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Doughnuts / Tennessee Trips / Southside Cheering

Indy’s southside magazine

Common Bonds Pete Grimmer continues the family tradition of service

Spring 2018


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contents

Feature Stories

on the cover

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Doughnuts / Tennessee Trips / Southside Cheering

Indy’s southside magazine

Spring 2018

74 A Community Commitment Pete Grimmer continues his family’s local improvements

Common Bonds Pete Grimmer continues the family tradition of service

Dana and Pete Grimmer photographed by Angie Jackson

80 An Accent on Accents Kelly and James Hanson’s welcoming custom home

88 The Volunteer State

Trips to Tennessee make for beautiful memories

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contents Becky Tilson Squires

Departments

15 This & That

Southside news and views

20 Five Questions For ... 23 Taste Becky Tilson Squires

Chicken dishes, doughnuts

30 Recipe

Roasted portobello and kale bisque

32 Community 38 Goodwill The Social

Gateway Services

Thunderbird

20 42 Health 48 Indiana Made Dancers’ workouts

Welcome

56 Arts & Lifestyle

8 94 100

62 Home Trends

110

Calendar of Events

68 Worth the Trip

114

A Look Back

Fashion designers

Cheer groups

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In Every Issue

Treehouses

New Harmony

Weddings Our Side of Town


welcome

Springing up

I

I was fortunate enough to spend a little more than a week of February housesitting on a farm that’s minutes away from the south side. Full of goats and chickens and alpacas and cats, as well as a pair of dogs, the farm offers a magical spot for me to get centered and catch my breath. Although we might think of Indiana — and most of the Midwest — as having a leisurely pace, life still moves by quickly. Oh, certainly, sometimes the days crawl by like a dollop of molasses on snow, but more often than not, I look up from my work and we’re headed into a new season. So I am grateful for the opportunity the farm yields. Although I shuddered at the thought of heading out in 20-degree weather to tend to the outdoor animals, it turned out to be not so bad. It might surprise you to know that farm animals aren’t early risers; I would watch the sun rise over the neighboring and bare cornfields, drink another cup of coffee and waddle out in muck boots, clad in a thick sweater that held onto the hay from the day before. As I get older, I need moments to stretch and steel myself before I bend to pick up water buckets. It was in those moments, as the water buckets filled, that I could look around me. And that’s when I felt it: that feeling of anticipation. On each morning, I’d catch myself wondering about its origins; what was putting this energy out there? Was it the chickens waiting for a grain refresher and time to stretch their legs outside the coop? Was it the goats, eager to start their day’s partying?

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It wasn’t until my third day in that I put my finger on it: It was spring. Even though it was only February — and early February at that — spring was tapping gently all around me. Now that I was in tune with it, I could see it: in the sunrises and the sunsets. I could feel it in the air. I thought about the Hoosiers who came before me, the folks who’d built this house, this barn and then further back, to the ones who’d settled the land. I meditated on what spring looked and felt like for them, how grateful they were for the warmer weather coming, for the budding trees and the easier mornings. Spring in central Indiana is lush and dramatic. Even when the winters aren’t overly hostile, when I wake up to an Indiana spring morning, I want to capture the day and preserve it in amber. Of course, such a task is impossible, especially with a season as gossamer and slippery as spring. Like all things, it will move on in its time, but until then, welcome to spring.

Jenny Elig jelig@aimmediaindiana.com


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Raymond James & Associates, Inc., member New York Stock Exchange/SIPC 701 E. County Line Road, Suite 302 | Greenwood, IN 46143 | (317) 885-0114 www.raymondjames.com/greenwoodin


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SOUTH Indy’s Southside Magazine

S

Spring 2018 | Vol. 13 | No. 4

Simplified Maintenance Free Living

huffling down 12 stairs with a load of laundry on your hip, you balance by sliding your hand down the banister and wonder why a multi-story home sounded great 30 years ago. As he mows for the second time this week, your husband is wondering the same thing about the lawn. Maybe, or more likely, it’s time to simplify your life. According to recent statistics, baby boomers are looking to downsize to smaller homes for various reasons. They want luxury with less space and responsibilities yet convenience regarding location. “Their lifestyles are changing at the same time they are changing

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“My wife wanted an open floor plan, and we liked the quality of Gorman Homes. And there are no steps, which is great,” said Dave.

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Pam added, “All the rooms flow into each other, but the bedrooms are quite private. We customized the interior floor plan, which was a nice option. Our closets are huge, and we changed the screened porch to be more of an extension of the great room, like a sunroom.”

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this & that

A reel good time As downtown Franklin has continued to evolve over the years, one constant has been the Historic Artcraft Theatre. The theater, which kicks off a new season in June, has been in operation since 1922. It is one of the few theaters that still show films on 35-millimeter film. When deciding the new season, David Windisch, the theater’s advertising and public relations director, says the committee wanted to be sure to provide a variety of films in the 625-seat theater, which is mostly operated by its base of nearly 200 volunteers.

They also consider timing: Is there a significant anniversary of a movie coming up? Is there a fair or festival in downtown Franklin that might bring more people to the area where a movie will be a nice complement to the event? For instance, last summer there was a 1980s film fest weekend to coincide with the 1980s theme of the Hops & Vines Festival. Windisch says that depending on the film, some visitors will come to Franklin and make a weekend of it; he says he’s answered his share of calls from visitors as far as Zionsville, Martinsville, Columbus, Carmel and Noblesville. When someone from Lafayette called asking what else is near the theater, he suggested a nearby bedand-breakfast and a few dining options in downtown Franklin. Because the theater mostly shows older films — with the exception of the occasional new local or independently produced movies they’ve screened — audience participation is not only expected, but appreciated, whether it’s singing or talking along with the lines. “When we show ‘Monty Python and the Holy Grail,’ people know when to talk. People show up with coconuts,” to clap together to mimic the sound of horses’ hooves, Windisch says.

The theater has also offered special events, such as the Reel Women/Vintage Wine films. These evenings feature movies with strong female leads, and Brew and View, during which comedy flicks are paired with a local beer offering. (Teetotalers, don’t fret: Moviegoers can also get a popcorn and soda instead of beer or wine at these showings.) Artcraft also offers a senior series. Attendees who are 55 and older can get a free ticket ahead of time by visiting the sponsor, that is, Swartz Family Community Mortuary and Memorial Center. Windisch says that it’s not meant to be morbid. In fact, the Thursday afternoon shows tend to have 300 or more people in seats. Audience members often make a day of it by having lunch before or an early dinner after the show. Other indie theaters around the country have taken the Artcraft’s lead and started their own similar series. But the real magic of the theater is the history that it holds. Windisch recalls several examples of grandparents who bring their grandkids to see a movie, and the grandparents recall having a first date at the theater when they were young. Sometimes people see a movie at the theater that they saw at the Artcraft when it was first released 20 or more years ago. Having children of his own, Windisch considers what family-friendly films to program for them to see and hopes that someday they’ll be able to bring their children. There’s even a kids series in the summer and a theater camp for children in mid-June. While anyone can watch a movie at home, Windisch says, “I want my kids and their friends to be able to still see movies in the theater because that’s how I saw them.” — Rebecca Berfanger SOU T H

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Mind on your money Spring and summer may be synonymous with fun and relaxation, but money matters don’t rest no matter what the season. Just ask Greenwood’s Adam Allen, a Raymond James financial adviser at MainSource Bank. Allen knows his stuff: Earlier this year, he was named one of the nation’s top 100 bank advisers by Bank Investment Consultant magazine. South chatted with Allen about life as a “money guy” and picked up some general financial advice along the way. Congratulations on your recent honor. What do you think has made you stand out in your career? I’m a local guy. I grew up in Greenwood. I’m a Center Grove kid … and so being anchored in the community, raising my own family, I think that has a lot do to with building the trust that’s necessary for this business. I also was fortunate to have good financial training in my own home, so I practice good financial disciplines Adam Allen myself. And I got a great education through my first firm, A.G. Edwards, and then Raymond James. What is a typical day for a financial adviser? I help people make smart decisions about their money. That can look different for different stages of life. We engage people who are just getting started, who need to build a good financial foundation, one that preferably has very little debt. ... Sometimes we engage people

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midstream, and they’ve skipped those (early) steps. And we’ve got to go backward and take care of those things and then help them grow. And we engage people who are late in their careers in working hard toward preparing for retirement. You’re transitioning from a lifetime of saving and accumulating to … being solely responsible for creating your own income stream and figuring out how to do that for quite possibly several decades. That’s no small feat. Any of those stages is challenging enough, and you’re dealing daily with all of them. That sounds tough. Helping people make smart decisions, as you can imagine, is always a new puzzle. It’s very exciting and stimulating to meet people where they are and figure out the best path for them. What should someone look for when hiring a financial adviser? Someone who has education, who has experience. In this business, you’ll see a lot of folks who look like they’ve succeeded. They’ll drive around in a fancy car and have a big house and good-looking suits, but it doesn’t necessarily mean it’s paid for, right? A lot of those people need your money more than you do. A reputable firm is really important. And there’s that trust factor that you mentioned earlier. Money and financial decisions, they’re very emotional, and they’re very difficult. Frankly, sometimes the easiest part is the math, and the hardest part is the human factor. You’ve got to have confidence in that individual, that they know what’s best, and it’s not always what you want to hear. Sometimes it’s hard things you need to do. You need somebody to help you over that emotional hurdle. — Julie Cope Saetre

Get ready … get set … to give

Get ready to hear a lot about the gift of giving. In April, the Johnson County Community Foundation will officially kick off the countdown to its first Day of Giving, to be held June 21. Giving Day will focus on fundraising for seven Johnson County nonprofit organizations: Franklin Education Connection, Gateway Services/Access Johnson County, Girls Inc. of Johnson County, Greenwood Christian Academy, Humane Society of Johnson County, Interchurch Food Pantry of Johnson County and United Way of Johnson County. To participate, each agency had to file an application, agree to undergo development training and establish an endowment with JCCF. In the eight weeks leading up to Giving Day, JCCF will launch an intensive eight-week marketing plan to garner awareness about the event. The foundation and participating Giving Day agencies will spread the word through social media posts, speaking engagements, newsletters and other venues. “We’re going to create all the branding materials, and we’re going to give them all those promotional items to use during that eightweek period,” explains Kim Minton, JCCF’s vice president of development. On June 21, the foundation will be open from midnight to 11:59 p.m. to accept donations to any of the seven participating agencies. Individuals and businesses also can donate via the foundation’s website, jccf.org. Johnson County has dedicated $50,000 from its Unrestricted Community Impact Fund for Community Grants to proportionally match all donations, and the Branigan Foundation committed an additional $10,000 for that purpose. For example, if the total amount raised by and on behalf of all seven participating agencies is $100,000 and Agency A raised $13,000 of that amount, then Agency A will receive 13 percent of the $60,000 Giving Day pool. Community members can do more than donate. The evening of June 21, JCCF will host a block party with booths, food vendors and representatives from all participating agencies on hand. “We are hoping to broaden the (number of) people who know about the agencies and the work that they do here in the community,” Minton says, “and also raise some funds for these agencies.” — Julie Cope Saetre


this & that

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composer, arranger, concert pianist and conductor. Hayes composed, orchestrated and conducted the concert, consisting of five movements celebrating Christmas music of faith from around the world. “All the members of our choir found Mr. Hayes to be a personable, yet demanding and exacting, musician, who honored us with a prestigious and rewarding lifetime singing experience in a magnificent concert hall where most people would only dream of performing,” York says. “He was very gracious and appreciative to all who participated in this incredible endeavor, making it a beautiful and powerful memory in our lives.” In all, some 275 singers joined together Southport Christian Church’s director of on the Carnegie stage, backed by a full music, and invited the Chancel Choir to orchestra. audition for the holiday performance. After “Once they started playing, I felt a part York and her fellow vocalists submitted the of something ethereal and larger than life,” required audition material, says Denise Beck, another they received an official invita- “To stand on that participating choir member. tion to join the event. But it wasn’t all hard work stage and look out “The SCC Choir received and bright stage lights. into the expanse this invitation because of the city that never sleeps’ of the auditorium also“‘The high quality and high level of reflects my wonderful – well, it was musicianship demonstrated time in New York City,” breathtaking.” by the singers, as well as the recalls choir member Jane exceptional quality of their Kixmiller. “How could I find —Bill Bass audition recording,” says time to sleep with the bright Jonathan Griffith, DCINY’s artistic director lights, sounds and adventures awaiting me and principal conductor. in New York?” So the Southport choir prepared for Adds Beck, “A major plus to the trip Carnegie Hall, where they would perform was getting time to bond with members of the New York premiere of the “Internamy own church choir whom I barely knew tional Carol Suites” by Mark Hayes, an before this trip and now I consider lifelong internationally known and award-winning friends.” — Julie Cope Saetre

Southport Church Choir

Let’s flash back to Nov. 19, when the Southport Christian Church Chancel Choir kicked off the 2017 holiday season. But this was no normal Sunday singing session. The Southport vocalists stood in the spotlight on the stage of Carnegie Hall in New York City with 15 other choirs from across the United States to perform a concert presented by Distinguished Concerts International New York. “To stand on that stage and look out into the expanse of the auditorium – well, it was breathtaking,” recalls Bill Bass, one of 19 participating SCC choir members. “I couldn’t help but think about the numerous world-renowned performers who had been in that same place; what a humbling and rewarding feeling.” It was a moment the choir members had been working toward for nearly a year. In January 2017, DCINY contacted Karri York,

Get strong-armed by helping Nothing gets us quite as buff as moving; get your moving workout in by helping the Friends of Johnson County Public Library. The Friends are currently seeking volunteers to help move boxes of books for the quarterly used book sales each year. The organization transports about 100 boxes of books from its Franklin branch to each of the other branches for the Friends Used Book Sales. The Friends are looking for volunteers to help load and unload the boxes before the sales. Those interested in volunteering should contact the marketing department at (317) 738-2957 or email at marketingandcommunicationsdepartment@jcplin.org. SOU T H

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book nook

“Caroline: Little House, Revisited” By Sarah Miller A must-read for any “Little House” fan, this historical novel will pull at the readers’ heartstrings and bring waves of nostalgia, even if you haven’t read the original series in quite some time. “Caroline” is told through the perspective of Caroline, better known to most fans as “Ma.” This narrative starts right where “Little House in the Big Woods” ends, as the family is loading the wagon and heading out to the prairie. Readers will see Laura’s carefree nature, Pa’s strong unwavering love, Caroline’s fears about her pregnancy and the long road ahead, and the dayto-day details about surviving in the wild on their own. Featuring all the excitement, adventure and hope from the original series, with more detail about how the adults were truly making ends meet and providing the safest and most loving atmosphere for their children. It ties in beautifully with the series and lends an adult viewpoint and perspective to the stories we love so well. — Reviewed by Erin Cataldi, teen and adult reference librarian, Johnson County Public Library

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“Artemis” By Andy Weir It’s impossible to talk about “Artemis” without talking about Andy Weir’s first book, “The Martian,” in which a very smart and resourceful, but goofy, astronaut uses incredible science to survive on Mars, all the while cracking bad jokes. “The Martian” is a unique mix of frat boy humor mixed with high level but understandable science that makes a compelling read. In “Artemis,” this same formula is applied to a heist. Jazz Bashara lives on the moon. She is very bright but uses her intelligence to smuggle contraband and perform petty crimes for hire. Jazz gets pulled in to some industrial espionage, but when she realizes the full extent of these crimes and the impact they will have on her beloved moon, she plans a way to fix her mistakes and creates her own “Ocean’s Eleven” to pull off one more job. Where “Artemis” shines, and what is Weir’s strength as a writer, are in its descriptions of how people live on the moon. The lunar colony is depicted in fascinating detail, with the science simply and clearly explained. — Reviewed by Amy Dalton, reference librarian, Johnson County Public Library

“Fierce Kingdom” By Gin Phillips It’s almost closing time at the zoo, and Joan and her son are rushing to leave before the gates lock. But on their way out, Joan sees something terrifying: Armed gunmen are in the zoo, and quite suddenly, everything changes. For several hours, they play a game of cat and mouse with the gunmen. Joan has the advantage of knowing all the nooks and crannies and hiding spots to keep her and her son safe. From her hiding place, Joan sees other zoo patrons fleeing for safety, and she begins to question the sacrifices she might have to make in order to save her son. The taut thriller focuses on the lengths a mother will go to protect her son and also raises some valid moral quandaries that will make the reader stop and think. “Fierce Kingdom” is a suspenseful and quick read with an unexpected ending. — Reviewed by Kelly Staten, reference librarian, Johnson County Public Library


“The Great Alone” By Kristin Hannah It’s 1974 in Seattle. Teenage Leni and her mom and dad are set to make yet another move. But this time instead of moving around the Northwest, they are headed to Alaska, the land of The Great Alone. The move comes as Leni’s dad has lost yet another job. He was a prisoner of war in Vietnam and returned physically fine but has trouble interacting with people and controlling his temper. They arrive on a little spit of land near Homer. They’re just in time to prepare for the long, dark winter that will be upon them before they know it. Leni’s dad thrives in the sunshine and long days. His nightmares are held at bay. But once the season turns, all bets are off. Kristin Hannah does a fabulous job building the tension between Leni and her mom and her dad, the strain between her dad and the residents, and the battle between Leni’s family and the elements. All those nail-biting scenes are set against a beautiful and sometimes harsh Alaskan backdrop that Hannah describes wonderfully. — Reviewed by Susan Jerger, reference librarian, Greenwood Public Library

Rosalie Lightning: A Graphic Memoir”

“Stillhouse Lake”

By Tom Hart

“Stillhouse Lake” is the first book I have read by Rachel Caine and the best thriller I read in 2017. It is one I couldn’t put down and stayed up late to finish. The narrative pulls you in from the first chapter with a very gruesome scene. The story follows the life of Gina Royal after her life is turned upside down when her husband’s secret life as a serial killer is exposed. Gina flees with her two children and changes her name to Gwen Proctor, going to great lengths to protect her children from internet trolls wanting revenge. Gwen thinks they are safe and may have found a permanent home at Stillhouse Lake, when a body of a young woman shows up in the lake by their house, killed in the same style that Melvin used. The novel has a great, although terrifying, ending. — Reviewed by Carissa Simpson, customer service associate, Greenwood Public Library

This graphic memoir by Eisnernominated cartoonist Tom Hart features a true story centering on the Hart family after the death of their young daughter. Rosalie passed away at night, just before her second birthday; the memoir is heartbreaking — frenetic at times — and provides a raw, honest look into their lives. I have no idea how one begins to cope with the loss of a child, and I love that Hart doesn’t either. He offers no answers, no guidelines, just an observation of what happens and how he processes it. This book is highly recommended to anyone who appreciates a good graphic novel. — Reviewed by Katherine Roush, children’s librarian, Greenwood Public Library

By Rachel Caine

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five questions for...

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by Julie Cope Saetre // Photography by Stacy Able

Becky Tilson Squires Becky Tilson Squires visited Walt Disney World for the first time as a middle schooler, and it was love at first trip. Today, as the founder of Tilson Travel, she gets to share that feeling of wonder by planning dream trips for her clients, not only to the house of Mickey Mouse, but to destinations worldwide. South chatted with her about the best travel outfits, her favorite weekend getaway and how to survive a family vacation.

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What are the in-demand vacation destinations for summer?

4

What is your personal approach to travel?

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Do you have a favorite travel spot?

Hawaii and Disney consistently, year after year, whether it’s family vacations, multigenerational vacations or grandma and grandpa are taking their kids and then their grandkids. We’ve got a lot of honeymooners, and the first place they think of is Hawaii. Both of those destinations are always at the very top of the list. And there’s plenty to do. You can go back to Hawaii and Disney and not do the same thing twice. You can have a different experience every time.

2

Traveling with family is fun, but it can also be challenging. Any advice for staying sane?

Don’t over-schedule your trip down to the last second. Especially with Disney, it’s hard to do, because you have Fast Pass (ride reservations) and dining reservations. But allow for free time; schedule some late mornings or early evenings so that you’ve got free time to relax at your leisure. Go on a run, go to the spa. Allow the parents and the grandparents to do their own thing. Let the kids play at the pool while you just hang out by the pool. Especially for those introverted family members or travelers, like myself. I need that time to be by myself and not go, go, go all the time.

3

What about travel outfits? What can you wear that’s both comfortable and stylish?

Items that breathe and aren’t too tight, like linens. I love linen pants. Those I will live in. Something that’s not so fitted and constricting, especially on the plane, (because) your hands will get swollen or your feet will get swollen. Wear clothing that is breathable and relaxing, not too clingy and uncomfortable. And that washes well. Layers too. If you’re worried about whether it will be too chilly or too warm on the flight, then you’ve got layers to take on and off.

It’s the saying about the cobbler’s kids having no shoes. I am my own worst travel agent. I’m thinking of everyone else and planning everyone else’s travel, but then when it comes to my own I kind of forget about it. But I like to have it about 50/50. Half of my trip is planned. We know what we’re doing. We know we’re going to see the main sights. We’re going to eat at the main places, making sure that we’re getting into the destinations where the locals live, where they eat, and really experiencing that destination. And then the other half of the time I like to keep open and flexible for either spontaneity or just free time to relax. This is time to recharge the batteries. I’ve done vacations for myself that are just go, go, go, and halfway through I’m just beat. So I like to have flexibility and free time scheduled as well. I love the Biltmore estate in Asheville, North Carolina. It’s such a lovely, long-weekend destination. It’s a beautiful home. Every time that we go, we see something different, we learn something different about that period in which they lived, or they’ve opened a new wing of the house. They just opened a new village there, with its own dining and winery and tasting room and shops. Their botanical garden is just gorgeous, (especially in) the spring because of the tulips and everything that’s blooming. And it’s very relaxing. Once the house closes, you go back to your hotel and grab dinner and hang out on the Adirondack chairs and read a book. It’s a nice, cozy place.

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taste

What are you, chicken? Notable poultry dishes on the southside

We’ve all been there: We go to a restaurant and order a chicken dish. Expecting the perfect poultry, we’re excited when it arrives, only to have it be rubbery or bland. But the noble chicken does not deserve such treatment. Never fear: The southside has plenty of chicken dishes to cluck about; here are four standouts for you to try. By Sara McAninch Photography by stacy able

Chicken-N-Waffle Bytes Tried & True Alehouse

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taste

Buffalo Chicken Pizza at The Willard 99 N. Main St., Franklin, thewillard.com »When you first walk into The Willard, it feels like home. With the fireplace at the head of the main dining area and the welcoming atmosphere of the place, it’s like eating at a friend’s house if that friend offered an extensive menu of food and beer. Since it was built in 1860, The Willard has been a family home, a hotel and now a bar and eatery. Known for its chicken wings and sandwiches, the restaurant also boasts some of the best pizza in the area, and the buffalo chicken pizza is no exception. Starting with a thin crust that adds a nice crunch to the finished

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product, the dough is then coated in a small layer of Frank’s RedHot sauce. The cayenne kick of the sauce is balanced by the marinated chicken breast that makes up the next layer. Rounding it out is a mixture of cheddar and mozzarella cheeses, which gets bubbly and brown during the baking process and holds everything together. What really sets this pizza apart is the chicken. Breast pieces are cut into thin slices and then marinated for hours in a combination of soy sauce, lime juice, vinegar and a proprietary blend of southern spices. Cooked in the same oven as the piz-

zas, the result is a sweet and tangy taste that’s so good even the staff wants to snag bites of it without the accompaniment of dough and sauce. The buffalo chicken pizza ranges in price and size from a 7-inch personal pan, to a medium 12-inch to a large 16-inch. Paired with any one of the beers on tap at The Willard, or even a glass of chardonnay or zinfandel, this pizza is sure to please with a little bit of heat and a lot of flavor. Stop in on a Friday or Saturday night to enjoy live music, or before or after a movie at the Historic Artcraft Theatre next door, and it’s the perfect night out.


Chicken-N-Waffle Bytes at Tried & True Alehouse

2800 S. State Road 135, Suite 100, Greenwood, triedandtruealehouse.com

»Fried chicken and waffles are a popular southern comfort food entrée. When Indy area hotspot Tried & True Alehouse put the dish on its menu, it did so with a twist: an appetizer called Chicken-N-Waffles Bytes. While chicken and waffles on their own might not seem all that different, what is special is how they’re prepared and served. The Bytes start off as made-from-scratch waffle batter, into which fresh chunked chicken breast cutlets are placed. Once dipped, the chunks are deep-fried, thus marrying in the holiest of matrimony two things that are usually separate in the traditional dish. Once fried, the Bytes are dusted with powdered sugar; when the appetizer arrives at your table, it’s served

with sides of regular maple syrup and a spicy syrup that’s made in house. The result is tender, juicy chicken in crispy golden waffle batter that’s balanced by the sweet from the powdered sugar and the heat from the syrup. Each serving comes with 10 Bytes; upgrade with strips of bacon on top. As an appetizer or your main meal, the Chicken-N-Waffle Bytes can be washed down with any one of the 20 drafts or 12 craft beers on rotating taps that the restaurant offers daily. Tried & True Alehouse also offers a laid-back atmosphere with more than 30 televisions, and there’s always music playing softly in the background. If beer isn’t to your liking, then it also offers wine and cocktails.

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taste Naptown Hot Chicken Thunderbird

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Naptown Hot Chicken at Thunderbird 1127 Shelby St., Indianapolis, thunderbirdindy.com

»Nashville, Tennessee, is known for, among other things, a signature dish called the Nashville Hot Chicken. The open-faced sandwich consists of a white bread base, pickle slices and fried chicken covered in a spicy paste whose main ingredient is cayenne pepper. Thunderbird chef Kristen York brings her version of the dish to Indianapolis’ Thunderbird restaurant with the Naptown Hot Chicken. At its most basic, the Naptown Hot Chicken is two buttermilk biscuits topped with two spicy chicken thighs, mustard seed slaw, and bread and butter pickles. When combined, the flavor of each element creates a spicy, sweet and tangy mix with a crispy mouth feel. Bringing the heat is a combination of cayenne pepper, ghost chilies and Gochujang, a Korean hot sauce. The mix of spices ensures that your taste buds tingle all over while you’re eating. The heat is balanced with a sweetness from the two buttermilk biscuits that make up the foundation of this dish, and bread and butter pickles, both house made. Lastly there’s a tangy bite from the mustard seed slaw, which is made with cider vinegar, sugar, mayonnaise, whole grain mustard and mustard seeds. Each serving come with two biscuits, two thighs, pickles and a heaping pile of slaw. If you want a smaller portion, the starters menu offers a single chicken biscuit with some slaw and pickles. Add in one of Thunderbird’s signature cocktails from a bar that takes center stage in the restaurant to have a warm, cozy dining experience with a rockabilly vibe while surrounded by a lot of reclaimed wood.

Kickin’ Chicken Sandwich at Zaxby’s 1274 N. Emerson Ave., Greenwood, zaxbys.com »When you see a sandwich called Kickin’ Chicken, you expect some heat. This sandwich from Zaxby’s delivers that and more. Instead of the run-of-themill bun, this sandwich starts with two thick slices of Texas toast covered with a margarine garlic spread. The bread is then smothered with Zaxby’s Tongue Torch sauce, a vinegar based hot sauce that rates two flames out of five on its signature sauce heat scale, which includes flavors like Wimpy and Insane. It also has ranch sauce as a cooling counterbalance to the heat of the other sauce. Three Chicken Fingerz complete the sandwich. Each of the Chicken Fingerz

is 3 to 4 inches long and hand breaded in-house. Since they’re deep fried, they have a crunchy exterior and tender interior that mimics the texture of the Texas toast. The finished product of dripping sauces, thick bread and juicy chicken means you’ll want to keep the napkins handy when eating this dish. The Kickin’ Chicken Sandwich is available by itself or as a meal. The meal includes a small serving of crinkle-cut fries and 22-ounce drink. Want to get your meal on-the-go? Zaxby’s has a drive-thru if you want to keep moving or a dine-in space with a family-friendly atmosphere if you want to sit and relax while you eat.

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taste

Food finds

Holier Than Thou

Spots for doughnuts on the southside By Jenny Elig

There might be two ways to spell the name, but doughnuts themselves can be summed up rather succinctly: They’re delicious. Although the contemporary, ringed American doughnut traces its origins to old New York, fried, sweetened dough goes back to the days of ancient Rome. In short, the doughnut has staying power. In recent years, we’ve seen a resurgence in the doughnut, and this sometimes-holey confection has cleared a place for itself at the breakfast table and on the dessert plate. Oh, sure, the doughnut has always been around, and we’re certainly not above grabbing one or two (or three or four) from the doughnut display at the gas station. If you want to elevate your doughnut experience, try these spots.

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On the go

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You might swing by Rise ‘n Roll Bakery & Deli — a franchise, the first of which opened in 2012 in Nappanee — for Amish-style baked goods, including preservative-free cookies, pies, cinnamon rolls, breads and cheeses. As for the doughnut lovers among us? We’re headed there for the cinnamon caramel doughnut. Stop by the Greenwood location, grab an assortment and get ready to tuck into the yeast-raised, cinnamon caramel doughnut, covered in homemade caramel icing and powdered with cinnamon. It is a decided standout on the doughnut-dedicated menu (the bakery also boasts bakery and deli menus for those of you who need more from life than doughnuts). You’ll find plenty of tried-and-trues on the doughnut menu, including glazed, white powdered, cremefilled, fritters and Bismarcks. In the mood for a limited-edition taste? Seasonal offerings include chocolate covered strawberry, a chocolate-iced number filled with strawberry creme. 1277 N. State Rd 135, Greenwood. (317) 300-

1841, risenroll.com/greenwood.

Photo provided Rise ‘n Roll Bakery & Deli


»

Out to lunch Gigi’s Sugar Shack co-owner Amber Schall is a nice woman, but she’s about to drop a bomb on you. OK, it’s a sugar bomb. Schall, who has a background in the health care field, opened Gigi’s Sugar Shack in Franklin in 2014 after she couldn’t find a job. After switching locations, she opened the full deli and bakery. The shop, named for co-owner Greg Schall’s grandmother, is fittingly styled a la grandma’s house with antique furniture and pleasantly mismatched tables and chairs. Gigi’s, which opens bright and early at 6 a.m. and stays open through the lunching hour (until 3 p.m.), is a good resting spot for folks who are just waking up or are hungry for lunch. The menu consists of healthful and comfort food options. Round it off with a doughnut, éclair, cruller or the aforementioned sugar bombs, which are fried biscuits stuffed with pastry cream. It’s all about balance. 377 E. Jefferson St. B, Franklin, 317-

868-8888, gigissugarshack.com.

»

On the town

Make a morning of it at Fountain Square’s General American Donut Co., a destination spot where craft doughnuts are served in a boutique setting. Owners Kari Nickander and Adam Perry opened the spot after they moved to Indianapolis from Seattle. Coming from a background in food trucks, the couple saw a gap in the Indy scene, that is, a spot for small-batch doughnuts. Thus, in 2014, GADCO was born. And the shop, with its retrostyle fireplace and twee touches, couldn’t offer a better spot for noshing on sweet things; in fact, some folks will stop in and stay all day. Its creme brulee received a lot of press when it was introduced, and the salted caramel has had its praises sung as well. Every doughnut, including The Bennie (more on that in a moment), is made from scratch, making for, Nickander says, a doughnut experience that’s altogether different. Of the 12 to 15 doughnuts offered daily, The Bennie, which is made of croissant dough, stands out as a zenith of decadence, featuring buttery layers of dough; sometimes Nickander pipes lemon curd in between the layers. 827 S. East St., Indianapolis. (317) 964-0744,

generalamericandonutco.com.

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Recipe

Risky Bisque-ness When you’re not sure if the weather will be friend or foe, reach for this hearty soup by Twinkle VanWinkle

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This low-carb soup features a blend of spring greens infused with the deep flavors of roasted portobello mushrooms and garlic. It’s a recipe for a rich, creamy and earthy bowl of soup, perfect for those spring days that border on winter or winter days that border on spring.

Roasted Portobello and Kale Bisque 2 pounds baby portobello mushrooms 3 heads garlic ¼ cup fresh thyme leaves ½ cup or so olive oil 4 tablespoons unsalted butter ½ cup finely diced sweet onion 3 cups low-sodium chicken stock 4 cups almond milk 3 cups fresh baby kale, julienned 3 tablespoons kosher salt 2 tablespoons freshly ground black pepper Fresh thyme stems for garnish Extra stock/water

Preheat oven to 400 F and place oven racks as close to the center of the oven as possible. Rinse mushrooms and pat dry gently. For best results, lay mushrooms out on a clean sheet pan and stick in preheating oven for 5 minutes to make sure mushrooms are dried well enough. Remove from oven and let cool. Blend olive oil with 1 tablespoon of thyme leaves and 1 tablespoon salt and brush mushrooms liberally on sheet pan. Cut the tops of the garlic heads off evenly and brush with olive oil, placing on sheet pan with mushrooms. Return pan to oven and roast for 30 minutes, turning once during cooking time. While mushrooms roast, melt butter in a heavy-bottom 6-quart pot. When butter has melted, sauté onions and remaining thyme leaves. When onions are translucent, add pepper, chicken stock and almond milk and let cook on medium-low for 30 minutes. Pull mushrooms out of the oven after 30 minutes and remove the garlic heads and thyme and set them aside. Immediately transfer roasted mushrooms to liquid; slice some of them if you wish or leave whole. Turn down to low and let simmer. Scoop some broth from soup and mash the roasted garlic, making a paste. Whisk into soup liquid. Add julienned kale to soup. Let everything cook again on low; add stock if needed. After soup has cooked for approximately 1 hour or so, remove from heat and garnish with fresh thyme or shredded Parmesan.

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Community

A Socially Speaking Greenwood organization gives seniors a place to meet By Rebecca Berfanger

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About 10 years ago, Fay Jarosz was driving down Polk Road in Greenwood when she noticed the sign for The Social of Greenwood. She had just moved from her home in northern Indiana to Greenwood to live with her son but wanted to have more social interaction. She decided to stop in and have a look around. The visit led Jarosz to volunteer at The Social’s resale shop that, at the time, helped raise money for The Social, which is a nonprofit organization. Working in the resale shop allowed her to meet and interact with other seniors. She later started volunteering as a receptionist for the organization, and she continued to engage with The Social’s community of other active seniors. Nearly 10 years later, Jarosz now volunteers as the receptionist one day every week; she oversees two bingo events each week. She also is a member of The Social’s chapter of the Red Hat Society, which helps support its food pantry and sponsors a child through United Way’s Christmas Angels; she has traveled with other members of The Social as far as Cape Cod, Massachusetts, and throughout Indiana. And, she says, she enjoys being able to spend time with the friends she has met through the organization. “People are really nice here and so friendly,” Jarosz says. “We get to be social, so we’re not alone. I’ve made a lot of friends here.” On the days when she is volunteering at the receptionist desk, she is one of the first people prospective members meet when they find out about the building at 550 Polk Road. “I’ll give them a folder and take them on a tour,” she says, including “the puzzle area and the library.” She’ll also tell them about the different groups, such as the women’s group and the woodcarving group, “depending on their interests.” Daily Journal file Photos


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The Social offers a range of activities to members.

Community

Life stories Andrea Sutherland, executive director of The Social, says that Jarosz’s story is pretty typical: Seniors who move to the area or are from central Indiana hope to meet new people or be more active with others who are 50 and older, with an average age of about 73. She adds that although The Social’s membership used to be primarily Johnson County residents, ever since another senior center closed in Indianapolis in 2012, they’ve seen an influx of Marion County residents. Some of the members come from Bartholomew and other counties. “We try to navigate with them into what would be their best fit,” Sutherland says. “Some people say, ‘I have five friends tell me to come here because they play cards here,’ and I have some who come in and say, ‘I lost my wife 10 years ago, and I’m lonely and want something to do.’” Sutherland is one of two full-time employees; the other is operations manager Ashley Koval. Sutherland and Koval rely on 55 volunteers, such as Jarosz, to help keep things going at The Social, now at a membership of about 1,100. “We like to joke that we have 1,000 grandparents,” says Sutherland, “but I wouldn’t want to have it any other way.” Anytime someone new visits, Koval, Sutherland, Jarosz or any of the volunteers are right there to provide tours and information. “We want our doors open to meet the new people,” says Sutherland. “We’ll ask, ‘What brought you here, what are you interested in?’ We’ll try to play the middleman to figure out what groups to put them in because no matter how old you are, it’s still overwhelming to meet new people.” She compared it to starting over at a new middle school. However, she says, the current members of The Social and volunteers, many of them members themselves, “are so nice and welcoming that when new people do come in, they get excited. They’ll ask, 34

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‘What’s your name? Sit with us, tell us what you’ve done in your life.” Board President Keri Brantley echoes the sentiment. After being asked to be on the Fund Development Committee a couple of years ago, she first learned what the organization was doing for seniors. “The culture is such a warm, loving culture,” Brantley says. “Andrea just embraces the seniors, and Ashley is a great fit as well. They are a dynamic duo and have the seniors’ best interests at heart.” The Social offers many opportunities for members: monthly trips with a tour guide to different Indiana locales, including the popular casino trips; trips out of state, including one this fall to the Pacific Northwest; different card groups, including a

euchre game that brings in up to 70 people on Tuesdays; the flourishing woodcarving group; assorted exercise classes; cooking classes; a massage therapist on site; the ability to volunteer, including at the food pantry that serves about 600 families of all ages in Johnson County; a daily nutritionally balanced lunch provided by the Central Indiana Council on Aging; and the Rock Steady Boxing class for members with Parkinson’s disease. The in crowd The Social is open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, but, Sutherland says, it’s the relationships that carry on outside the building that show the importance of The Social to its members.


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“Some of them end up going to dinner after we close or going to the movies with friends,” she says, “while others will host card games and lunch at their homes” with the people they’ve met at The Social. “It’s not just within these four walls. I love that they have interactions throughout the weekends or evenings.” “I love that what we do is so accessible in the types of programming and services, especially for seniors who might be by themselves a majority of the time,” Brantley added. While the cost of a membership is only $18 a year for members with a Greenwood address and $21 a year for everyone else, they offset operating costs with grants, fundraising and sponsorships. If seniors

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Community

have trouble paying the membership fee, The Social will also try to work with them.

Seniors enjoy excursions offered through The Social.

Raising funds and awareness Other than the daily activities that can attract up to 200 members on some days and have been welcoming one or two new members every day, The Social hosts off-campus events and fundraisers throughout the year. One of the upcoming fundraisers for the 501(c)3 organization, a purse bingo that will take place in April at the Barn at Bay Horse Inn, where participants win a designer purse for each bingo, sold out its 300 tickets within the first week after they became available. Sutherland says there are plans for another purse bingo event in August. On May 3 from 9 a.m. to noon at the Gathering Place in Greenwood, The Social will host its 20th annual Senior Expo. Sutherland says about 100 vendors, all

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Photos provided The Social


vetted by The Social, will be on hand. In past years, about 1,000 seniors attended, many of them prepared with questions for the vendors and lists of whom they want to meet at the expo. Even if a member of The Social needs help finding a service outside the Expo, Sutherland adds, such as a handyman or someone to paint a house, she can refer someone she knows is trustworthy. She can even call the company ahead of time as a courtesy to the member. You never stop growing The Social is also in the process of raising funds to help the building better suit the needs of the quickly growing organization. The building, formerly a preschool, includes several small spaces, but Sutherland says they are currently researching what would be feasible for the space. For instance, the small gym is large

enough for small classes, but the Rock Steady Boxing program, the only one in Johnson County, started in 2014 with five boxers and now has about 70 participants. Sutherland anticipates that number will continue to grow as they communicate more with neurologists and primary care physicians who may have patients with Parkinson’s disease. A larger space could help benefit more people. “I would say we’re just really on the cusp of (The Social’s membership) really exploding, which is what makes the expansion vitally important,” Brantley says. “We consistently keep increasing membership every month, especially under Andrea’s leadership. I think programs like this become increasingly important as baby boomers are living longer and healthier because of access to care. They need something like The Social to keep them healthier and happier.”

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Goodwill

G

A Gateway to Opportunity Organization provides services, helping hands and benefits to its clients and their community By Greg Seiter

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Gateway Services of Johnson County exists for the sole purpose of helping people with disabilities. From employment assistance and daytime programming to community opportunities and mobility assistance through the Access Johnson County public transportation service, Gateway’s primary objective is to help individuals fully integrate into their communities, no matter the personal challenges they may be facing. “When I first started working here 19 years ago, I hoped to be here just long enough to go back to school and get my master’s,” says Eve Pressnell-Moore, director of employment services. “Funny: I still don’t have that degree. I just fell in love with the people we serve. They are some of the most amazing people you will ever meet.” Photos provided


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Goodwill

Gary Kubancsek, who serves on Gateway’s board of directors, agrees. “My 23-year-old son, JJ, started receiving Gateway assistance when he was 6 months old and since that time has received almost every service they have ever provided,” he says. “I think the world of those folks.” From its humble beginnings in 1963 as a small school program to what is now a United Way of Johnson County partnering agency accredited at the maximum level by the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) International, Franklin-based Gateway is today a provider of services to those living in southern Marion and other neighboring counties as well. “They are great community partners who provide wonderful services,” says Dana Monson, Johnson County Development Corp. interim executive director. “They 100 percent support other organizations as well.” Gateway staff members, Pressnell-Moore says, are community cheerleaders, endeavoring to encourage and advocate for clients. “For those we assist, sometimes we’re their voice, while at other times we’re in the background reassuring them that they can do something,” she says. Her department helps people find and maintain integrated jobs. As part of that program, an assigned job coach works with employment candidates to determine areas 40

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Another target area for Gateway is the enhancement of social skills. Many of the people served by Gateway aren’t able to visit with their peers, Pressnell-Moore says. For example, 20-somethings who would typically have opportunities to socialize; those who rely on parents or caregivers might not have many opportunities to hit the clubs. “Nobody wants to take their parents to a club, and conversely parents usually don’t want to sit at a club with their children,” Pressnell-Moore says. Gateway’s solution includes periodic nighttime shopping opportunities and social events. Through Gateway’s Aktion Club, an arm of Kiwanis, the organization offers bi-monthly parties with food and a live DJ. And Gateway offers care to those who usually give it by providing respite services to caregivers, enabling them to enjoy of interest, assist with resume developpersonal time. ment, sharpen communication and other “When you have an adult child living work-related skills and ultimately secure an with you at home, it can be very difficult appropriate position. to go out on a date, shop or even get away “We have a pretty good working refor a short vacation,” Pressnell-Moore says. lationship with Gateway,” says William “A lot of the services we provide are really Wethington, manager of Chicago’s Pizza in geared toward helping the entire family. ” Franklin. “If Gateway needs to do a skills Gateway can also provide economic assessment for someone assistance, deaf serthey’re working with, vices and help for those “I think a lot of times, they use us as a practice striving to break free the community has a place to see what that of disorders related to stigma that Gateway person’s strengths and substance abuse. It should participants can’t take weaknesses are. Right come as no surprise that care of themselves. now, we employ two of Gateway’s diversified That’s not true. These their folks.” program offerings require are great people with Gateway even helps an extensive budget, and great work ethics.” young adults prepare for unfortunately Press— William Wethington the process of finding nell-Moore admits that their first job. money is sometimes a “We have a transitionchallenge. She says many al group, generally for 16- to 22-year-olds, of the services provided by the organization that helps people learn basic work skills are funded through vocational rehabilitathey’ll need to prepare them for real life,” tion and Medicaid waivers, but there are Pressnell-Moore says. “They do mock clockstill other hurdles to overcome. in and clock-out sessions and go out into “These are state-funded ways to get the community to volunteer.” money; however, the reimbursement rate is Sometimes, individuals are in need of much lower than the service provided,” she daytime programming for instructional says. “As with any not-for-profit, we are unand recreational purposes. Gateway orgaderfunded, so any cuts really hurt us a lot.” nizes groups that collectively learn about Therefore, beyond relying on donations things such as food safety and preparation from the community, Pressnell-Moore and and the arts. her co-workers must be creative with their


fundraising efforts. “We do a lemonade stand each year at the Johnson County Fair,” she says. “We also have a fashion show in which we partner with a boutique. It’s an integrated event but is heavy on the folks we serve.” This year’s fashion show, which includes brunch and an auction, is scheduled for Sept. 16 at Mount Pleasant Christian Church in Greenwood. Gateway personnel are also busy looking toward the future. To be specific, according to Pressnell-Moore, the organization hopes to eventually extend the hours of operation for day services and potentially grow its existing young adult transition program through word-of-mouth and by achieving deeper penetration into area school systems. She also hopes that an increasing number of nearby employers will be willing to allow Gateway to refer people for employment opportunities. “To be honest, it’s hard to find employers who are open to that concept,” she says. Wethington understands. “I think a lot of times, the community has a stigma that Gateway participants can’t take care of themselves. That’s not true,” he says. “These are great people with great work ethics. Sure, they may have a few hardships, but Gateway looks at those and helps people overcome their disadvantages.” Despite the challenges and occasional setbacks, Pressnell-Moore remains passionate about Gateway and especially the people it serves. “Any aspect of serving is hard work, but it’s also very rewarding,” she says. “You’re entwined in the lives of these people, so if they have a bad day, you have a bad day, too.” Gateway has dramatically changed JJ Kubancsek’s life, but the organization has had a powerful impact on his father as well. “I’ve served on Gateway’s board for 20 years now and have been an officer almost all of that time,” Gary Kubancsek says. “Gateway stepped in and started guiding us almost from the time JJ was born, and I feel like I owe them a life debt. Gateway is my second family.” Find more information about Gateway Services of Johnson County at gatewayarc.com.

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Raising the barre Traditional forms of exercise for dancers keep fitness seekers on their toes By Angela Hurley Jorden

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Celebrities are doing it. Athletes swear by the results. Pilates, barre training and yoga are effective exercise techniques that have been used by dancers for decades. The public is realizing the benefits of these exercise forms as studios pop up across the country. And it makes sense. If you want a dancer’s body, you exercise like a dancer, right? Barre training, Pilates and yoga use different techniques but have similar results, such as toned muscles, better balance and improved flexibility. These practices are now widely used to increase endurance and strength. The barre essentials

Remember the barre you clung to during your first ballet classes? Well, the barre, that is, is the horizontal handrail dancers hold while practicing moves and techniques, is back in the incredibly popular barre training. Barre-style workouts were inspired by classic ballet warmup exercises, but they’ve evolved into much more to attract a wider audience. “Most of our classes have a good mix of


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push-ups, sit-ups and planks,” says Jessica Kilburn, owner of Pure Barre Greenwood. “We use the barre itself for support during different sections of class, but we also offer a cardio-centric class called Pure Empower, so clients can get the most of their membership.” Barre training focuses on lengthening and strengthening muscles while using small, isometric, low-impact movements that are driven by music. Barre retains bragging rights when it comes to quick results. In just 10 classes, clients may start seeing the physical and mental results of this 50-minute workout. Variety is key to client commitment,

“The one thing we all have in common is our intentions when we walk inside those studio doors. Everyone is there to be their best selves and support each other.” — Jessica Kilburn

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too. “We are always working to provide the same great low-impact technique while changing the class to make sure we are constantly providing a challenging workout,” Kilburn says. “You will never have the same class twice.” Barre routines are combined with upbeat music to sustain the energy of the workout. The Pure Barre clientele is diverse, says Kilburn, but they have one similarity. “The one thing we all have in common is our intentions when we walk inside those studio doors,” she says. “Everyone is there to be their best selves and support each other.” Barre classes aren’t exclusive: Even male clients and pregnant women can do the workouts. And better yet, the workouts at Pure Barre require minimal equipment; participants need sticky socks — to prevent heat from leaving your body and to allow your feet to grip the floor well — as well as water and a towel. Pumped for Pilates

When classically trained dancer Brienne Christopher opened PurposeFit Pilates in Greenwood, she came home to her roots. After years of performing on stage, living in the limelight in Los Angeles and raising children, she desired more. “My family and I recently moved back to Indiana after living in California for 12 years,” Christopher says. “We wanted to be closer to family and give our kids the Midwest childhood we enjoyed growing up.” Christopher’s husband, actor Tyler Christopher, still works in Los Angeles on the soap opera “Days of our Lives.” After coming back to Indiana, Brienne Christopher felt unfulfilled and restless before she was inspired to open the southside studio. The name PurposeFit comes from her


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intention to help clients find their purpose and physically prepare for it; as a practicing Christian, it is her hope to marry faith and fitness. Christopher firmly believes in the power of Pilates, an exercise system developed by Joseph Pilates in the early 20th century, as well. “The best part of Pilates is the way it transforms people’s bodies,” she says. “You get the benefit of resistance training. We are always working the muscles in a lengthened state, which creates long and lean ‘dancer bodies.’” As with many studio exercise routines, Pilates is subject to fallacies about its clientele. Christopher knows better. “The biggest misconception is that ‘Pilates is for girls,’” she says. “My husband is an avid CrossFitter who uses Pilates to work on his core and maintain flexibility. In fact, most major professional sports teams use Pilates to keep their athletes in top shape and prevent injury.” For example, Pittsburgh Steelers wide receiver Antonio Brown and former Chicago Cubs pitcher Jake Arrieta are big proponents of Pilates; Arrieta credits Pilates for his successful pitching season in 2015, with benefits including improved balance and mental and physical toughness. Although most of PurposeFit’s clientele hails from Greenwood, Center Grove and Bargersville, Christopher streams a live fitness ministry class worldwide, three days a week. The location also serves as a school, offering teacher training and certification for barre and Pilates. The mind-body connection

Yoga classes today focus more on connecting mind, body and spirit, with a concentration on body awareness, breathing and stretching to create balance within the body. Like Pilates, yoga is widely used by professionals who rely on physical strength to succeed. “The physical practice of yoga is a great way to get in tune with your body,” says Jeremiah Elliott

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Jr., yoga instructor at BodySpace Yoga & Wellness in Fountain Square. “Many athletes, dancers included, use yoga to better understand their bodies. When you understand your body, you know your limits. You know where the edge is and when to push the edge and when to carefully approach it.” One meaning of yoga in Sanskrit is “union,” marking the synchronization of body, mind and spirit. Unlike Pilates and barre training, it includes many mental and spiritual practices that complement the physical ones. Elliott iterates its complete approach. “People like yoga because 46

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of the variety of classes available. You can take a restorative class that focuses on deep relaxation or a yin class that focuses on deep release of muscle connective tissues.” And the clientele is as varied as the offerings. “The practice of yoga is for everyone,” says Elliott. “We have students who are athletes and students who are office professionals that use yoga to help de-stress and unwind from their work.” BodySpace’s origin story is similar to those of PurposeFit and Pure Barre. Owner Olivia Openshaw was involved in gymnastics and competitive dance as a young woman and performed several

times as a ballerina. After a bout with body image distortion, she discovered yoga and used it to reconnect with her body. She fell in love with the Indianapolis area of Fountain Square, but noticed a lack of workout space or anywhere to be physically active. The studio opened in early 2016 to a strong reception from locals. BodySpace offers yoga, but it’s all about wellness and being physical. Barre classes, kickboxing and Pilates are part of the studio, hence the name BodySpace. “Our studio is welcoming to anybody,” Elliott says. “BodySpace was created in an act of love for the community.”


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Indiana Made

Finer Things

Hoosier designers help clients dress well By CJ Woodring

Clutch by House of Fifth

I

Indiana most often isn’t renowned as the world’s fashion metropolis or even the nation’s. But the Hoosier State continues to gain global prominence through the works of custom designers whose apparel and accessories present price points for every budget. It’s good news for fashion mavens who want to dress well, which in the United States sometimes seems like a lost art. Linda Przybyszewski, associate professor of history at the University of Notre Dame, is well versed on the subject.

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For nearly 10 years she’s been teaching “Nation of Slobs: The Art, Ethics and Economics of Dress in Modern America,” a course she conceptualized to enlighten students. In 2014 she wrote “The Lost Art of Dress: The Women Who Once Made America Stylish.” Professor Pski, as students call her, has been making most of her own clothes since she was a little girl. But much has changed on America’s fashion scene since the days the Chicago-area native first encountered a sewing machine. Photos provided


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Indiana Made

It’s all about dressing for success in finely crafted, custom-fitted items that display beautiful features, precise stitching and elegant details and trim. And Prof Pski says it doesn’t take a lot of money or skill. “It just takes knowledge,” she says. “Learn the principles of art and how they apply. And make sure whatever you buy fits your life occasions and is beautiful.” With the assistance of Indiana designers such as the following, the art of dressing well — with elegance and class — needn’t remain lost.

A cut above

Truen Jaimes of House of Fifth

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She explains the phenomenon. “America once had ‘dress doctors’ who set the rules through teaching, radio programs and home economics classes. Those people are no longer in place, so people aren’t learning about different levels of formality and appropriate attire. Today’s rules seem to be that you cannot dress up.” Fashion faux pas “clearly coincided with the 1960s, when we threw out rules of formality and life. I think style moved toward simplicity and eventually slipped into stupidity,” she says, noting the trend toward sloppy attire is uniquely American. “In Europe, there’s a certain formality for appearing in public that Americans have lost.”

At a time when “Mad Men” apparel holds widespread appeal, a man in a gray flannel suit is rarely present in today’s workplace settings. However, discerning customers still desiring professional attire seek the services of Lee’s Custom Tailoring and proprietor Jin Lee. A second-generation tailor, Lee began apprenticeship in his native South Korea in 1967. Since emigrating to the United States in 1985, he has provided custom-made men’s and women’s suits, sports coats, blazers, trousers, topcoats and shirts for distinguished clientele. As Indiana’s only certified master tailor — there are just 25 in the United States and fewer than 300 worldwide — the Indianapolis resident offers suits that take between 25 to 40 hours and sometimes up to 100 hours to construct. Lee’s customers range from 9 to 93 years old. His attention to detail, pride in workmanship and passion for excellence have won him multiple industry awards in what remains a niche market. “Anyone can go to a department store, but there are not that many tailoring shops, even in Indianapolis,” Lee says. “Of those, I’m the only master tailor. Whatever they need, I make for them.” Suit prices range from just shy of $800 to $20,000, depending upon whether they’re made-to-measure (MTM), custom-made bespoke or Oxxford bespoke. Customers select from more than 5,000 wool and cashmere suit fabrics sourced


from luxury cloth merchants. Shirts are constructed from luxury shirting that includes poplins, twills and cotton-cashmere blends. Consultations generally take about an hour. Lee says custom suits in a majority of businesses are MTM. His MTM suits take about three to six weeks to complete, with one or two fittings. “I also provide bespoke, the old, old handmade tailoring system. I make a pattern, like a blueprint,” he says. Suits are handmade, with delivery from four to eight weeks. Finally, Oxxford bespoke is handmade in Chicago, based on Lee’s pattern and design, and delivered within six to 10 weeks. Well-made custom suits most often include functional working cuffs and horn buttons, with optional details unseen by all but the wearer: monogrammed heel guards and suede collar felts. The result? A beautiful, comfortable suit that will outlast mass-produced garments and identify the owner as a confident, well-dressed professional.

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Ah, leather! Perhaps nothing else so eloquently whispers of elegance and good taste. And House of Fifth responds with a line of artisan quality handbags, travel bags, cuffs, bracelets and iPad cases. Creative director and co-owner Truen Jaimes first began working in apparel design, then transitioned to leather goods. After years of pre-designing his product line, the North Carolina native, along with two friends, opened an Indianapolis atelier. His mother and brother eventually were involved. “It definitely was my baby, my product line, but my friends helped me get a jump start. Then for about three years my mom helped with great feedback on samples, construction and technical details,” he says. About a year ago, Jaimes returned the studio to his home, where he focuses on hand-stitched artisanal pieces. All work is done in-house, using state-of-the-art industrial equipment and full artisan handmade work benches.

DJ-32021750

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Indiana Made

Erin Young Designs

Leather is sourced from throughout the world, with an eye for the best grade and price. Although Jaimes dyes in-house — he’s created about 19 different colors — most leather is vegetable tanned, creating a durable product that, with good care, can last a lifetime. Jaimes says leather remains a big seller despite animal protectionists’ concerns. “One of the biggest things we propose is a higher-end leather with a more environmentally friendly dyeing process and a lower impact on the animal population. In fact, artisan leather goods have had a real spike in sales the last few years. People are just more conscious about how they impact the environment.” Price points range from $7 for the SnapTech, which brings order to electronics cord chaos, to handbags and wallets for $100 to $200 all the way up to the St. Ellé

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traveler bag, priced at $15,000. The designer’s client list extends globally. “Our clients are well-traveled. With our products, I think they appreciate they can get something locally they believe is comparable to what they can get in great cities they visit. “A lot of them love accessories because they can spice up an ensemble, express their personality and have something different. As we dress more casually, it’s nice to have something upscale and still be comfortable at the same time.”

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Material goods

Spring is in the air, and the fashion forecast signals bright pastels for the girls in their summer dresses: ultraviolet, lavender, crocus, dahlia. Custom designed and constructed from natural fibers sourced from Chicago, New York City and California — cottons, linens, silk/hemp blends — the frocks are cool and comfortable, a return to yesteryear and simple authenticity. And they’re available at Indianapolis-based Erin Young Designs. Founder and proprietor Young and her team offer bridal gowns, special occasion and everyday dresses and business fashion, presenting busy, business and hard-to-fit women — whether in their mid-20s or 90s — a special place to connect with quality apparel. Services also include alterations and fashion consulting. “In most other nations, it’s common for women to have their own tailor,” Young says. “It’s not even considered in the U.S.,

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Indiana Made

Amanda Joyner of Chef Bizzaro Millinery

and young people here don’t even know how to use a sewing machine. “Professional women at upper levels are in a quandary, because today’s business suits either show too much cleavage or the skirts are too tight. Then there are women shopping for everyday dresses who are hard to fit and must have everything altered.” Young began working with fabric at the age of 5, and by the time she was 15 was undertaking high-end tailoring for men’s shirts and trousers. Following graduation from Purdue University, she attended the Fashion Institute of Technology and worked for Laura Ashley, both in New York City, also spending six months in Europe visiting design houses. After working out of her home for two decades, the designer opened her fabric and dressmaking studio in 2012, relocating three years ago. Price points range from $120 for a short skirt to $1,500 for a wedding gown, depending upon detail. Fabric is additional. 54

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“Our goal is to bring that higher-end product to clients, showing them the quality difference between off-the-rack versus custom-made that fits and looks well,” she says. “And it’s very rewarding, as a business, to see people so happy with how they look.”

Oh, chapeau!

For nearly eight years, former chef Amanda Joyner has been whipping up hats for clients who display the wearable art at local and global destinations that include weddings and community events, the Grammy Awards and the royal wedding. Many are jaw droppers. Think a giant hummingbird clothed in 500 feathers. Or a 2-foot octopus that accompanied its owner in Coney Island’s Mermaid Parade. But the custom-made creations needn’t be show stoppers: For the rest of us, there are cloches, pillboxes, boaters, swingers and more. “Hats for everyday wear are coming back,” says Joyner, founder and owner of

Chef Bizzaro Millinery in Michigan City. “People are starting to care about how they look. It’s a matter of being ‘put together’ and respecting yourself.” And it doesn’t require breaking the piggy bank, she says. “You can put on dress jeans and a T-shirt, and throw on a hat,” Joyner says. “A hat makes a statement, is magical and tells so much about a person.” The Texas native grew up playing dressup with her grandmother. With a love for vintage fashions, she first began making hats when her husband challenged her to duplicate an expensive one she loved. The designer is self-taught except for a “crash course” she took from milliner Joy Scott. As with all attire, individuals want to be defined by what they wear. “I just had a bride who selected rose-gold antlers with a diamond band trim for her wedding,” Joyner says, noting overall price points range from $25 headpieces to large chapeaux costing hundreds of dollars. This spring calls for bright pastel colors, textures such as sinamay (a type of straw) and leather and shapes including turbans. Joyner recently began using leather, a big seller in the U.K, and sources many supplies from Granger-based Judith M. Millinery Supply House. The designer hopes women will begin considering hats as a “must have” accessory, adding there’s an antidote for not dressing well. “You must get in the mindset to get dressed up every day, even if you don’t feel like it. Throw on a little hat. It will make you look and feel good, while changing your day, week, year and life.”


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Arts & Lifestyles

Tiffany’s Cheer & Dance Studio

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Photos provided


o t g n i h t Some

t u o b A r Chee

Local groups bring it on By Rebecca Berfanger

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D

Fierce Allstars Cheer

During the last weekend of January, a sea of young athletes in satiny track jackets, sequins, glitter and giant hair bows took over the Indiana Convention Center for the JAMfest Cheer Super Nationals. A billboard near the Indianapolis International Airport — the same one that also welcomes visitors to the Indy 500 every May — welcomed them to the Circle City. The cheerleaders had all worked on their two-and-a-half minute routines for months. But it turns out that it’s not only the awards that mattered that day, or at other competitions, but what the cheerleaders did leading up to and after the big event, that their coaches say make the sport important to these girls and boys. While the young athletes came from all over the Midwest and even as far as Texas, Florida and New York to compete at the JAMfest event, at least three of the teams were from much closer to home: VIP Athletics in Franklin, Tiffany’s Cheer & Dance Studio in Greenwood and Fierce Allstars Cheer in Franklin. Each of these organizations has different uniform colors, routines and coaches — all of whom are extremely qualified with years of their own experiences as cheerleaders. But what they do have in common are a love of the sport and a shared sense of the values the athletes learn from participating in cheering.

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Plus they all start the 2018-19 season in May, so there is still time to find out if cheer is appealing for you or a young person in your life. While most of us probably think of movies like “Bring It On” and the many sequels, or even the cheerleaders who perform on the sidelines of middle school and high school sports, the athletes who participate in all-star cheering are more into the competitive side of the sport. They spend several hours a week at and outside the gym, not only practicing their routines, but getting stronger through conditioning, learning new stunts, sharpening their tumbling skills and perfecting their choreography. Unlike the drama in the movies, the coaches say the athletes form a bond similar to that of a family. VIP Athletics co-owners Aaron Riley and Amy Rock have members of their gym who not only come to their classes, but might stay at the gym for additional hours to watch other classes. They also have members who tend to hang out for weekend slumber parties, even though they’ve already spent several hours together that week. “We are a family-owned and operated gym, therefore each member of Fierce Allstars is our family,” says Crystal Dyer, who co-owns Fierce Allstars with her sister, Sara Hawkins. When the Fierce gym was ravaged by a devastating fire four years ago, the organization and the community pulled together. “The amount of support was breathtaking. Every day, every hour someone was reaching out to us and offering support.  Our parents, athletes, friends, community and complete strangers were eager to help in any way possible,” Dyer says. “Our parents immediately held a prayer vigil in our honor, started organizing local fundraisers and then put their tool belts on and stood by us as we once again put our blood, sweat and tears into another home.” The bond formed among teammates is also important to Tiffany Messersmith, owner and coach at Tiffany’s Cheer & Dance Studio, because, she says, “we are a second family to a lot of our kids in the

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Arts & Lifestyles

VIP Athletics

program.” Many of the children stick with the program from a young age through high school, and some even compete at the college level. Those who have been in the program long enough have even received college scholarships from the gym. Like any family, there are different levels and personalities, even from the beginning, but cheer helps bring them all together. For instance, Rock says, “We often see older ones take responsibility for their actions or help little ones understand a routine. It’s a lot like a big sister-little sister relationship. Throughout the season, the big sister is like a support for the little sister.” 60

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These relationships also help build confidence. “It takes a lot of confidence to perform, even in practice,” Rock says. For instance, Rock and Riley mentioned a girl at their gym who, the first year she came in, seemed very shy. She was so quiet that the coaches had to stand right next to her to hear her talk. But with a little help from some of the other girls and the coaches, within a couple of seasons she came out of her shell and was able to perform well at an event for the athletes’ families to come watch them. “Now I can hand her a microphone and she’ll confidently say her name, age, how

long she’s been cheering and a little about herself,” Riley says. The girl’s mom was “ecstatic” to see her daughter being brave. Dyer has had similar experiences at her gym. “While we are here to compete and everyone loves to win, this sport truly is about so much more than winning,” she says. “It’s about the leadership skills, confidence, teamwork abilities, lifelong friends and memories these athletes gain from being a part of an organized sport and team. They are learning life skills that will help them navigate through every area of their life while growing into adulthood.”


Messersmith credits the team atmosphere for the sense of camaraderie the cheerleaders form. “It’s a team sport, not an individual sport,” she says. “They learn to work together as a team, make lots of friends, do conditioning games, and we make it fun.” Of course, the athletes all know they will eventually have an audience. For instance, Messersmith’s gym has girls who are Pacers Cheer Pals, that is, members of a cheer team put together by Messersmith and the Indiana Pacers basketball team to help encourage crowd involvement and entertain at select Pacers home games. A former cheerleader for the Pacers (aka Pacemate), Messersmith started the partnership as a way for the girls to get the experience of performing in front of big crowds. The girls, ages 5 to 11, must be members of Tiffany’s All-Star cheer program when they audition. A coach for the Pacemates holds the tryouts

and makes the decision of which girls will cheer at a Pacers game once a month. “They love all of it,” she says. “They get to learn different routines each month. It’s also a little more relaxed because it’s about performing instead of competing. When they go in front of the NBA crowd, it’s pretty exciting for them. They’re back in the locker room area, they’re like little mini Pacemates, they get to see Boomer, they see the Pacemates, they have a lot of fun.” The Cheer Pals perform during a timeout in the first quarter. The last two games of this season where they’ll perform are March 23, Pacers vs. L.A. Clippers, and April 10, Pacers vs. Charlotte Hornets. While there are a few options in the area for all-star cheering, most cheerleaders do the work because they’re in love with it, not necessarily with the dream of going pro.

“When you talk to someone who plays basketball or baseball or soccer, they say, ‘I play basketball,’ ‘I play baseball,’ ‘I play soccer,’” Rock says. “But cheerleaders will say, ‘I am a cheerleader.’ It’s more than something you decide you want to do. After you decide to try it in the beginning, you adopt the lifestyle of fitness and health, and you become this person that is a cheerleader.”

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Photos provided by Dowty construction


Out on a limb Wishes and childhood dreams flourish as treehouses capture the imagination By CJ Woodring

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Treehouses have a storied history, first used by ancient Romans and then by South Pacific and Southeast Asian natives as sturdy homes. Beginning about the early and mid-20th century, they stood as symbols of independence throughout the United States, the dream of every red-blooded American kid. Nestled in the boughs of a backyard tree, the fantastical aeries were the one place a kid (mostly boys at that time) could be alone with his thoughts, his friends and his dog. The crudely lettered sign on the door said it all: “No girls allowed!” In later decades, girls claimed their own spaces, dedicated to tea parties, solitary reading and, as now, girlfriend getaways. Those boys and girls are today’s adults. And youngsters who once yearned for a

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treehouse — but didn’t get one — are fulfilling that long-ago dream through their own children. Morgantown resident Pat Dowty is among them. Along with his brother, Chris Dowty, Pat is co-owner of Franklin-based Dowty Construction LLC. The company was founded in 2006, specializing in exterior additions such as docks, decks and boathouses. Dowty’s crews first built a treehouse in 2008, a basic playhouse supported by posts with a tree that served as centerpiece. When it came to building a treehouse for his own family — he and his wife, Jackie, have seven children age newborn to 12 years — it was a different story. “I wanted to build the best treehouse. This was about the time ‘Treehouse Masters’ came on,” he says, referring to the Animal Planet presentation, now in its fifth season. “I was about halfway done when I saw that program, and after that, I got a little bit more carried away with it.” The 600-foot aerie’s loft has hosted several sleepovers for about a dozen girls, and construction will include a bathroom when completed, he says. Although construction took about a year-and-a-half, Dowty admits he worked on it only as he was able. “It probably took longer than need be. It’s one of those things that if I’d had a crew on it, we’d have knocked it out in anywhere from six to eight weeks.” The sky isn’t the limit Early treehouses most often were crudely built, a father-son project composed of wood, nails, a limited budget and boundless imagination: It might be a pirate ship, fort, clubhouse or castle. Or simply a private space for overnight camping with friends. Today’s treehouses have grown up, morphing into retreats, romantic hideaways and luxury homes of up to three stories. They are used for habitation, recreation, observation and work spaces,


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peaceful and private sanctuaries where owners can interact with nature or let their imaginations run wild, recapturing long ago childhood days. The structures have also been used as money-making operations: Overnight resort getaways. Mountain retreats. Bedand-breakfasts. Along with Dowty Construction, an increasing number of builders specializes in constructing complex fantasies in the clouds, incorporating phones, Internet access, air conditioning, skylights, privacy shutters and creative staircases. Extra features can include a waterfall, rope swing, zip line and escape chute that replaces a staircase. To ensure they last longer than yesterday’s structures, wood, steel and fiber are structural components. If you can dream it, a building contractor can turn it into reality. Jackie Dowty says their treehouse has an attached slide, an attraction for the younger children not yet interested in the treehouse. But the older ones love it, she says. “We’ve had a birthday party, and Pat has joined them in sleepovers. They’ve also held Bible studies they would have done in the house with us, leading it themselves.” Although movie nights are currently shown on television, she says her husband plans on eventually installing a projector. What is the average treehouse owner looking for? Pat Dowty says they’re mostly looking for escape. “Several people who have seen my treehouse say they’d like to have one for a little getaway. At the end of the day, most hotel rooms aren’t even as big as my treehouse.” The builder notes there are certain considerations to keep in mind, among them cost. “I think a lot of people just want something really nice, but they need to remember that they’re basically building a small house. Imagine the cost, and then it’s going to be almost double that because you’re building it up in the trees. “The most important thing is to know what you want and what you want to

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spend. Builders can do whatever the customer wants. It’s just based on how expensive you want to get.” As with all home-building projects, Dowty says, the key word is location: “You have to have a good spot. You could have three trees, but if you want it to look professional and don’t have the right trees, it’s not going to work.” As for considering it a DIY project, “It depends on how far one’s talent goes and their prior experience,” Dowty says. “Especially if kids are going to be playing in it, you want it to be safe. Some people could get online and figure it out a lot on their own. I would suggest they have a pro do it. But that’s just me.” Take it indoors houses, tents, playground equipment and Central Indiana-based Jan Banister, an sheds have found their way indoors and American Society of Interior Designers into children’s bedrooms. Many compamember, says she never had a treehouse: nies offer a treehouse loft bed, while some She had a fort, built into the bushes in manufacture outdoor furnishings solely the far corner of the yard. The longtime, for indoor use. full-service interior designer says treeSo how far does Dowty think the houses foster independence, beginning in treehouse fad will rise? “There are a lot of small steps, while TV programs about also encouraging treehouses now. I just “I think a lot of people just teamwork and imagsaw a new one. So want something really nice, ination. it’s really starting to but they need to remember “I think a treegrow, and I’m kind of that they’re basically house serves the excited to see where it building a small house. same function for goes,” he says. Imagine the cost, and then a child that we, as Although people it’s going to be almost adults, are all lookhave been asking him ing for in that sunto rent his children’s double that because you’re room, window seat, playhouse, he says building it up in the trees.” small den or sewing he’s not ready to do —Pat Dowty nook. It’s a space to that yet. On the other get away to that’s truly your own. hand, ownership does have one perk: “If “Some projects I’ve seen and read my wife puts me in the doghouse, I can go about note that treehouses can be a child’s to a really nice one,” he says with a laugh. first design collaboration with an adult — planning, designing and building it Before you build together — while also fostering a sense » Have a site in mind, ensuring it’s of imagination and expressing what they adequate for construction and doesn’t want their dream space to be.” infringe on neighbors’ privacy Don’t despair if you lack yard space or » Build on at least two mature or nearly even a tree. Retreats in the form of playmature trees, depending on how large you 66

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want the structure and how many might occupy it at one time. The best trees are Douglas fir and red cedar. Others are oak, maple, chestnut, beech, pine and fruit trees; bypass poplar and silver birch. » Consult with a company with prior treehouse-building experience. » Consider safety, pest control, waterproofing, plumbing, power and a possible future expansion. » Consider the building’s impact on the trees’ health and surrounding vegetation. » Account for tree movement and growth. » Get approval of homeowners association and proper building permits from city and/or county.


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Worth the Trip

New Harmony Inn guest house

Utopia, Hoosier-Style New Harmony has a peaceful past and present By Glenda Winders

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Photos provided by Visit Posey County, Inc,


Griffin Cemetery

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Hollow, an antique store housed in the historic train depot. “Sara’s Harmony Way Wine Bar and Pub serves the Rappite recipe for Harmonie Bier, and Firehouse Antiques is housed in the old historic firehouse. In a town of approximately 850 people it takes everyone to help connect the history of the past with the living events of today.”

A look back

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Carol’s Garden

First a little history to get you into the local spirit: George Rapp and a group of German Lutherans who called themselves “Harmonists” or “Rappites” were the first to settle the town. They hoped to find the isolation that had eluded them at their first home in Pittsburgh. They built an orderly town and set up a successful economy with mills, factories and breweries, but after a decade they returned to Pennsylvania to be closer to other German-speaking people. Rapp sold the town to Owen, a wealthy Scottish industrialist who had made his fortune in textiles. Owen envisioned a “new moral world” based on social reform

A stone bench in New Harmony bears the inscription, “If we cannot reconcile all opinions, let us endeavor to unite all hearts.” The author of the quote was Robert Owen, who in 1825 was the second person to attempt establishing a utopian community on the idyllic banks of the Wabash River. His experiment failed, but his influence remains, and today his bench and the sentiment behind it provide the perfect place to begin exploring this fascinating town. History-rich New Harmony, located in southwest Indiana’s Posey County, is an excellent spot for a weekend getaway or a longer stay. And the shops, galleries and restaurants that embrace and celebrate the town’s storied past make the visit just that much more fun. “Many of the businesses are housed in historic buildings, and we all take pride in New Harmony’s historic past,” says Lynn Clark, president of the New Harmony Inn New Harmony Business Association and owner of Lowry

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and happiness achieved through equality and enlightenment, science and technology. The ideals were lofty, but individualism soon replaced socialism, and the experiment failed after two years. Fast-forward to 1941, when Jane Blaffer Owen, the wife of Robert’s great-greatgrandson, Kenneth, visited New Harmony and fell in love with it. She pledged to restore the town to its original glory, and her effort was a success. Many of today’s must-see spots are the results of her ideas and commissions. It seems the town’s original goal, that of isolation, was met: At the time of the 2010 census, New Harmony boasted a population of 789.

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In the present

When visiting, the logical first stop is the Athenaeum, a sweeping white modern building designed by architect Richard Meier, whose designs also include Clifty Creek Elementary School in Columbus and the Getty Center in Los Angeles. You’ll find a museum, as well as the visitors center, where the walking tours begin. These two-hour tours will bring the community’s utopian past to life and begin at 1 p.m. daily. During the tour you’ll see some of the original buildings, such as a house built by Robert Owen and rented to some of his followers; Community House No. 2, a dormitory where single Harmonists lived and which Owen later converted into business space; and the home of Harmonist David Lenz and his family, among others. You’ll visit Harmonist-built Thrall’s Opera House and the Harmonist Cemetery and go for a stroll through the Harmonist Labyrinth, a 1939 re-creation of the original. Some of these attractions are free and available to see on your own, though not the buildings. Other sites to see independently are the Cathedral Labyrinth, which duplicates the one at the 13th-century Chartres Cathedral near Paris; Church Park, built on the site of two Harmonist churches; Carol’s Garden

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spotlight local, Indiana and Midwestern artists, such as the Hoosier Salon and the New Harmony Gallery of Contemporary Art. There’s also the Women’s Institute and Gallery, so named because of New Harmony’s early efforts toward women’s suffrage. The Antique Doll Shoppe is a museum filled with dolls and related objects.

Fresh air and fresh shopping

New Harmony

and Fountain of Life, created as a memorial to Jane and Kenneth’s daughter; and Our Lord’s Wood, where the art- and poetry-lined path leads across a turquoise bridge and to a waterfall. Make sure to visit the Roofless Church, designed for Jane Owen by another famous architect, Philip Johnson. The idea was that the only roof big enough to cover a world full of worshippers was the sky; the “church” is a park enclosed by a brick wall. At one end is a bronze sculpture by Jacques Lipchitz titled “The Descent of the Holy Spirit.” Covered by the cedar dome the sculpture has become a New Harmony icon. Before you return to the present for more modern shopping and dining, you might want to check out the Working Men’s Institute, which was established by William Maclure, a business partner of Robert Owen who shared his vision that knowledge should be available to everyone. This functioning library — the oldest continuously operating one in Indiana — also houses rare books, papers and artifacts, such as a letter from Robert Owen 72

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to Abraham Lincoln. The 1894 Victorian Romanesque Revival building also houses traditional and contemporary art galleries. Save some time to browse in the town’s other art galleries, some of which

The Red Geranium

New Harmony is also a perfect destination for anyone seeking outdoor fun, with its miles of riverfront and wooded trails as well as its state and city parks. Thanks to its proximity to the Wabash, boating, canoeing and fishing are all available, as are golf, tennis and horseback riding. You might want to finish your day with a massage or scrub at the Moon River Spa in the New Harmony Inn, but be sure to call ahead for an appointment. As you might guess, New Harmony shopping is heavy on antiques. In addition to Lowry Hollow and Firehouse Antiques are the Antique Emporium; Cookie Jar Antiques, where many dealers display their wide variety of offerings; and The Mews, which carries items ranging from


antiques to current fashions. For unusual gift items and fun places to browse, visit Arbor House and Garden, the New Harmony Soap Co. and Creation Station, where if you can’t find what you want they’ll make every attempt to create it for you. The Golden Rose, named for the symbol of the Harmonists, is the place for fresh and silk flowers as well as chocolates and gifts. Several of these businesses are closed on Wednesdays, so plan accordingly if you’re coming to shop. The Red Geranium, also part of the New Harmony Inn, has long been a favorite of visitors for fine dining, so when you’re ready for a meal, be it breakfast, lunch, dinner or brunch, you might want to give it a try. The three dining rooms range from casual to elegant, and the menu features American food with Midwestern favorites. Other good places to eat are Mary Scott’s Kitchen for Southern, Cajun and Mexican dishes; the Yellow Tavern for burgers, pizzas, tenderloins and their signature bread pudding; and Main Café for family-style dining and good pie. At day’s end there are plenty of places to lay your head, and most of them abound in character. The New Harmony Inn Resort and Conference Center is one popular choice. The A.C. Thomas House Bed and Breakfast Inn features luxurious accommodations in a Victorian home, and Cooks on Brewery Bed and Breakfast offers locally sourced breakfasts and complimentary bicycles. Or rent The Loft on Main, which bills itself as a “home away from home” and is an apartment that sleeps four. And that’s just a start. For more places to explore, eat and stay and for the many festivals to which New Harmony is host, check out visitposeycounty.com. “New Harmony is the perfect place to get away to relax, refresh and renew,” says Kari Mobley, executive director of Visit New Harmony. “Our one-of-a-kind arts and architecture and beautiful scenery will leave you feeling enlightened.”

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Legacy of Leadership Pete Grimmer continues a family tradition of business excellence and community involvement

By Jon Shoulders | Photography by Angie Jackson

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Profile

Dana and Pete Grimmer

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The list of Pete Grimmer’s career accomplishments is lengthy. He founded a highly successful strength training equipment company not one year out of college, he owns and manages several commercial and residential rental properties throughout Franklin, and more recently, he was instrumental in bringing Big Woods restaurant to Hillview Country Club, of which he is a co-owner and longtime member with his wife, Dana Grimmer. Such achievements seem to speak to his individuality and personal initiative, but he’s quick to attribute some of the credit for his successes to the influence of and example set by his father, John. “Dad did so much for this community, not just as the co-founder of a big company here, but with the way he was always involved in Franklin and the county,” Pete says of his father, who died last summer. Even as a youngster coming up through the Franklin schools, Pete, along with his

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brothers, John Jr., Curt, Andy and Tom, was closely observing the way his dad conducted his professional business and relationships throughout Johnson County. An Indianapolis native, John worked for Cummins in Columbus for 17 years before striking out on his own and co-founding Grimmer-Schmidt Compressors, which would become a major Franklin employer and far-reaching supplier of air and natural gas compressors. “Dad was an amazing businessman; it was inspiring to watch,” Pete says. “Observing a lot of his and my mom’s community involvement, I found over the years that I really wanted to keep that tradition going. He and his business partner were very friendly with bankers and real estate people here. Franklin was very good to him, and he was always trying to give back.” Pete began channeling his father’s industriousness and entrepreneurial spirit even before finishing his undergraduate


Glass Designed Around You mechanical engineering degree at Purdue. As a member of the crew team he spent a large chunk of non-classroom time in the campus weight room and began formulating ideas for his own line of strength training equipment. After graduating in 1987, he rented some manufacturing space from his dad and launched Pro Industries, a Franklin-based supplier of athletic equipment and accessories. For the next 10 years Pete focused on developing training products and business relationships for Pro Industries, and furnished equipment for multiple college and pro football organizations, including the Colts, Packers and Bears. Along the way he noticed the rate at which his father’s compressor company was also growing

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Promises Kept Since 1945 Grimmer with his father, John.

and by the late 1990s decided to sell Pro Industries and work full time at the family business, where all four of his brothers have also worked at various points throughout their careers. “Pete wanted to help carry on what his dad had grown,” says Dana, an Indian Creek High School and Ball State grad who ran Euphoria Salon & Spa in Morgantown for several years before selling the business in 2007. “His dad really saw the potential in Franklin.” More recently, Pete has been helping Franklin reach that potential by spearheading a few residential and commercial development projects, including the spring 2017 opening of Big Woods restaurant at

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Evan Wilds, Mack Wilds (2), Beck Wilds (2 months), Dakota Wilds, Mia Wilds (5), Dana Grimmer, Derek Grimmer, Pete Grimmer, Jensen Grimmer, Gwen Grimmer (14), Dustin Wisehart, Dane Wilds (8)

Hillview, a project he says was years in the making. After he and Dana became regulars at the Big Woods Nashville location, Pete eventually called the owner to discuss a presence at the country club, in the building formerly occupied by Scotty’s Brew Club. “Big Woods was always our first choice there, and they had shown some interest in Franklin prior to my cold-calling them,” Pete says. “It was a pretty quick turnaround. We’re getting lots of compliments in our first year, and the parking lot’s always full.” With Johnson County’s steady commercial growth over the past 10 years, John began to see a growing

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Photo by annie syers / provided by dana grimmer


demand for quality housing on the city’s east side and purchased 87 acres of land from Franklin Community School Corp. in 2013 for residential development. Pete and Dana purchased the land, which sits adjacent to Hillview, from John Sr. prior to his death with the intent of bringing the project to fruition. “We’re really focused on the east side with the new restaurant, and the housing I’m developing is integrated into the clubhouse and golfing,” Pete says. “We’ve probably sold a dozen lots, and this spring we’ll be busy with a lot of houses going up. We’re focused on promoting that development right now to really help out Franklin and the need for good housing.” Fourteen acres of the Grimmers’ development were recently acquired by Emmanuel Church, the leaders of which are currently building their third campus on the property and expect construction to be complete by the end of the year. Pete feels the 30,000-square-foot facility will add to the area’s appeal and diversity. These days Pete and Dana spend time between their residence on Lamb Lake in Franklin and a vacation house in Stuart, Florida, where Pete’s parents began visiting 25 years ago. Having both grown up on Lamb Lake, the couple have developed a love for water-related activities, like boating, fishing, water-skiing and paddle boarding. The Grimmers also spend time with family, including their five children: Dustin Wisehart of Franklin, Dakota Wilds of El Paso, Texas, Jensen Grimmer of Orlando, Florida, Derek Grimmer of Bloomington and Gwendolyn Grimmer, a high school student. The family has grown to include Dakota’s children, Dane, Mia, Mack and Beck and husband, Evan Wilds. “Growing up in Franklin I really came to appreciate the town and have seen its potential with the projects I’ve been involved in,” Pete adds. “The fact that the college is right there in the center of the county makes it a little more diverse than some other areas. We like the progressiveness of the city, and we’ve enjoyed working with the city on these various projects. We feel like we’re on board with the city’s vision.”

Business Services Medicaid Planning & Elder Law Estate Planning & Administration Litigation & Appeals Commercial Law Mediation Services Municipal Law Real Estate, Land Use & Zoning (317) 888-1121 www.wbwlawyers.com

600 N Emerson Ave, Greenwood (near I-65 & County Line Road) SOU T H

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Classic

A Contemporary

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Kelly and James Hanson’s custom home blends modern design and warm, comfortable accents By Jon Shoulders | Photography by Angie Jackson

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When you’re not able to downsize, then simply resize. That’s the philosophy Kelly and James Hanson brought to bear when designing their four-bedroom, five-bathroom residence on Indy’s southside. In 2015, the Hansons realized the physical layout of their previous home in the Greystone subdivision was no longer ideal for hosting parties with friends and frequent visits from their three children, Katie, Chris and Drew, as well as their children-in-law and six grandkids. “The kitchen we built in our old house for a family of five was not really accommodating for 14, and we toyed with doing a remodel, but the pricing for that can be ridiculous,” Kelly recalls. “We ended up getting an offer on that house, and since we wanted to stay in this neighborhood, we bought a lot across the water.”

Kelly and James Hanson

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Room for more Soon after discussing several design scenarios with Greenwood-based builder Ron Wampler of Wampler Builder Inc., they decided on an open floor plan for their new home’s main level, doing away with formal dining and living room spaces. “We kind of wanted to downsize but needed to make sure we had room for the kids and grandkids who come over every Thursday for dinner,” Kelly says. “So my thought was that instead of a downsize, we’d do a resize.” The result is a 5,500-square-foot design that’s sensible without sacrificing style, spanning two levels and built into the lot’s steep decline overlooking one of Greystone’s lakes. As a passionate interior designer who used to run her own design company in Indianapolis, Kelly worked directly with Wampler on the floor plan details and the home’s interior and exterior material selections throughout the yearlong design and construction process. “It’s definitely a modern style,” Kelly says. “I like contemporary lines, but I


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also like a lot of color, so I just tried to keep that contemporary feel, with modern-looking blinds and lighting and things like that, but yet still make it feel like who we are is reflected throughout.” Several homey touches work to achieve this balance throughout the central living area, including a range of soothing blue tones from the furniture and wall-hung artwork, as well as a mantel fashioned to resemble piano keys — a brainstorm of Kelly, a longtime musician. “The kids weren’t too sure about that mantel, but they learned to trust me on it before it went up,” she says with a chuckle. Hearth and home The kitchen design could well be characterized as casual contemporary, with decorative lighting, a spacious island and quartz counters, one of which has an ice bucket built directly into the shelf space below it for convenient countertop access when serving cold beverages for guests. “We really don’t cook too much, but the way the kitchen opens onto the living space works well for when the whole family is over and we’re all having drinks and stuff,” Kelly says. The upper level floor plan also includes a screened-in porch (the couple’s favorite spot to relax) overlooking the backyard and surrounding neighborhood of Greystone, a master suite with a Jack-and-Jill bathroom, and a study equipped with floor-to-ceiling bookshelves and a professional sketch of James, a labor and employment attorney, from the time he argued a case before the U.S. Supreme Court. “Kelly did a great job doing her own decorating for the whole house and picking out everything outside and inside,” says Wampler, adding that the two-story construction on the steep lot necessitated an 18-foot retaining wall. “It’s a different kind of house from what you normally see as far as the way it’s laid out, and she did a great job using her interior design sense.” Guests descending the stairs to the SOU T H

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home’s lower level are greeted by the word “Dwell” printed on the wall in stylish, oversized font — another of Kelly’s personal touches. “It’s my favorite word, and the Bible verses on the wall all have the word “dwell” in them,” she explains. “I thought the black-on-black printing tied in well with the wrought-iron stair railing, too.” Upstairs, downstairs The downstairs level offers functionality with an emphasis on fun, featuring an exercise space where the Hansons are in the process of installing a full-course golf 86

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simulator, a secondary laundry facility and a well-equipped playroom for the grandkids complete with a wooden treehouse, which the Hansons have affectionately dubbed the Treehouse Room. “We put in a second laundry room on the lower level for resale value since three of the four bedrooms are down there, and it does come in handy when we have swimming parties because everyone can just come straight in from the pool outside and throw their stuff in there,” Kelly adds. The Hansons even managed to achieve a modern-yet-classic look for the home’s exterior walls, opting for dryvit, a synthetic

material that can be fashioned into blocks of any size. Dark hues for the roof, exterior trim and garage doors offer an eye-pleasing contrast to the dryvit coating’s lighter tone. “A lot of people use dryvit just for accents up in gables and things like that on their homes, and it was a challenge for the whole exterior with getting it to look like stone slabs, which was what Kelly was going for,” says Wampler, who also oversaw construction of the Hansons’ previous Greystone home. “It’s a unique and fairly distinct look.” A Muncie native, Kelly met James while they both attended Anderson University,

and the couple moved to Indianapolis in 1982 after he finished law school at IU. Having been married for 40 years and lived in Greystone for 25, Kelly says she and James have come to see their southside neighborhood as a residential sweet spot, a tranquil, family-friendly setting with easy access to lively downtown amenities. “We couldn’t really find another neighborhood we like as well as this one,” she says. “James works downtown and it’s easy to get on I-65, and yet we don’t feel like we’re in the city. You just can’t beat that about this part of town. It really feels like we have our own community.” SOU T H

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Nashville at sunset

Tennessee offers its own twang By Glenda Winders

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If entertainment, museums, food, scenery and outdoor activities are on the wish list for your next weekend getaway or family vacation, you need travel no farther than two states away. Tennessee’s major cities are bursting with good times; in between them are Pigeon Forge, with Dollywood to thrill the kids, and Gatlinburg, where the grown-ups can shop and dine.

Beale Street

Memphis Memphis bills itself as the home of the blues and the birthplace of rock ’n’ roll. But that isn’t all that makes this city special. “The magic of Memphis is in the mix,” says Kevin Kane, president and CEO of the Memphis Convention and Visitors Bureau. “The city is filled with unexpected fusions: high culture and outdoor adventure, soul food and haute cuisine, rich heritage and forward thinking, and the many forms of music born and still recorded here.” What to do First stop: Graceland. You can’t beat Elvis’ home for getting in the mood for music. Tour Sun Studio, where he made his mark, and if you’re a hard-core fan check out Rockabilly Rides for an Elvis-themed tour of the city. Don’t miss Beale Street, an important spot in the history of the blues. And while you’re here tour the Rock ’n’ Soul Museum, which offers a Smithsonian-curated history of how early musicians overcame cultural and economic odds to become

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stars. At the Stax Museum of American Soul Music, located at the site of the Stax Records studio, you’ll trace the roots of soul back to a reconstructed Mississippi Delta church, visit a recording studio and see Isaac Hayes’ custom-made Cadillac. A more sobering experience is a pilgrimage to the National Civil Rights Museum, located in the Lorraine Motel, where Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated. Also historically significant is the Slave Haven Underground Railroad Museum, where you can walk through an antebellum home and see where the fugitives were hidden. Make sure you get out on the Mississippi River while you’re here. One option is a sightseeing cruise on Memphis Riverboats; another is to walk, run or bike across Big River Crossing, the river’s longest pedestrian bridge. More adventuresome souls can try kayaking with Allen’s Kayaking Adventures. Don’t miss the Brooks Museum of Art and the Metal Museum with a sculpture garden that overlooks the river, but if you want more time outside, visit the Memphis Zoo in Overton Park or follow the Greenline pedestrian path to Shelby Farms Park for zip lining and horseback riding.


Where to eat Memphis is known for several distinctive cuisines, and you’ll want to try the local favorites. The Cupboard Restaurant is one of many that offer soul food, and the Half Shell Restaurant claims to have the best seafood in town. Be sure to check out Alfred’s on Beale for barbecue and B.B. King’s Blues Club (also on Beale) for Southern cooking. The Beauty Shop where Priscilla Presley had her hair done is now a restaurant with such flavor-fusion dishes as barbecued chicken wings with watermelon and chili lime sauce. Tsunami serves small plates of seasonal Pacific Rim-influenced cuisine. Where to stay The Guest House at Graceland is a must for Elvis fans. It’s decorated in the style of his home and is just a four-minute walk away. River Inn of Harbor Town is a boutique hotel with spectacular river views. Hotel Napoleon is also a boutique hotel located downtown in the historic Winchester building. If you’d rather have an apartment where you can spread out and eat in, contact Stay Alfred Vacation Rentals. More downtown apartments are available at The Exchange, completed in 1910 and listed on the National Register of Historical Places.

The Ryman

Nashville If country music is more your style, the place for you is Nashville, also known as “Music City.” And like Memphis, the state’s capital is a marvelous mix of popular culture and rich history.

Graceland

Where to go You’ll find music venues everywhere you look, but for sure don’t miss the Country Music Hall of Fame, the Grand Ole Opry and the Ryman Auditorium, the Opry’s original home. There’s a Sun Studio here, too, and the Bluebird Café, where songwriters come to try out their creations. Don’t miss the honky-tonks on Lower Broadway — Tootsie’s Orchid Lounge

and Legends Corner are among the bestknown. Up-and-coming groups perform for tips, with just enough time between sets for the next band to set up. While you’re here make a stop at the Ernest Tubb Record Store, or if country music isn’t your thing, get some tickets to the state-of-theart Schermerhorn Symphony Center. To explore Nashville’s historic side, a good place to start is President Andrew Jackson’s home, the Hermitage. Belle Meade Plantation is a 5,400-acre thoroughbred horse farm with a Greek Revival mansion where you’ll follow a guided tour through the house with wine-tasting and strolling the grounds on your own. To immerse yourself in more history, tour the state capitol and the nearby Tennessee State Museum, where you can see a bench made by Davy Crockett among many other memorable artifacts. SOU T H

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The Frist Center for the Visual Arts

Chattanooga

Another of Nashville’s nicknames is “Athens of the South” because of its numerous universities. That being the case, when Tennessee had its Centennial Exposition in 1897 an exact replica of the Parthenon in Greece was the celebration’s centerpiece. Inside is a 42-foot statue of Athena by local sculptor Alan LeQuire, made to the specifications of the lost Greek original. An art gallery containing paintings by 19th- and 20th-century American painters is also in the building. The Frist Center for the Visual Arts originates and hosts high-quality exhibitions in the classical/art deco building that was formerly the main post office. Where to eat Nashville is also known for its barbecue, and among the many good restaurants that serve it is Jack’s. Another Nashville mainstay is “meat and three,” Southern cooking establishments where the customer selects a meat and three sides that are served with cornbread and sweet tea. Some good ones are Swett’s and Monell’s. Southern cooking also abounds at the Loveless Café and Hattie B’s. Gray and Dudley uses local ingredients to yield an eclectic menu served in a museum setting. Where to stay The downtown Union Station Hotel is adjacent to the Frist Center and a short walk to Lower Broadway. This former railway station was recently renovated to reflect the spirit of the city today. The Fairlane Hotel 92

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in the downtown business and arts area is a retro-modern hotel in a mid-century modern building. If you’re planning to attend the Grand Ole Opry, the Gaylord Opryland Resort will be a good choice, and you can take advantage of the adjacent Opry Mills shopping mall. At the SoBro Guest House you’ll have a kitchen in your suite, and groceries can be delivered to your door. Anchor Rentals offers lofts that have been stylishly decorated, as does Music City Loft. For cozier surroundings, try the Daisy Hill Bed and Breakfast in trendy Hillsboro Village, Germantown Inn in the Germantown neighborhood or the Urban Cowboy Bed and Breakfast, located in a historic Victorian mansion in East Nashville.

Parthenon

While it may not be as big as other cities in the state or a music capital, Chattanooga is a charming destination, especially if you’re traveling with your family. What to do You may have seen the “See Rock City” ads painted on barns when you were a child, and being atop Lookout Mountain and seeing the ancient rock formations, Ruby Falls and native gardens are still a worthy bucket-list item. The Enchanted Trail leads through Fairyland Caverns and Mother Goose Village. This is also the spot from which it is said you can see seven states. Just eight minutes away is the Incline Railway that will take you to a different part of the mountain to see Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park, Lookout Mountain Civil War Battlefield and Point Park. The Tennessee Valley Railroad Museum is a moving museum where you ride in the trains to learn their history. Another place to learn about the past is the Bessie Smith Cultural Center, which preserves African-American culture through art, education and research.


For fine art, visit the Hunter Museum of American Art, which houses paintings by such favorites as Thomas Hart Benton, Edward Hopper and Andy Warhol. Housed in an early 20th-century mansion and a sleek glass and steel addition, it is close to the Creative Discovery Museum, where children can experience and create art of all kinds. A treat for the whole family is the Tennessee Aquarium on the banks of the Tennessee River, where water environments and their denizens from all over the planet are on display. The Riverbend Festival in June is a bonanza of food and entertainment. Where to eat Here, too, barbecue is king. Try Sugar’s Ribs for a patented process that leaves the ribs crunchy on the outside and tender on the inside. Or Shuford’s Smokehouse, located in an old gas station, or prize-winning Rib and Loin. Alleia offers rustic Italian food with views of Lookout Mountain, Public House serves a refined version of the meat and three, and Bluewater Grille is good for seafood. Where to stay Who wouldn’t want to overnight at the Chattanooga Choo-Choo, an old-time train depot where it’s possible to sleep in restored train cars? Or the Chanticleer Bed and Breakfast on top of Lookout Mountain? You can live the life of a cowboy at A Tennessee Dude and Guest Ranch or camp at Battlefield Campground near Civil War memorials.

Chattanooga Choo-Choo

Market Square, Knoxville

Knoxville The state’s first capital, Knoxville is home to the Women’s Basketball Hall of Fame and the world’s biggest basketball – 30-feet-tall and weighing 10 tons. The city also boasts the Sunsphere, a 75-foot-tall, gold glass sphere atop a 266-foot-high metal structure leftover from the 1982 World’s Fair. “With a sophisticated mix of culture and cuisine served up with genuine hospitality, Knoxville will surprise you,” says Erin Donovan, communications director at Visit Knoxville. “It’s a big town with little attitude. We treat everyone like a local.” What to do A good place to discover Knoxville’s history is to tour the city’s seven historic homes, which range from log cabins to stately mansions. Select a few or buy a combo pass that allows you access to them all. The Beck Cultural Center tells visitors how African-Americans influenced the area. While Knoxville isn’t a music hub, it nevertheless celebrates tunes with venues such as the historic Tennessee Theater and live concerts every day at the WDVX studios inside the Knoxville Visitors Center. The Knoxville Museum of Art displays the work of East Tennessee artists, and the McClung Museum of Natural History and Culture on the campus of the University

of Tennessee focuses on local archaeology, anthropology and decorative arts. This is a great place to be outside, with Navitat Zipline Canopy Adventures at the Ijams Nature Center, a zip line park for every skill level. Or there’s Zoo Knoxville, the red panda capital of the world and home to 800 other animals. Or the 1,000-acre Urban Wilderness with biking and hiking trails. Take a sightseeing cruise on the Star of Knoxville Riverboat or a dinner cruise so you can see the nighttime city from the Tennessee River. Where to eat Feast on farm-fresh regional dishes at J.C. Holdway or Italian food with freshmade pasta at Emilia. Knox Mason serves creatively prepared seasonal fare, and Plaid Apron focuses on local produce. A good dessert spot is Cruze Farm Ice Cream, which also operates a pizza barn next door. Knoxville is building a reputation as one of the best craft beer centers in the Southeast, so grab a map to the Ale Trail and start tasting. If clubbing is your scene, try Cotton Eyed Joe. Where to stay The boutique Oliver Hotel is located near Market Square, the hub for dining, entertainment and shopping. The brand-new Tennessean Personal Luxury Hotel is at World’s Fair Park, and Baymont Inn and Suites is near the university. For something more intimate, try Maplehurst Inn, Maple Grove Inn or Marble Hill Inn. SOU T H

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weddings

Megan Oliver & Thomas Madlem Jan. 28, 2017 Wedding and reception at Valle Vista Golf Club and Conference Center Thomas Madlem and Megan Oliver’s story began with a blind date. Set up by mutual friends, they’d been talking for some time, but were having trouble making time for a first date, between Thomas’ demanding work schedule and Megan’s busy life with her two young kids. “We finally had the chance to meet and opted for a romantic evening at the bowling lanes in Greenwood,” Thomas says. “I felt an instant connection with Megan that night, even after she took a tumble while bowling during a frame. When she didn’t get upset at me laughing at her misfortune, I knew there must be something there.” After several years of dating, he realized that Megan was the woman he wanted by his side. To propose, he challenged her to a duel in their favorite dancing video game, offering a trophy for the winner, with Thomas choosing the song. “When I chose the song, still wearing my normal clothes, Megan and the kids knew I was doomed to a miserable defeat, then I quickly hit the pause button and ran into the bedroom for an ‘emergency,’” he says. Thomas re-emerged in full M.C. Hammer attire and proceeded to dance as though his life depended on it. He lost and Megan won the trophy: an engagement ring. “How could she say ‘no’ to a guy dressed just like M.C. Hammer?” Thomas says. The couple centered their wedding ceremony on the concept of commitment, opting for a small gathering at his workplace, Valle Vista Conference Center. When Megan pulled up in a horse-drawn carriage, Thomas says he could not have been happier. “I was surrounded by our families, I had my friends running the show, I had everything I needed in life,” he says. In November Megan and Thomas welcomed a third child into their lives. “Megan and I have been on the same page since Day 1,” he says. “She is my love, she is my equal, she is my best friend.” Photography by Stephen Simonetto

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weddings

Jenna Linxwiler & Luke Dougherty Nov. 24, 2017 Ceremony and reception at The Sycamore at Mallow Run Jenna Linxwiler and Luke Dougherty knew each other for a long time, having mutual friends through school and 4-H. Luke, Jenna says, first made his move through Instagram. Luke adds to the story, saying that he was home from Purdue University and beginning his career in farming. “In search for the woman God had planned for me, I began watching a Christian sermon series on dating in searching for your spouse,” he says. “Amongst many great points, one common message stood out in all of them: that you should be praying for your future spouse.” Luke began doing so, and while praying, Jenna would pop into his head. “I knew it had to be God prompting me to reach out to her,” he says. “I finally reached out to her through social media, asking her out on a date.” Luke incorporated his ties to farming into the proposal; one evening, he gathered all of their closest friends and family into his barn. When Jenna entered, their friends and family made an arc with lighted sparklers, leading Jenna to Luke, who proposed. The couple planned their wedding with an aesthetic somewhere between rustic and elegant, using the colors maroon and navy. “We wanted to enjoy our day with family and friends and not stress about the little things that don’t matter at the end of the day,” Jenna says. The couple honeymooned in Cancun, Mexico, where they stayed at Villa del Palmar. Photography by Gretchen Robards

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Anna Wimmenauer & Michael Arnott Sept. 23, 2017 Wedding and reception at Indianapolis Central Library Center Grove High School graduate Anna Wimmenauer and Michael Arnott met through their jobs at Angie’s List. “He was so shy, we worked in the same department and didn’t know each other for four months,” Anna, who still serves as Center Grove’s diving coach, recalls. Mike proposed to Anna in London in September 2016 during a family trip. “It was our first night in London,” she said, “and a local sports talk radio star, Dan Dakich, was doing a live show from the ‘official Colts pub,’ for the weekend, and we wanted to check it out. We got off the train in Trafalgar Square and were walking into the square, admiring the beautiful scenery. Everyone in my family was looking a different way taking pictures, and meanwhile, Mike was down on one knee.” Anna screamed with excitement, and around 500 strangers clapped for the couple, while most of her family missed the real thing. “We went into The Admiralty for celebration cheers, and my dad makes his way back to Dan Dakich, who’s still doing the live broadcast, and announces, ‘My daughter just got engaged.’ Dan then does what any good broadcaster would do and gets us on the radio,” Anna says. “I was flustered and couldn’t stop shaking but kept answering his questions.” The couple returned home and began planning their wedding, working with the colors of black and white and a timeless, simple theme. The bridesmaids chose their own black dresses. “I wanted them to feel confident and comfortable the entire day,” Anna says. “The best part about getting married at Central Library was it was such a beautiful venue, we didn’t need any decorations.” The couple honeymooned in Europe, beginning in Munich, Germany. Photography by Amanda DeBusk

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Johnson Memorial Hospital Foundation Gala Feb. 24 // JW Marriott Indianapolis

1. Kelsey Kasting, Angela Morris, Emily Schuyler, Angie Gonzalez and Carrie Ford

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2. Dr. Craig and Diana Moorman 3. Rafael and Beth Sanchez 4. Suzanne Findley, Ann Gordon, Rebecca Oaks, Debbie Bechman, Jennifer Tennell, Sandi Huddleston 5. Jill Thompson, Cindy Grant and Gina Sims 6. Innovative Casting Technologies 7. Larry Heydon 8. Chris Cosner, Dean Abplanalp, Chuck Wells, Tom Thompson and Doug Stewart 9. Kim Snyder and Steve Wohlford 10. Craig and Jill Bland 11. In front from left: Jerry Westerfield, Julie Evans, Sharon Sauter, Joy Westerfield and Dawn Whitaker. In back: Jim Evans, Jeff Sauter and Tracy Whitaker.

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Daddy/Daughter Dance Feb. 17 // Beeson Hall

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5. Gwen, 12, and Jerry Preilis 6. Kinley, 7, and Chris Pagano 7. David Armbruster with Emery, 3, and Riley, 6 8. Hailey, 11, and Tom Wheeler 9. Nora, 9, and Matt Hobbs 10. Brad Hinds with Lanie, 6, and Kenley, 3 11. Bryson and Kennedy Urban, 12 12. Michael Williams with Addy, 7, and Ellie, 3

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13. Andrew and Samantha White, 4 14. Emma, 10, and Jeff Christoff 15. Brian and Taylor Klem, 6 16. Lance and Cammie Marshall, 10 17. Matt and Megan Meriwether, 10 18. Derick and Sophia Kurtz, 5 19. Olive, 5, and Luke Davidson 20. Faith, 3, and Josh Abraham

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21. Dance party 22. Morgan, 12, and Ken Sandrock

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Valentine’s Dinner Presented by The Castlewood Singers Feb. 10 // The Sycamore at Mallow Run Winery

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Daily Journal Bridal Show Jan. 28 // Valle Vista Golf Club 1. Amy McCorkle, Sweet Escape Cake Co. 2. Maggie Pace and Charlene Brown, Carpenter Realtors 3. Ken Carter, Aadvanced Limousines

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4. Barb Miller, Center for Vein Restoration 5. Jenna Singleton, LuLaRoe 6. Jennifer Jennett, The Cocoa Exchange 7. Spencer Truelove, Truelove Film & Photo 8. Dasee Johnson, Monat with Dasee 9. Nick Samson, Bridal Beatz DJ Entertainment 10. Glenn Smith & Julia Smith Complete Weddings 11. Mike Briggs, Louie’s Tux Shop 12. John Ittenbach, Gary Cornelius and Stephanie Brewer, Hilton Garden Inn South/ Sprague Co. 13. Chloe Chappelle and Morgan Whyde, Dye’s Walk County Club

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Jim Rhoades Memorial Hog Roast Nov. 30 // Scott Hall, Johnson County Fairgrounds 1. Bill Harmening serves Franklin resident Annie Leser. 2. Finley Able 3. Jessica Chaney and Franklin Mayor Steve Barnett 4. The hog roast allowed the Franklin Rotary Club to donate more than $27,000 in proceeds to area charities. 5. Tina Phelps and the Franklin Community Band perform. 6. Members of the Indian Creek High School FFA cooked 450 pork chops.

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Photos by Scott Roberson


Southside Business Directory BREWHOUSE BREWHOUSE

Tried & True Tried & True Alehouse Alehouse

2800 S State Road 135 2800 S State Road 135 Greenwood, Indiana 46143 Greenwood, Indiana 46143 (317) 530-2706 (317) 530-2706 triedandtruealehouse.com triedandtruealehouse.com

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

CATERING

CHURCH

CRAFTING

Archer’s Meats & Catering

Mount Pleasant Christian Church

Craft + Cork 3115 Meridian Parke Dr.

259 S. Meridian Street

381 N. Bluff Road Greenwood, IN 46142

Suite G Greenwood, IN 46142

(317) 881-6727 mpcc.info

(317) 300-1277

Greenwood, IN 46143 (317) 881-9300 cateringbyarchers.com

www.craftandcork.com

DAY CAMP

DAY SPA

FINE JEWELRY

FITNESS CENTER

Baxter YMCA

Transformations Salon & Spa

Reis-Nichols Jewelers

Baxter YMCA

8083A S. Madison Avenue

789 US 31 North Greenwood, IN 46142

7900 S. Shelby Street Indianapolis, IN 46227 (317) 881-9347 indymca.org

Indianapolis, IN 46227 (317) 882-1773 transformationssalonandspa.com

GLASS, MIRRORS, SHOWER DOORS GLASS, MIRRORS, SHOWER DOORS

Suburban Glass Suburban Glass Service, Inc. Service, Inc. 5999 N.U.S.31 5999 N.U.S.31 Whiteland, IN 46184 Whiteland, IN 46184 (317) 535-5747 (317) 535-5747 www.suburbanglass.net www.suburbanglass.net

INSURANCE

Franklin Insurance 359 N. Morton Street Franklin, IN 46131 (317) 736-8277

7900 S. Shelby Street Indianapolis, IN 46227 (317) 881-9347 indymca.org

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GRANITE COUNTERTOPS

HOSPITAL

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Cutting Edge Concepts Inc.

Johnson Memorial Health

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1125 W. Jefferson Street Franklin, IN 46131

500 S. Polk Street, Suite 1 Greenwood, IN 46143

(317) 736-3300 johnsonmemorial.org

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KITCHEN & BATH REMODELING

LAW OFFICE

Distinctive Kitchen & Bath

Schafstall & Admire, LLP

1480 Olive Branch Parke Lane,

Attorneys at Law 98 N. Jackson Street Franklin, IN 46131

KICKBOX FITNESS

9Round Kickbox Fitness 239 S State Road 135 Greenwood, IN 46142 (317) 300-1830 9round.com/gwin

(317) 752-3410

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MEDIA

MORTGAGE COMPANY

PRESCHOOL

SWIM LESSONS

AIM Media IN— Daily Journal

Approved Mortgage

Grace United Methodist Church Preschool

Baxter YMCA

30 S. Water Street, Suite A Franklin, IN 46131 (317) 736-2730 dailyjournal.net

A Winterwood Mortgage Group

107 N State Road 135, Ste. 301 Greenwood, IN 46142 (317) 882-2255 ApprovedMortgage.com

7900 S. Shelby Street Indianapolis, IN 46227 (317) 881-9347 indymca.org

1300 East Adams Drive Franklin, IN 46131 (317) 736-7961 www.franklingrace.org SOU T H

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Calendar of Events

March, April, May

Cruising around the courthouse during Smoke on the Square

Library Franklin Branch. Free, registration required. Information: pageafterpage.org.

March 21

» Ongoing

Did you know that Johnson County Public Library cardholders can check out a variety of passes to area attractions? Enjoy a free trip to the Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art, the Indiana Historical Society, the Indiana State Museum and Historic Sites or the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Museum. These passes can be used for free or reduced admission and other benefits. All passes are available at all JCPL branches on a first-come, first-served basis and can be checked out for one week. Contact your branch to inquire about availability. Information: pageafterpage.org.

March 20

Farmer and foodie Sara Sterley from Sara by the Season will discuss how to eat seasonally and locally on a budget. Join her to learn some beginner’s basics to consuming by the season. You’ll get easy gardening tips as well as some simple tricks to eat more seasonally. Time: 6:30 p.m. Location: Johnson County Public 110

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Some of us get motivation from having group support. If that’s your thing, join the JCPL’s White River Branch’s Couch Potato to 5K program. This six-weeklong program, which began March 7 and will continue through mid-April, is open to anyone who wants to meet for a short walk or run, get safety tips and more. Time: 7 p.m. Location: JCPL White River Branch. Free, registration required. Information: pageafterpage.org.

March 25 and 26

Enjoy the music of Acoustic Catfish as you eat spring minestrone soup during Mallow Run Winery’s last Winter Warm-up Weekend of the year. Time: Food is served noon to 6 p.m.; live music from 2 to 5 p.m. Cost: $8. Information: mallowrun.com.

March 27

In honor of Women’s History Month, Kelly Tudor, a citizen of the Lipan Apache Tribe of Texas, will be talking about influential Native American women in history and today. Registration is required. Time: 6 p.m. Location: JCPL Trafalgar Branch. Free, registration required. Information: pageafterpage.org.

March 28

You saw the Hulu series, now it’s time to discuss the book. That’s right: The White River Branch leads a book discussion of Margaret Atwood’s “Handmaid’s Tale.” Time: 1:30 p.m. Location: JCPL White River Branch. Free. Information: pageafterpage.org. Teens can get tips for dressing up their formal wear during DIY Prom Style, a library program. Participants will also create a cute frame to showcase their prom photos. Attendees must be in either 11th or 12th grade. Time: 6 p.m. Location: JCPL Clark Pleasant Branch. Free, registration required. Information: pageafterpage.org.


March 29

Professor Leslie Bishop offers a high energy presentation about locally growing mushrooms during the Trafalgar Garden Club’s “Funky Fungi” presentation. Time: 2 p.m. Free. Location: JCPL Trafalgar Branch. Information: pageafterpage.org.

March 30

Just in time for Easter, the JCPL Clark Pleasant branch will host Marshmallow Peep Science. Ever wonder what would happen if you poured soda over a Peep? Let kids find out in a space that’s not yours. Time: 4-5 p.m. Free. Information: pageafterpage.org.

April 1

Join your friends and head to your favorite local businesses for First Fridays after Five. Time: 5 to 8 p.m. Location: Downtown Franklin. Free. Information: franklincoc.org.

April 2

Did you know that book clubs and beer are not mutually exclusive? Join the Stout Stories book discussion group at Greek’s Pizzeria and Tapp Room, 18 E. Jefferson St. Stout Stories is “reinventing the book club” with promises of great food, drinks, comfortable atmosphere and discussion

on today’s most intriguing books. During this meeting, the group will discuss “The Bone Garden” by Tess Gerritsen. Time: 6:30 p.m. Meeting is free; registration is required. Information: pageafterpage.org.

April 12

The 2018 JCPL Author Series kicks off with emotional thriller best-selling author Lisa Scottoline. She is The New York Times best-selling author of 30 novels, including “Exposed,” “One Perfect Lie,” “Keep Quiet,” “Think Twice” and “Dirty Blonde.” Authors at JCPL is a program that brings popular and award-winning writers from around the country to Johnson County. Scottoline will speak at Franklin College. Time: 7 p.m. Free. Information: pageafterpage.org/authors-at-jcpl.

April 14

The Center Grove Education Foundation celebrates 20 years of supporting the Center Grove Community School Corp. with an evening of dinner, dancing and entertainment at the organization’s annual Gala for the Grove. Time: 6 p.m. Location: Indiana Roof Ballroom, Indianapolis. Tickets: $100 per person. Information: (317) 8819326, centergrovefoundation.org.

April 21

If your kids hanker for cartoons, take them to The Historic Artcraft Theatre, where, for the cost of one canned good, they can get in to see screenings of Warner Bros. classic cartoons. Time: 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. Information: historicartcrafttheatre.org. The 2018 Johnson County Public Library Authors series continues with author and cellist Edward Kelsey Moore’s visit to White River Branch. Moore is the New York Times best-selling author of “The Supremes Sing the Happy Heartache Blues.” Authors at JCPL is a program that brings popular and award-winning writers from around the country to Johnson County. Time: 3 p.m. Free. Information: pageafterpage.org/authors-at-jcpl. Ten bucks gets you into The Historic Artcraft Theatre to see “National Lampoon’s Vacation.” Time: 7:30 p.m. Information: historicartcrafttheatre.org. Celebrate Earth Day with Johnson County Planet Partners festival in Franklin’s Province Park. The event will feature free family friendly activities and projects, tree giveaways, rain barrel demonstrations and more. Information: jcplin.org.

April 23 Greenwood Freedom Festival

The Windows to Our World Book Club is for families with children age 2 to 7. Each session, the group will enjoy story time about different cultures; children will make a craft while caregivers participate in conversations led by a children’s librarian. Time: 4:30 p.m. Free. Location: JCPL White River Branch.

April 24

During the Johnson County Public Library presentation “Guerilla Gardening: Seed Bombs,” you’ll learn how to create an explosion of color in your garden this spring with these handmade seed bombs. Simply toss them into your garden and watch them grow. Time: 6 p.m. Free. Location: Trafalgar Branch. Information: pageafterpage.org. SOU T H

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Have you noticed the trend toward gorgeous, calligraphy graphics? Learn how to create special projects and gifts using calligraphy. Basic familiarity with calligraphy is helpful. Paper provided. Bring your own pens or markers. Time: 6:30 p.m. Free. Location: White River Branch. Information: pageafterpage.org.

April 25

If you have a spoiled feline or two at home, you have to attend “DIY Cat Tents and Toys.” Learn how to use common household items to make treats, including a cat tent, that your furry friend will be sure to love. All you need to bring is an old T-shirt, and the library will provide the rest of the supplies. Time: 6 p.m. Free. Location: Clark Pleasant Branch. Information: pageafterpage.org.

April 25 through May 13

The musical magic of “Wicked,” the Broadway sensation, stops in Indianapolis at the Murat Theater at the Old National Centre. A prequel to the “Wizard of Oz,” the musical explains how the Wicked Witch and Glinda the Good Witch came to be. Show times and ticket prices vary. Information: oldnationalcentre.com

April 26

Around the country and the world, folks are falling in love with the escape room experience. See if you have what it takes to escape the Trafalgar Branch. Time: 6 p.m. Free. Location: Trafalgar Branch. Information: pageafterpage.org.

April 30

The Great Gatsby comes to life on stage at Clowes Memorial Hall. Time: 11 a.m. Cost: $15. Information: butlerartscenter.org/events.

May 3

The Social of Greenwood will host its 20th annual Senior Expo, an event featuring vendors who serve older adults to present their services and resources. There will be free health screenings and more than 100 vendors. Time: 9 a.m. to noon. Location: The Gathering Place. Free. Information: (317) 882-4810, thesocialofgreenwood.org. 112

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At the Artcraft Theatre Classic movies are shown on the big screen at the Historic Artcraft Theatre in Franklin. All movies start at 2 and 7:30 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays unless otherwise indicated. Location: 57 N. Main St., Franklin. Information: (317) 736-6823 orhistoricartcrafttheatre.org.

“The Neverending Story” March 23 and 24

“All about Eve” April 6 and 7

“Napoleon Dynamite” April 13 and 14

“Bridget Jones’s Diary” April 20

“The Iron Giant”

“Back to the Future II” May 4 and 5

“The Wizard of Oz” May 11 and 12

“West Side Story” May 18 and 19

“Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom” May 25 and 26

April 27 and 28

May 12

Official race season kicks off at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway with the IndyCar Grand Prix, where the stars of the Verizon IndyCar Series race on an IMS road course. Time: 3:50 p.m. Gates open at 7:30 a.m. Location: Indianapolis Motor Speedway. Tickets: $25-$77; children 15 and under free with paid adult. Information: indianapolismotorspeedway.com. Kids can join in on the fun, too, with Indiana’s largest free outdoor festival for children: the Chase 500 Festival Kids Day. Featuring a slew of fun, interactive educational displays and a carnivallike atmosphere, you and your kids can see local mascots, race mini-cars, hop in giant inflatable bounce houses and make 500 Festival sashes with festival princesses. Time: Noon. Location: Monument Circle, downtown Indianapolis.

May 18-19

Car enthusiasts can peruse more than 450 vendor spaces at the Hoosier Vintage Wheels Swap Meet and Car Show. Cars, trucks, RVs and campers, and more will be on display, with plenty of goods and parts for sale for those looking to create their own vintage vehicles. Time: 8 a.m. Location: Johnson County Fairgrounds. Tickets: $5. Information: johnsoncountyfair.com.

May 25

Miller Lite Carb Day kicks off Indy’s biggest racing weekend. There’s the Indy 500 practice, the Indy Lights Freedom 100 race, and the Pit Stop Challenge, and of course the Carb Day Concert. Time: 9 a.m. Location: Indianapolis Motor Speedway. Tickets: $20-$50. Information: indianapolismotorspeedway.com.


Mount Pleasant Christian Church 381 N. Bluff Road, Greenwood, IN 46142 317.881.6727 . www.mpcc.info

If you’re in downtown Franklin you might want to stop by the square for the town’s annual “Strawberries on the Square” event. Enjoy some fresh strawberry shortcake and stay for the live music, garage sale and classic cars. Time: 11 a.m. Cost: $5 for strawberry shortcake and water. Location: Franklin town square. Information: franklin.in.gov.

June 1-2

Hoosier Hills Fiber Festival at the Johnson County Festival Fairgrounds will feature fiber animal classes, demonstrations and a variety of fiber arts vendors. Free. Information: (317) 403-5667 or hoosierfiberfestival.com.

June 2

Head to Military Park from noon to 6 p.m. for Indy’s 19th annual Vintage Indiana to sample and celebrate local food and wines. More than 200 awardwinning wines will be available for complimentary tasting. Must be 21 or over. Tickets $30 in advance, $40 at the door, with special prices for designated drivers. Information: vintageindiana.com.

Making an Undeniable IMPACT for Christ Saturdays - 6pm Sundays - 8:45, 10 & 11:30am

(ASL Interpretation Available @ 10am Service)

Watch Online :: Live.MPCC.Info Sundays - 10am/ET

Connect with Us!

MPCCGreenwood

June 12-17

Now on its 20th anniversary tour, the major award-winning Broadway musical “Rent” stops by Clowes Memorial Hall. Ticket prices vary. Information: butlerartscenter.org/events.

June 22-23

What better way to celebrate the warm weather than with a barbecue cook-off? Franklin’s Smoke on the Square will feature food vendors, live music and entertainment, and a People’s Choice competition ($5 participation). Information: discoverdowntownfranklin.com.

June 30

Celebrate Independence Day with Greenwood’s Freedom Festival, hosted at Craig Park and Greenwood Amphitheater following the community parade. Enjoy food, beer, wine and craft vendors while listening to live bands and entertainers. Information: greenwoodfreedomfestival.com. SOU T H

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A Look Back

Bring it on This photo is from 1966 or 1967 and features Lynne Hughes, Vicki Hynds and Cathy Gregg in Trafalgar cheerleading uniforms.

Photo courtesy of

Johnson County Museum of History

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SOUTH | Spring 2018  
SOUTH | Spring 2018  
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