good for me. But it was definitely difficult and frustrating at times.” Wolf isn’t yet sure where she’ll attend college, but she is looking at ways to combine her interests in writing and the sciences — for example, technical writing. In the meantime, she looks to her father for guidance. “He works so hard, and I know it. He comes home from work, and I know he’s tired, but he smiles for us anyway,” she said. “Seeing him work hard to provide for us makes me want to work hard in school and in sports to give something back to him.” 86

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Cameron Smock Senior, Roncalli High School

»In terms of extracurricular activities, Cameron Smock is what you might call a late bloomer. Although he is active on the student council, he just joined the group last year. And as a senior, he finally decided to nurture his talent for the trombone by joining Roncalli High School’s marching and concert bands. “The hardest thing to Report Card do (in high school) was GPA: 4.45 learn that it was cool Favorite teacher: “I genuinely to be involved,” said enjoy all the teachers Smock, who was recently I’ve had at Roncalli. crowned homecoming I’ve been lucky.” king. “I had to settle in Favorite recent read: “The and get comfortable Kite Runner” by Khaled and learn that it’s OK Hosseini. “I liked the story of redemption and guilt, to be yourself and do and I really liked how it what you want to do.” taught about Middle Eastern Not that he wasn’t culture and how that mixed with American culture. It already keeping busy. was cool to see how those Smock played football ideas came together.” throughout high school What’s playing on the iPod: Jack and served for two years Johnson, the Avett Brothers, as the team’s starting John Mayer, Johnny Cash, quarterback; now, he’s Drake and “tons of country.” looking for opportunities to continue playing football in college. Smock also serves as a peer mentor for Promise to Keep, an abstinence education program, and volunteers as a Eucharistic minister at his church. He excels in AP and honors classes, such as biology, chemistry, psychology and physics. “I don’t know what I want to major in (in college), which is a major crisis for me right now,” he said. “But I know that eventually I want to be a doctor. I’m just weighing the options for how to get there.” Smock said he is lucky to have had a wealth of positive role models, from his parents and grandparents to his many teachers and coaches. “Coach Scifres does a good job of teaching us not just about football but also about life lessons and religious lessons, so it all ties together, and I think that’s really neat,” he said. Now, he hopes he can influence younger students to avoid his mistake and get involved in extracurricular activities as soon as possible. “Joining the band this year, I’ve met so many people that I’ve gone to school with but never talked to, and they are great people that I enjoy spending time with every day,” he said. “High school is such a self-discovery time, and you don’t know who you are until you’ve exhausted all the options, and you’ve realized what you enjoy doing and what you don’t enjoy doing.”

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modern Marvel Local developer’s Bargersville home assumes contemporary character amidst unassuming surroundings

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by Jon Shoulders photography by Chris Whonsetler

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T

here were several reasons behind Tony Alderson’s stylistic and architectural choices when approaching the design of his new Bargersville home. He relished the opportunity to build something that would reflect his unique modern design preferences cultivated during 29 years in the development and construction business. As a new grandfather, he also wanted plenty of space for annual family gatherings and parties. However, the most salient reason was simple. “This was an opportunity for me to have fun, and that was the main goal,” he says. “I started out as an art major coming out of high school, and I enjoy the chance to use my creativity.” The 6,600-square-foot four-level home, which features three bedrooms, three full baths and two half-baths, was completed in March

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after a 12-month construction process. The residence sits on 40 acres of former farmland off Banta Road. Alderson and two partners purchased the property and separated it into five lots now known as Abaco Estates. Set comfortably back from the road, with a lengthy front driveway and a sprawling backyard enclosed by forest, the house is a welcome departure from his previous two homes, both of which were in crowded cul-de-sacs with neighbors 30 to 40 feet away. “When this land became available, I didn’t know if I was a country

boy or not, but the space I’ve come to enjoy,” he says with a grin. “On the other side of the ravine back in the woods, it’s like you’re in the middle of Brown County.” Born and raised in Indiana, Alderson was awarded a scholarship to the Herron School of Art and Design after graduating from Center Grove High School in 1984. He eventually transferred to IUPUI to study architecture and in 1989 landed a position at a local commercial development company. Seventeen years later, having worked his way up to a management

Alderson’s aesthetic inclinations subtly emerge throughout the home’s interior, from towering windows to brushed nickel fixtures to dark bamboo flooring on the main level. SOU T H

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Alderson’s home is situated on 40 acres. Above, Tony holds grandson, Anthony. Daughters from left are Sydney and Cassie.

role, Alderson struck out on his own and began Alderson Commercial Group, a company that offers comprehensive commercial building and development solutions, such as site selection, interior space planning and construction services. Alderson’s aesthetic inclinations subtly emerge throughout the home’s interior, from towering windows to brushed

nickel fixtures to dark bamboo flooring on the main level. “Architecturally, I’m a fan of Frank Lloyd Wright—long eaves, glass corners and a lot of symmetry,” he says. “I tried to keep that in mind while designing the house.” Alderson turned to Keith Cole and Jill St. Claire of Mitsch Design in Carmel to help actualize his design concepts.

According to St. Claire, retaining an interior simplicity to complement the long, clean lines of the exterior became a primary focus. “There were a lot of unique features to incorporate that could have muddied the simplicity of the interior, but Tony was great to work alongside, and he understood the beauty of a more subtle design,” she says. SOU T H

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Greg Thompson of GRT Glass Design on Brookville Road created the kiln-fired laminate glass kitchen table top, which was completed by applying a textured mold to the underside during the heating process. A white onyx bar with stools and engineered quartz kitchen countertops made by Cambria, glistening with flecks of cream and blue, both add an understated spark to the surroundings. “The problem with building a modern, contemporary home is that you can’t find a lot of furniture,” Alderson says. “It seems like 70 to 80 percent of homes are traditional, tradesman style or country. You’re relegated to a lot of Internet searching and custom makes.” The hideaway room, as Anderson calls it, sits just off the kitchen, housing a washer, dryer and a drop-off storage

The hallway leading to the master bedroom is lined on one side with a computer station and built-in armoires, maximizing space without sacrificing visuals.

area for jackets, shoes and other accessories. “Then if you entertain, you literally can just shut the door and nobody sees coats and all that stuff,” he says. It’s hard to dispute Alderson’s impression that the home’s main living area offers a relaxing panoramic window view that no television screen could approximate. “People say, ‘Why don’t you have a TV in that room?’ Well, the view is my TV,’” he says. “I can just sit and relax, and talk to people who come over, and there’s a TV in the basement.” Adding to the living area’s cozy theme is a 10-foot, in-line fireplace and a daybed-style sofa that gives its occupant a front row seat for the outside view. The hallway leading to the master bedroom is lined on one side with a computer station and built-in armoires, maximizing space without sacrificing visuals. The second of the home’s two SOU T H

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fireplaces and floor-to-ceiling windows adorn the master bedroom, which connects to the master bath via an open space between the two—an idea Alderson made note of while staying at W Hotels in Chicago and New York. Twin sinks with floating cabinets flank the bathroom’s see-through space, and a shower with dual spouts and a separate tub help Alderson relax after a long day. The home’s temperature, lighting, television, fireplaces and even the window blinds can be adjusted via Control4 automation, a system Alderson set up on his iPhone, which routes a remote signal from a rack of receivers located in the basement. The system also features security monitoring for the exterior of the house. Outside, an in-ground pool with a tanning deck and black bottom, a matching hot tub with its own sound speakers and a gas fire pit make the backyard a 96

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relaxing retreat any time of the year. Five steps descend from the pool level to an outdoor patio where Alderson plans to add tables, a grilling set and stainless steel cabinets to help when entertaining. Glass doors with screens lead from the patio into the lower-level gaming and television area, complete with a bar and a display of shot glasses collected from Alderson’s travels around the world. With two daughters—Cassie, 26, and Sydney, 18—as well as a new baby grandson, Anthony, visiting and staying over often, Alderson feels the timing was perfect for constructing a home that combines character and comfort. “I’m soon to be the patriarch of the family, so my job is having enough room for parties where you could have a bunch of people in and out,” he says. “This year is the first Thanksgiving here and the first Christmas, and having the space for the family is really great.” SOU T H

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Amy and Ryan Abell with sons Liam, Noah and Tucker.

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Bringing

Tucker One southside couple goes on a physical — and spiritual — journey to adopt

home By Ashley Petry Photography by Josh Marshall

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Tucker at home in Greenwood.

Amy Abell was pregnant with her second child in 2011, she was certain her son, Liam, would be born in late April and was a bit perplexed when he didn’t arrive until early May. But now she knows the whole truth: She did have a son born in late April of that year, but he started his life thousands of miles away, in China, and he would be nearly 2 years old before Amy and her husband, Ryan, saw his photo for the first time. His name is Tucker, and Ryan and Amy brought him home in late October after a year-long adoption process — a roller coaster of heartache and joy that has renewed their faith and strengthened their family. Both native Hoosiers, Ryan and Amy met as students at Hanover College. After completing degrees in business (his) and psychology (hers), they married in 2005 and moved to the 100

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southside. They had two boys, Noah and Liam, and started designing their dream house, which they planned to build on four acres near Bargersville. But God, they say, had other plans. “After we got married, adoption was something we would occasionally talk about, like, ‘Yeah, after we have biological children, or if we can’t have biological children, maybe we’ll adopt,’” Amy said. “I think a lot of people go through that. It’s something you’ll do later, or someday.” Liam had been born with a minor cleft lip that required surgery, and Ryan and Amy had often wondered about the larger purpose of that experience. They made donations to Operation Smile, which pays for surgeries around the world for children with cleft lip and cleft palate. For a time, that seemed like enough.

Nearly 38 weeks after first seeing Tucker’s face, Ryan and Amy met their son in a hot, stuffy room at the Civil Affairs Building in Chongqing. Then, in spring 2012, Amy read a book called “Choosing to See,” by Mary Beth Chapman, about the experience of adopting children from China. “That really got me thinking,” Amy said. “She talks about being in an orphanage and seeing this little boy with cleft lip/cleft palate, who was so sick and malnourished because he couldn’t get enough nutrients with his condition. It was the very first moment that I thought, ‘Oh, kids with cleft lip and cleft palate need to be adopted.’” The thought weighed on her — at first once a week, then every day, then all the time. But it wasn’t a good time to adopt, she thought; she already had two young children, and the family was living in a rental house as they prepared to build their new home. Then, one day, she drove to Cincinnati with a friend for a quick getaway. After going for a run, her friend jumped in the shower in the hotel room, and Amy picked

Amy and Tucker on Gotcha Day in Chongqing, China.

up her phone to skim through her emails. One message was from Operation Smile, and Amy almost deleted it, but then decided to read it while waiting for her turn in the shower. The email included a story about a little boy in the Amazon who had cleft lip/cleft palate and who was repeatedly passed over for adoption because of his condition. “I was heartbroken,” Amy said. “I thought, ‘I could do that. I’ve been a mom to a child with that condition. The surgeries were really hard, and the recovery was really hard, but we had a great surgeon, we had Riley Hospital, we have the resources, and we’ve done this before.’

“The second I thought that, I heard a voice in my heart, and God said, ‘This is what I’m asking you to do.’” When Amy got home, she told Ryan about her experience, and he was open to the idea right away. But other family members were more hesitant, reminding Ryan and Amy that they already had their hands full with raising two young children and building a home. That Saturday evening, at church, a thought popped into Amy’s head during the music: that sometimes being obedient to God meant giving up your own dreams. When the music stopped, Amy sat down and opened the bulletin: The sermon topic SOU T H

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was, fittingly, obedience. The pastor talked about Katie Davis, a woman in her early 20s who moved to Uganda and opened an orphanage. Amy wept through the entire service. The decision was made. The next few months were a flurry of research, paperwork, home studies and other logistical challenges. The couple set aside their original construction plans and built a smaller home in Center Grove. Ryan and Amy chose to pursue adoption in China because the country has more children with cleft lip/cleft palate available for adoption than any other country, meaning they could complete the process more quickly. They reviewed countless photos and files, but none of the children stood out to them. On Jan. 23, 2013, the couple had an appointment to be fingerprinted for their background check, the final step before sending their adoption paperwork to China. As Amy waited in the parking lot for Ryan to arrive, she pulled out her phone and posted a status update on Facebook, celebrating this final step and saying she felt sure she would see her son or daughter very soon.

Liam, Tucker and Noah Abell

The instant she closed her Facebook app, her phone rang. It was the social worker at the adoption agency. She told Amy she had two boys whom other couples weren’t considering. Soon the agency would have to release the boys’ files and return their names to the general China adoption pool, where they were much less likely to be adopted. The social worker asked if she could send Amy pictures of the boys. But there was a catch: Neither one had cleft lip/cleft palate. At first, Ryan and Amy were confused and a bit angry: They had been very clear with the agency about their intention to adopt a child with cleft lip/ cleft palate. But they spent the afternoon looking at the two pictures, scrolling up and Brothers, Liam and Tucker. down on their screens — Amy at home and Ryan back at work. Both of them felt drawn to the same boy. “I’m the plan person. There’s a plan, you follow it, you execute it, and you’re done,” Amy said. “This was not part of the plan.” But they requested the boy’s medical

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file and shared it with a doctor at the Riley Hospital International Adoption Clinic. While they waited for a response, they prayed and talked — and fell totally in love with their son. “Even when the doctor was looking over the file, I started thinking, please don’t let anything be wrong so that we can move forward,” Ryan said. “And even before we heard from the doctor, I thought, it doesn’t matter if there is anything wrong.” Ryan and Amy soon discovered that cleft lip/cleft palate isn’t a significant barrier to adoption in China because adoptive parents understand that the condition can be fixed. The real problem, the agency told them, is that most adoptive families come to China looking for girls; they know baby girls are often abandoned there. Boys are therefore much harder to place. “We knew that God softened our hearts with this cleft lip that Liam was born with, but he was really just leading us the whole time to see these orphans — not just kids with cleft lip/cleft palate but all of them — to really look in their faces and start to grasp the conditions they live in,” Amy said. If Ryan and Amy had any doubts, they were quickly dispelled by what the couple call “God winks.” The day Amy turned in the paperwork to dissolve their contract for the land near Bargersville, she ran into an acquaintance at the library, only to discover that the woman had adopted a child


Visiting the Chongqing Zoo.

from Ethiopia. The day they first visited the playground in the neighborhood they now call home, they met a man whose son was adopted — who never stopped at the park but who had decided, just this once, to acquiesce to his son’s request for a few minutes of playground time. When they met their new neighbors, they discovered that the neighbors’ younger son was adopted from Russia. But the process wasn’t without challenges. Because of a database glitch in China, the couple waited nearly five months for their letter of approval — a process that normally takes 30 to 90 days. Amy feared that the file might never be processed at all, that it had slipped through the cracks. “It was all the emotions of sadness to complete anger, to just wanting to kick and scream, to wanting to sit on the couch and not do anything and just be sad,” she said. “You’d have these moments of hope, and then when nothing happened you would crash again.” The letter of approval finally came through in early August, and then the couple spent several months working on immigration paperwork and travel approvals. They finally began their journey to China on Oct. 9. While they waited for the letter of approval, Ryan and Amy also worked on raising funds for the adoption, which cost more than $30,000. Although they had some money set aside already, they also started a puzzle fundraiser. Family and friends could contribute $5 to have their name written on the back of a puzzle piece; the China-shaped puzzle would then hang in Tucker’s bedroom as a reminder of how many people were invested in his homecoming. The couple reached their $5,000 goal in just nine days. Meanwhile, a friend who is a longdistance runner raised pledges for his next race, contributing part of the proceeds to Tucker’s adoption and the rest to five other adoptive families. Ryan and Amy will also receive a $5,000 reimbursement from his employer, but they plan to pay that forward to other adoptive families. “Once you take the leap and you’re open to it, you see that these aren’t barriers,” Amy said. “You blow through those barriers and start fighting like Mama and Papa Bear to get these kids home.” During the long year of waiting, Ryan and Amy prepared Noah and Liam for the changes to come. During the day,

they talked about what Tucker might be doing. At dinner, they talked about what Tucker might be eating. At bedtime, they encouraged the children to include Tucker in their prayers. They shared the pictures and videos the orphanage sent, waiting for the moment when they could finally kneel down and look Tucker in the eyes. And then, on Oct. 14, they finally did. Nearly 38 weeks after first seeing Tucker’s face, Ryan and Amy met their son in a hot, stuffy room at the Civil Affairs Building in Chongqing. Soon they were playing with the toys Ryan and Amy had brought and giggling together as they watched cellphone videos of Noah and Liam. “Seeing Tucker for the first time was truly indescribable,” Amy said. “My heart was so full of joy, and even though I was holding him in my arms, I could not believe we were finally together.”

After 11 more days of paperwork, Ryan and Amy boarded an airplane with their new son in tow, eager to introduce him to his brothers. Soon he was meeting the family dog, building Lego castles with Noah and Liam, carving pumpkins for Halloween and dressing up as a frog for trick-or-treating. In other words, he fit right in. Now, Amy said, she is eager to close this chapter of their lives and move forward as a family. “The first word that comes to mind is relief,” she said. “Relief that we don’t have to be apart anymore, relief that there is no more paper chasing to do, and relief that we are home with all three boys and can just focus on growing into a family together. I still can’t believe he is here in our home and that God took us on this crazy adventure, all to bring him home.” SOU T H

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weddings

Breanna Cunningham and Devin Woods Married Sept. 21, 2013. Ceremony and reception at Sycamore Farm, Bloomington.

Breanna Cunningham and Devin Woods were both juniors in high school when they first met in 2007. “We had a lot of mutual friends, so we were eventually introduced to each other and hit it off,” Breanna recalls, though she says the pair didn’t start dating until later that year. Fast forward to Dec. 5, 2012. Breanna was a student at Indiana University, and Devin was driving down from Greenwood to meet her for dinner. “I went back to my apartment where he was already waiting for me with roses and proposed before I could even ask what was going on,” she says. “My husband and I are fairly laidback, so we wanted our wedding to be a casual celebration with our family and friends,” Breanna says. “Everything turned out like a dream.” They took a short honeymoon to Mackinac Island. “It was beautiful and very relaxing,” Breanna says. “We are hoping to save some money for a bigger trip for our first anniversary next fall.” Photography by Amanda DeBusk Photography

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Anne Kaylor and Eric Geary Married June 15, 2013. Ceremony at St. Barnabas Catholic Church; reception at Indiana War Memorial

Eric Geary and Anne Kaylor met as freshmen at Franklin College in 2008 through Anne’s brother, Jason, who was also a student at Franklin and had befriended Eric during the latter’s first semester there. On a group outing to Indiana Downs Horse Racing and Casino, Jason invited his younger sister along, and she quickly developed a crush on her brother’s friend. The two eventually began dating, and on Dec. 16, 2011, Eric and Anne went with a group of friends to a concert in Chicago. Eric had made arrangements with the lead singer of The Rocket Summer to be allowed on stage to pop the big question. “I can’t even remember what he said because I think I blacked out from excitement, but I’m sure it was the sweetest thing anyone has ever said to me,” Anne says. “Then he got down on one knee and proposed.” They honeymooned at Riviera Maya. Photography by Seth and Jamie Rainwater

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Katelynn Farmer and Samuel Lee Kemp Married Sept. 4, 2013. Reception at Indiana Downs.

Sam Kemp, of Circle K Farms in Bargersville, met his bride-to-be, Katelynn Farmer, in April 2011 when they were both working cattle, Farmer says. It was in the spring of 2013 at a barrel race rodeo event when he proposed to her. “That night after it (the race) was over and we were loading horses to go home, he asked me,” Farmer says. The couple decided to forgo a formal wedding and eloped in Fishers in September. They hosted a reception at Indiana Downs to celebrate with family and friends, and the pair hasn’t had a chance to honeymoon yet, Farmer says, because “we have too much livestock to take care of; it’s hard to get away.” Photography by Josh Marshall

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our side of town

Johnson County Community Foundation Gala Nov. 9 // Johnson County National Guard Armory 1

1. Lindsey Morgan, Joe and Julie Waltermann

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2. Greg Taylor, Mayor Joe McGuinness, Rafael Sanchez, Kate Taylor and Amy McGuinness 3. Joe and Amy Kelsay 4. Gail Richards, Steve Spencer and Sandy Daniels 5. Benji Betts, Chris Purcell and Loren Snyder

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6. Brooke and Matt Worland 7. Erin Dunn-Vance and Cindy Weddle 8. Paula and Bob Heuchan and Birgit and Ken Austin 9. Debbie Hillenburg and Ed Deiwert

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10. Patrice Hardy and Donna Wills 11. Elaine Stewart and Jon Daniels 12. Steve Spencer and Claire Meade

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Photos by Erin Davis, Bare Bones Photography


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Wine at the Line Oct. 5 // Mallow Run Winery

1. Sherry Parker, Diane Harter and Sabrina Collins 2. Phyllis Jensen, after completing the 5K 3. Runners and walkers grab some complimentary chocolate milk, courtesy of Prairie Farms.

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4. Father and son duo Mike, left, and Keegan Bradley. 5. Tonya Maschino, right, checks Eric Feider’s 5K time. 6. Jenna Porte and Alston Plessinger play with their umbrellas near the finish line. 7. Vicki Marshall 8. Runners make their way down Whiteland Road. 9. Runners and walkers go through the starting line. 10. Ian Thomas, winner of the 5-mile race portion, crosses the finish line.

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11. Jana Spears, Kathy Click and Judy Morie 12. Runners and walkers were treated to a complimentary glass of wine, courtesy of Mallow Run Winery.

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Photos by Mike Wolanin


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South Magazine’s Ladies Night Out

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Oct. 4 // Hilton Garden Inn

1. Chris Lennon with Aadvanced Limousines 2. Sherry Long with Southside Harley-Davidson 5

3. Kimberly Watts from American Cancer Society 4. Kelli Hinds Family Dentistry team 5. Marleen Kramer and Cole Hale from Reis-Nichols Jewelers 6. Women from Transformations Salon & Day Spa

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7. Leanne O’Neil with BrainCore Therapy 8. Hannah Kern and Michelle Gillen 9. Staff from Arni’s Restaurant

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Staff Photos


A Special Thank You to our Booth Vendors: Aadvanced Limousines | American Cancer Society American Girl Fashion Show | Arni's Restaurant Deck the Walls | FE MORAN Security Solutions | Financial Center Federal Credit Union Franciscan Physician Network | Franklin College | Fred Astaire Dance Studio Hamilton Facial Plastic Surgery | Integrated Therapeutic Wellness/Braincore Therapy Kelli Hinds Family Dentistry | Pilsung ATA Martial Arts | Reis-Nichols Fine Jewelers Southside Harley-Davidson and Buell | Transformations Salon & Day Spa

And our Major Sponsors:

We’re Looking Forward to Another Great Night Out in 2014!


our side of town

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Pub Crawl for Cancer Research Sept. 14 // Franklin Elks No. 1818 1. Marla Clark and Greg Hayes 2. Members of the Largest Pub Crawl team 3. Christian Smeltzer, Brian Carnes, Marita Thurman and Craig Wells 4. Debbie and Steve Bechman 5. Lisa and Scott Jones 6. Erin Hampton, Jenny Edwards and Linda Hines 7. Brandi Epperson, Linda Hogan, Dale Hughes and Beth Harriman

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Staff Photos


Dr. Gregory Raymond’s Retirement Party Sept. 26

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1. Dr. Gregory Raymond, right, handing Dr. Adam Richardson the keys. 2. Richardson and his wife, Betsy 3. Chelsi Yuodzukinas, Valerie Edley and Bonnie Ochsner 4. Raymond with Barb Kelso 5. Richardson, Raymond, Glenn Carlstrand and Sarah Topletz

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6. Scarlett Syse, Raymond and Eric Feathers 7. Betsy Richardson, Helen Hodgen, Dr. James Malooley and Kathleen Schutz

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Photos by joe Saba

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events

Compiled by Amy NOrman // photos provided

Through Dec. 30 | Christmas at the Zoo

Ongoing Through Dec. 22

Share a festive breakfast with Mrs. Claus, Snowflake Sam and Raggedy Ann. Once you’ve enjoyed your buffet meal, visit Santa at his holiday home and ride the Santa Claus Express. Time: 8, 8:30 and 9 a.m. Saturdays; 9, 9:30 and 10 a.m. Sundays in December. Reservations required. Location: Indiana State Museum, 650 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 232-1637 or indianamuseum.org.

Through Dec. 23

Five-time Grammy Award-winner and Indiana favorite Sandi Patty returns to the stage

with Jack Everly, the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra and a cast of singers and dancers during the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra’s Yuletide Celebration. The von Trapp Family Singers, the great-grandchildren of Captain von Trapp, will perform a “Sound of Music” medley. Location: Hilbert Circle Theatre, 45 Monument Circle, Indianapolis. Information: indianapolissymphony.org.

Through Dec. 30

Visit during Christmas at the Zoo and take in the many twinkling lights that blanket the Indianapolis Zoo. Sip a hot beverage, visit the animals, and enjoy exhibits and special activities. It runs Wednesdays to Sundays only. Location: Indianapolis Zoo, 1200 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. Information: indyzoo.com.

Through Dec. 31

“Celebration Crossing,” the Indiana State Museum’s annual holiday exhibit, continues the tradition begun in 1991 when the Santa Claus Express was acquired from the downtown Indianapolis L.S. Ayres store. Please note that no personal photos can be taken in Santa’s House except by his elves. Location: Indiana State Museum, 650 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 232-1637 or indianamuseum.org.

Through Jan. 19

Enjoy a locomotive wonderland with a network of trestles, bridges, tunnels and chugging trains during “Jingle Rails: The Great West Adventure.” Travel west on the Great Western Adventure and witness detailed replicas of national treasures while SOU T H

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making holiday memories. Location: Eiteljorg Museum, 500 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 636-9378 or eiteljorg.org.

December Dec. 8

St. Nikolaus Festival. Celebrate with traditional holiday activities, including a tree lighting, gingerbread house making, a puppet show and traditional holiday songs. Time: Registration begins at 12 p.m. Event from 1 to 4 p.m. Cost: $8, children under 12 are free. Location: The Athenaeum, 401 E. Michigan St. Information: (317) 655-2755, www.athfound.org.

Dec. 6-22

The Buck Creek Players presents “The Little Town of Christmas: Where There’s Always a White Christmas.” Everybody in the little town of Christmas is friendly and funny. You’re in for an evening of holiday

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laughter and warmth. Tickets: $16 adults; $14 children, students and senior citizens (62 and older). Location: 11150 Southeastern Ave., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 862-2270 or buckcreekplayers.com.

the Singing Hoosiers and the IU Wind Ensemble. Time: 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $14 to $20. Location: IU Auditorium, Bloomington. Information: iuauditorium.com.

Dec. 10-28

The Trans-Siberian Orchestra presents the live debut of the band’s multiplatinum rock opera, “The Lost Christmas Eve.” Times: 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $44.70 to $83.15. Location: Bankers Life Fieldhouse, 125 S. Pennsylvania St., Indianapolis. Information: bankerslifefieldhouse.com.

Put your entire family in the holiday spirit by attending “Christmas at the Puppet Studio.” Enjoy lots of audience participation, music, fun and free popcorn. Tickets: $12; 2 and younger free. Location: Peewinkle’s Puppet Studio, 25 E. Henry St., Indianapolis. Information: peewinklespuppets.com.

Dec. 11

Justin Timberlake brings his “The 20/20 Experience World Tour” to Indianapolis. Time: 8 p.m. Tickets: $47 to $177. Location: Bankers Life Fieldhouse, 125 S. Pennsylvania St., Indianapolis. Information: bankerslifefieldhouse.com. Enjoy the sounds of the holidays at “Chimes of Christmas,” Indiana University’s joyous annual holiday program, featuring

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Dec. 14

The St. Paul Lutheran Church Concert Series will feature the 45-voice Lafayette Bach Chorale Singers & Orchestra with a pre-concert harp recital at 6:40 p.m. Time: 7 p.m. Cost: Free. Location: St. Paul Lutheran Church, 6045 E. State St., Columbus. Make ornaments celebrating different cultures during the “Saturday Sampler: Holiday Ornaments.” Everyone will also have the opportunity to view the special holiday


events

exhibit. Time: 11 a.m. to noon. Location: Bartholomew County Historical Society, 524 Third St., Columbus. Information: (812) 372-3541 or bartholomewhistory.org.

Dec. 12 | Trans-Siberian Orchestra

Santa Claus is coming to the Greenwood Community Center to have breakfast. Breakfast includes pancakes, sausage, eggs, fruit, juice, milk and coffee. Children must be accompanied by a paying adult. After breakfast visit Santa in his workshop for your own photo with Santa or buy a professional photo from Pro-Tek Photography for $5. Seating is limited. Time: 9 a.m. Cost: $4 residents; $5 non-residents. Children younger than 3 are free. Location: Greenwood Community Center, 100 Surina Way, Greenwood. Information: (317) 881-4545 or greenwood.in.gov. Basketball fans will enjoy the Crossroads Classic. In Game 1, IU takes on Notre Dame. Purdue will battle Butler in Game 2. Game times: 3:15 and 6 p.m. Tickets: $60 to $90. Location: Bankers Life Fieldhouse, 125 S. Pennsylvania St., Indianapolis. Information: bankerslifefieldhouse.com.

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Dec. 14 | Santa at the Johnson County Museum

arrangements written by a living legend of the musical world, British composer John Rutter. Time: 7 p.m. Cost: Free. Location: St. Bartholomew Catholic Church, 1306 27th St., Columbus. Information: (812) 379-9353. Experience the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra and Indianapolis Symphonic Choir in Handel’s holiday masterpiece, “Messiah,” with its iconic “Hallelujah Chorus.” Time: 8 p.m. Tickets: Start at $20. Location: Clowes Memorial Hall, 4602 Sunset Ave., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 940-6444 or clowes.org.

Dec. 21-22

Straight No Chaser brings its a cappella sound to Indianapolis. Time: 8 p.m. Tickets: $22.50 to $42.50. Location: Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St., Indianapolis. Information: livenation.com.

Dec. 27

The Cult perform in Indianapolis. Time: 8 p.m. Tickets: $27.50 in advance; $30 day of show. Location: Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St., Indianapolis. Information: livenation.com. Don’t miss Breakfast with Santa, sponsored by the Franklin Parks & Recreation Department. Enjoy pancakes, sausage, eggs, fruit, doughnuts, juice, milk and coffee as well as a visit from the Big Guy himself. Time: 9 to 11 a.m. Limited space is available. Location: Franklin Cultural Art & Recreation Center. Information or to register: (317) 736-3689 or franklinparks.org. Enjoy a more traditional and relaxing holiday experience with Santa at the Johnson County Museum in Franklin. Time: Noon to 3 p.m. Photos with Santa will be available for purchase. Admission to the museum is free. Location: 135 N. Main St., Franklin. Information: (317) 3464500 or johnsoncountymuseum.org.

Dec. 15

Don’t miss “Celebrate the Holidays” with the Columbus Indiana Philharmonic and the Columbus Indiana Children’s Choir. Time: 3 and 7 p.m. Cost: $10 to $35. Location: Erne

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Auditorium, Columbus North High School, 1400 25th St., Columbus. Information: (812) 376-2638, ext. 110 or thecip.org. TobyMac brings his “Hits Deep” tour to Indianapolis with special guests Brandon Heath, Mandisa, Jamie Grace, Colton Dixon, Chris August and introducing Capital Kings. Time: 7 p.m. Tickets: $18 to $43. Location: Bankers Life Fieldhouse, 125 S. Pennsylvania St., Indianapolis. Information: bankerslifefieldhouse.com. X103 presents Not So Silent Night with Thirty Seconds to Mars. Time: 7 p.m. Location: Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St., Indianapolis. Information: livenation.com.

Dec. 20

Get in the holiday spirit with Mannheim Steamroller. Time: 8 p.m. Tickets: $42 to $67. Location: Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St., Indianapolis. Information: livenation.com.

Dec. 21

“A John Rutter Christmas,” featuring St. Bartholomew Choir and Fairlawn Presbyterian Chancel Choir, will be an inspiring program of beautiful Christmas originals and

Last Fridays Bluegrass is an open bluegrass jam for musicians of all ages. A mix of traditional bluegrass, newgrass, folk and gospel will be played. The public is welcome to participate or simply enjoy the music. Time: 7 to 9 p.m. Cost: Free. Location: Fairlawn Presbyterian Church, 2611 Fairlawn Drive, Columbus. Information: (812) 344-2664. See your favorite WWE superstars during The WWE Live Holiday Tour. Don’t miss CM Punk, Daniel Bryan, Randy Orton, Ryback, Paul Heyman, the Indianapolis debut of the Wyatt Family and more. Time: 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $15 to $95. Location: Bankers Life Fieldhouse, 125 S. Pennsylvania St., Indianapolis. Information: bankerslifefieldhouse.com.

Dec. 29

Led Zeppelin 2 performs. Time: 8 p.m. Tickets: $15. Location: Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St., Indianapolis. Information: livenation.com.

Dec. 31

Ring in the New Year with Mike Armstrong as he takes the stage as part of the Yes Comedy Showcase. Tickets: $20 advance; $25 at the door. Time: 7 and 9:30 p.m. Location: Yes Cinema, 328 Jackson St., Columbus. Information: (812) 378-0377 or yescinema.org. Celebrate the New Year on Georgia Street. Information: indydt.com. Don’t miss ONC Underground NYE. Time: 8:30 p.m. Tickets: $35. Location: Old


National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St., Indianapolis. Information: livenation.com. End the year with a bang with a family-friendly alcohol-free celebration at the Indiana State Museum. Face painting, stilt walkers, clowns and music highlight the evening. A balloon drop at 8 p.m. allows the little ones to celebrate the New Year in style. Reservations are accepted, but not required. Time: 6 to 9 p.m. Location: Indiana State Museum, 650 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 232-1637 or indianamuseum.org.

Jan. 3

First Fridays for Families presents Johnny Magic. This interactive show includes silly characters, colorful props, fun music, audience participation and jaw-dropping magic. Cost: Free. Time: 6 p.m. Location: The Commons, 300 Washington St., Columbus. Information: (812) 376-2539 or artsincolumbus.org.

Jan. 14

Join actor and teaching artist Will Gould for Clowes Conversations: Theatre Radio Play. Learn how storytelling, sound effects and music helped create the stage for audible theaters throughout American living rooms. Tickets: Free, but required. Time: 7:30 p.m. Location: Clowes Memorial Hall, 4602 Sunset Ave., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 940-6444 or clowes.org. Project Foodie: the Food of Downton Abbey. If you are a fan of “Downton Abbey” you may remember the Dowager Countess remarking that “it seems a pity to miss such a good pudding.” During Project Foodie, explore a few of the recipes from the show. Time: 6 p.m. Location: Greenwood Public Library, 310 S. Meridian St., Greenwood. Information: (317) 8811953 or www.greenwoodlibrary.us.

Original Italian Ice Cream

Jan. 18

Don’t miss Dancing with the Stars Columbus Style, an event that benefits Children Inc. and Family School Partners. Time: 2 and 7 p.m. Cost: Matinee tickets $15 each or a table of 10 for $200; evening tickets $35 each or a table of 10 for $400. Location: Clarion Hotel, Jonathan Moore Pike, Columbus. Information: (812) 314-3860. The St. Bartholomew Concert Series presents “The Journey with Everett Greene,” bassbaritone, and his jazz combo. The Emmy Award winner and smooth jazz singer SOU T H

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returns to perform jazz selections, including compositions written for Martin Luther King Jr. Time: 7:30 p.m. Cost: Free. Location: St. Bartholomew Catholic Church, 1306 27th St., Columbus. Information: (812) 379-9353.

Jan. 20

The Columbus Area Arts Council presents the Living Voices’ production of “The Right to Dream” in honor of Martin Luther King Jr. Day. The struggle and sacrifice for civil rights in America is witnessed in this compelling story. Time: 2 p.m. Cost: Free. Location: The Commons, 300 Washington St., Columbus. Information: (812) 376-2539 or artsincolumbus.org. The Harlem Globetrotters visit Indianapolis bringing the world’s tallest pro basketball player and the shortest Globetrotter ever. Time: 2 p.m. Tickets: $26 to $117. Location: Bankers Life Fieldhouse, 125 S. Pennsylvania St., Indianapolis. Information: bankerslifefieldhouse.com.

Through Dec. 23 | Sandi Patty with the ISO

Jan. 22 to 26

Enter a world of wonder where heroes and hearts prevail in “Disney on Ice Princesses & Heroes.” Times vary. Tickets: $6.50 to $73. Location: Bankers Life Fieldhouse, 125 S. Pennsylvania St., Indianapolis. Information: bankerslifefieldhouse.com.

Jan. 24

Ivy Tech Community College is proud to present “An Evening of Stand-Up Comedy featuring Greg Hahn.” Hahn has parlayed his absurdly energetic all-out style of physical humor, one-liners and crowd work into a performance of pandemonium and fun. Catering will be by 450 North Brewing Co./ Simmons Winery. Time: 7 p.m. Cost: $45 per person in advance or $50 per person at the door; $80 per couple; $300 table of 8. Location: The Commons, 300 Washington St., Columbus. Information: (812) 374-5342 or ivytech.edu.

Jan. 24-25

Pianist Rich Ridenour joins his son, Branden Ridenour, for “I Love a Piano.” Enjoy celebrated hits from classical to classic rock, including a tribute to Liberace and Victor Borge. Tickets: $15 to $54. Location: Hilbert Circle Theatre, 45 Monument Circle, Indianapolis. Information: indianapolissymphony.org.

Jan. 24 to Feb. 2

The Buck Creek Players presents “Vintage

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Hitchcock,” a live radio play by Joe Landry. Spies, murder, love and other trademarks of Alfred Hitchcock come to life in the style of a 1940s radio broadcast of the master of suspense’s earlier films. Tickets: $16 adults; $14 children, students and senior citizens (62 and older). Location: 11150 Southeastern Ave., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 862-2270 or buckcreekplayers.com.

Jan. 25

Bob Zany takes the stage as part of the Yes Comedy Showcase. Tickets: $20 advance; $25 at the door. Time: 7 and 9:30 p.m. Location: Yes Cinema, 328 Jackson St., Columbus. Information: (812) 378-0377 or yescinema.org. Not everyone begins the new year on Jan. 1. Celebrate the Lunar New Year during the “Saturday Sampler: Year of the Horse.” Explore the Chinese zodiac calendar, make some horse crafts and try Chinese New Year traditions. Be sure to wear something red for good luck. Time: 11 a.m. to noon. Location: Bartholomew County Historical Society, 524 Third St., Columbus. Information: (812) 372-3541 or bartholomewhistory.org. Clowes Hall welcomes “The Intergalactic Nemesis Book I,” a one-of-a-kind theatrical experience that mashes radio drama with

comic books. The show consists of three actors, dozens of characters, hundreds of sound effects, thousands of notes, and more than 1,250 full-color, high-res images blasting from a two-story-high screen. Time: 3 and 8 p.m. Tickets: Start at $35. Location: Clowes Memorial Hall, 4602 Sunset Ave., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 940-6444 or clowes.org. Make it a full day of Intergalactic Nemesis fun with the Out of this World Feast with the cast of the show. Time: 6 p.m. Tickets: $30. Location: Clowes Memorial Hall, 4602 Sunset Ave., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 940-6444 or clowes.org.

Jan. 27

View the screening of “The Big Picture: Rethinking Dyslexia.” Sponsored by the International Dyslexia Association and Decoding Dyslexia Indiana. Time: 6 p.m. Location: Greenwood Public Library, 310 S. Meridian St., Greenwood. Information: (317) 881-1953 or www.greenwoodlibrary.us.

Jan. 28

“The Very Hungry Caterpillar” and other Eric Carle favorites return to Clowes Hall. This extraordinary puppet adaptation features blacklight technology to capture the charm and visual style of three favorite


books by Carle. Time: 10 a.m. Tickets: $15. Location: Clowes Memorial Hall, 4602 Sunset Ave., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 940-6444 or clowes.org.

Jan. 28-29

Travel back in time to a magical moment in rock ’n’ roll history—a famed and fateful recording session that brought together music legends Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis and Carl Perkins. “Million Dollar Quartet,” the hit Broadway musical inspired by this real-life, impromptu, clash of the musical titans, brings you inside the recording studio with these four major talents. Time: 8 p.m. Tickets: $38 to $62. Location: IU Auditorium, Bloomington. Information: iuauditorium.com.

Jan. 30

In cooperation with Indiana Landmarks and the Indiana Modern Committee, local experts and former colleagues of Evans Woollen discuss the effect Clowes Hall had and continues to have in the world of modern architecture during Clowes Conversations: The Architecture of Clowes Hall. Time: 7:30 p.m. Tickets: Free, but required. Location: Clowes Memorial Hall, 4602 Sunset Ave., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 940-6444 or clowes.org.

Jan. 31-Feb. 1

Written on a grand scale for orchestra including organ, a battery of percussion and an off-stage brass band, Strauss’ “Alpine Symphony” is a breathtaking masterwork. Tickets: $15 to $80. Location: Hilbert Circle Theatre, 45 Monument Circle, Indianapolis. Information: indianapolissymphony.org.

Feb. 1

The Columbus Indiana Philharmonic performs “Classical Mystery Tour: A Tribute to the Beatles.” The full show presents 30 Beatles tunes from the early years through the solo years. Time: 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $15 to $50. Location: Erne Auditorium, Columbus North High School, 1400 25th St., Columbus. Information: (812) 376-2638, ext. 110 or thecip.org.

Feb. 1-28

“Feed Your Mind – Read!” Winter reading is open to all ages. Register at one of four branches: Clark Pleasant, Franklin, Trafalgar or White River. Visit the library at least four times during the month, get your card and be rewarded with a prize SOU T H

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Jan. 20 | The Harlem Globetrotters

each time you visit. Earn an extra bonus ticket for completing the library scavenger hunt. Location: Johnson County Public Library. Information: (317) 738-2833.

Feb. 5

David Hochoy, Dance Kaleidoscope artistic director, moderates a conversation with members of the Martha Graham Dance Co., engaging them in stories of their lives, how and why they started to dance, where their career path has taken them and where their future leads during Clowes Conversations: Life of a Dancer. Time: 6 p.m. Tickets: Free, but reservations required. Location: Clowes Memorial Hall, 4602 Sunset Ave., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 940-6444 or clowes.org.

Feb. 7

First Fridays for Families presents a musical show by Billy Jonas. It is a musical

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conversation and a sonic celebration where the audience makes the music. Cost: Free. Time: 6 p.m. Location: The Commons, 300 Washington St., Columbus. Information: (812) 376-2539 or artsincolumbus.org. The Martha Graham Dance Co. finishes a week-long residency at Clowes Hall with a special performance. Time: 8 p.m. Tickets: Start at $25. Location: Clowes Memorial Hall, 4602 Sunset Ave., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 940-6444 or clowes.org.

Feb. 7-8

Follow the classic tales of Don Juan and Till Eulenspiegel, the inspiration behind some of Richard Strauss’ most popular work, during “Romance and Riddles: The Music of Richard Strauss.” Tickets: $15 to $80. Location: Hilbert Circle Theatre, 45 Monument Circle, Indianapolis. Information: indianapolissymphony.org.

Feb. 8

Love is in the air during “Saturday Sampler: Victorian Valentines.” The Victorians were masters of showcasing sentimentality using every scrap they had to create elaborate tokens of affection. View some examples of Valentines and then make some of your own to share with someone you love. Time: 11 a.m. to noon. Location: Bartholomew County Historical Society, 524 Third St., Columbus. Information: (812) 372-3541 or bartholomewhistory.org. The Johnson County Museum is hosting a Victorian Valentine Workshop open to children of all ages. Visitors will learn the history of the valentine, see a display of Victorian era valentines from the museum’s collection and have the opportunity to make their own. Admission to the museum and participation in the valentine workshop are free. Time: noon. Location: 135 N.


Main St., Franklin. Information: (317) 3464500 or johnsoncountymuseum.org.

Feb. 13-16

Friends Used Book Sale at the Franklin Branch at 401 State St., Franklin. Times: 4 to 8 p.m., Thursday; 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., Friday; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday; 1 to 4 p.m. Sunday. Location: Johnson County Public Library/ Franklin Branch. Information: (317) 738-2833.

Feb. 14

The 2014 PowerShares Series tennis circuit heads to Indianapolis with John McEnroe, Jimmy Connors, Jim Courier and Mark Philippoussis. Time: 7 p.m. Tickets: $25 to $200. Location: Bankers Life Fieldhouse, 125 S. Pennsylvania St., Indianapolis. Information: bankerslifefieldhouse.com.

Feb. 14-15

A smorgasbord of pottery, jewelry and artwork to suit every taste will kick off the art fair season at the Indiana State Museum’s 11th annual Indiana Art Fair. The juried show is a great place to see art by more than 70 Indiana artists. Location: Indiana State Museum, 650 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 232-1637 or indianamuseum.org.

Feb. 14-16

From the classic love story of Romeo and Juliet to the timeless theme “As Time Goes By” from “Casablanca,” the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra performs a selection of some of the most well-known and romantic classical, pop and jazz standards. Tickets: $15 to $88. Location: Hilbert Circle Theatre, 45 Monument Circle, Indianapolis. Information: indianapolissymphony.org.

Feb. 15

Nick Griffin takes the stage as part of the Yes Comedy Showcase. The event is a fundraiser for Lincoln-Central Neighborhood Family Center. Tickets: $20 advance; $25 at the door. Time: 8 p.m. Location: Yes Cinema, 328 Jackson St., Columbus. Information: (812) 378-0377 or yescinema.org. Bridging the worlds of film and music, Hollywood’s critically acclaimed live concert experience “For the Record” is a unique fusion of music, theatre and film that brings motion pictures to life in a concert setting. “Tarantino in Concert” is a high-octane ride of songs and scenes from the films of the great Quentin Tarantino: “Reservoir Dogs,” “Pulp

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Licensed Sales Assistant, NMLS #868535 Direct: 317.886.5202 eFax: 317.534.3393 stefanie.sanders@stonegatemtg.com

THE FIRST STEP TO HOME OWNERSHIP

Get pre-approved with Stonegate Mortgage Corporation Stonegate Mortgage Corporation 1499 Windhorst Way, Suite 200, Greenwood, IN 46143 Located at I-65 and Main Street

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events

Fiction,” “Kill Bill,” “Jackie Brown,” “Death Proof” and “Inglourious Basterds.” Time: 8 p.m. Tickets: Start at $40. Location: Clowes Memorial Hall, 4602 Sunset Ave., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 940-6444 or clowes.org.

Feb. 15 | Daddy/Daughter Dance

Moms, enjoy a night out for just you and your sons, ages 3 to 12, at Hi-Way Lanes in Franklin. Cost includes two hours of unlimited bowling, shoe rental, pizza, soft drinks and party favors. Cost: $25 for residents; $27 for non-residents. Time: 7 to 9 p.m. Information: (317) 736-3689 or franklinparks.org. Don’t miss the popular Daddy/Daughter Dance for girls ages 3 to 12 and their dads. The event features dancing, appetizers, sweets, photo opportunities, event CD and party favor. You must register to attend. Time: 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Cost: $35 for residents; $37 for non-residents. Information: (317) 736-3689 or franklinparks.org.

Feb. 18

The Excellence in Leadership Series presents Derreck Kayongo, a business visionary and global Soup Project founder. Time: 4 p.m. Cost: Free. Location: Columbus Learning Center Lecture Hall, 4555 Central Ave., Columbus. Information: (812) 375-7525.

features a cast of madcap farm animals that exemplify bravery, selfless love and the true meaning of friendship. Time: 10 a.m. Tickets: $15. Location: Clowes Memorial Hall, 4602 Sunset Ave., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 940-6444 or clowes.org.

“Second Piano Concerto,” a work 20 years in the making. Tickets: $15 to $80. Location: Hilbert Circle Theatre, 45 Monument Circle, Indianapolis. Information: indianapolissymphony.org.

Feb. 20

Feb. 20-22

Experts and vendors from all over the country come to the Indiana State Museum with fossils, rocks, minerals, jewelry and more for GeoFest: The 12th Annual State Museum Fossil, Gem and Mineral Show. Location: Indiana State Museum, 650 W. Washington St., Indianapolis. Information: (317) 232-1637 or indianamuseum.org.

Enjoy a dramatic adaptation of “Charlotte’s Web,” the treasured tale by E.B. White that

Powerhouse pianist Andre Watts returns in Brahms’ colossal

At the Artcraft Theatre Dec. 13, 14 & 15: “White Christmas” Dec. 20, 21 & 22: “Christmas Vacation” Jan. 10 & 11: “King Creole” Jan. 24 & 25: “Annie” Feb. 14 & 15: “Casablanca” Feb. 21 & 22: Franklin Community High School Film Festival Feb. 28 & March 1: “The Pajama Day” Classic movies are shown on the big screen at the Historic Artcraft Theatre in Franklin. All movies start at 2 and 7:30 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays unless otherwise indicated. Location: 57 N. Main St., Franklin. Information: (317) 736-6823 or www.historicartcrafttheatre.org.

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Feb. 21-23

Feb. 22

The St. Bartholomew Concert Series presents the Young Musicians Concert featuring talented young adults, as well as high school and college level musicians from the parish. Time: 7 p.m. Cost: Free. Location: St. Bartholomew Catholic Church, 1306 27th St., Columbus. Information: (812) 379-9353.

Feb. 23

The Columbus Symphony Orchestra presents “Musical Interpretations & Borrowings.” Time: 3:30 p.m. Location: Columbus North High School, 25th Street, Columbus. Information: csoindiana.org.


March 7

First Fridays for Families presents “The Wild Rumpus World Circus.” This one-of-a-kind circus combines hilarious clowning with aerial artistry, fantastic stilt characters with mask theater and rapid fire juggling. Cost: Free. Time: 6 p.m. Location: The Commons, 300 Washington St., Columbus. Information: (812) 376-2539 or artsincolumbus.org.

March 8

How did the settlers move from one place to another and what did they bring with them? Learn this and more during “Saturday Sampler: Pack Your Wagon.” Discover the trials of moving pioneers and have a chance to see what you would take with you if you were traveling to the frontier. You’ll also take home a pioneer surprise. Time: 11 a.m. to noon. Location: Bartholomew County Historical Society, 524 Third St., Columbus. Information: (812) 372-3541 or bartholomewhistory.org.

Feb. 8 | Victorian Valentine Workshop

March 15

The St. Bartholomew Concert Series features “Echoing Air,” an early music vocal ensemble with Baroque instruments. The program explores Baroque chamber music, featuring duets by Henry Purcell for countertenors and recorders. Solo works of Pelham Humphrey, Daniel Purcell and Henry Lawes are also presented. Time: 7 p.m. Cost: Free. Location: St. Bartholomew Catholic Church, 1306 27th St., Columbus. Information: (812) 379-9353. SOU T H

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a look back

Santa and his elves Christmas parade in downtown Franklin, circa 1950.

Photo courtesy of

Johnson County Museum of History

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SOUTH | Winter 2014  
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