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ENSURING A CLEAN FUTURE TOGETHER

2019 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT


2019 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT

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WORKING SUSTAINABLY ON A SAFE CIRCULAR ECONOMY The circular economy is the ecologically sustainable way to share prosperity and well-being evenly across the global population. Both concepts – circular and economy – are tightly interlinked: without economy, the driving force behind progress, we can’t invest in ecology, in sustainability. If we are to achieve a better world, we have to aim to close the materials loop. For this reason, waste plays a fundamental role in the circular economy. From waste, we can create value, which is what we do in our role as ‘enabler’. We try not to lose anything usable from all the many waste streams we treat. This means that we recover raw materials from waste – sometimes rare raw materials – right down to a molecular level. We are constantly getting better at this, even though waste streams are becoming more complex in their composition. Plastics, for example, now often consist of several types of film. At the same time, the secondary materials chain demands the same quality as that of new, raw materials. That is why, together with our partners, we are working on technological innovations, such as plastics-to-chemicals. Another example is thermal treatment, during which

a lot of energy is released, in the form of steam, heat or electricity. We give value to this energy by seeking out sales markets, such as our participation in the ECLUSE steam network in the Antwerp Waasland port.

ourselves and each other. Our staff know that they should voice their concerns as soon as they see that an activity is not or does not seem safe. When everyone feels responsible, we work together to identify problems and find the right solutions.

In the waste industry, safety is paramount. After all, the residual streams we treat include hazardous industrial and complex pharmaceutical waste. We take our role as gatekeeper very seriously and ensure that these substances do not end up in the environment, in the food chain or in the materials loop. This requires a specialised and safe approach. Our safety policy explicitly focuses on sending all staff and visitors home safe and well at the end of each day. To protect our people, we have established safety procedures, our staff receive safety training and all staff and site visitors are provided with the correct personal protective equipment. While these are effective tools, ultimately our safe working practices revolve around our safety culture and awareness. We ensure that every single member of staff understands that a safe work environment is our shared responsibility and that we must protect

In this annual Sustainability report, you will find out about the efforts we made in 2019 to foster and promote a circular economy. Of course, we do not do this work alone. We collaborate with partners in the waste sector and the wider industry and with knowledge institutions who are also committed to the circular economy. Our work is presented here under the key headings of: People, Planet and Prosperity. I invite you to read on and discover more about the ways in which Indaver is continuing to improve across all areas of the organisation.

Paul De Bruycker, CEO


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CONTENTS Overview

People

People

4

Sustainable deployment of talented staff

24

Planet

5

Safety: our priority

32

Prosperity

6

Partnerships

7

Projects

7

Introduction Sustainable Development Goals

8

European policy

9

Sustainability report addresses expectations

11

Our mission: Leading the field in sustainable waste management

12

Our core values

13

The Indaver Group in Europe – Locations

14

Gatekeeper and enabler of the circular economy

15

Our service provision

16

The Indaver Group in Europe – Volumes Managed

19

Audits improve the quality of our processes

20

Checking customer satisfaction

22

Planet Materials

39

Energy

47

Climate

52

Safe Sink

57

Impact

61

Prosperity Contributing to prosperity

80

Operational Excellence

85

Growth and innovation

93

GRI reporting

97

Glossary

100


4

People Human Resources

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Hey, jij harde werker! Hoe is jouw balans werk & privé? Doe de test, meld je direct aan via fit@indaver.com!

Attracting skilled staff

Healthy at work for longer with IndaFit

Staff speak up

Luc. Houdt van hoogtes. Maar ook van veiligheid.

Ensuring a clean future together

Exceptional as a sustainable employer

Safety concerns everyone

Prestigious HPR Award for Doel and Meath

Luc Stevens is Hoofd Onderhoud en Infrastructuur in Willebroek (B) en is in zijn vrije tijd rotsklimmer.

Safety IndaFIT houdt je de spiegel voor.

Ensuring a safe work environment together

Measuring and comparing safety

Safety campaign in all regions

“Mijn ouders namen mij altijd mee naar de bergen. Pas later kwam ik in aanraking met rotsklimmen. Wat ik nog veel spectaculairder vond. Maar welke rots ik ook beklim, ik doe het altijd met de noodzakelijke veiligheidsuitrusting. Ook bij werken op hoogte in Willebroek staat veiligheid altijd voorop. We gebruiken alle PBM’s die nodig zijn, zorgen voor de nodige verankeringspunten en dragen een harnasgordel. Altijd.”

Werk veilig. Work safe ◆ Home safe ◆ Everyone ◆ Every day

TY FE SA ST FIR

Centre of Expertise Human Resources Development


5

Planet

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Materials

A transformation for Willebroek

IndaChlor: recovering hydrochloric acid and energy

IndaMP: recovering precious metals

Clean compost is a must

A sustainable energy supplier

ECLUSE steam network open

North Antwerp Heating Network Project

Waste-to-energy plants

Striving for climate neutral facilities

Reducing our footprint

Energy Efficiency Network in Germany

Fewer CO2 emissions from our mobility

Stainkoeln guarantees landfill capacity

Three Valleys is economical with use of space

Remediation of contaminated German soil

Old pesticides removed safely

Environmental impact: reporting

Very Concerning Components

Protecting the soil

Healthy ecosystems and biodiversity

New raw materials from bottom ash

Energy

Climate

Safe Sink

Impact

Safety around old ammunition

Methanol from CO2 and hydrogen


6

Prosperity

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Contributing to prosperity

2019: a strong financial basis

‘Green’ finance following audit

Sustainable suppliers and partners

A good neighbour and partner

Investing in relationships and society

Working proactively on optimisation

Flexible decontamination unit

Digital strategy: safe and pragmatic

Digitalisation of waybill and ID form

Data safety on all levels

Tank Park 2.0 in Antwerp

Next step Plastics2Chemicals

E-Wood: energy from wood waste

Operational Excellence

Growth and innovation

Grontmij BRP takeover

Ensuring transparency in communications and actions


7

Partnerships Work experience placements for students

Sharing knowledge for a sustainability degree

North Antwerp Heating Network

World Resources Forum

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Partner in Ports Energy and Carbon Savings

Partnership Alliance Award

ASH-CEM: doing more with secondary granulate

Fewer CO2 emissions thanks to heating network

Green light for NESS energy project

New energy-from-waste plant Belfast

Projects P2C: new life for end-oflife plastics

Power-to-Methanol in Antwerp port

Remediation of contaminated soil

E-Wood: energy from wood waste


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Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages

Ensure access to water and sanitation for all

In this Sustainability Report, Indaver makes a clear reference to 9 of the 17 SDGs which will, collectively, transform our world. In September 2015, the United Nations General Assembly adopted an unprecedented development agenda for the period 2015–2030. The aim of these Global Sustainable Development Goals, or SDGs, is to bring an end to extreme poverty, inequality and injustice and to tackle climate change. The SDGs apply to all countries and to all people on Earth. For the first time, the business world had a seat at the negotiating table. Alongside other societal actors, the business world has a crucial role to play in helping to achieve these ambitious goals. With its vision “to create a world without waste� and its support for this new Agenda for 2030, The International Solid Waste Association (ISWA) helped to define the goals for reliable sustainable waste management. u Further information

Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all

Promote inclusive and sustainable economic growth, employment and decent work for all

Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and foster innovation

Make cities inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable

Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns

Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts

Revitalize the global partnership for sustainable development


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EUROPEAN POLICY ON ENERGY AND CLIMATE, A DETERMINING FACTOR FOR THE WASTE SECTOR

u download the pdf here

LEGAL FRAMEWORK – MATERIALS

Circular Economy Package

Packaging directive

Single use plastics directive

In 2018, the European Union brought in the Circular Economy Package, which contains radical refinements for the waste framework directive, the landfill directive and the packaging directive, among others. The innovative framework refines the objectives for sustainable waste management, with useful applications for waste streams.

Directive 94/62/EC establishes the European regulations and objectives concerning packaging waste. The 2018 revision set stricter objectives: at least 65% recycling by 2025 and at least 70% by 2030, with specific minimum objectives for a range of materials. The calculation methods for determining the recycling percentage have also been refined. Member States must have converted their 2030 objectives for recycling plastic packaging into national legislation by the end of 2020.

The single-use plastics directive (2019/904) was published at the start of 2019. The Member States have two years in which to convert this into national legislation. The goal of this directive is to reduce plastics pollution by taking strict action against ‘single-use plastics’. The measures focus on avoiding this type of disposable plastic or seeking out more environmentally friendly alternatives. Furthermore, by 2025, PET drinks bottles must be made from at least 25% recycled plastic and by 2030 from at least 30%.


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EUROPEAN POLICY ON ENERGY AND CLIMATE, A DETERMINING FACTOR FOR THE WASTE SECTOR LEGAL FRAMEWORK – ENERGY & CLIMATE

The European Union’s energy policy

RED

The European Commission would like to make the energy provision within the EU cleaner, more reliable and cheaper. The energy policy (with 1990 as its reference year) is therefore also being readjusted rapidly.

Goal 2010 > 20-20-20 In 2010, the EU looked ahead 10 years and set the 20-2020 objectives for 2020: ■■ to have 20% of our total energy use from renewable energy; ■■ to save 20% energy; ■■ to have 20% less CO2 emissions. 

2020

EED

GHG

(Renewable Energy Directive)

(Energy Efficiency Directive)

(Greenhouse Gases)

% energy use from renewable energy:

% energy saving:

% less CO2emissions:

20

20

20

The climate policy: The European Green Deal In November 2019, the European Commission presented its Green Deal. It sets the new CO2 climate objectives to cut CO2 emissions by 50–55% for 2030, as well as the goal of being climate neutral by the end of 2050. This will be included in the new climate law. The Green Deal also states that the directive for renewable energy will be replaced by a new version in 2021. This will undoubtedly lead to more stringent goals.  The European Climate Law, which is being prepared within the framework of the Green Deal, can be expected by autumn 2020.

2018 Objectives In 2018 these objectives were comprehensively redrawn to include, by 2030: ■■ 32% of European energy must come from renewable sources; ■■ 32.5% less energy consumption; ■■ 40% less CO2 emissions.

2019 goals The European Green Deal.

2030

32

32,5

40

Green Deal:

50 - 55

(proposition)

2050

Green Deal:

climate neutral

National Integral energy and climate plan The different member states had to set up a National Energy and Climate Plan (NECP) by the end of 2019, which will then be monitored annually by the EU up to and including 2030. This plan outlines the climate and energy policy for the next ten years. It contains a package of measures for the different sectors involved to achieve the predetermined reduction in CO2 emissions.


SUSTAINABILITY REPORT ADDRESSES EXPECTATIONS

A working party made up of staff from the various regions and departments determines the content and scope of the sustainability report. This results in a report that is balanced and representative of the entire organisation. In addition, our stakeholders, the readers, are paramount. We have listed them here according to their interests and potential impact upon Indaver. Thanks to our experiences and our frequent contact with these groups and with individuals, we are able to produce a report that addresses their expectations and those of the authorities.

In the materiality matrix for sustainability, Indaver maps out subjects according to the interests of stakeholders and the impact on our operational management. We collect this information by questioning our stakeholders, both through a general questionnaire and in direct conversations. Thanks to the materiality analysis, we know better which subjects our stakeholders want to see included in our sustainability report. This also supports us in finetuning our policies.

Employees

HIGH

Materiality Matrix

HIGH

Involving Stakeholders

Keeping the environment safe and clean

Customer satisfaction

Customers

Safety, health

Traceability

Shareholder

Neighbours

Press

IMPACT ON INDAVER

IMPACT ON INDAVER

Authorities

NGOs

Suppliers General public

Modal shift

Operational excellence

Partners Knowledge sharing

Achieving good results

Business ethics

Circular economy: energy and material recovery Biodiversity

Trust, transparency

Human rights & labour

Students LOW

Federations

Sustainable procurement

LOW

STAKEHOLDER INTEREST

HIGH

LOW

STAKEHOLDER INTEREST

Planet People Prosperity Partnerships

Quality of output

Value creation

LOW

2019 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT

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HIGH


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OUR MISSION LEADING THE FIELD IN SUSTAINABLE WASTE MANAGEMENT Indaver was established in 1985 because public authorities and businesses believed there had to be a better way to manage waste. Striving for sustainability is, therefore, in our company’s genes. We are constantly searching for and finding the most sustainable solutions for the waste streams we treat for industry and public authorities in Europe. Our role has changed dramatically over the last few decades. We have evolved from a waste treatment company to a waste management company. As a waste management company, we are no longer at the end of the materials chain, but are inextricably linked to it at every stage. As a producer of raw materials and energy, we create added value, which we recover from the industrial and household waste we treat.

Indaver doesn’t simply recycle a lot, it is the quality of the recycling that is so important. We supplement mechanical recycling methods with innovative techniques for chemical and thermal recycling, which produces new, high-quality products. In this way, we are helping to close the materials loop in a safe and energy-efficient manner and with the lowest CO2 emissions possible. Materials that can no longer be used because they contain hazardous components are destroyed, neutralised or stored safely at our landfill sites. By operating according to this safe-sink guarantee, we protect the materials and the food chain from contamination.

Three pillars Our sustainable approach to recovering materials and energy rests on three pillars: ■■ working with reliable technologies; ■■ focusing on value creation and efficiency to ensure affordable solutions; ■■ focusing on quality and safety to bring reliable products back into the loop without negative consequences for people, the environment or society.


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OUR CORE VALUES From our mission to lead the field in sustainable waste management, we work on solutions for local authorities and industries. We are guided by ecological considerations, combined with economically and socially responsible choices. We opt for solid, longterm relationships with customers, partners and suppliers, with the aim of collectively closing materials loop.

Five core values underpin all our work:

We want to be pioneers and we want to create a work environment in which innovative solutions can grow. We care for our staff, who come up with these solutions. We want to be a sustainable employer that facilitates and supports its staff in their efforts for continuous improvement. Striving for sustainability is not always easy. But sustainable business practices are necessary for every company and for every region to remain competitive. We believe that ecology, corporate social responsibility and economy can go hand in hand.

■■

Demonstrating concern for people, safety and the environment

■■

Building relationships based on mutual trust

■■

Ensuring transparency in communications and actions

■■

Concentrating on achieving results

■■

Continuously improving


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THE INDAVER GROUP IN EUROPE

To contact Indaver:

Locations

u e-mail: communication@indaver.com

u www.indaver.com u more information: company data

Indaver has branches and specialized installations in various European countries.

Belgium Antwerp, Doel, Grimbergen, Kallo, Mechelen, Nivelles, Waregem, Willebroek

The Netherlands Alphen aan den Rijn, Delfzijl, Dordrecht, ’s-Gravenpolder, Groningen, IJmuiden, Leeuwarden, Moerdijk, Nieuwdorp, Oldekerk, Oude-Pekela, Rijpwetering, Rotterdam-Europoort, Terneuzen, Vlissingen-Oost, Voorschoten, Well

Germany Biebesheim, Billigheim, Frankfurt, Hamburg, Kassel, Mainz, Stuttgart, Wetzlar

Ireland Cork, Dublin, Dun Laoghaire, Meath

United Kingdom Aberdeen, Belfast, Essex, Teesside

France Loon-Plage (Dunkerque)

Portugal Abrantes, Lisboa

Spain Tarragona

Italy Origgio


GATEKEEPER AND ENABLER OF THE CIRCULAR ECONOMY

GATEKEEPER

SAFE SINK

Waste products in the green chain are relatively pure and therefore have a high circular potential. From this we recycle as many materials and as much energy as possible.

Waste products in the grey chain contain hazardous substances, also known as contaminants, and have a low circular potential.

With specialist facilities we guarantee a ‘safe sink’: we destroy and/or neutralise all hazardous substances or store them safely in a landfill. Thus keeping the materials chain safe.

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When treating hazardous components our focus is on keeping the cycle safe. Using innovative techniques we can also recover energy and valuable molecules from these streams.

re

Indaver manages around 5 million tonnes of hazardous and nonhazardous waste each year. To prevent harm to people, the environment and society, Indaver is the gatekeeper and enabler of the circular economy.

EE

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WASTE

MATERIALS

ENERGY

Businesses and households produce waste. Indaver provides a sustainable solution.

Maximum recovery of high-grade materials.

Production for 266,900 households* (*) Equivalent, 2019 figures


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OUR SERVICE PROVISION Society

A sustainable total solution Indaver manages waste for industries, businesses, local authorities and waste collectors. In consultation with our customers, we offer the best total solution for every waste stream. Indaver can handle the most complex waste portfolios. We always take into account the properties of the waste, its potential impact on the environment and the possibilities for recovery and treatment. We do this in conjunction with an efficient approach to possibilities for recovery and treatment, alongside an efficient approach to logistics and costs. As a result, our customers get the most sustainable solution for their waste stream.

Producers

Consumers

of waste

of energy and materials

Full Service Provider in Sustainable Waste Management On-site Services

Transport & Transfer

PreTreatment

Treatment

Production of Energy & Materials


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OUR SERVICE PROVISION For industry - Industrial Waste Services Every industrial customer has different needs. Therefore, Indaver always provides a bespoke solution. Indaver Total Waste Management (TWM) takes waste management to the next level by combining proven solutions, economic cost-effectivness and risk management. We handle every aspect of waste management, from the initial request to final treatment, with the maximum recovery of raw materials and energy. Our Industrial Waste Services are focused on four sectors:

chemicals, petrochemicals and plastics

pharmaceuticals, biotech, health

ferrous metals, non-ferrous metals, automotive

cleaning, collectors, treatment centres.

Health, safety and the environment are our top priorities. We guarantee reliability and efficiency to achieve optimum results. We continue to innovate and invest in our treatment and recycling options and data management systems so that we can check, trace and monitor increasingly complex waste streams. We are steadily expanding our treatment capacity and commercial activities in Europe through organic growth and targeted acquisitions. This enables us to serve our customers even better. Our total solution for sustainable waste management makes us the leading service provider for complex, often hazardous industrial waste products in North-West Europe.

EcoVadis 2019: ‘Gold’ for Corporate Social Responsibility

Just like Indaver, our industrial customers want to make continuous improvements to their own levels of sustainability. Accordingly, they want to know that their subcontractors are committed to sustainable practices. The EcoVadis international evaluation platform is there to help them with their selection of waste partners and other suppliers. EcoVadis assesses organisations from 155 countries and 198 business sectors in four areas of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR): the environment; employment conditions; business ethics; and sustainable procurement policy. Indaver has been audited annually since 2013 and each time we have managed to improve our score. In 2019, we implemented our Suppliers’ Code of Conduct and our Sustainable Procurement Policy. With the ‘Gold Advanced’ score (2019), Indaver is still in the top 5% of all suppliers assessed in the waste management and treatment category.


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OUR SERVICE PROVISION For local authorities - Municipal Waste Services Local authorities have an important role to play in achieving the European recycling goals. After all, they are responsible for treating their residents’ household waste. The basic waste management principles are: sustainable, cost-effective, with maximum recovery of energy and materials. Indaver is a reliable partner that can provide real added value. We have decades of experience in the management and treatment of household and similar commercial waste. We use our expertise and experience to support and advise local authorities on how to make better use of their waste streams. Continuity and guaranteed sustainable treatment of waste are also essential. We have our own facilities for treating household waste streams. Highquality recycling and energy recovery are central to our operations.

Our service provision is defined by flexibility, free choice and trust. These principles ensure that public authorities are well-served. We can work with local authorities to maintain and improve the quality of the materials chain. Our service provision has three levels: ■■ Treatment of household waste: waste-to-energy, digesting and composting, preliminary treatment of biomass, sorting different plastics, treatment of hazardous household waste. ■■ Organisation of waste management systems: management of waste services for local authorities, collection and transport, operation of transfer stations, talking to external treatment centres for recyclable or residual materials and support for waste prevention campaigns. ■■ Infrastructure management: management or full operation, optimisation of capacity, co-ownership packages, joint projects.

Bespoke waste management Each local government approaches its waste policy in its own way and can choose to join forces with other municipal authorities. Indaver has the expertise needed to work within these complex partnerships.

  OUTLOOK

Development of the collaborative model with Flemish public authorities At the end of 2017, the Flemish government changed the legislation on intermunicipal partnerships. New rules were brought in for future partnerships with fellow municipal authorities and private partners. Other changes are also happening simultaneously. In addition to the treatment of waste streams, new treatment solutions are in development. Furthermore, local authorities want to put their own stamp on the pursuit of a low-carbon and circular economy. That is why, in consultation with the Flemish public sector, Indaver wants to investigate the needs of the public authorities and identify how we can shape our partnership with them. This research process began in September 2019, during a study day on plastic waste. Ultimately, Indaver would like to design an up-to-date and future-oriented partnership model for the Flemish public authorities.


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THE INDAVER GROUP IN EUROPE Volumes Managed

In 2019, Indaver managed 5.1 million tonnes of waste, of which 4 million tonnes was treated in our own facilities and 1.1 million tonnes by third parties.

60%

Trading

1.1 million tonnes

19%

We treated 60% of the waste products with an emphasis on recycling materials and finding useful applications for the energy.

Treatment

4

million tonnes

21%

We treated 19% thermally, to break up the hazardous components at high temperatures or to neutralise them through physico-chemical treatment.

Total volume of waste managed

5,147,872 tonnes

19 %

Waste to Decontamination

Belgium

The Netherlands

Germany

million tonnes

million tonnes

million tonnes

2.3

1.4

35 %

Waste to Energy

1

21 %

Waste to Safe Sink

8 %

Ireland/UK

0.40

million tonnes

Other

0.02

million tonnes

Treatment Trading

Preparation for Recovery

17 %

Waste to Materials

We store 21% of the waste products safely and sustainably on a landfill site.


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AUDITS IMPROVE THE QUALITY OF OUR PROCESSES We use audits to check the safety, reliability and traceability of our processes. We are transparent, we seek to improve wherever possible, and we operate to very high standards.

Internal audits Internal audits help us to improve our business processes. The internal audit team is made up of staff from all departments. Each member of the audit team brings their own expertise, technical knowledge and analytical ability to the task of continually improving the quality of our processes. There are two different types of internal audit: ■■ Compliance audits: the internal audit programme for quality, safety and the environment assesses whether Indaver’s operations are being carried out in accordance with the 10 Codes of Good Practice, operational procedures, legislation and the various accreditations and licences. ■■ Risk-based audits: these audits identify and quantify risks in the processes and test the efficiency and effectiveness of the management systems.

u Read the 10 Codes of Good Practice here

External audits Each year, Indaver is audited by a number of third parties. ■■ Public Authority Audits: in all regions, Indaver is audited by public authorities that grant licences and monitor correct compliance with such licences. ■■ SEVESO Audits: Indaver’s sites in Hamburg, Biebesheim, Frankfurt, Stuttgart, Antwerp, Terneuzen, Dublin Port and Dunkirk store and treat hazardous waste. This means they are subject to the SEVESO directive. This European directive is designed to manage the risks associated with the storage and treatment of hazardous substances. The directive aims to prevent serious accidents and, where accidents do occur, to minimise their impact on people and the environment. The preventive measures and the inspection and maintenance programmes on a SEVESO site are audited periodically by the competent authorities. ■■ Audits by customers: customers conduct regular (on-site) audits to screen the Indaver acceptance procedure (precontractual audits) or for an interim evaluation (post-contractual audits).

■■ Audits by certification agencies: with the certification of Indaver’s management systems, an independent and accredited certification body formally confirms that Indaver is operating correctly. Indaver demonstrates in a vetting process or certification audit that it complies with these internationally recognised standards. The ISO/OHSAS certificates are valid for three years, and follow-up takes place via annual audits.

Audits of third parties Indaver has a large network of trusted partners that complement its activities by offering specialist treatment and logistics solutions. These partners are carefully selected by our own QESH, Waste Flow & Logistics teams based on location, flexibility, quality standards, services and price. Centres treating waste that is critical (in nature, composition or process) must go through the QESH approval procedures. We also screen permits, treatment techniques and management systems. For less critical waste management we use existing Qualification Guarantees (QG).

u Click here for more information

All of the figures in Indaver’s sustainability report are audited by an external agency. For the 2019 edition this was Bureau Veritas Certification Belgium. You can find the external verification bureau’s validation statement on page 102.


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Certificates per country and per site Country

Certificate holder

Certificate

Since

Belgium

Indaver nv (Antwerp, Doel, Kallo, Willebroek, Grimbergen, TWM sites)

ISO 9001/14001

1991/ 1997

OHSAS 18001

2011

RHP Keurmerk

2011

Indaver Groencompostering (Kallo)

Vlaco

2008

Indaver Groencompostering (Grimbergen)

Vlaco

2006

SVEX nv (Doel)

ISO 9001/14001

2008

OHSAS 18001

2011

ISO 9001/14001

1995 / 1997

OHSAS 18001

2012

Indaver IWS (Industrial Waste Services) B.V.

SQAS-certificaat

2011

Indaver Compost B.V. (Alphen aan den Rijn, Europoort, Nieuwdorp), Indaver Groencompost B.V. (Moerdijk, Rijpwetering, Voorschoten)

Keurcompost

2011

NTA 8080

2010

Indaver Compost B.V. (Alphen aan den Rijn)

NTA 8080

2014

NTA 8080 certificaat voor vloeibare CO2

2016

ISCC biogas en biomethaan

2019

Indaver IWS (Industrial Waste Services) B.V., Indaver Impex B.V. and Indaver Impex N.V.

VCA petrochemie

2014

Indaver Ireland Ltd (Meath WTE, Transfer Station, TWM-sites) Indaver (UK) Ltd (TWM sites) Indaver (NI) Ltd

ISO 9001/14001

1994/ 2000

OHSAS 18001

2002

AVG mbH (Hamburg)

ISO 9001

1994

ISO 14001

1997

OHSAS 18001

2003

EN 50001

2010

EFB

1997

ISO 14001

2001

EFB

1997

ISO 9001

2008

EFB

1997

Chemisch-Physikalische Behandlung (Frankfurt)

EFB

1997

Chemisch-Physikalische Behandlung (Kassel)

EFB

1997

Chemisch-Physikalische Behandlung (Stuttgart)

EFB

1997

Sonderabfalldeponie (Billigheim)

EFB

1997

Gareg Umwelt Logistik GmbH (Hamburg)

EFB

1997

Dรถrsam + Nickel Transport GmbH

EFB

2013

Indaver Portugal S.A. (Abrantes)

ISO 14001

2015

The Netherlands Indaver Nederland B.V. (Indaver ARP B.V., Indaver Afvalberging B.V., Indaver Compost B.V., Indaver Groencompost B.V., Indaver IWS (Industrial Waste Services) B.V., Indaver Impex B.V., Indaver WTE B.V.)

Ireland / UK

Germany

HIM GmbH (Biebesheim) Panse Wetzlar Entsorgung GmbH (Wetzlar)

Portugal


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22

CHECKING CUSTOMER SATISFACTION Balanced Score Card Every year our industrial customers assess Indaver’s performance. They do this using the Balanced Score Card (BSC). This tool links the main key performance indicators (KPIs) to our waste treatment services. Our customers award a certain weighting and a score to each of these KPIs. Based on our core value of ‘continuously improving’, in 2019 we reviewed the BSC thoroughly to see how we could improve this tool. From that review it became clear that the BSC was too extensive, that the KPIs were not

all relevant for every customer and that there were different interpretations of some KPIs. To tailor the BSC to our customers as much as possible, the KPIs have been ranked in order of importance for each industry sector (chemistry, life sciences and technology). This helps our account managers to put together a relevant and short BSC quickly, one that is tailored to the customer. Clear topics and unambiguous KPIs prevent confusion.

Through the Balanced Score Card, Indaver gets annual feedback from industrial customers about their customer satisfaction.

  OUTLOOK We are training our account managers on our updated BSC in 2020. After that, they will be able to introduce it to our industrial customers.

Customized BSC

Industry specific KPIs

Easy & flexible


People

23

Waste is a complex business. Everything changes quickly. By investing in our people, we can come up with the smart, sustainable solutions that our customers and society need. So, we want our staff to stay working for us with plenty of with focus, energy and commitment. That’s why we nurture the talent of the current and future employees and the people who work hard for Indaver every day. A safe work environment is our key priority.


24

SUSTAINABLE DEPLOYMENT OF TALENTED STAFF

People

Social context

Our approach

Enjoying work for longer

Sustainable employment

We are all working for longer now and we all want to reach the finish-line healthy and with plenty of enthusiasm for our future . The onus is on employers to offer their staff the opportunity to reach the end of this longer career path happily. They can’t do that without talking to their employees. Enjoying work for longer is only possible if the employee and the employer join forces to make it happen.

Our staff want to be healthy and motivated when doing their work. As this a core pillar in our sustainable employment policy, we wholeheartedly promote this way of working.

War on talent The narrowness of the job market has led to employer uncertainly around attracting talent. This applies to many professions, but in the technical professions it has been going on for longer. And there’s no end in sight. Older, more experienced employees are retiring and taking their knowledge with them. Younger employees tend not to choose a career for life anymore, and they want careers with social relevance. Employers that embrace this shift can foster job satisfaction and loyalty among new staff members.

These pillars are: ■■ Health and Energy: we help our employees to stay healthy, physically and mentally. ■■ Professional knowledge & Skills: we offer our employees the opportunity to hone their skills and to continuously develop their potential. ■■ Motivation & Engagement: we stimulate our staff’s engagement. ■■ Work/Life Balance: we help our staff to find the right balance to remain productive throughout their career. Prevention comes first in our policy. With the IndaFIT on-line scan, staff can see how they score on the four pillars. Indaver offers a sustainable employment programme, which allows staff to improve their own sustainable employability.

Employer branding Indaver’s employer brand, ‘Ensuring a clean future together’, reflects very clearly what binds us to Indaver and what motivates us as Indaver employees. It also strengthens the connection with Indaver as our mutual commitment. In addition, the Indaver employer brand gives an honest and attractive image of Indaver as an organisation. This means we can position ourselves on the job market in a more targeted manner and recruit new colleagues more effectively.


25 PEOPLE > SUSTAINABLE DEPLOYMENT

WAR ON TALENT

Average age pyramids Belgium

From social media to pop-up job fairs

Internships as a steppingstone

Job fairs and job markets are key opportunities for us to introduce ourselves and talk to visitors. In Belgium and the Netherlands, we meet a lot of interested candidates at job fairs for universities and colleges.

We want to attract talented people. But that talent will only be tempted if they see Indaver as an attractive employer. To increase our appeal to starters and students, we have developed internships. We adjust our internship programmes with input from educational establishments. This means that we increase our chances of students choosing Indaver for their internship. The intern gets to see what we do and can then be an ambassador and recommend Indaver to their fellow students. At the same time, we gain access to the latest findings and developments in the area being studied by the intern.

We also use Facebook, LinkedIn and Instagram to draw attention to our job vacancies. In Ireland, Indaver went to all of the larger job fairs organised by Enterprise Ireland. We also set up a number of pop-up job fairs ourselves. By doing so, we reached local newspapers and radio stations, where we were able to promote our regional job vacancies. Thanks to our efforts, a large number of highly qualified and experienced candidates became interested in working for Indaver.

Workforce

1,837

total Group

* Grontmij BRP staff included

714 Belgium 239 The Netherlands* 187 Ireland 18 UK / Northern Ireland 632 Germany 20 France 24 Portugal 3 Italy

2019 The Netherlands**

≥ 55 years

18 %

30 %

45-54 years

31 %

36 %

35-44 years

25 %

20 %

25-34 years

22 %

12 %

≤ 24 years

4 %

2 %

Ireland

Germany

≥ 55 years

11 %

27 %

45-54 years

30 %

31 %

35-44 years

38 %

16 %

25-34 years

21 %

16 %

≤ 24 years

0 %

10 %

Average seniority pyramids Belgium

2019 The Netherlands**

≥ 25 years

8 %

14 %

20-24 years

11 %

12 %

15-19 years

14 %

15 %

10-14 years

21 %

17 %

5-9 years

17 %

10 %

< 5 years

29 %

32 %

Ireland

Germany

≥ 25 years

1%

23 %

20-24 years

5%

8 %

15-19 years

10 %

6 %

10-14 years

13 %

9 %

5-9 years

21 %

20 %

< 5 years

50 %

34 %

** Grontmij BRP staff not included


26 PEOPLE > SUSTAINABLE DEPLOYMENT

WORKING FOR LONGER WITH PLENTY OF ENERGY

IndaFIT

Bridge Builders

A Healthy Back

Staying at work for longer healthily and happily is something we can only achieve together. With IndaFIT, we have an effective tool we can use to fulfil this goal. This on-line scan, lasting around 20 minutes, gives our staff insight into their mental and physical condition and whether they have a good work/life balance.

In Belgium, the sustainable employment programme gave rise to Bridge Builders. They are responsible for implementing the ideas and viable actions that staff suggest in workshops on sustainable employment. The Bridge Builders community consists of three groups:

In 2019, Indaver in Germany focused on healthy backs in its health programme. We organised health days at every site, that included health tests, training sessions and tips for maintaining a healthy back from a professional trainer.

After completing the questionnaire, the employee instantly sees their score on the topics of health and energy, professional knowledge and skills, motivation and involvement and their work/life balance. These are the four pillars of our sustainable employment policy. The member of staff discusses their score with an independent coach – the only person other than the staff member who can see this data. Through a personal action plan the member of staff then Hey, jij harde works on selfwerker! Hoe is jouw balans improvement and werk & privé? personal goals, with help from the sustainable employment programme. Doe de test, meld je direct aan via fit@indaver.com!

IndaFIT houdt je de spiegel voor.

■■ The MoodMakers ensure lunch breaks offer healthy, sporty and fun distractions. ■■ The WegWijzers (SignPosters) have a passion for mobility that they want to pass on to everyone else. ■■ The MedeMerkers (BrandMakers) are our ambassadors. They help us to define and promote Indaver’s identity and image, both internally and externally, online and offline.

MoodMakers

WegWijzers

“Indaver’s approach to sustainable employment is special because staff development comes first. Employees are invited and encouraged to work on their development, their health and their vitality and to check they have the right work/life balance”

MedeMerkers

Refer a friend In 2018, Indaver implemented the ‘Refer a Friend’ programme. Employees who introduce a new colleague get a reward as soon as the colleague starts working with Indaver. There is continued interest in this action. It encourages our staff to like and share vacancies posted on social media. As a result, a wider circle of people are aware of our vacancies.

Floor van den Heuvel, Programme Manager for Sustainable Employment WENB

  Watch the video


27 PEOPLE > SUSTAINABLE DEPLOYMENT

SUSTAINABLE EMPLOYMENT

Employee Engagement Survey We believe that our employees’ engagement is a determining factor in Indaver’s success. So, in 2019 we asked our staff to describe their experience of working at Indaver. Plenty of people responded: 66.8% of staff in Benelux/ France, Ireland/UK and Germany/ Italy completed the questionnaire. This provides a good basis for insight into staff attitudes. Staff say they are happy and proud of their work, that they agree with our objectives, support the direction we are taking and feel a sense of loyalty to Indaver.

KeepWell Mark 31.5% of staff say that they are enthusiastic and involved in the organisation, which is 6.8% higher than average for similar organisations. There are also points for improvement: efficiency, work pressure, communication and collaboration between teams in the regions. These are points we need to tackle as a priority. Following on from discussions with the staff, supervisors have set up and promoted action plans that will be implemented in each location or department.

In 2019, Indaver in Ireland received the ‘KeepWell Mark’ from the Irish business and employer association, Ibec. This award is in recognition of our efforts for our staff’s welfare and well-being and their sustainable employment. Ibec assessed Indaver in Ireland on the topics of health, employee benefits, flexible work opportunities, maternity and paternity leave, training and development, equal opportunities for job applications, promotions and knowledge development. We are very proud of the KeepWell Mark and will continue to uphold this high standard throughout 2020 and beyond.


28 PEOPLE > SUSTAINABLE DEPLOYMENT

Connect2Work

EMPLOYER BRANDING

Ambassadors

Ensuring a clean future together To show the world who we are, what we do and why, in 2019 Indaver focused on its employer branding. With a good employer brand that reflects Indaver’s qualities, we can position ourselves strongly on the job market and increase our brand awareness. It was an interesting development process, which was supported by an experienced external party. From the sessions with a cross-section of Indaver staff, it became apparent that Indaver is a modern organisation that produces professional quality, has an informal work atmosphere and is modest and understated. All of this led to the mutually agreed brand promise: “ensuring a clean future together”. This is based on our commitment that: ‘we are ensuring a clean circular economy by converting waste into new raw materials and energy and by neutralising hazardous substances’. With this targeted brand identity and vision, we can raise our profile even further and present Indaver as the employer of choice to work for.

In Indaver’s recruitment and selection campaigns we let our staff express their enthusiasm to potential new colleagues on our careersite. They are our best ambassadors and their testimonials provide a clearer picture of the job we are offering. In addition, depending on the vacancy and the target group, Indaver uses one or more social media channels.

New IndaChlor team For our new treatment facility in Northern France, we were looking to recruit a whole new team. The local media paid a lot of attention to the sustainable recovery of chlorine by the future treatment facility. The publicity around this sustainability aspect, as part of the circular economy, produced a huge amount of positive reactions and spontaneous applications. The people who were first employed at IndaChlor then made others aware of the remaining vacancies.

In Belgium, highly educated, foreign-language newcomers often find it hard to find suitable work. Diplomas that aren’t recognised in Belgium, different work methods and the language barrier sometimes create very challenging obstacles. Connect2Work connects these newcomers with experienced Belgian professionals working in the same field. These mentors support the newcomers with advice and practical assistance for a period of three months. Indaver staff have also volunteered to be mentors. From the start, it was clear that this was not about promoting their job with Indaver. Mentors advise newcomers on job applications, help them to understand cultural differences and provide support with practical matters. The newcomer primarily initiates interaction in these matters.

“Indaver does this through commitment to society. We may also recruit people along the way, but in the first instance this is about the company’s social responsibility.” Grim Sekeris, Shared Services Manager - Process Assurance & Continuous Improvement


29 PEOPLE > SUSTAINABLE DEPLOYMENT

STRONG, SUSTAINABLE ASSETS FOR THE JOB MARKET

With initiatives such as IndaFIT (see page 26), the TandjeBij (GearUp) mobility concept and the well-received debut of Sustainable Thursday, Indaver stands out from its peers and promotes itself as an attractive sustainable employer.

Less Travel Indaver has several different sites, spread out across a large area. That means some of us find ourselves on the road a lot. Indaver would like its staff to travel as sustainably as possible and to always ask themselves whether a journey is really necessary. With a view to reducing travel for meetings, Indaver is encouraging video-conferencing. We have gradually been equipping our meeting rooms with systems that make this possible. In a number of roles it’s possible to work from home or log in from a hot desk on another site. With these types of solutions, we are saving on travel time and costs and reducing our CO2 emissions. We also adapt to the tax regulations (which are different for each country) on travel between home and work.

TandjeBij (GearUp)

Sustainable Thursday

In Belgium, Indaver initiated the TandjeBij mobility concept, which supports sustainable mobility. TandjeBij gives staff the opportunity to buy a bike, for example, or a public transport season ticket, the cost of which can then be deducted from their monthly salary with tax incentive scheme. They can use a tool that clearly shows what effect the purchase would have on their gross and net salary. Through the TandjeBij knowledge cafés, intranet pages and newsletters, staff are given information about the mobility policy and can exchange tips and contribute ideas. Several ideas have now been adopted and developed by the sustainable mobility working party. Consequently, there are now pool cars on the sites. In the Antwerp port area, for example, increasing numbers of staff are opting to use electric bikes, occasionally in combination with The Waterbus.

Indaver is continually promoting its sustainable contribution to society. Our staff know about our efforts, and they help us to achieve them. In May 2019, we organised our first Sustainable Thursday, for staff in Belgium and the Netherlands. Participants were able to create their own programme from a wide range of workshops, from recycling to safety and mobility. The aim of Sustainable Thursday is to give our people a better understanding of what sustainability means from different perspectives, which in turn helps employees to see what they can do personally to live and work more sustainably. The day was a great success and the staff really appreciated the effort. We will organise this again in future.


30 PEOPLE > SUSTAINABLE DEPLOYMENT

DIGITALISATION

Centre of Expertise

Human Resource Development

Structured learning In addition to traditional workshops and on-the-job training, Indaver initiated e-learnings in 2019. Following on-line courses is a practical way to transfer knowledge. They are available through the PC, laptop, tablet and smartphone. Staff can do the course at a time that suits them and at their own pace. It means that everyone has acces to the same knowledge and skills. The e-learning initiative enables staff to follow a course on the 10 Codes of Conduct for sustainable waste management. We also offer SAP training courses, focused specifically on our shared service centres. We are also working on developing an extensive training course for operators who operate the rotary kiln incinerators in Antwerp. This involves digitalising an existing training course, which is focused on safety and efficiency. The e-version of the course makes it easy to understand using (interactive) animations, video clips and photos. Our basic principle for e-learnings is that they are complementary sources of education and training. After this digital starting point, a traditional workshop or on-the-job training follows.

compliance & safety

21,338 hours technical skills

9,063 hours leadership/management

3,337 hours other skills

4,547 hours

38,285 total training hours in 2019

Indaver encourages staff development through its core value, ‘Continuously Improving’. Continuous development benefits both the individual staff member and Indaver. The new centre of expertise, the ‘Human Resource Development’, promotes and supports development across every region from the first day of work. The centre of expertise has started working on: ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■

employer branding; onboarding programme for new staff; talent management; goals & performance management.

The four topics follow on from each other. It starts with awareness and the attractive proposition of working for and with Indaver (employer branding). From this we recruit the right new staff and we integrate them with Indaver and their colleagues through a targeted introduction programme (onboarding). Their career with Indaver is defined by our focus on staff talents and interests (talent management), and productivity in line with Indaver’s ambitions (goals & performance management).

  OUTLOOK

Expanding e-learnings New e-learnings are planned for 2020, including some for the Antwerp Tank Park operators. In addition, all Indaver staff have access to an external e-platform in 2020. This offers a broad range of courses, across 125 subjects. Staff can develop practical and personal skills that are useful at work and in their personal life.


31 PEOPLE > SUSTAINABLE DEPLOYMENT

LEADERS AND TALENTS

Partnerships

SIRA Triple C Continues To support our current leaders and to shape future leaders, Indaver initiated the Triple C leadership programme. This is based on the leadership model of ‘Care, Connect, Coach’. With Triple C, we encourage knowledge sharing and we ask staff for their ideas and opinions, which keeps them motivated and involved. All supervisors have followed the Triple C course, and new supervisors will start the leadership programme within six months of commencing their employment. In 2018, Indaver offered experienced supervisors more in-depth courses: such as the Indaver Triple C Continues. In 2019, we evaluated their experiences and made improvements where necessary: ■■ responding even more to current events by linking the topics to projects within the organisation; ■■ in addition to leadership development, in view of developments at Indaver we have now made organisation development an integral part of the topics; ■■ modular structure allows participants to choose one module or several modules.

From September 2019 we were able to offer supervisors and senior managers a new programme, consisting of five topics: ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■ ■■

Change Management; High Performing Teams; Effective Dialogue; Virtual Teams; Personal Branding.

The last three topics will be given over the course of 2020. Germany In 2019, supervisors in Germany began a three-year leadership course. Over four modules, they are learning how to tackle difficult situations, they gain experience in discussion techniques and learn to improve their communication skills.

With its complex processes, the chemical industry is an exciting and challenging employer. The SIRA course, an initiative of the npo Scheikundige Industrie Regio Antwerpen (SIRA - Chemical Industry in the Antwerp Region) and its partners, provides the theory and workexperience placements for young people aged between 18 and 25 years old who don’t have the right qualifications. They have theory lessons two days a week and on the other three days they gain work experience in chemical companies in the port of Antwerp, including Indaver.

Partnerships

Chair Management Education for Sustainability From mid-2019 onwards, Indaver agreed to give lectures as part of a new three-year course that began on 1 January 2020. This degree-level course, Management Education for Sustainability, is a joint initiative from the Antwerp Management School (AMS) and Breda University of Applied Sciences (BUas). It is based in both cities and is being run by Lars Moratis, Professor of Sstainable Business at AMS, and Frans Melissen, Professor of Sustainable Experience Design at BUas, with the support of researchers. The aim of the course is to provide sufficient knowledge of sustainability to our current and future leaders, both in the business world and in society. For a company like Indaver, it’s about the connection between newcomers to the job market and the staff who have already been working with us for a long time. Students learn methods for incorporating visions and plans for sustainability in businesses like Indaver. Managers and staff gain insight into exactly what the younger generation’s view on sustainability is. Ultimately, this should help us to make the sustainability and innovation process within Indaver run faster and more efficiently.


32

SAFETY: OUR PRIORITY

People

Social context

Our approach

Working together safely

Work safe, get home safe

People must be able to work safely. The government puts legislation and regulations in place to establish the framework for a safe work environment. Employers then ensure that it is possible to work safely at all workstations and that there is a good safety culture. Each member of staff takes responsibility for themselves and works in a safe manner. Safety concerns everyone.

The international management team (IMT) sets the safety goals each year. These are then translated into individual safety plans by the respective safety departments, with internal audits, risk assessments and training courses. We use the safety pyramid to create a safe working environment in every region.

Safety as a common thread Safety is a common thread that runs through our policies, procedures and management systems. Every workstation must be a safe workplace. There are tools and procedures for reporting, registering and monitoring unsafe situations throughout the entire organisation. Safety training, medical tests and the correct (personal) protective equipment are part of the standard provisions.

We expect our staff to work safely, to use the correct protective equipment and to take the safety courses offered. Supervisors can be seen taking their responsibility regarding safety and together we work on having a culture in which everyone feels responsible for each otherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s safety. Naturally, we respond to and correct situations, but prevention is most effective. Staff can use a user-friendly app to report unsafe situations. The more that unsafe situations are reported and tackled in a preventive manner, the smaller the risk of actual incidents happening. Any incidents that do occur are analysed thoroughly to find the cause, using our incident management programme. Within set time frames we connect actions to our findings and record the new measurement results. This is carried out with a view to learning from incidents and preventing them from being repeated. The most frequently occurring unsafe situations are considered as a topic for our safety campaign.


33 PEOPLE > SAFETY

TOGETHER OUR EMPLOYEES AND THIRD-PARTIES ENSURE A SAFE WORK ENVIRONMENT Antwerp: T(h)anks for safety

A safe work environment stands or falls by everyone’s safe behaviour, i.e. our own staff, suppliers, drivers and other visitors to our locations. Supervisors are role models in a corporate culture where everyone looks out for each other’s safety. We encourage people to report safety risks so that we can investigate and tackle them. Our staff reported potentially unsafe situations in 2019, giving us ‘early warnings’, which allowed us to intervene to prevent incidents from occurring.

In September, drivers and logistics planners visited our Antwerp site. Transporters are the link between our customers and the treatment facilities. Indaver ensures that drivers can deliver the waste safely. At the same time, we want them to follow our safety directives. We seized the opportunity of this meeting to explain our stricter acceptance policy and the importance of using specific connectors to unload safely and to quickly use the direct injection lines on the ovens. The guests were able to visit the control room so they could see for themselves what happens to the waste they deliver.

Extra attention

Falling & Slipping

From an analysis of the most frequently reported accidents and near-misses, it seems more attention needs to be paid to:

Once again a lot of accidents arose from ‘slips & trips’. These are due to a combination of not being sufficiently alert and obstacles. A tidy and clear workspace helps to prevent tripping incidents.

■■ tidy and clear workspaces; ■■ correct manual operations; ■■ traffic instructions at our sites.


34 PEOPLE > SAFETY

MONITORING SAFETY PERFORMANCE

Lost work time incidents Compared to the previous year, 2019 saw more accidents resulting in lost work time/ absence. These are incidents that cause a member of staff to stay off work for more than a day (frequency rate). Safety performance numbers of all regions are input into the Incident Registration Management System. This keeps us focused on safety. Permanent contractors are also included in the figures. In 2019, as a group, we had 33 incidents with injuries, which was unfortunately 10 more than in 2018. But more than 50% of these incidents in 2019 were feet or leg injuries resulting from tripping or falling.

Comparing safety figures Indaver compares its safety figures with other available figures, from which we conclude that we scores better than the general waste treatment sector. Our frequency rate of accidents was significantly lower in 2019 than the average frequency rate.

LTIR (Lost Time Incident Rate)

Frequency rate 2019

10.4

2017 - 2019

12-month rolling average (incl. contractors) 20 18 16 14 12 10 8 6 4 2 0

2017

2018

2019

Total Indaver Group (incl. contractors)

Waste sector

Group target (<10)

Chemistry sector

The ‘Lost time incident rate’ chart marks the amount of lost time accidents


35 PEOPLE > SAFETY

WE DO IT SAFELY, OR NOT AT ALL

Safety Campaigns For the third year in a row we ran a safety campaign that linked people’s home situation to work. After all, an accident at work affects our employees’ home life and vice versa. The campaign always has a personal touch. Through posters, among other things, the employees themselves stated that they use personal protective equipment at work, just as they protect themselves against danger and noise in their home lives. Work and hobbies are also generally related. Topics included working at a height, falling and slipping. The poster campaigns aren’t the end

goal, however. The same topics are dealt with in toolbox talks, in consultations and are therefore given extra attention in a range of ways.

“In my spare time I am a tour guide for mountain bikers. As a guide, you should always be careful that people do not slip or fall. Here, at the unloading points, I make sure that discharge hoses are cleaned up immediately and that spilled products are removed quickly. This way we reduce the risk of slipping and tripping.”

Social Safety There was no poster campaign, but social safety was the focus of one safety topic, suggested by the confidential advisors in the Netherlands. By social safety we mean that staff should be safeguarded against aggression, bullying, exclusion and sexual (or any other form of) intimidation.

Bas Wesdorp, Head Waste Transfer Terneuzen and Storage+

Luc. Houdt van hoogtes. Maar ook van veiligheid.

Moritz. Immer gut gesichert, damit auch alles gut läuft.

Ciarán. Is no sloucher on the hurling field.

Bas. Let op dat jij niet struikelt.

Luc Stevens is Hoofd Onderhoud en Infrastructuur in Willebroek (B) en is in zijn vrije tijd rotsklimmer.

Bas Wesdorp, Hoofd Waste Transfer Terneuzen en Storage+

“I make sure I keep a good posture when sitting at my desk and take regular breaks. Its important to me that I can play a match after work and still be at my best. Hurling is a sport famous for its speed and its physicality, I make sure I can be on the right side of a hurley.”

”In mijn vrije tijd ben ik tourgids voor mountainbikers. Als gids moet je altijd opletten dat mensen niet uitglijden of vallen. Ook hier op de losplaatsen let ik erop dat losslangen direct worden opgeruimd en dat gemorste producten snel worden verwijderd. Zo verminderen we het risico op uitglijden en struikelen.”

„Sobald ich Feierabend habe, ziehe ich meine Laufschuhe an und gehe eine Runde joggen. Dies hilft mir den Arbeitsstress abzubauen und abzuschalten. Um dies regelmäßig machen zu können, achte ich auf meine allgemeine Sicherheit am Arbeitsplatz, egal ob auf dem Stapler oder zu Fuß.”

“Mijn ouders namen mij altijd mee naar de bergen. Pas later kwam ik in aanraking met rotsklimmen. Wat ik nog veel spectaculairder vond. Maar welke rots ik ook beklim, ik doe het altijd met de noodzakelijke veiligheidsuitrusting. Ook bij werken op hoogte in Willebroek staat veiligheid altijd voorop. We gebruiken alle PBM’s die nodig zijn, zorgen voor de nodige verankeringspunten en dragen een harnasgordel. Altijd.” Ciaran Brady, Production Accountant

Werk veilig. Work safe ◆ Home safe ◆ Everyone ◆ Every day

TY FE SA ST FIR

Work safe. Work safe ◆ Home safe ◆ Everyone ◆ Every day

Moritz Scheffer ist Mitarbeiter der Sammelstelle in Kassel. In seiner Freizeit geht Moritz häufig laufen um sich fit zu halten.

TY FE SA ST FIR

Arbeite sicher. Work safe ◆ Home safe ◆ Everyone ◆ Every day

TY FE SA ST FIR

Werk veilig. Work safe ◆ Home safe ◆ Everyone ◆ Every day

TY FE SA ST FIR

Process Safety Action Plan 2019–2020 Within Indaver, all regions work with the Process Safety action plan. This is made up of three safety actions: ■■ safely designing and maintaining facilities; ■■ improving safety of production and maintenance; ■■ knowing and monitoring the variables of waste to be able to predict its ‘behaviour’ better. A lot of work has been done to improve these three areas. So, group training courses were held for HAZOP (identifying the potential dangers of processing plants) and LOPA (determining and managing the risks). If we know the potential dangers and risks, we can include solutions in our design that are not dependent on humans. In Antwerp (Tank Park 2.0 and Plastics2Chemicals) and in Ireland the training courses are held in the workplace.


36 PEOPLE > SAFETY

SAFETY ABOVE ALL

Antwerp: Safety concerns everyone

Reference

A proactive approach to safety is particularly important to prevent accidents. This was the priority for the four-year safety project that Indaver started on the Antwerp site in 2019. The aim of the project is to switch from reactive to proactive. Colleagues from all departments are working on the project, for which Indaver brought in an external party.

Indaver Antwerp has an ambition to be known as the reference for safe and sustainable treatment of hazardous waste both within the waste industry and beyond it. In addition, the safety and well-being of their staff come first.

First, we worked out a clear vision and strategy. By 2024, we will have implemented several improvement projects in which we will always use 5 key points as a guide:

The Antwerp safety project was also expanded to IWS Terneuzen.

■■ Risk-based approach: focused on safe and customer-focused solutions for risks. ■■ Process safety and installations: investing to bring installations up to a higher and more reliable level, operated by staff who know the installations inside and out. ■■ Rolls and responsibilities: to be aware of the knowledge and skills of every member of staff, so it is clear who should be performing each task. ■■ Think first, then do: we act after we have thought something through and continuously share new experiences with each other about working safely. ■■ Adapted organisation: the right people in the right place, with the right training, resources and tools for every role, adapted to the risk-based approach.

“It’s interesting to be a part of this work group. You don’t just examine an important safety topic, you also learn about the challenges faced and approaches taken by your colleagues in the other departments. These are efficient meetings that are well-run and that you feel everyone wants to get the most out of. Together we come up with actions that are achievable everywhere. It’s remarkable how much you can achieve in 1.5 hours.” Vincent De Bleeckere, Assistant-Team Leader TBA


37 PEOPLE > SAFETY

EXTERNAL APPRECIATION FOR SAFETY AT INDAVER

Jemeppe: Inovyn Safety Trophy for Indaver As a Total Waste Management partner for the chemicals manufacturer Inovyn Manufacturing SA in Jemeppe (Belgium), Indaver manages all of their hazardous and non-hazardous waste. Inovyn produces vinyl, PVC, sodium hydroxide and nitrogen peroxide, among other things. These processes involve risks, so Inovyn attaches great value to safety. Every year, Inovyn awards a safety trophy to the best safety performance among its (sub)contractors. For the second year in a row, Indaver was declared the winner in the category of subcontractors that work less than 7,000 hours on the site. We excelled with a ‘zero accident track record’ for 2018. There were no negative comments about our approach to safety, our actions or our adherence to safety directives. This trophy is wonderful recognition of the daily efforts of our on-site staff at Inovyn.

Indaver ARP: Nomination for Tata Steel Golden Helmet Award In 2019, our hydrochloride recycling plant ARP at Tata Steel in IJmuiden (The Netherlands) was nominated for the Golden Helmet Award 2018 for Tata Steel contractors. We received the nomination thanks to our daily efforts, the open communication between ARP and the Tata factory in Beitsbaan and the overarching standardised approach to safety risks. Unfortunately, we didn’t take the Golden Helmet home, but we are proud of the nomination, which shows that our efforts do not go unnoticed.

Doel: Prestigious HPR Award After it was awarded to the Irish Meath site in 2017, in 2019 our site in Doel (Belgium) received the prestigious HPR Award from our lead insurer, FM Global. This insurer is responsible for fire and risk insurance. HPR stands for Highly Protected Risk. It is the highest status a facility or site can earn and is very difficult to achieve. This prize is a reward for all the efforts made by the staff in Doel.

From left to right: Filip De Schutter, Paul Geens, Wim Ooms, Patricia Delaconcorde, Michel Decorte


Planet

38

With the help of our facilities and processes we recover

We also generate energy from waste. We put this back

valuable materials from the waste we treat. We then

as steam, hot water (heating), green gas or electricity,

put these materials back into the materials loop as

which in turn reduces consumption of fossil fuels.

high-grade secondary materials, contributing our link

At the same time, we protect the materials loop

in the circular economy.

against unwanted hazardous substances. During all of our activities we keep our impact on the environment to a minimum.


39

MATERIALS

Planet

Social context

Our approach

Rare and expensive raw materials

Closing the materials loop

The demand for raw materials keeps rising, not just because of increasing wealth but also because of population growth. In many cases raw materials are not inexhaustible. This means we need to start using materials and energy more intelligently. In addition, rarity equals high prices for primary raw materials.

Manufacturers make products out of raw materials. This production creates unusable materials, i.e. waste. From a certain point onwards, the products themselves also become waste. By recycling these materials as efficiently as possible, we draw on fewer primary and fossil raw materials. In this way, Indaver is closing the materials loop.

The circular economy is one of the answers to this complex issue. Waste streams contain a lot of materials that we can reclaim and reuse as a secondary material. This not only helps to save on primary raw materials, it also fits in with current initiatives to combat waste. The European Unionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Green Deal will help to scale up the circular economy.

End-of-waste materials There is clearly a transition period when it comes to recovering raw materials from waste (end-of-waste materials). In 2018, the European Union approved the Circular Economy Package, which includes radical refinements for the waste framework directive, the landfill directive and the packaging directive, among others. This revised framework refines the objectives for sustainable waste management, with useful applications for waste streams. Stricter regulations are being imposed on member states to achieve their goals. Accordingly, they must have converted their 2030 goals for recycling plastic packaging to national legislation by 2020.

Creating value from waste Indaverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s high-tech facilities have been designed to recover as many valuable materials from the waste we treat as possible. Innovations such as chemical and thermal recycling supplement existing techniques. Indaver continuously invests in the technological innovations needed to recover materials in such a way that they satisfy the quality requirements set by the market. With our Molecule Management approach, we break down complex waste to a molecular level. This enables us to supply high-quality secondary materials to the industry that are as good and as safe as the original material.


40 PLANET > MATERIALS

METAMORPHOSIS OF THE MILIEUPARK WILLEBROEK

The Household Waste Recycling Centre in Willebroek (Belgium) is undergoing a veritable transformation. Next to the existing facility for the treatment of household packaging (PMD) waste, Indaver is building an entirely new hall that will be able to sort even more materials from this waste stream. This will allow us to ensure that Flanders’ updated policy on plastics recycling can be adhered to adequately and that the European goals can be achieved. With our state-of-theart sorting infrastructure, we are making the circular economy a reality. Test projects result in a ‘New Blue Bag’ Alongside FOST Plus (which is responsible for the collection and recycling of PMD waste in Belgium), the Flemish government began a few test projects in 2016 to trial a broader definition for PMD. The aim of these alternatives is to recycle higher amounts of plastic waste. The most successful system was chosen in 2018 and a future vision was worked out under the name the ‘New Blue Bag’. Indaver is a partner to local authorities and FOST Plus. The aim is that in the period 2019–2021, all Belgian local authorities will gradually switch over to the new definition of PMD with more fractions. In the meantime, Indaver has been preparing to build a new and larger facility

and in mid-2019 it landed the contract for the long-term treatment of almost 60,000 tonnes of PMD waste. This contract secures and strengthens our position as a partner to public authorities in Flanders.

began on 1 April could already be sorted according to the new definitions. In this transition phase (up to 2021) we will sort around 37,000 tonnes of packaging waste per year.

Increasing from 9 to 14 fractions Whereas the existing facility produces 9 end products, we will sort the ‘New Blue Bag’ into 14 materials. The main new fractions are plastic films and hard plastic packaging, such as polystyrene packaging and PET trays.

New state-of-the art facility In September 2019 the construction of a new facility commenced. Our sorting technologies have proven their worth over the past few decades. We achieve a very high level of purity for all fractions, as demanded by the recycling companies. The new facility will have the same machines, just several more of them. An ingenious set-up with a lot of correction loops will guarantee high-quality end products, as prescribed by FOST Plus. The deadline by which the new facility must be operational is Spring 2021.

Necessary Transition Phase A change on this scale will inevitably involve a transition phase. Indaver offered a solution for this, too, by converting our existing facility in Willebroek. This was done in March 2019, which meant that the contracts that

Projects

Chemical Recycling Not all plastics are suitable for mechanical treatment – for example, because they are made up of multiple layers of plastics, or are composed of aluminium (crisp packets, packaging for medicines, etc.). This growing number of plastics are not included in recycling. Over the last two years, at Ghent University, Indaver in Belgium has been developing its own depolymerisation technique for chemically recycling plastics. This innovative technology makes secondary basic chemicals from end-of-life plastics that the plastics industry can use as a raw material. In 2019, Indaver received permission to build the Plastics2Chemicals test facility in Antwerp. (See page 95)


41 PLANET > MATERIALS

INDACHLOR: HYDROCHLORIC ACID AND ENERGY FROM CHLORINATED RESIDUE In 2018, Indaver received permission to extend its activities with a new recycling facility. This facility, called IndaChlor, will make hydrochloric acid from chlorinated residue from the PVC industry. Its construction in the port of Dunkirk (Northern France) began in 2019. The new facility recovers hydrochloric acid from chlorinated product residues. This represents 40,000 tonnes each year. Hydrochloric acid is an essential raw material for industrial production processes. Once the facility is operational, Indaver will be able to supply the hydrochloric

acid to a neighbouring company via a direct pipeline. During the treatment process IndaChlor generates energy. Indaver supplies this through a steam pipe to a neighbouring alcohol distillery, which then doesn’t have to produce energy-using fossil fuels. Thanks to this industrial symbiosis, CO2 emissions are avoided. With IndaChlor, Indaver is putting the circular economy into practice. We recover materials and energy while treating chlorinated residues and thus create value from waste. This project therefore fits perfectly with the Green Deal presented by the European

Commission at the end of 2019. During construction in 2019, several involved and interested parties were able to find out about the sustainable nature of the project.

  OUTLOOK It is expected that IndaChlor will become operational in the second quarter of 2020.

Partnerships

Ports Energy and Carbon Savings IndaChlor is a partner in the Ports Energy and Carbon Savings (PECS) project. This international project, which is part of the European guiding framework Interreg 2 Seas, researches ways to make small- and mediumsized ports greener, more energy efficient and more CO2 neutral. Ports, industry, knowledge institutions and local stakeholders are working together on this project. Once IndaChlor is operational, it will make the energy supply in the port of Dunkirk more sustainable. The steam that is released during treatment goes to a steam turbine. A portion of it is then converted into electricity for our own use, the rest of the steam goes to the neighbouring company. We hope that the knowledge gained from the PECS project inspires other ports to make their energy supply more sustainable. Financial PECS receives financing from the Interreg 2 Seas programme 2014–2020, which is partly financed by the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) under the subsidy contract No. 2S01020. The Dutch provinces of North-Holland and South-Holland also provide financial support.


42 PLANET > MATERIALS

INDAVER METAL PROCESSING RECOVERS PALLADIUM The recovery of precious metals is an important part of closing the materials loop. They have unique chemical properties, are often rare and therefore expensive, which makes recovery beneficial economically as well as ecologically. Since 2016, and in conjunction with several customers, Indaver has been testing possibilities for recovering precious metals from industrial waste streams. The positive results led to the conversion of the existing solvent recycling facility on our Antwerp site in 2018. Using a thermal process, Indaver Metal Processing (IndaMP), separates palladium, platinum and gold from industrial solutions and collects these precious metals again in the residues.

In February 2019, IndaMP supplied the first recovered palladium from waste streams that originated in the pharmaceuticals industry. This is a great example of industrial symbiosis, whereby we recover raw materials from one company’s waste for use by another company. IndaMP can recover palladium sustainably over and over again. This means our customers aren’t just reducing their ecological footprint, they are also no longer dependent on palladium suppliers, which strengthens their market position.

  OUTLOOK We have several projects lined up to expand the services offered by IndaMP. The aim is to continue to grow into a broad and flexible recycling centre for precious metals from liquid waste streams.

Partnership Alliance Award In October, Indaver received great recognition for its new IndaMP facility in Antwerp. Our collaboration with the pharmaceutical company Pfizer in Ringaskiddy, Ireland, to recover palladium from residue received the Partnership Alliance of the Year Award from the pharmaceutical industry. u Read the full article From left to right: Indaver team with Account Manager Mike Dee, IWS Sales Manager Ireland Ruth Appelbe and Wouter van Zundert, International Key Account Manager; and next to him Brian O’Rourke, Cost reduction specialist at Pfizer Ringaskiddy and his colleague Rob Bohane, with the evening’s host.

“Since 2018, Indaver’s IndaMP facility has been treating our palbociclib liquid waste stream from which a considerable amount of palladium has been recovered. In addition to the financial gains, this project also reduces Pfizer’s ecological footprint by 700 tonnes of CO2 emissions. This was only made possible by our joint efforts and successful collaboration.” Brian O’Rourke, Cost Reduction Specialist for Waste at Pfizer, Ringaskiddy, Ireland


43 PLANET > MATERIALS

CLEAN COMPOST IS MADE TOGETHER

Chain responsibility Compost, as a replacement for peat and fossil artificial fertiliser, fits in perfectly with sustainable soil management – but only as long as it’s clean. Clean compost starts with clean raw materials, that is Vegetable, Garden and Fruit (VGF) material. From our sorting analyses, it appears that contamination of Dutch VGF material is increasing: from less than 1% in 2000 to around 4% in 2018. At the same time, our buyers, and the agricultural industry in particular, are demanding that our compost contain less particles of plastic and glass – and rightly so. Symposiums on cleaner VGF material At the end of 2018, Indaver in the Netherlands organised a symposium on the need to come up with a joint approach to achieve better quality VGF material. In November 2019 a similar meeting took place in Utrecht, by Rijkswaterstaat in conjunction with the sector organisations NVRD (Royal Society for Waste Cleaning Management) and VA (Vereniging Afvalbedrijven - Association of Waste Companies). Indaver was in attendance and spoke, also on behalf of the VA, about tools for collecting more and yet still clean VGF and to prevent contamination in the

chain from all kinds of plastics. Everyone involved has now begun diverse projects under the title “Aanvalsplan GFT” (VGF Plan of Attack), which are focused on improving quality within the chain, from VGF to compost. There will soon be, amongst other initiatives, a simple and clear permitted/not-permitted list for VGF waste. All local authorities will use these for their residents. Bioplastics disrupt the composting process We are also collectively linking this to the fight against so-called “compostable” bioplastics, which are not suitable for treatment in the industrial composting process. The concern about bioplastics in VGF is also shared by VLACO, the Flemish compost organisation, of which Indaver is an active member. During a well-attended symposium in June 2019, the issue of bioplastics was the main theme in the biological loop. Experts from Belgian and Dutch composting facilities shared their experiences and reviewed them against the findings from the academic world.

Automated quality control Quality control of the waste supplied is of the utmost importance for optimum treatment. Indaver monitors the quality of organic waste in various ways. In addition to our regular sorting analyses, we monitor the loads delivered using the iAuditor app (see p. 81). We use this app in our other operational locations in Belgium and the Netherlands, as well, as a tool to monitor incoming waste streams. With this new technology, customers get feedback on the results quickly so that they can apply them to better waste separation. u More on the iAuditor app on p. 90

Flanders expands the definition of VGF In 2019, the Flemish authorities expanded the definition for Vegetable, Garden and Fruit waste. Henceforth, animal by-products will also be allowed in VGF waste. This resulted in a number of operational adjustments to the VGF composting facility that we use in Erembodegem. It also means an additional administrative task for our compost transshipment and transport activities. In the Netherlands, animal by-products have been permitted in VGF waste for a while.


44 PLANET > MATERIALS

BIO POWER ALPHEN HAS EXCELLENT RESULTS

In 2019, Bio Power Alphen produced record amounts of green gas and liquid CO2. Compost production also increased by 3,575 tonnes. This fantastic, sustainable result was primarily thanks to the improvement measures that we had implemented. From our core value of ‘Continuously Improving’, Bio Power Alphen did a lean scan in 2019. The scan highlighted difficulties in the interaction between the composting facility

and the digester. The digester works best with an even supply of good-quality VGF material, but the composting facility was not always able to meet optimum demand.

looked at seasonal influences on VGF material and took planned maintenance into account. This resulted in record production of green gas and liquid CO2.

The Europoort and Nieuwdorp VGF sites have therefore also become involved in the improvement process. They come in at the point where the digester’s demand for VGF material is greater than the supply from the Alphen location. To improve coordination, we

At the same time, we have embedded the Lean Six Sigma system in the operational work. Staff have more insight into the total process and the results. We encourage them to come up with suggestions for improvements.

VGF waste produces three sustainable products Our latest generation of VGF digester, Bio Power Alphen, is located in Alphen aan den Rijn. Here, we have applied all of the knowledge and experience we gained previously at EcoFuels. We recover three high-quality raw materials from the VGF waste from municipalities in the wider area. By doing this, we are once again closing the materials loop: ■■ Compost: a natural soil improver that replaces fossil peat and fertiliser. ■■ Green Gas: wet organic residue waste is digested into biogas, which is reprocessed into green gas. This green gas is of a very high quality and replaces fossil natural gas. ■■ Liquid CO2: when biogas is refined into green gas, CO2 is released. Bio Power Alphen compresses this into liquid CO2, which can be used to stimulate plant growth in greenhouse farming, among other things.

liquid CO2

Bio Power Alphen

Compost Nieuwdorp

Rotterdam Europoort

compost

2,340 tonnes

34,150 tonnes green gas

2,415,533 Nm 3


45 PLANET > MATERIALS

FROM BOTTOM ASH TO RAW MATERIAL

Indaver processes more than 400,000 tonnes of household and similar commercial waste in the grate incinerators on the Doel site. After incineration, there remains around 85,000 tonnes of bottom ash. Doel also has an ash treatment plant, which is used to give a second life to three-quarters of the bottom ash. We recover ferrous and non-ferrous metals from the bottom ash, as these are valuable raw materials for industry. The sand fraction is used for our own landfill sites as the (final) capping layer for the full sections. The approximately 30,000 tonnes of granulate that we produce from bottom ash each year satisfies the requirements for use as a construction material for concrete blocks. Shaped like enormous Lego bricks, these have excellent structural properties. Indaver

uses these blocks on its own sites, as well as on other locations. Applications for the blocks include compartmentalising bulk storage, as traffic islands and for laying slopes. The granulate is also suitable as part of the sub-base layer when laying roads and car parks. Indaver invests a lot of attention to finding valuable applications for all of the end products from bottom ash treatment. That way we can improve the quality of the sand fraction. Indaver also invests in technology to further refine the recovery of raw materials from bottom ash. The goal is a higher recycling efficiency from copper, aluminium and precious metals.

Urban mining and Indaver Valley Indaver is becoming increasingly successful in recovering special metals from the fractions it treats. In addition to precious metals, we can also list fluorescence powders among these. The powders are released when gas-discharge lamps are recycled at Indaver Relight in Doel. These powders consist of 15% rare earth metals. By recovering this, which is also known as urban mining, Indaver is preventing the negative effects that result from the extraction of rare earth metals, such as high CO2 emissions, water and soil pollution, disruption of ecosystems. Indaver stores the entire production of fluorescence powders from Indaver Relight in its own Indaver Valley, located at our landfill site in Antwerp. These are packaged securely and kept entirely separate from other waste products, so that we can recover the rare earth metals from the powders when there is a market demand for them.


46 PLANET > MATERIALS

CO2 MANAGEMENT

Partnerships

ASH-CEM Carbon Capture and Utilisation As much as Indaver would like to work without any CO2 emissions, CO2 is inextricably linked to our production process. However, we make every effort to reduce our CO2 emissions by recovering materials and energy in the thermal

treatment of waste, which then don’t have to be produced using fossil raw materials elsewhere. In addition, we investigate every option for useful applications of CO2 once it has been captured.

Projects

Power-to-Methanol a first in Belgium In 2019, Indaver got involved in the new, ambitious project Power-toMethanol from Port of Antwerp. The aim is to produce methanol using a sustainable method. Together with several players from the port authority, Port of Antwerp wants to produce methanol using captured CO2 and hydrogen instead of fossil raw materials. In the Port of Antwerp, which is home to the largest European, integratedenergies, chemical cluster, methanol is essential for its daily operation. The port companies consume 300,000 tonnes of this important raw material on an annual basis. With the help of a new electrolysis plant, the test project wants to combine captured CO2 with

sustainably generated hydrogen. These two elements form the perfect basis for the production of sustainable methanol. Capturing this carbon dioxide will be achieved using Carbon Capture and Utilisation (CCU). Power-to-Methanol is aiming for a production of 8,000 tonnes of methanol per year. For every tonne of sustainably produced methanol, Port of Antwerp will avoid releasing one tonne of CO2 into the air. In the future, sustainable methanol can probably also be used as a sustainable fuel for transport by road and within the port, with minimum emissions of hazardous substances. The key to success and the economic viability of this project

lie in the innovation and combination of different activities within the port platform, such as the electricity and fuel industry and the chemicals sector. Each party has its own role to play in this alliance. Indaver contributes its expertise to CO2 capture. This complex project will be the first of its kind in Belgium.

Between 2016 and 2019, alongside VITO, Ghent University, Orbix and CRH, Indaver was a partner in the ASH-CEM research project. The project researched whether granulate recovered from bottom ash can be made suitable for higher-grade applications and, if the result is positive, which technological innovations would then be necessary. The results of the research, presented in September 2019, are encouraging. The granulate demonstrated its robustness. By binding it with captured CO2 from our own flue gases (carbonisation), the recovered granulate is suitable as a replacement for ‘virgin’ granulate in high-grade building products. Furthermore, the granulate can also serve in part as an alternative to cement. A lot of greenhouse gases are released during cement production, which will be reduced with this application. Through this procedure, new products can be created that have a lower environmental impact: bricks and tiles, and reinforced concrete beams and sheets. Industrial prototypes of these products have been tested and demonstrated. Now, the partners are looking into whether it is economically viable to produce them.   Watch the video


47

ENERGY

Planet

Social context

Our approach

Fossil fuels

Energy recovered from waste

Despite all our efforts, the majority of the energy we use comes from oil, coal and gas, i.e. fossil fuels. To generate that energy, they are burned. During that process, contaminants and greenhouse gases, including CO2, are released, which contribute to global warming.

Indaver offers a sustainable alternative for fossil fuels. We recover energy from waste via thermal treatment. We supply this to industry and residential areas through heating and electricity networks. They use the electricity or heat supplied as processing heat or as heating for buildings, thereby closing this loop. For our customers, we are a reliable supplier of alternative (green) affordable and sustainable energy.

The European Union’s energy policy The European Commission wants to make energy provision within the EU cleaner, more reliable and cheaper. The energy policy (with 1990 as the reference year) is therefore being quickly revised. In 2010, the EU looked forward 10 years and posited the 20-20-20 goals for the year 2020: To save 20% energy, for 20% of our total energy consumption to come from renewable energy and to have 20% less CO2 emissions. In 2018, these goals were refined significantly to include a reduction in energy consumption of 32.5% by 2030. In November 2019, the European Commission presented its Green Deal (See p. 10). This contains the new CO2 climate goals of 50–55% by 2030, as well as the goal to be climate neutral by 2050. This has been included in the new climate law.

Renewable energy policy The revision of the directive for renewable energy in 2018 states that in 2030, 32% of European energy will come from renewable sources. The use of energy from wind, sun, water, heat and, to a lesser extent, biomass must reduce dependency on polluting fossil fuels. In the details of the Green Deal (See p. 10), it states that this directive will be replaced by a new version in 2021. This will undoubtedly lead to more stringent objectives.

Green gas and electricity Using a turbine, we also convert the steam into electricity, which we supply to the grid. Besides the energy we generate with our thermal treatment facilities, we also produce green gas from organic waste and electricity from landfill gas on our landfill sites. This waste-to-energy strategy is reducing the use of fossil fuels and CO2 emissions and increasing our share in renewable energy.


48 PLANET > ENERGY

Energy for

SUPPLIER OF SUSTAINABLE ENERGY

266,900 households

At the moment, both industry and households primarily use fossil fuels, such as natural gas and oil. Indaver offers a more sustainable alternative. Our treatment facilities for household and similar commercial waste are power stations. The steam we produce during incineration is used for our plant machinery and buildings, and we also supply families and neighbouring businesses. Using a turbine, we convert the steam into electricity,

which we use ourselves or supply to the grid. Our treatment facilities for hazardous industrial waste, which principally keep hazardous substances out of the materials chain, also produce energy in the form of electricity and heat. If all the energy recovered in 2019 from thermal treatment processes, was converted into electricity, this would equate to the average

electricity consumption of 265,300 households (3.5 MWh/family per year). In addition to the energy generated by our thermal treatment facilities, we also produce green gas from organic waste in Alphen aan den Rijn (the Netherlands) and at our landfills in the Netherlands and in Belgium. Alphen aan den Rijn produces energy for a further 1,600 households (1,500 m3 natural gas per year).

Antwerp

Doel

Rotary kilns

Grate incinerators

households

households

9,600

90,000

Doel

Meath

Fluidised bed incinerators

Grate incinerator

households

households

107,000

40,600

Biebesheim

Hamburg

7,000

11,100

Rotary kilns

Rotary kilns

households

The steam turbine for the fluidized bed incinerators in Doel produces energy for the equivalent of 107,000 households

households

Alphen a/d Rijn Bio Power (green gas)

1,600

households


49 PLANET > ENERGY

STEAM AND HEATING NETWORKS

During the thermal treatment of waste, a huge amount of energy is released. Indaver supplies this energy in the form of steam or heat to households and businesses in the immediate vicinity of its facilities.

ECLUSE: Green energy provision in Waasland Port On 15 March 2019, the ECLUSE steam network in the Port of Antwerp was officially declared operational in the presence of the Flemish ministers for Energy and Innovation. ECLUSE supplies steam to five chemical companies, which is generated by burning waste in Indaver’s and SLECO’s facilities. The five neighbouring companies, ADPO, Ashland, Monument Chemical, Ineos and Lanxess, no longer need to make steam using natural gas for their processes. On an annual basis this represents a reduction of as much as 100,000 tonnes of CO2 emissions. The steam network has been built for the future. It has double the capacity of the current demand for steam.

“Waste is not an end product, it is a phase in the life cycle of a material. We recover energy in all of our thermal treatment facilities. Great examples of the industry’s sustainable commitment to achieve the climate goals.” Paul De Bruycker, Indaver CEO

This green energy provision currently represents at least 5% of all the green heat produced in Flanders. ECLUSE will therefore make a significant contribution to the achievement of Flemish climate targets.

Broad Collaboration ECLUSE is a partnership between Indaver LECO, Fluvius, FINEG, water-link and Maatschappij Linkerscheldeoever (the Scheldt Left Bank Corporation), which functions as a ‘green energy sluice gate’ between Indaver and SLECO’s waste-to-energy facilities and the businesses in the Waaslandhaven.

ECLUSE opening: Philippe Muyters (Flemish Minister for Employment, the Economy, Innovation and Sport), Lydia Peeters (Flemish Minister for Energy), Paul De Bruycker (CEO Indaver)


50 PLANET > ENERGY

STEAM AND HEATING NETWORKS Hamburg

Investing in a turbine and tank park Projects

Antwerp North heating network ensures 35,000 tonnes less CO2 emissions In North Antwerp, the development of a heating network has been being planned for quite some time. This network must transport the residual heat from our incinerator facilities to nearby industry and a few residential areas. After a thorough examination of its practical and economic feasibility, Indaver and the Antwerp Port Authority set up a transport company in December 2019: ‘Warmtenetwerk Antwerpen Noord’ (North Antwerp Heating Network). This is set to become the largest heating network in Flanders. Once it has been fully built, the heating network will produce an annual CO2 saving of 35,000 tonnes per year. Building heating networks such as Antwerp-North fits in perfectly with Indaver’s strategy to increase the energy efficiency of its Energy-from-Waste plants.

Boortmalt Collaboration A long-term contract with an industrial client willing to purchase the heat was necessary to make the project economically viable. For this Indaver made agreements with Boortmalt, the world’s largest malting company. Boortmalt’s biggest site is in Antwerp, approximately 8 km from Indaver. The malting process requires large quantities of heat that are currently being generated using a fossil fuel or CHP. Now that the essential industrial heat supply is assured, the supply to 3,000 households and a number of schools and public buildings can go ahead.

Partnerships The partners in the newly established transport company ‘Warmtenetwerk Antwerpen Noord’ are Indaver (70%) and Port of Antwerp (30%). The company will be responsible for the construction, operation and maintenance of the heating network between Indaver and Boortmalt as well as the interface to the residential heating network that will be constructed. The Flemish Government is supporting this project with an investment grant of EUR 15.7 million. There is still plenty of potential for the reuse of residual heat in Flanders. This project should help to fulfil European objectives for energy efficiency.

After almost two years of research, building and testing, Indaver started using a new turbine in Hamburg, Germany, in 2019. This increases our efficiency when generating energy, both for our own use and for supply to the Hamburg power grid. It is also fulfilling the wishes of our industrial customers. Indaver is simultaneously expanding the tank park with new acid tanks, liquid tanks and a new hall for accepting packaged waste. This guarantees continuity of our service provision and increases our flexibility in the treatment of industrial waste.


51 PLANET > ENERGY

NEW WASTE-TO-ENERGY FACILITIES

Projects

Projects

Aberdeen: NESS-energy project In August 2019, Indaver in Aberdeen (United Kingdom) signed a wasteto-energy contract to run a new energy-from-waste plant. This facility will convert 150,000 tonnes of non-recyclable household waste into electricity for a several local authorities in North-East Scotland. Indaver has a lot of experience in

running waste-to-energy plants. We are very proud that Scotland is entrusting this service provision to us, a foreign company, and drawing on our expertise. The construction of the treatment plant has been awarded to Acciona. This Spanish building company

is active globally in the field of sustainable infrastructure and renewable energy. From 2021, it will be illegal to landfill waste and the energy-fromwaste plant must be operational by then. The length of the contract is 20 years.

Belfast: arc21 In Ireland, the construction of an energyfrom-waste plant has been put up for tender by arc21, an umbrella organisation that represents waste management for six Northern Ireland local authorities. The Becon Consortium, with Indaver as the leading party, is the last remaining bidder. The facility will treat the household and similar commercial waste of around 1.6 million people in the North-East of Ireland. This will generate 18 MWh of electricity, which will be supplied to the electricity grid, enough for the annual requirements of 30,000 households. The arc21 project in Belfast will require an investment of £240 million. Once it is operational, it will provide 340 direct and indirect jobs annually.


52

CLIMATE

Planet

Social context

Our approach

Further reducing CO2 emissions

Economical energy consumption

For the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), it is clear that the Earth is heating up and that this global warming is related to greenhouse gas emissions, such as CO2. As much as 90% of this gas is created in energy production. Limiting CO2 emissions can be achieved by making plants, processes, buildings and transport as low energy as possible. The European Union’s previously stated ambition of 40% less CO2 emissions by 2030 was upgraded at the end of 2019 to 50–55% less emissions.

In order to get our energy consumption as low as possible, it is important to know how we can improve our energy management. That is why we constantly monitor the energy consumption of our facilities and processes and investigate potential areas for improvement.

The European Union’s climate policy

We are looking into how we can reduce our CO2 emissions in all of our activities. This applies to everything from industrial treatment processes to our staff’s mobility. For example, by combining road transport efficiently with more sustainable transport by water and rail (modal shift) we are working on a low-carbon solution. The re-use of CO2 is now also one of the possibilities for reducing these emissions.

In 2015, climate agreements were made in Paris that provide the roadmap for the EU’s climate policy. These agreements revolve around efforts to reduce CO2 output. In 2019, the European Commission presented its Green Deal (See p. 10), with its key aim of achieving climate neutrality by 2050. If this aim is to be realised, we need to switch to a circular economy. This raises the question of how all this change can be funded. The European Commission is discussing an annual investment of €260 billion by Member States.

Integral Energy and Climate plan By the end of 2019, every Member State had to propose an Integral Energy and Climate plan. These plans provide the general outline for the energy and climate policies over the next few years. They contain a set of measures in diverse sectors to achieve the intended CO2 reduction by 2030. The waste sector will also contribute to this.

Climate neutral and low carbon


53 PLANET > CLIMATE

STRIVING FOR CLIMATE NEUTRAL FACILITIES AND SITES

Meath and Doel The sites in Meath (Ireland) and Doel (Belgium) are striving to become climate neutral. By recovering energy, Indaver is preventing CO2 from being emitted elsewhere through the use of fossil fuels to generate energy.

Reducing CO2 by recovering energy

2019

Doel

Meath

1,100,000 250,000

1,000,000

225,000

900,000 585,127

800,000

reduced CO2 emissions (organic part of waste)

200,000

700,000

175,000

600,000

150,000

500,000

1,090,979

reduced CO2 emissions (organic part of waste)

125,000 100,000

400,000 376,794

300,000

115,617

avoided CO2 emissions (energy)

210,212

75,000 76,236

50,000

200,000 44,561

100,000

avoided CO2 emissions (metals)

84,497

0

difference (8 %)   CO2 emissions   avoided and reduced CO2 emissions   not avoided or non-renewable

The calculations are based upon the “methodological agreements made by the International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) in the framework of the UN Convention of Climate Change”

avoided CO2 emissions (energy)

25,000 0

11,707 difference (6 %)

6,653

avoided CO2 emissions (metals)


54 PLANET > CLIMATE

REDUCING OUR CO2 EMISSIONS The Netherlands As in previous years, Indaver in the Netherlands is more than CO2 neutral. The products we produce from waste and the energy we generate counteracts for several of our own scope 1 and 2 emissions in the chain, as defined in the CO2 performance ladder. The CO2 performance ladder is the benchmark for environmentally aware companies that want to do business more sustainably. Its application leads to lower energy and materials costs as well as lower CO2 emissions. It has helped us to spread awareness of energy consumption widely throughout the staff in the organisation. Certificate Between 2014 and 2018 there was a strong ambition to achieve 2% CO2 reduction per tonne of waste, with 2012 as our reference year. Over the past few years, we have managed to achieve our ambition and the CO2 Performance Ladder certificate has been extended each year. From 2020 onwards we are working on not only lowering our CO2 emissions, but also on increased energy saving.

Reducing our carbon footprint (The Netherlands) CO2 emissions and compensation in tonnes in 2019

  OUTLOOK

40,000 30,000

12,901 Scope 2 24,618

20,000 10,000

Increased energy saving

Using compost*, biomass, green gas and liquid CO2

23,004 Scope 1

0

From the start of 2020, as we do in Indaver’s other regions, we are targeting savings for all energy sources. The focus is on the IWS Terneuzen and Alphen aan den Rijn sites. They serve as the format for the energy management action plan 2021 for the remaining Dutch sites. Therefore, we are viewing 2020 as a transition year.

-10,000 -20,000

66,662

Hydrochloric acid recycling**

IWS Terneuzen

-30,000 -40,000 -50,000

ARP in IJmuiden It is true that the Dutch site, Indaver ARP, has had a ‘negative’ ecological footprint for years. The regeneration of hydrochloric acid prevents so many CO2 emissions for customers that it more than compensates for their CO2 emissions from energy consumption. In 2019, alongside Tata Steel, ARP began an improvement process to further reduce CO2 emissions. Its key points are energy-saving measures and re-use of heat and water.

-60,000

Scope 1: direct CO2 emissions  Scope 2: indirect CO2 emissions

C  O2 emissions (scope 1&2: externally validated data) (total emission: 35,905 tonnes) Compensation (Total: 91,280 tonnes) * Utilization compost: calculated according to established method ** Avoided emissions: calculation based on emission factors (from literature)

Bio Power Alphen aan den Rijn


55 PLANET > CLIMATE

REDUCING OUR CO2 EMISSIONS Energy-saving measures

Germany: Reducing CO2 emissions

In 2019, Indaver in the Netherlands invested in the implementation of various measures, both major and minor. A few examples:

Indaver in Germany introduced the Energy Efficiency Network in 2019. Representatives from the top of the industry are working and investing together in the development of projects that are aimed at the efficient use of energy. For the Hamburg site, with the remit of treating hazardous and complex waste streams, Indaver set a number of improvement goals: optimisation of the pressurised pumps for fire-extinguishing water; improvements to the turbine; an overhaul of the (site) lighting; reduction in the volume of steam consumption for own purposes. All of this will lead to an extra reduction in CO2 emissions of 2,000 tonnes per year.

■■ Our Nieuwdorp VGF site is now working with another production line which, in combination with new machines, removes more plastic, stone and glass from VGF waste. This produces better quality compost while saving on man hours and energy. ■■ A new bridge (over ditches and railways) between the sites for green composting and the transshipment station in Nieuwdorp saves time, fuel and equipment hire. ■■ A number of sites have switched to LED lighting. The site in Terneuzen chose to replace the 27 lamps for the site lighting with LEDs. This represents a 240-Watt saving per lamppost. ■■ All of the preparations (infrastructure and roof construction) for installing 1,200 solar panels on the roofs of the Terneuzen site were completed in 2019. They will be installed in 2020.

A new bridge in Nieuwdorp

Signing the declaration ‘Alliance for the Industry and its Future’ At the front: Matthias Boxberger (President Industrial Association Hamburg), Peter Tschentschner (Mayor of Hamburg). At the back, 2nd from left: Stefan Kühnbach (Sales Director Indaver in Germany)

Electric transport In 2019, the Meath (Ireland) site provided an electric delivery truck for all of its on-site transport. The site has also had a charging point fitted to supply the delivery truck with electricity. The Doel (Belgium) site has had an on-site electric car since 2019. The on-site operator uses it to drive to customers. While in situ, he/she uses the car for the day-to-day waste management on the site, thus avoiding CO2 emissions for the customer.


56 PLANET > CLIMATE

MOBILITY: STRIVING FOR LESS CO2 EMISSIONS Transporting waste and people We are gradually reducing CO2 emissions in our logistics activities. For years, we have been reducing the CO2 emissions from staff transport. These are the steps we are taking: ■■ Optimising transport routes: our facilities are situated as close as possible to customer clusters. We draw on a broad network of treatment options by third parties. ■■ Transport by boat or train: in Germany, contaminated water from one of our customers is transported to the Netherlands by boat for treatment. Once IndaChlor in northern France is operational, chlorinated residues can be transported by boat or train. ■■ Intermodal transport: we combine sustainable, safe and cost-effective transport by rail or water with road transport. In 2019, 2,422 shipping containers, the equivalent of 55,636 tonnes of household waste, travelled by barge from municipalities in Flemish-Brabant to Indaver’s treatment facilities in Doel. ■■ Low-energy vehicle fleet: operators and mobile teams visit customer locations in electric vehicles. We recover the energy they use in our thermal treatment plants. Our logistics fleet has been fitted with Euro 5/6 engines, which have far lower emissions than older models. ■■ More efficient routes: through clever planning using GPS and a trackand-trace system for our lorries, we can plan the best routes. By loading lorries efficiently, we can reduce the number of kilometres travelled and thus CO2 emissions. ■■ A broad, sustainable mobility plan for transporting people in Belgium. Indaver also offers its staff sustainable alternatives for home-work travel.

Green driving behaviour Drivers for Indaver Logistics regularly follow a course on low-energy and defensive driving (EcoDrive). In combination with the Fleet Management System (FMS) we can monitor driving behaviour. An app gives the driver an overview of their driving behaviour and tips to limit fuel consumption.


57

SAFE SINK

Planet

Social context

Pure and safe raw materials In the circular economy we always re-use raw materials. Producers and consumers must be able to trust this materials chain. That is why the recovered materials must be pure and safe.

No hazardous substances in the loop Waste streams contain hazardous components as well as usable materials. These unwanted and hazardous substances must not contaminate the materials and food chains. So, the circular economy needs safe sinks (safe storage places).

Our approach

Treating hazardous substances sustainably and safely Indaver recovers as many usable materials from waste streams as possible. Ultimately, a fraction remains that is not eligible for recycling. A portion of this is potentially hazardous. We remove that portion from the materials loop. By doing so, we guarantee that hazardous substances cannot cause any adverse effects on this loop, now or in the future. We destroy these hazardous components in our rotary kiln incinerators. To achieve a homogenous and complete incineration, we ensure a combination of high temperatures and intense mixing (thanks to its rotating movement) for a specific length of time. The extensive flue gas cleaning ensures the emissions meet all emissions standards. We treat inorganic waste streams in our physico-chemical plants. These facilities use a chemical process to neutralise and immobilise heavy metals and other remaining hazardous components. We then transport the end product to Indaverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s landfill sites, where we store it under special conditions. We take measurements throughout the entire treatment process to check that all hazardous components have been incinerated or permanently immobilised. Our Safe Sink guarantee keeps both the environment and the circular economy clean and safe.


58 PLANET > SAFE SINK

LANDFILLS: THE FINAL PART OF SUSTAINABLE WASTE MANAGEMENT Stainkoeln

Waste Storage North and Mid Zeeland

Merwedeheuvel

Stainkoeln was part of the takeover of Grontmij BRP in November 2019, which is now the landfill site for Indaver BRP in Groningen (the Netherlands). There is adequate space here to set up a third landfill phase. Stainkoeln 1 was closed in 1995, Stainkoeln 2 is almost fully landfilled. Apart from the landfill site for waste, the large 58 hectare Stainkoeln site also provides space for Vagroen, the composting section of Indaver BRP. Recycling is carried out at Stainkoeln. There are a lot of treatment techniques available there, partly through collaboration with partner companies. The main activities include soil cleaning, the storage and transshipment of waste, a sludge depot and the temporary storage of waste for further examination or for field tests.

In the Netherlands, the law states that 30 years after laying the base-liner for a landfill space, it must be capped. For phase 2 of Indaver’s North and Mid Zeeland landfill site, that was the case in 2019. The final closure was completed before the summer. In that same summer, Amsterdam’s AEB energy-from-waste plant was closed temporarily. In North and Mid Zeeland we set up the buffer capacity to guarantee temporary storage of commercial waste. At the end of 2019, the majority of the waste was removed again. In the meantime, Indaver provided sufficient landfill capacity for its customers, partly thanks to the 5B landfill space that we set up in 2018.

The former Dutch landfill site Derde Merwedehaven, now known as Merwedeheuvel, took five years to bed down. The lead contractor, KWS, is now working on the final closure of the 55 hectares and its transformation to a recreation area. In line with the conditions of the tender, this project, which has lasted several years, is also providing work opportunities for several staff who were previously long-term unemployed. Indaver will hand over the Merwedeheuvel recreation area to the SouthHolland province no later than 1 January 2023. The Dordrecht local authority and Parkschap Nationaal Park De Biesbosch (De Biesbosch National Parks) will manage and determine the area’s future use.


59 PLANET > SAFE SINK

LANDFILLS: THE FINAL PART OF SUSTAINABLE WASTE MANAGEMEN Hooge Maey Indaver has run the Hooge Maey landfill site in Antwerp for years. In-situ cleaning of the area was needed and has now been completed. After that, Indaver integrated all of Hooge Maeyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s activities into our own service provision. These activities include landfilling solid waste and collecting and treating leachate. The Hooge Maey landfill site also generates energy thanks to the biogas engines that generate electricity from the landfill gas. There are also two wind turbines there and solar panels on the Hooge Maey hillside. Hooge Maey landfill site is one of the examples of Indaver using its knowledge and expertise in the management, running and closure of landfill sites for a better environment.

Three Valleys Economical and sustainable use of space No new landfill sites are allowed in Flanders. Existing sites can potentially be extended. Indaver has found an innovative solution. We have set up the area between the Antwerp landfill site, the Hooge Maey landfill site and the Amoras dewatering project landfill site as an additional landfill site. With the Drie Valleien landfill site, Indaver can offer its customers continued landfill options. The extra landfill capacity of the Drie Valleien landfill site uses space that has no beneficial purpose. This solution is unique in Europe.

Projects

Remediation partner In Germany, Indaver was a subcontractor on a remediation project in 2019 for one of its pharmaceutical customers. It concerned the transport and treatment of 20,000 tonnes of contaminated soil. The Indaver site in Biebesheim functioned as the logistics hub for this project. Ultimately, 45% of the soil was treated in the rotary kiln incinerators in Biebesheim, we transported 50% by train to the high temperature plants in Hamburg and 5% was transported by lorry to Antwerp for treatment.


60 PLANET > SAFE SINK

SOCIAL COMMITMENT STORING AND TREATING HAZARDOUS WASTE SAFELY, AND INTERNATIONALLY Safe treatment of Valentijn

Treating obsolete pesticides

Old ammunition Ziegenhain

Thirty years ago a whale washed up on the Flemish coast near Koksijde and was given the name Valentijn. The 17Â metre-long giant, which weighed around 50 tonnes, was buried, but in 2019 the decision was made to disinter the remains. The skeleton will be given a place of honour in the Navigo Fisheries museum in East Dunkirk. The rotary kiln incinerators at our Antwerp site ensured that the fleshy remains were destroyed safely and sustainably. The high temperature destroyed all hazardous components. We are proud that we were able to contribute in this way to scientific research and soon, once the skeleton has been assembled, to education.

Indaver in Germany took up its social role in 2019 in an international project to treat obsolete pesticides from a former production plant in Moldavia. In close collaboration with local and international companies and authorities, the waste from 31 locations was transported to the Hamburg site. There, the rotary kiln incinerators have been treating these pesticides safely and sustainably since the end of 2019. The energy that is recovered from the treatment process is supplied to local households through the municipal heating network.

The state of Hessen (Germany) is working on a two-year project to remove munitions from the moat of an historic site, Ziegenhain. This materiel was dumped in the canal after the end of the Second World War. Indaver in Germany is in charge of the on-site project management for this extensive operation. It was necessary to put a safety programme in place to protect the staff and neighbouring residents. Indaver put up temporary protective walls using bigbags and containers. The on-site team carefully scooped out the entire moat from the pontoons in the canal, after which the mud was carefully examined. Indaver is working closely with specialist companies for this project.

Cleaning mercury-containing waste A pharmaceutical customer of Indaver Germany dismantled a former factory for inorganic mercury-containing substances in 2019. A lot of the components of the technical facility were contaminated with mercury. Before Indaver started cleaning it, we drew up a Safety, Health & Environment plan, prepared the project on-site and planned everything from start to finish. All of the steel parts were then cleaned so thoroughly that the material was no longer hazardous and could once again be returned safely to the loop.


61

IMPACT

Planet

Social context

Care for the environment Most of Indaverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s facilities are in business areas, but a few sites are located near to residential areas. Regardless of location, the fact that people work there and that there are all sorts of animals, plants and insects in the surrounding areas is applicable in all cases. We do everything possible to ensure our activities donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t harm the lives of people, animals and plants in our environment.

Our approach

Minimising the environmental impact We limit the environmental impact of our activities as much as possible in order to minimise our influence on air, water and soil. That is why we monitor our activities closely, measure our emissions continuously and check the properties of our emissions and residues. These measurements help us to limit our impact on the environment. New technologies help us with this process. We prevent contamination of the soil and groundwater during our treatments. Our activities always satisfy the strictest environmental standards. We use water and energy sparingly and avoid the unnecessary use of new raw materials, and we check our processes to ensure they are efficient and prevent waste. We promote biodiversity in our environment.

Impact in figures

Air Indaver measures and checks the flue gas emissions from its plants. We invest in new technologies and methods to limit the influence of our emissions on the air as much as possible. u More information on pages 62-74

Water Indaver uses water sparingly. To limit our water consumption further, we invest in new technologies and methods. u More information on page 75

Soil Indaver strives to ensure its activities have as little impact on the soil as possible. We take the necessary measures to prevent contamination of the soil and groundwater. u More information on page 76


62

ROTARY KILNS ANTWERP Emissions and impact in 2019

1. Mass balance IN Waste (*) Waste used in place of raw materials (*)

OUT 143,386 tonnes 6,821 tonnes

Energy Heating oil Steam Electricity

2,488 tonnes 142,762 GJ 23,175 MWh

Flue gas cleaning additives Quicklime Sodium hydroxide Absorbent for dioxins and heavy metals Limestone DeNOx reagent

Emissions to atmosphere Flue gases

958,044,775 Nm³

Energy Energy recovery

1,009,953 GJ

Water discharged Waste water (**)

117,593 m³

Residual products 997 tonnes 2,436 tonnes 2 tonnes 3,428 tonnes 121 tonnes

Bottom ash Fly ash + boiler ash Filtercakes (**)

24,153 tonnes 4,786 tonnes 11,188 tonnes

Water purification additives TMT FeCl3

77 tonnes 494 tonnes

Water Mains water (**) Ground water (**) Re-used water (**)

249,815 m³ 213,142 m³ 123,554 m³

(*) Total volume waste processed in rotary kilns: 150,207 tonnes = 143,386 tonnes + 6,821 tonnes (**) Calculated value


63

ROTARY KILNS ANTWERP Emissions and impact in 2019

2. Performance relative to emission limit

CO

Dust 10 mg/Nm³ Metals* 0.5 mg/Nm³

0.99

mg/Nm³

mg/Nm³

1.27

0.00203

mg/Nm³

3.54

mg/Nm³

SO2 50 mg/Nm³

NOx 200 mg/Nm³

HCl

10 mg/Nm³

mg/Nm³

128.61

Concentration (ng TEQ/Nm3)

 aily average standard unless otherwise stipulated in D environmental licence * Sum of Sb, As, Pb, Cr, Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, V, Sn

0.9

CO

20.6

TOC

1.2

0.100

HCl

0.2

0.080

SO2

3.4

NOx

123.2

Cd, Tl

0.040

0.037 0.02

0.020 0.000

2015

2016

2017

2018

< 0.0086

Hg

0.0019

Metals*

0.1089

2019

Rotary kilns continuous Rotary kilns discontinuous Emission limit

Performance 2019

Dust

0.060

0.17

mg/Nm³

Cd, Tl 0.05 mg/Nm³

TOC 10 mg/Nm³

mg/Nm³

<0.00902

4. Volume of pollutants

0.120

21.51

0.11

mg/Nm³

0.140

50 mg/Nm³

mg/Nm³

Hg 0.05 mg/Nm³

3. Dioxin measurements

Dioxin pollutant volume = 26,8 mg TEQ (in normal conditions)

* Sum of Sb, As, Pb, Cr, Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, V, Sn

Volumes of pollutants from contaminated components (in tonnes)


64

ROTARY KILNS BIEBESHEIM Emissions and impact in 2019

1. Mass balance IN Waste (*) Waste used in place of raw materials (*)

OUT 110,650 tonnes 7,000 tonnes

Energy Heating oil Steam Electricity

399 tonnes 83,207 GJ 23,042 MWh

Flue gas cleaning additives Hydrated lime Sodium hydroxide 50% Absorbent for dioxins and heavy metals Na -sulfide/-polysulfide DeNOx reagent

Emissions to atmosphere Flue gases

673,339,488 Nm³

Energy Energy recovery

737,603 GJ

Water discharged Waste water

63,206 m³

Residual products 165 tonnes 4,756 tonnes 70 tonnes

Bottom ash Fly ash

20,378 tonnes 7,366 tonnes

379 tonnes 371 tonnes

Water Mains water Ground water Process water

61,040 m³ 111,424 m³ 14,159 m³

(*) Total volume waste processed in rotary kilns: 117,650 tonnes = 110,650 tonnes + 7,000 tonnes


65

ROTARY KILNS BIEBESHEIM Emissions and impact in 2019

2. Performance relative to emission limit

Dust 10 mg/Nm³ Metals* 0.5 mg/Nm³

0.30

mg/Nm³

CO

TOC 10 mg/Nm³

16.50 mg/Nm³

0.65

mg/Nm³

NH3 30 mg/Nm³

mg/Nm³

1.65

0.24

mg/Nm³

mg/Nm³

0.002

HCl 10 mg/Nm³

3.85

mg/Nm³

Hg 0.03 mg/Nm³

0.140

50 mg/Nm³

0.022

mg/Nm³

0.0010 mg/Nm³

Cd, Tl 0.05 mg/Nm³

151

mg/Nm³

3. Dioxin measurements

SO2 50 mg/Nm³

NOx 200 mg/Nm³

Concentration (ng TEQ/Nm3)

Performance 2019 * Sum of Sb, As, Pb, Cr, Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, V, Sn

Dust

0.21

CO

11.06

TOC

0.43

0.100

HCl

0.16

0.080

SO2

2.61

NOx

101.3

Cd, Tl

0.0007

0.040

Hg

0.0014

0.020

NH3

0.120

0.060

0.000

0.0037

2015

2016

2017

2018

Rotary kilns discontinuous Emission limit

 aily average standard unless otherwise stipulated in D environmental licence

4. Volume of pollutants

Dioxin pollutant volume = 2,5 mg TEQ (in normal conditions)

Metals*

1.08 0.015

2019

*

Sum of Sb, As, Pb, Cr, Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, V, Sn

Volumes of pollutants from contaminated components (in tonnes)


66

ROTARY KILNS HAMBURG Emissions and impact in 2019

1. Mass balance IN Waste (*) Waste used in place of raw materials (*)

OUT 141,460 tonnes 309 tonnes

Energy Heating oil Steam Electricity

156 tonnes 472,413 GJ 21,380 MWh

Flue gas cleaning additives Lime rock meal Absorbent for dioxins and heavy metals DeNOx reagent

Emissions to atmosphere Flue gases

791,667,749 Nm³

Energy Energy recovery

1,163,189 GJ

Water discharged Waste water

12,529 m³

Residual products 924 tonnes 48 tonnes 215 tonnes

Bottom ash Fly ash + boiler ash Gypsum

33,032 tonnes 4,635 tonnes 1,391 tonnes

Water Mains water Water from channel Rain water + process water Demineralised water

6,601 291,730 11,388 23,782

m³ m³ m³ m³ (*) Total volume waste processed in rotary kilns: 141,769 tonnes = 141,460 tonnes + 309 tonnes


67

ROTARY KILNS HAMBURG Emissions and impact in 2019

2. Performance relative to emission limit

CO

Dust 10 mg/Nm³

mg/Nm³

12.1

mg/Nm³

0.141

1.3

mg/Nm³

mg/Nm³

0.00446

mg/Nm³

0.0023

mg/Nm³

71.1

mg/Nm³

SO2 50 mg/Nm³

NOx 200 mg/Nm³

HCl

10 mg/Nm³

7.2

mg/Nm³

Concentration (ng TEQ/Nm3)

0.06

CO

9.57

0.120

TOC

1.06

0.100

HCl

0.60

0.080

SO2

5.68

NOx

56.27

0.060

0.8

Hg mg/Nm³ 0.03 mg/Nm³

Cd, Tl 0.05 mg/Nm³

TOC 10 mg/Nm³

Cd, Tl

0.00071

0.040

Hg

0.00353

0.020

Metals*

0.000

Performance 2019 * Sum of Sb, As, Pb, Cr, Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, V, Sn

0.11

0.0024

2015

2016

2017

2018

Rotary kilns discontinuous Emission limit

 aily average standard unless otherwise stipulated in D environmental licence

4. Volume of pollutants

Dust

0.140

50 mg/Nm³

0.1

Metals* 0.5 mg/Nm³

3. Dioxin measurements

Dioxin pollutant volume = 1,9 mg TEQ (in normal conditions)

2019

*

Sum of Sb, As, Pb, Cr, Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, V, Sn

Volumes of pollutants from contaminated components (in tonnes)


68

FLUIDISED BED INCINERATORS DOEL Emissions and impact in 2019

1. Mass balance IN Waste

OUT 651,982 tonnes

Flue gases

Energy Heating oil Steam Electricity

569 tonnes 128,963 GJ 71,546 MWh

Flue gas cleaning additives Quicklime Sodium hydroxide Absorbent for dioxins and heavy metals DeNOx reagent

9,601 tonnes 422 tonnes 725 tonnes 615 tonnes

Incinerator additives Sand

4,101 tonnes

Water Mains water Re-used water

Emissions to atmosphere

304,466 m続 20,884 m続

2,830,652,161 Nm続

Energy Energy recovery

4,497,994 GJ

Water discharged Waste water

0 m続

Residual products Bottom ash Electrostatic filter and boiler ash Flue gas cleaning residue Scrap

40,417 tonnes 89,375 tonnes 17,827 tonnes 1,669 tonnes


69

FLUIDISED BED INCINERATORS DOEL Emissions and impact in 2019

2. Performance relative to emission limit

CO

Dust 10 mg/Nm³ Metals* 0.5 mg/Nm³

1.1

13.6

mg/Nm³

mg/Nm³

0.002

1.1

mg/Nm³

mg/Nm³

SO2 50 mg/Nm³

NOx 125 mg/Nm³

HCl

10 mg/Nm³

mg/Nm³

92

Dust

Concentration (ng TEQ/Nm3)

38.4

0.120

TOC

3.2

0.100

HCl

1.0

SO₂

6.5

NOx

262

Cd, Tl

0.040 0.018

0.020

Performance 2019 * Sum of Sb, As, Pb, Cr, Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, V, Sn

< 0.028

Hg

0.004

Metals*

0.004

0.017

0.000

2015

2016

2017

2018

2018

Fluidised bed incinerators continuous Fluidised bed incinerators discontinuous

*

Sum of Sb, As, Pb, Cr, Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, V, Sn

Emission limit

 aily average standard unless otherwise stipulated in D environmental licence

3.1

CO

0.060

2.3

< 0.01

4. Volume of pollutants

0.080

0.37

mg/Nm³

Cd, Tl 0.05 mg/Nm³

TOC 10 mg/Nm³

mg/Nm³

0.002

mg/Nm³

0.140

50 mg/Nm³

mg/Nm³

Hg 0.05 mg/Nm³

3. Dioxin measurements

Dioxin pollutant volume = 48,7 mg TEQ (in normal conditions)

Volumes of pollutants from contaminated components (in tonnes)


70

GRATE INCINERATORS DOEL Emissions and impact in 2019

1. Mass balance IN Waste

OUT 450,560 tonnes

Flue gases

Energy Heating oil Steam Electricity

499 tonnes 57,461 GJ 49,045 MWh

Flue gas cleaning additives Quicklime Limestone Absorbent for dioxins and heavy metals DeNOx reagent

2,504 tonnes 1,420 tonnes 285 tonnes 1,246 tonnes

Water Mains water Re-used water (*)

Emissions to atmosphere 2,063,048,646 Nm続

Energy Energy recovery

3,775,632 GJ

Water discharged Waste water

0 m続

Residual products Bottom ash Boiler ash Flue gas cleaning residue Gypsum

142,364 m続 2,844 m続

(*) Calculated value

90,397 5,127 9,803 1,643

tonnes tonnes tonnes tonnes


71

GRATE INCINERATORS DOEL Emissions and impact in 2019

2. Performance relative to emission limit

CO

Dust 10 mg/Nm³ Metals* 0.5 mg/Nm³

0.71

2.7

mg/Nm³

mg/Nm³

0.12

0.005

mg/Nm³

Cd, Tl 0.05 mg/Nm³

mg/Nm³

149

mg/Nm³

SO2 50 mg/Nm³

NOx 200 mg/Nm³

HCl

10 mg/Nm³

2.5

< 0.01

CO

5.6

0.120

TOC

0.3

0.100

HCl

1.3

SO₂

5.1

NOx

307.4

0.060

0.61

mg/Nm³

1.5

Concentration (ng TEQ/Nm3)

0.080

mg/Nm³

0.009

mg/Nm³

TOC 10 mg/Nm³

Cd, Tl

0.040 0.028

0.020 0.000

Performance 2019 * Sum of Sb, As, Pb, Cr, Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, V, Sn

< 0.021

Hg

0.019

Metals*

0.011

0.012

2015

2016

2017

2018

2018

Grate incinerators continuous Grate incinerators discontinuous Emission limit

 aily average standard unless otherwise stipulated in D environmental licence

4. Volume of pollutants

Dust

0.140

50 mg/Nm³

mg/Nm³

Hg 0.05 mg/Nm³

3. Dioxin measurements

Dioxin pollutant volume = 42 mg TEQ (in normal conditions)

*

Sum of Sb, As, Pb, Cr, Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, V, Sn

Volumes of pollutants from contaminated components (in tonnes)


72

GRATE INCINERATOR MEATH Emissions and impact in 2019

1. Mass balance IN Waste

OUT 229,125 tonnes

Flue gases

Energy Heating oil Electricity

228 tonnes 17,124 MWh

Flue gas cleaning additives Quicklime Hydrated lime Absorbent for dioxins and heavy metals Expanded clay DeNOx reagent

1,263,966,305 Nm³

Energy Energy recovery

1,896,762 GJ

Water discharged 3,543 tonnes 1,352 tonnes 84 tonnes 234 tonnes 381 tonnes

Water Ground water

Emissions to atmosphere

71,398 m³

Waste water

0 m³

Residual products Bottom ash Boiler ash Flue gas cleaning residue Fly ash

37,914 728 6,959 6,000

tonnes tonnes tonnes tonnes


73

GRATE INCINERATOR MEATH Emissions and impact in 2019

2. Performance relative to emission limit

Dust 10 mg/Nm³ Metals* 0.5 mg/Nm³

0.10

mg/Nm³

CO

TOC 10 mg/Nm³

4.70

mg/Nm³

0.30

mg/Nm³

mg/Nm³

mg/Nm³

0.000155

HCl

10 mg/Nm³

31.9

mg/Nm³

mg/Nm³

0.20

121.2 mg/Nm³

SO2 50 mg/Nm³

mg/Nm³

HF 1 mg/Nm³

0.12

CO

6.61

0.120

TOC

0.55

0.100

HCl

1.54

SO2

50.73

NOx

193.21

Cd, Tl

0.0002

Hg

0.0009

Metals*

0.1599

Concentration (ng TEQ/Nm3)

0.080

0.70

Hg 0.000745 0.05 mg/Nm³ mg/Nm³

NOx 200 mg/Nm³

0.060 0.040 0.020 0.000

0.0082 0.00065

2016

2017

2018

 aily average standard unless otherwise stipulated in D environmental licence * Sum of Sb, As, Pb, Cr, Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, V, Sn

2019

Grate incinerator continuous Grate incinerator discontinuous Emission limit

Performance 2019

4. Volume of pollutants

Dust

0.140

50 mg/Nm³

0.1265

Cd, Tl 0.05 mg/Nm³

3. Dioxin measurements

Dioxin pollutant volume = 5,6 mg TEQ (in normal conditions)

*

Sum of Sb, As, Pb, Cr, Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, V, Sn

Volumes of pollutants from contaminated components (in tonnes)


74

ARP IJMUIDEN Emissions and impact in 2019

Mass balance IN Waste acid

OUT 131,723 tonnes

Energy Natural gas Electricity

9,823,102 m³ 4,794 MWh

Flue gases

82,020 m³ 329,741 m³ 567 m³

113,314,100 Nm³

Water discharged Waste water

3,054 tonnes 59,959 m³

Water Industrial water Acid rinse water Demineralised water

136,253 tonnes

Emissions to atmosphere

Additives Fresh acid Compressed air

Regenerated acid

296,782 m³

Residual products Iron oxide

29,396 tonnes


75 PLANET > IMPACT

PRIMARY AND SECONDARY WATER

Indaver uses water sparingly. We closely monitor our water consumption, which we get from primary and secondary sources, and look for ways to limit or recover any water used. Where possible we collect rainwater and use that as an alternative for primary sources. In 2019, we also used our technology to monitor our influence on ambient water and its quality.

Water consumption per site

2019

Primary water consumption

in m3

700,000 650,000 600,000 550,000 500,000

Very Concerning Components In 2019, Indaver consulted with the waste sector, governments and its customers to find practical solutions for the Netherlands’ substances of very high concern (SVHC) policy. SVHCs are substances that are hazardous to people and the environment because they are carcinogenic, impede reproduction or bioaccumulate in food chains. People and ecosystems can come into contact with them through the environment (air, water or soil), food, the workplace, or via chemical products. In 2019, the Waste Management Association (VA), of which Indaver is a member, and the NVRD (National Association for Waste and Cleaning Management) asked the Dutch government to set up a national policy framework for dealing with SVHCs within the waste sector. The framework

450,000

must make it clear to waste companies, and to the relevant authorities, which concentrations of SVHCs cause issues and what businesses can do to control the risks.   OUTLOOK The waste sector is going to develop a number of ‘best practices’. These will then be included in the policy and serve as guidelines in the SVHC policy for waste companies.

400,000

300,437 m³ Mains water 6 601 m³

350,000 300,000

565,920m³

250,000 200,000 150,000

232,491 m³

Demin. water 567 m³

100,000

61,040 m³ 111,424 m³

82,020 m³

50,000 0

291,730 m³

Antwerp

Doel

IJmuiden

Ground water

Surface water

Mains water

Demineralised water

Hamburg

Biebesheim

Industrial water

Secondary water consumption

in m3

200,000 150,000 100,000 50,000 0

132,089 m³

Antwerp Re-use water

69,133 m³

Doel

122,722 m³

IJmuiden

35,170 m³

Hamburg

14,159 m³

Biebesheim


76 PLANET > IMPACT

SAFEGUARDING THE SOIL AGAINST CONTAMINATION We comply with all legal provisions for soil remediation. In addition, we take all the necessary preventive and technical measures to limit the risk of soil and groundwater contamination. ■■ Separate sewage systems guarantee the quality of the drainage into the public sewage system. ■■ Storage tanks are installed above the ground, fitted with bund walls and the necessary monitoring and alarm systems. ■■ Regular checks and detailed procedures reduce the risks to an absolute minimum and enable us to respond immediately to any anomalies.

Landfill sites: the final destination for unwanted waste Waste substances for which we cannot find a useful application or treat thermally end up in landfill sites. This is a sustainable solution for waste that cannot be used within the circular economy. In Belgium, Indaver uses an electronic leak detection system to ensure that we are protecting the soil sufficiently against infiltration from waste substances.

Billigheim, in Germany, has a comprehensive groundwater monitoring system with on-site/ off-site control wells from which we take regular samples. Even when a landfill site is full, we ensure that there are sufficient financial resources for the final capping and aftercare.

  Watch the video

Thanks to bund walls we protect soil and groundwater against potential leaks from above-ground tanks (IndaChlor)

Billigheim, Germany


77 PLANET > IMPACT

THE IMPORTANCE OF BIODIVERSITY

Indaver uses natural sources, such as raw materials and energy, responsibly. We also make every effort to promote biodiversity. Indaver recognises the importance of the diversity of the flora and fauna and of ecosystems. Biodiversity is an important part of every environmental permit whether for a new location, an adjustment or an extension. Consequently, we can guarantee a focus on biodiversity in and around our sites and throughout the entire chain.

Supporting healthy ecosystems and biodiversity In 2019, Indaver established its policy on biodiversity. We are also explicitly committed to the United Nations’ Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD).

Meath, Ireland

Indaver focuses on maintaining biodiversity: ■■ in the selection of raw materials; ■■ with regard to emissions into the environment; ■■ on production sites and by minimising or compensating for the effect of our constructions on nature (for example, Meath and Cork: the horizon-line of the facility follows the undulations of the landscape); ■■ by developing innovative processes for recovering materials and energy from waste; ■■ by contributing to soil fertility and resilience against diseases and soil erosion through our production and sale of compost; ■■ by supporting local projects that promote biodiversity. u More information on our web site

IndaChlor’s limited impact on the environment The area where Indaver is building Indachlor is classified as a ‘wetland area’, i.e. a marsh. Due to the composition of the soil and the geohydrology, specific fauna and flora can develop there. We have grouped the site and plant facilities in a way that limits our impact on the ‘wetlands area’ as much as possible. In accordance with French regulations, where an effect on an area is unavoidable, comparable areas have been created in other areas of the port. The license also includes prerequisites to leave the fauna present as undisturbed as possible, in part by using adapted lighting, amphibian ladders, reservoirs and bat boxes.


78 PLANET > IMPACT

THE IMPORTANCE OF BIODIVERSITY

Sea of wildflowers

Careful and fast pond cleaning

The field next to our offices on the Nieuwdorp site (in the Netherlands) was sown with wildflowers in 2019. This created beautiful views and provided a feast for the eyes on this industrial site. But, more importantly, the wildflowers produced nectar and pollen for the honey bees, bumble bees and other insects that are becoming rarer or are even under threat of extinction.

In Meath in Ireland, we cleaned the surface water of the pond on the site. A newly planted hedge around the pond provides a natural screen. This was needed because protected newts live around the pond. We planned the work precisely so that it could be carried out as carefully and quickly as possible to save the newts. The activities were supervised by an Ecological Clerk of Works. The National Parks and Wildlife Service approved the project.

Killing weeds using natural methods In 2019, we managed to keep the green zones on the Meath site in Ireland weed-free using 100% natural methods. We got rid of the weeds using a combination of soapy water and hot steam. The heat, in combination with the soapy mixture, creates a thermal blanket that causes the plants to die.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Do you know that there is currently more biodiversity on our Waste-to-Energy site in Meath than there was before the plant was built? Fields of wildflowers, grasslands and trees that we have planted on the site offer a natural living environment for local animals, birds, honeybees, bumblebees and other insects.â&#x20AC;? Nikita Coulter, Environmental Specialist, Indaver Ireland (Meath facility)


Prosperity

79

As a waste management company, Indaver creates value for the circular economy by producing energy and secondary materials. In the circular economy, value has a financial and qualitative component and the ‘benefits’ to society are also important. Indaver’s growth model rests on three pillars: •  break-through innovations •  exceptional service provision • organic growth whilst maintaining its vision and values. The market is under immense pressure, the competition is stiff and the legislation and regulations are susceptible to change. As a stable business, Indaver maintains that doing good business goes hand-inhand with sustainability.


80

CONTRIBUTING TO PROSPERITY

Prosperity

Social context

00

Our approach

Corporate social responsibility

Core values

As with any other economy, the aim of the circular economy is to create value. The difference is that the circular economy doesn’t just focus on financial value, it also focuses on quality. The benefits it produces aren’t solely intended for a single company. The wider benefits to society also play a role, such as the well-being of local residents, the safety and quality of the living environment and sustainable mobility. In short, it’s about conducting business according to the principles of corporate social responsibility.

Indaver is leading the field in sustainable waste management. Our mission expresses succinctly what our company stands for. As a company that treats industrial and household waste, we have defined economic goals (concentrating on achieving results), social goals (demonstrating concern for people and building relationships based on mutual trust) and environmental goals (with minimal environmental impact). These core values are fundamental to all of Indaver’s activities. They guide our strategy, our decision-making processes and our relationships with everyone involved. Our core values guarantee that we do business with integrity and corporate social responsibility in a complex world. And we do it all from a healthy and strong financial basis.

Company code To support sustainable business practices, we set up the Indaver company code. This company code sets out our mission, our main values, our responsibilities to stakeholders and the standards and rules that apply to all Indaver employees. It states what we stand for and how we set ourselves apart. At the same time, everyone involved knows what they can expect from Indaver and – conversely – what the company expects of them. This makes it clear what demands the organisation, employees and stakeholders can place on each other. In the regions where we operate and in the companies we acquire, we always remain true to our own vision and values. Indaver is proof that doing good business can go hand-in-hand with sustainability.

Indaver Company Code Mission, core values and code of conduct for sustainable business

u Read our Company Code for more information on how our values inform our relationships with all of our stakeholders.


81 PROSPERITY > CONTRIBUTING TO PROSPERITY

STRONG FINANCIAL BASIS MAKES SUSTAINABLE GROWTH POSSIBLE Over the past three years, Indaver has achieved stable growth in challenging economic circumstances. In 2019, Indaver achieved an operating revenue of €579 million and EBITDA of €113 million. This strong financial basis provides the opportunity to develop new investment and growth projects.

Group operating revenue (in million Euro)

Group EBITDA (in million Euro)

112

2017

103

2018

542.5

542.8

579.0

113

2019

208.7 Belgium 118.7 The Netherlands 157.7 Germany 86.0 Ireland/UK 7.9 Other 2017

2018

2019

From countries to regions

Adapted organisation structure

00

From 1 January 2019, Indaver’s country organisations in the Netherlands and Belgium were added to the BeneluxFrance region. The aim is to use synergies as well as possible and to deploy resources as efficiently as possible. The staff services don’t just support the region, they also support the Business Unit Indaver Sludge Dewatering, Indaver Impex and the new Landfill Reconversion Business Unit.

The Landfill Reconversion BU is tasked with capitalising on development opportunities, including in countries where significant amounts of waste are still being landfilled. Our knowledge of the development, management, capping and aftercare of landfill sites offers significant added value in terms of getting sustainable waste management off the ground in these countries. u See p. 96

Sustainable finance possible after successful audit Indaver carries out numerous projects that require the investment of considerable sums of money, which we finance through bank loans. Green ‘sustainable’ loan Part of that finance comes from what are known as ‘green loans’. To qualify for these loans, as a company we must be able to demonstrate that our project is sustainable and/or fits within our sustainable activities, and we must report transparently. These checks are conducted via an audit by an independent consultancy company. In 2019, this type of external audit declared two Indaver projects ‘sustainable’: the IndaChlor project in Dunkirk and the construction of the new PMD sorting facility in Willebroek. Green loans can now be awarded on this basis. In 2019, a green loan of €25 million was awarded to Indaver for the IndaChlor project in Dunkirk. The project for the construction of a new PMD sorting facility in Willebroek will receive €34 million in financing from a green loan. Robust, credible and transparent On behalf of a financial institution, Indaver (as part of the Katoen Natie Group) was subjected to an audit in May 2019 by AECOM, a

renowned consultancy firm. They assessed the extent to which Indaver and its investment projects fulfilled the Green Loan Principles/ Green Bond Principles (GLP/GBP). These principles are guidelines to promote transparency and integrity in investments that contribute to a sustainable environment. In concrete terms, AECOM examined Indaver’s waste management activities, how we will use the money received, how the selection and evaluation of a project is carried out, how the fund management is performed and in which way and to what extent we report on this. AECOM summarised the results and findings of the audit in a ‘Sustainable Finance Framework’ report: “Indaver is robust, credible and transparent and satisfies the GLP/GBP principles. (…) thanks to sustainable waste and materials management they are contributing to the circular economy and a safe and clean planet. (…) Indaver’s annual sustainability report shows that they communicate transparently about their performance with respect to people, environment and corporate social responsibility.”


82 PROSPERITY > CONTRIBUTING TO PROSPERITY

POLICIES FOR SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS

Sustainable suppliers and partners Indaver demands the same level of sustainability as it promotes from its suppliers and partners. That way, we are supporting sustainability in the chain. The Indaver company code for sustainable business practices reflects for each of our core values how we position ourselves with suppliers and what we expect from them. In addition, we have drawn up two policy documents: ■■ The Sustainable Procurement Charter This document reflects our commitment to sustainable development in all phases and aspects of procurement: the process, how we manage this and organise it. It outlines our expectations of our suppliers to be in line with our own behaviours and practices.

Social Employment Companies ■■ The Supplier Code of Conduct This document specifically describes the requirements and expectations we place on our suppliers in terms of ethics, labour standards, human rights, health and the environment. If necessary, we demand that our suppliers take steps to ensure their practices are compatible with the content and spirit of our Code of Conduct. Both the Charter and the Code of Conduct are available for stakeholders to consult on our website.

u More information

Sustainable Procurement Charter Code of Conduct for Suppliers

Through the principles of Social Return on Investment and the Dutch Participation Act (Participatiewet) we help people who are at a distance from the labor market or who have been long-term unemployed to get back to work. We do this by, for example, outsourcing the horticultural and production work to public employment services. We also ask our suppliers to use this target group for (some of) their resources. ■■ In the project for the final closure of the former landfill site Derde Merwedehaven and its transformation into the Merwedeheuvel Recreation Ground, people from FrisFacilitair are taking care of cleaning the offices. The gatekeeper role and caretaker position were also filled through the DordtMij recruitment agency. ■■ Fruitful Office provides the fruit baskets that are delivered to our staff at different locations. These baskets are carefully put together by people who are distanced from the labour market. ■■ The social employment company mans the weigh bridge at our green compost location Moerdijk. ■■ The social employment company packages our promotional gifts and gadgets.


83 PROSPERITY > CONTRIBUTING TO PROSPERITY

INVESTING IN RELATIONSHIPS IN THE ENVIRONMENT AND SOCIETY We are well aware that our activities can have an effect on the environment. We try to be a good neighbour to the residents living near our facilities and to be a good partner in the region where they are located in all sorts of ways.

Open days ‘Ensuring transparency in communications and actions’ means that, at set times, we open our doors to stakeholders. Through neighbourhood councils and consultation committees we also keep residents living near our sites informed of our activities, projects and permit applications (or renewals). Such meetings are also a good opportunity to answer questions. Alphen aan den Rijn Open Day During the Dutch national compost day on 30 March 2019, the residents living near our VGF location in Alphen were able to have a tour of the site. Our staff explained the fermentation process and there were practical games to educate our visitors about what should and shouldn’t go into the VGF container. This open day rounded off the environmental communication. Five years ago, this was put in place due to complaints about odour pollution. Adjustments to the plant have resolved this and in general residents are satisfied.

Family days ‘at a Height’ On the last weekend in September 2019, family members of our staff and contractors at Indaver Belgium were invited to an open day at Hooge Maey and the Indaver site in Antwerp. More than 800 family members took up the invitation. They were able to go on tours and take part in fun activities.

28 en 29 september 2019 Hooge Maey en site Antwerpen

FAMILIEDAG OP HOOGTE! voor wie?

• alle medewerkers van Indaver Benelux-Frankrijk en SVEX • de vaste contractoren van site Antwerpen • breng 5 familieleden mee!

wat? • • • • • •

Exclusief 360° uitzicht vanop Hooge Maey Kijkje achter de schermen in Antwerpen Demonstraties en laboproefjes Virtual Reality film Klimmuur en death ride Vliegeren

en ook

• Hapjes en drankjes • Kinderopvang voor 2,5 tot 6-jarigen

Schrijf je nu in! Via het formulier op

Indanet

zo. 4 tijdsblokken: za. en telkens van 10u-13u en van 13u-16u Aantal plaatsen per tijdsblok is beperkt!


84 PROSPERITY > CONTRIBUTING TO PROSPERITY

INVESTING IN RELATIONSHIPS IN THE ENVIRONMENT AND SOCIETY Galgeschoor Clean-up Activity

Support for Social Projects

The Galgeschoor foreshore in the Antwerp port area is constantly moving through the Westerschelde. The waste that drifts into the river ends up in the valuable nature area. The many birds that come to forage on the shores don’t know the difference between food and waste.

Increasing numbers of people, organisations and companies know that the circular economy is everyone’s duty. This has led to more and more efforts being made on a local level. Indaver supports these community projects, if they reflect our values.

In March, in an initiative by the Port Authority and Natuurpunt, around 440 volunteers rolled up their sleeves for what has now become a traditional cleanup campaign. Just as we did on the two previous occasions, Indaver provided the containers to gather the waste collected. A total of eight tonnes of waste was collected, 30% more than the previous year. A great result, although it is such a shame that so much waste ends up in a nature area every year. Indaver treats the collected waste in the incinerators in Doel.

Indaver Impex is 30 years young!

■■ The Sustainable Materials and Energy Management Fund (Fonds Duurzaam Materialen- en Energiebeheer) supports local projects that: fight climate change; organise mobility in a more energy-efficient manner; encourage people to live differently and to consume more sustainably. In 2019, local associations, youth movements, environmental councils, schools, neighbourhood committees and other local organisations received a helping hand from Indaver once again. ■■ In 2019, Indaver in Ireland sponsored Fleadh Cheoil na hÉireann, a week-long traditional Irish music festival. The 250,000 visitors to the Fleadh were able to find out how much energy the Indaver waste-to-energy plant in Meath recovers from household waste. ■■ Indaver in Ireland also sponsors the Wildlife Rehabilitation Hospital, the animal ambulance and organisations that protect Irish cultural heritage.

IN02-Indaver Billboard Art Winner 11 July 2019 PRINT.indd 1

11/07/2019 12:19

On 26 September 2019 our sludge dewatering expert, Indaver Impex, celebrated its thirtieth year with the theme ‘Always Clear’. Around sixty invitees from large-scale industry and the water authorities went on a wonderful boat trip together. They sailed from Yerseke in Zeeland across the Eastern Scheldt (Oosterschelde). The guests and the commercial Indaver Impex team found out all about fishing for cockles and oysters and learned the importance of clear water for harvesting these delicacies. The parallel of clarity can also be related to its services: open communication ensures clear agreements and clear water is the end product that we return to our customers as a result of our service provision.   Watch the video


85

OPERATIONAL EXCELLENCE

Prosperity

Social context The goal of operational excellence is about making our customer service provision the most reliable for the customer. In these challenging times, particularly for the waste market, every company is deliberating over how to achieve optimum service provision. Digitalisation and (organisational) improvement processes play an essential role in that.

Our approach

Structural and systematic improvements So that we can continuously improve our service provision, we are applying structured and systematic methods, including Lean Six Sigma (LSS). It helps us to work efficiently, to prevent waste in corporate processes and to increase profitability. We encourage our staff to submit suggestions for self-improvement. That is only possible if, when performing a task, they continually ask themselves whether there might be a better way to do it. In addition, they are given the opportunity to make the LSS system their own. We continually work with further digitalisation of processes and organisation (the workplace of the future) to enable us to work faster and more efficiently. LSS has become embedded in organisation. We are now working on further process assurance and and continuous improvement by use of an overarching quality care system with digitally available process descriptions. This digitalisation drive will improve our service provision, increase efficiency and reduce administrative pressure.


86 PROSPERITY > OPERATIONAL EXCELLENCE

OPTIMISING EXISTING PROCESSES AND SERVICE PROVISION

Best Available Techniques (BAT) Reference Document for Waste Treatment

Industrial Emissions Directive 2010/75/EU (Integrated Pollution Prevention and Control) Antoine Pinasseau, Benoit Zerger, Joze Roth, Michele Canova, Serge Roudier 2018

EUR 29362-EN

The most environmentally friendly techniques

Flexible service provision

One of the outcomes of the European Union’s Industrial Emissions Directive (IED Directive) are the BREF documents. Every sector has its own BREF documents that describe the most environmentally friendly techniques that companies can use and the permitted emissions limits that these facilities can have. The documents for the waste sector previously dated from 2006. They were revised for other waste treatment techniques in 2018 and for waste incineration in 2019. Member States have four years to record the implementation in legislation.

A large chemical group in the Netherlands, for which Indaver is their Total Waste Management (TWM) partner, suffered an oil leak in 2019. In order to repair the leak, the plant concerned was shut down. Indaver came to the rescue by collecting up the tar, which was mixed with sand to form a mass that could be shovelled into skip containers. Various Indaver teams then put everything in place to clear up the effects of the disaster. External logistics partners sprang into action to fulfil the demand for a total of 85 skip containers. New waste codes were created as a matter of urgency, to facilitate removal. Later that month we transported 550 tonnes of waste to our transfer station in Terneuzen. All in all, the customer’s plant

From our core value of ‘continuously improving’, we work proactively to improve our treatment techniques and facilities. Furthermore, permit providers make decisions based on the BREF documents. These stricter conditions have now been incorporated into the new environmental permit for our location in Antwerp. Among other things, this resulted in us tightening our discharge standards and emissions standards for nitrogen oxides.

As a TWM partner Indaver provides support for disasters only had to shut down for two weeks. From day one, we have demonstrated that we are a reliable and flexible partner, with clear lines of communication between the customer’s production department and the Indaver account manager.


87 PROSPERITY > OPERATIONAL EXCELLENCE

OPTIMISING EXISTING PROCESSES AND SERVICE PROVISION

Indaver Biebesheim Invests The Biebesheim (Germany) site made improvements in 2019 to enable it to receive complex residues. A new incoming train station was built to pump up the liquids more easily. One platform is specifically for IBCs (intermediate bulk containers). The acceptance area for schredder waste was modified and thanks to new direct supply lines, Biebesheim can treat larger amounts of complex industrial waste streams. At the end of 2019, the site put the Direct Injection plant into operation and this will, in time, lead to a considerable reduction in fuel consumption.

Investing

New Decontamination Unit for a Pharmaceutical Customer The main focus of one of our Dutch pharmaceutical customers is the safe and traceable collection, removal and treatment of rejected medicinal products. We built a new decontamination plant at our transfer station in Terneuzen specifically for this customer. The customer doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have its own specialised cleaning unit for the API-contaminated metal waste. This waste, which may contain traces of Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (APIs), is released when clean rooms (very pure environments for the production of medicines, for example) are demolished or dismantled. Indaver had the unit built in close consultation with the customer, according to their specifications. The unit is similar to a clean room, but it is portable and can therefore be used flexibly for other customers as well. The advantage of putting it next to our transfer station is that it can make use of the washing facility that is already there. This allows us to offer an integral solution for the safe and thorough cleaning of that type of waste.


88 PROSPERITY > OPERATIONAL EXCELLENCE

DIGITALISATION

Nowadays, digitalisation is a vital part of any company. Indaver has its own software, Unity, which our staff use to communicate with our customers (supplier zone) and suppliers (supply zone). Unity connects us to these two groups. In 2016 and 2017 we laid the digital foundations that we improve and update every year. In 2019, Belgium’s Federal Science Policy (BELSPO) certified Unity as innovative software.

Digital Strategy Our strategy for improving our digital service provision is based on working safely and pragmatically with staff from different departments. We also involve our customers, suppliers and other stakeholders. We have defined three distinct aspects: 1. Improving our digital service for customers through the customer portal. We have put together a team for this, made up of people from various disciplines. This is supervised by advisers from Deloitte. Every two years, they determine new paths for improvement (digital journey). The improvements have so far comprised the user interface for our customer portal and the user experiences concerning the paperless exchange between customers and Indaver. We are also working on the traceability of all raw materials (from the cradle-to-cradle principle) and on further automation of administrative processes. 2. A Lean Six Sigma (LSS) approach for process safety and data security, among other things. 3. The digitalisation of education and training courses under the heading Structured Digital Learning Programme (SDLP). This programme offers courses that are compact, visual and easy to understand, in an interactive manner. Digital learning can be adapted quickly at any time to make it relevant to the latest requirements. It allows us to train all our staff relatively simply, using a uniform approach. In 2019, we introduced two large campaigns: ■■ Our vision on sustainable waste management (10 Codes for Good Practice). ■■ SAP-training courses for our administrative support, focused specifically on our shared service centres.

LSS project

Delivery of Packaged Waste Correct labelling of (hazardous) waste is important for its treatment later in the chain. Indaver in Ireland and Belgium have jointly set up a Lean Six Sigma project for this. Colleagues from both countries worked methodically to improve processes. As a result, thanks to digitalisation, mutual service provision was improved. A handy app helps Irish operators to choose the right processing method and location (Belgium or Germany). The LSS project is now focusing on the process codes for treating and classifying waste.


89 PROSPERITY > OPERATIONAL EXCELLENCE

DIGITALISATION

Goals and Performance Management Process In striving for a paperless organisation, Indaver in Ireland implemented the Goals and Performance Management (GPM) system in January 2019. This digital system makes it possible to share information about common goals and results easily between all teams. Staff therefore have better knowledge of what is expected of them and their colleagues and how they can achieve that. There is more understanding of each other’s goals and insight into the fact that decisions in one team can affect another team’s goals. The transparency of the GPM system creates a positive dynamic between teams. In this first year, 95% of the staff have already used the GPM system. In 2020 we plan to make further improvements based on users’ responses.

e-CMR

MSD is thrilled with e-CMR

Every waste shipment has its own waybill (CMR) and identification (ID) form. The CMR sets out the transporter’s contractual responsibility for the goods that are entrusted to it. The ID form states the waste producer, waster transporter and waste treatment company’s address details and contains information about the waste product.

In the summer of 2019, Danny Van de Weeghde, Environmental Control Manager at MSD, implemented the e-CMR with Indaver.

In 2019, we managed to replace these paper versions, which the customer always has to sign manually, with digital versions. Indaver Logistics for nonhazardous waste in Belgium was the first to try it out. By doing this, we are lightening the (paper) administrative load and giving the customer peace of mind. Communication works through QR codes that are read using a smartphone, scanner or tablet. All information comes directly into the customer zone, where customers can consult their transport documents securely, quickly and at any time.

Danny explains: “The e-CMR reduces the administrative load. This has had the following effect on the workflow. When the transporter arrives on site, the Indaver on-site operator checks everything. He ensures data such as the EURAL codes, the address, the waste stream and more are all in accordance with the waste removal request. After that he signs them off on behalf of MSD. Thanks to the digital platform, we now have on-line access to all of the administrative transport documentation. There is even a copy of the waybill. That makes it possible to check the reported weights in our own MSD e-CRM archive. All documents remain available for 10 years after the event, as required by law. Waste is a critical business for MSD and it is therefore also subject to audits. At those times an electronic archive is extremely useful. For us, implementing the e-CMR represents a considerable simplification of our administrative processes. Our weekly and time-consuming visits to the waste container park to pick up documents are now a thing of the past. Checking and signing is now also done electronically. Every document contains the correct information and nothing gets lost. Furthermore, we don’t have to file anything in a physical archive anymore. Everything runs more smoothly, we are relieved of all the paperwork and we save on space.”


90 PROSPERITY > OPERATIONAL EXCELLENCE

DIGITALISATION

Pure VGF waste, beautiful compost

Data security Now that society is increasingly being digitalised, we see some negative side effects. Cyber-crime is one of them. Increasingly we hear reports of businesses and organisations that have been hacked and have had to pay a ransom to regain access to their data. Indaver looks after the data security of its processes. There are extra technical components to protect us against unwanted digital interest. In addition, Indaver contracts “ethical hackers” to test the security of our system. Access to data is strictly controlled and software is updated as frequently as possible. In fact,

data security is a constant battle between IT staff and hackers. We are aware that not everyone is techsavvy enough yet. Therefore, human error is often the weakest link. Staff still need to pay constant attention to the correct and safe use of passwords, public and private networks and be aware of infiltration attempts through e-mail, for example. One additional advantage of all the publicity concerning holes in certain software programs and business processes being taken hostage is that people better understand the need for vigilant data security. We make our

staff aware of this through our internal communication channels and targeted posters.

  OUTLOOK Additional measures have been planned for 2020–2021 to increase the digital safety level further. In 2020 the Information Security Policy comes into force. This sets out our vision and our approach to protect information in various areas.

Connecting

Business Process Mapping. From our core value of ‘Continuously Improving’, we are also working on process optimisation using business process mapping. In 2019, we overhauled all of our business-related processes and digitalised all of them. In addition to this, our basic principle is that we will work on our service provision together, across departments. Mutual connection has our constant attention. In the team that is carrying this out, there is a broad mixture of staff, the majority of whom have a Lean Six Sigma Black Belt.

Good-quality compost starts with pure VGF (Vegetables, Garden and Fruit) waste. Over the past few years measurements have shown that there is increasing contamination in the VGF waste supplied. To reduce this contamination (specifically plastic, glass and stone), our VGF locations have started carrying out more thorough checks on the loads delivered. In the Netherlands this is done using the iAuditor app, with which all data is input in situ, including photos. If the check shows a load contains 7% or more contamination, we refuse it. We then feedback our experiences to the local authority concerned. With that knowledge the customer can then work on better collection to improve the quality of the material supplied.


91 PROSPERITY > OPERATIONAL EXCELLENCE

KNOWLEDGE SHARING AND TRANSPARENCY

Sharing knowledge is one of Indaver’s key strategic skills. We do this at a scientific level, with policy-makers, in research teams, through education and with customers. Based on our core value of ‘Ensuring transparency in communications and actions’, we organise open days, company visits and we make presentations at trade fairs.

Indaver is Keynote speaker at NEPIC Conference

British-Irish Chamber of Commerce Input

In the chemical process industry, health, safety and the environment receive a lot of attention. That is why the North East of England Process Industry Cluster (NEPIC) organises regular meetings where companies can share their knowledge on Health, Safety and Environment (HSE) services. As Indaver has a Total Waste Management contract with several clients in the United Kingdom, awareness of our brand is growing in the region. As keynote speaker at the NEPIC meeting in July 2019, we were able to share our expertise in waste management.

In July 2019, Indaver Ireland in Dublin gave a presentation to the British-Irish Chamber of Commerce. The subject of the meeting was the need to make changes to infrastructure to meet the needs of the growing population. The basis for this comes from Project Ireland 2040 and the Climate Action Plan. Indaver’s input focused on the need to simplify the process so that residents are still guaranteed input but turnaround times are reduced. There were more than fifty attendees, from the business world as well as opinion leaders, lawyers and academics.

Indaver Impex Participation in the Aqua Trade Fair Indaver’s sludge-dewatering expert, Indaver Impex, has been presenting itself successfully at the Dutch Aqua Trade Fair for several years already. This three-day fair is always a good way to make informal contact with existing and potential customers from large-scale industry and the water authorities. It is also a nice opportunity to demonstrate our flexible, innovative and reliable approach.

World Resources Forum: Closing Loops At the end of February 2019, the World Resources Forum was held in Antwerp. As a Bronze Partner of this international congress, Indaver’s presence was prominent. In diverse forums and workshops, we illustrated how Indaver recovers the maximum amount of materials from waste and thus contributes to the circular economy. For participants from the business world, universities and government institutions we organised an interactive workshop on our Plastics2Chemicals project. This led to exciting insights and discussions. Participants in the meeting were also able to visit ECLUSE’s new steam network in the Antwerp Waaslandhaven and our waste-to-energy plant in Doel. For our relationships with public authorities and our colleagues in the public waste management sector we organised a networking event. This was a good opportunity to exchange ideas with colleagues from the same region amongst the bustle of this international congress.


92 PROSPERITY > OPERATIONAL EXCELLENCE

KNOWLEDGE SHARING AND TRANSPARENCY

10 years of Belgian Waste-to-Energy

Contaminated packaging

The not-for-profit Belgian Waste-toEnergy (BW2E) unites all of the Belgian facilities that treat residual household and similar commercial waste and recover energy from it. BW2E has demonstrated its usefulness and has a dual function. On the one hand, our facilities guarantee a sustainable and safe solution for residual waste. On the other, they recover the maximum energy and raw materials for the circular economy. That is how we keep the materials chain pure and safe. The importance of this role will only increase over the next few years as the European action plan for a quicker transition to a circular economy is implemented.

In February 2019, the innovation platform for the Flemish logistics sector (VIL) completed the two-year project Polluted Packaging Logistics. With his presentation on the complex relationship that Indaver has with packaging waste, Alain Konings of Indaver was one of the speakers at the closing event.

BW2E is a valued partner for local and regional governments. Its members share a lot of knowledge in technical and safety working parties. We celebrated our 10th anniversary with representatives from all facilities, our European link organisation CEWEP and policy-makers from the three regions. In his speech, Indaver CEO Paul De Bruycker, who is also the chairperson for CEWEP, spoke about his appreciation of the amazing work that the Belgian waste-to-energy sector is doing. He stressed the importance of sharing knowledge and good practices, as that will raise the level of the entire sector.

The transport and treatment of empty and not-cleaned packaging materials from the chemical sector, for example, is complex. During the project, they looked at whether the logistics of this packaging waste could be made more efficient. A working party, with BASF, 3M and AgfaGevaert as producers, TWZ, Renewi, SGS and Vanheede as collectors and Indaver as a waste treatment company, analysed the current working methods and mapped out the types of packaging, volumes, collection and treatment methods and the difficulties. The project made the complexity of this waste stream clearer to all parties. There is now more attention for and care being taken over this waste stream.

Plastic Waste Study Day The Flemish public authorities were invited to Antwerp (Hooge Maey) on 27 September 2019 for a study day on plastic waste and how we can best deal with it within the circular economy. Prominent speakers from the academic world were included alongside our own experts from Engineering. Subjects included the new PMD facility in Willebroek and the Plastics2Chemicals project in Antwerp. Using VR technology, we gave attendees a virtual tour of the PMD sorting facility that is currently under construction. After this virtual tour there was also a real tour of our facilities on our Antwerp site. During this study day we linked our knowledge of mechanical sorting to our insights in terms of chemical recycling. We brought together representatives from the public, industrial and academic sectors. By doing this, we wanted to show that we are convinced that knowledge is the key to resolving the plastics issue. u See p. 95 (Plastics2Chemicals) u See p. 40 (PMD Willebroek)


93

GROWTH AND INNOVATION

Prosperity

Social context

Our approach

Competitive market

To strengthen our position

The waste sector is keeps innovating and its growth has been made possible in part through takeovers. As a result, everyone is looking across the borders of their own country with a view to making new acquisitions. The number of companies that treat waste is decreasing in more and more countries. But, at the same time, part of the waste market is facing a shortage of available treatment capacity. All businesses are looking for innovative, sustainable and safe solutions.

Over the years, Indaver has built up a good fundamental position. To maintain our economically stable position and strengthen it where possible, we are looking in all our regions to see where there may be opportunities to increase our working area through acquisitions. That would enable us to offer our knowledge and service provision in more countries and to more customers. We are scaling up and strengthening our negotiating position in the market.

Fast innovations Waste management is a complex subject. The market is in constant development, legislation and regulations are making new and more stringent demands. Customers are choosing service providers who can give them peace of mind in a fast-changing world. They want flexible and relevant solutions that match their specific requirements. Innovative business models and partnerships are needed to meet the European climate goals, to recover materials and energy and waste legislation.

Furthermore, with its long-term vision, Indaver has already been working on expanding existing facilities for years and we are constructing innovative sustainable facilities to increase our treatment capacity. We are already reaping the benefits of this strategy. Indaver is growing in a controlled manner. We only invest in proven technologies and only opt for takeovers if this fits in with our strategy and strengthens Indaverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s future.

Responding to technology, new business units Indaverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s focus lies in stimulating the circular economy and, by so doing, ensuring a clean future together. Indaver encourages new technological innovation projects and business cases. We make careful choices and take into account our customersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; requirements in terms of the quality of raw materials. New technologies must be reliable, ecologically sound and financially responsible. New business cases must fit in with our strengths and our strategy. We bundle our expertise on specific subjects into business units, which enables us to serve interesting niche markets.


94 PROSPERITY > GROWTH AND INNOVATION

NEW FACILITIES AND EXPANSION

Antwerp: Tank Park 2.0 In the second half of 2019, the Antwerp site converted the existing tank park into Tank Park 2.0. Through a new acceptance policy and an adapted technical concept, Indaver provides safe treatment of the liquids delivered and we provide continuity to our industrial customers. Throughout the renovation, Indaver paid extra attention to safety. On the one hand, for our staff during acceptance and when pumping liquids between the various storage tanks. And, on the other hand, for the drivers while unloading. With four

new acceptance tanks, we can keep time to check the delivery and unloading time under two hours. The tank park comprises 22 storage tanks with a total volume of c. 4,000 m3. These tanks are divided between four separate unloading areas. The choice of unloading area depends on the calorific value of the liquid, the pH value and the potential stratification. Tank Park 2.0 became operational in the first half of 2020.

Rivenhall Energy from Waste

Resource Recovery Centre Ringaskiddy

Together with Gent Fairhead & Co Limited, Indaver worked on the last development phase of a facility for household and similar commercial waste in Rivenhall (Essex, United Kingdom). This facility can treat around 595,000 tonnes of waste, which can produce enough electricity for 60,000 households. The environmental permit is pending.

In May 2018, Indaver was issued a permit to build an energy-from-waste facility in Ringaskiddy, Ireland, around 15 kilometres from Cork. This Resource Recovery Centre in Ringaskiddy will have a capacity of 240,000 tonnes of waste per year. It will deal with household, commercial, industrial, non-hazardous and small hazardous waste. The power station will produce enough electricity for the national grid to fulfil the needs of around 30,000 households. The investment is around â&#x201A;Ź160 million. The permit, issued by An Bord PleanĂĄla, the Irish planning authority, was reviewed by the court in May 2019. No ruling has been made yet.


95 PROSPERITY > GROWTH AND INNOVATION

NEW FACILITIES AND EXPANSION

Projects

Projects

Innovative process: Plastics2Chemicals In 2019, Indaver was issued a permit to build a Plastics2Chemicals (P2C) test facility to recycle 15,000 tonnes of end-of-life plastics annually. Together with the universities of Ghent and Antwerp, Indaver has been working for several years on an innovative process to recycle packaging materials that consist of mixed polyolefins (PP and PE) and polystyrene (PS), such as bottles, butter tubs, plastic film, cups, yoghurt pots and so forth. Since 2017, we have had a pilot facility at Ugent (Ghent University) to test the process thoroughly and to optimise the quality of the end products. With this innovative process we want to contribute to a solution for the increasing amount of plastic waste and to do so in a way that produces new basic chemicals from the waste. Now that we have permission to build the facility, from the second

half of 2022 we expect to be able to recycle around 50 tonnes of plastics every day into valuable basic raw materials for the industry. PP and PE will produce basic products, such as naphtha and wax. These can be used to make new high-quality packaging materials. The treatment process breaks down PS into monomers that are re-usable as raw materials. All of these new raw materials have the same quality as primary raw materials and are destined for the petrochemical/chemical industry. The new polymers are even suitable for the food industry. Indaver’s P2C treatment process can make a valuable and sustainable contribution to the circular economy.

E-Wood: Indaver invests in non-recyclable wood waste In Doel (Belgium), Indaver is going to expand by building a new power station that treats wood waste that is not recyclable. Indaver is making this €100 million investment together with its peer company, SUEZ. E-Wood, as the facility is called, will focus on treated (impregnated) wood that cannot be recycled.   OUTLOOK

Strategic locations Once the test facility in Antwerp has achieved the expected results, Indaver plans to have large-scale facilities in strategic locations in Europe to recycle PP, PE and PS. In time, we will be able to recycle 1 million tonnes of plastic in these facilities. P2C could therefore represent a real revolution for the end-of-life plastics recycling market.

The facility will treat around 180,000 tonnes of wood waste. That will then produce 19–20 MW of green energy, destined for the Flanders electricity grid. The power station will also supply steam to the ECLUSE industrial steam network. E-Wood is expected to become operational over the course of 2022.


96 PROSPERITY > GROWTH AND INNOVATION

GROWTH THROUGH SPECIALISATION AND TAKEOVERS

Business Unit Landfill Reconversion

Grontmij BRP takeover

Landfilling waste is the final resort for sustainable waste management, where substances that canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be recycled are stored safely (in a safe sink). Indaver has a lot of in-house knowledge and expertise regarding the management of landfill and the full life cycle of landfill sites. As we know that other people, even those outside of our work area, could benefit greatly from our expertise, in 2019 we set up the Business Unit Landfill Reconversion.

Since 7 November 2019, Indaver in the Netherlands has owned Grontmij Beheer Restoffenprojecten BV (BRP) [Grontmij Residual Waste Projects Management Ltd.]. This takeover has strengthened Indaverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s market position in the Netherlands. The new Indaver BRP adds five operational and office sites to our work area, with a total of 26 staff in the NorthEast of the Netherlands. We can now rightfully present ourselves as a national player.

In November 2019, Indaver in the Netherlands took over Grontmij BRP from the international engineering company Sweco. One of the main components of Indaver BRP, as the new acquisition is called, is the Stainkoeln landfill site in Groningen. Indaver BRP also has plenty of knowledge and experience in the area of safe sinks. BU Landfill Reconversion can combine this with its own expertise to fulfil its international ambitions.

With waste treatment companies such as Stainkoeln, Vagroen, Secundaire Bouwstoffen Unie and Waterzuivering Milieuboulevard Groningen, Indaver BRP is active in waste, soil, dredging, biomass, VGF and green waste.

With the Stainkoeln landfill site, we can continue to guarantee landfill capacity to our customers in spite of the fact that in the Netherlands, as in Flanders, the expansion of landfill capacity has been halted. The premature closure of the Derde Merwedehaven in 2013 means that Indaver has an unused portion of the permitted capacity. This can now be used in Stainkoeln. Through the acquisition of Vagroen

and the participation in OGAR (VGF composting) we are strengthening and increasing our market position in this specific segment. Although the purchasing agreement was already signed in June 2019, in part due to the Dutch nitrogen crisis it took until November for all of the details to be finalised and for the takeover to become a reality. The waste portfolio will be included in our 2020 sustainability report.


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INDAVER AND GRI REPORTING At Indaver, sustainability is integral to our commitment to the circular economy. In this Sustainability Report, we refer to the GRI criteria that are relevant to our sector. This report has been prepared in accordance with the “GRI Standards core option.” See the table for ease of reference.

GRI Standard

GRI is an international independent organisation that helps businesses, governments and other organisations understand and communicate the impact of business on critical sustainability issues such as those described in the UN’s SDGs. While business and government leaders can agree with international principles, GRI’s guidance helps to put these principles into practice.

Disclosure

GRI provides the world’s most widely used standards on sustainability reporting and disclosure, enabling businesses, governments, civil society and citizens to make better decisions based on information that matters.

Page number(s) and/or URL(s)

GRI 101: Foundation GRI 102: General Disclosures

Organizational profile 102-1 Name of the organization

Indaver, pg 1

102-2 Activities, brands, products, and services

Our service provision, pg 16-18

102-3 Location of headquarters

Indaver Mechelen. Dijle 17 a. 2800 Mechelen, pg 103

102-4 Location of operations

The Indaver Group in Europe, pg 16

102-5 Ownership and legal form

https://www.indaver.com/en/disclaimer-navigation/company-data/

102-6 Markets served

The Indaver Group in Europe, pg 16

102-7 Scale of the organization

Strong financial basis makes sustainable growth possible, pg 81

102-8 Information on employees and other workers

War on talent, pg 25

102-9 Supply chain

Gatekeeper and enabler of the circular economy, pg 15 en 16

102-10 Significant changes to the organization and its supply chain

Operational excellence, pg 85-92

102-11 Precautionary Principle or approach

Sustainable Development Goals, pg 8; Our mission: leading the field in sustainable waste management, pg 12; Our core values, pg13

102-12 External initiatives

Sustainable Development Goals, pg 8; Audits improve the quality of our processes, pg 18

Strategy

102-14 Statement from senior decision-maker

Working sustainably on a safe circular economy, pg 2

Ethics and integrity

102-16 Values, principles, standards, and norms of behavior

Our mission: leading the field in sustainable waste management, pg 12; Our core values, pg 13

Governance

102-18 Governance structure

Indaver, web site Organisation, https://www.indaver.com/be-en/in-belgium/organisation/

Stakeholder engagement

102-40 List of stakeholder groups

Involving stakeholders, pg 11

102-41 Collective bargaining agreements

War on talent, pg 25

102-42 Identifying and selecting stakeholders

Involving stakeholders, pg 15

102-43 Approach to stakeholder engagement

Involving stakeholders, pg 15

102-44 Key topics and concerns raised

Materiality Matrix, pg 11

102-45 Entities included in the consolidated financial statements

Strong financial basis makes sustainable growth possible, pg 81

102-46 Defining report content and topic Boundaries

Indaver and the Sustainable Development Goals, pg 8; Materiality Matrix, pg 11

102-47 List of material topics

Materiality Matrix, pg 11

102-48 Restatements of information

N/A

Reporting practice


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GRI Standard

Disclosure

Page number(s) and/or URL(s)

102-49 Changes in reporting

Materiality Matrix, pg 11

102-50 Reporting period

2019, pg 1; https://www.indaver.com/be-en/sustainability/sustainability-reporting/

102-51 Date of most recent report

Sustainability report 2018; https://www.indaver.com/home/

102-52 Reporting cycle

Yearly; https://www.indaver.com/be-en/sustainability/sustainability-reporting/

102-53 Contact point for questions regarding the report

Involving stakeholders, pg 15

102-54 Claims of reporting in accordance with the GRI Standards

Indaver and GRI reporting, pg 97

102-55 GRI content index

Indaver and GRI reporting, pg 97-99

102-56 External assurance

Declaration of validation Bureau Veritas, pg 102

103-1 Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary

Contributing to prosperity, pg 80

103-2 The management approach and its components

Prosperity, pg 79-96

103-3 Evaluation of the management approach

Prosperity, pg 79-96

201-1 Direct economic value generated and distributed

Strong financial basis makes sustainable growth possible, pg 81

103-1 Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary

Sustainable suppliers and partners, pg 82

103-2 The management approach and its components

EcoVadis 2019: Gold for Corporate Social Responsibility, pg 17; Sustainable suppliers and partners, pg 82

103-3 Evaluation of the management approach

EcoVadis 2019: Gold for Corporate Social Responsibility, pg 17; Sustainable suppliers and partners, pg 82

103-1 Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary

Materials, pg 39-46

103-2 The management approach and its components

Materials, pg 39-46

103-3 Evaluation of the management approach

Materials, pg 39-46

301-2 Recycled input materials used

The Indaver Group in Europe, pg 19; Materials, pg 39-46

103-1 Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary

Energy, pg 47-51

103-2 The management approach and its components

Energy, pg 47-51

103-3 Evaluation of the management approach

Energy, pg 47-51

302-1 Energy consumption within the organization

Climate, pg 52-54

103-1 Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary

Primary and secondary water, pg 75

103-2 The management approach and its components

Primary and secondary water, pg 75

103-3 Evaluation of the management approach

Primary and secondary water, pg 75

303-1 Water withdrawal by source

Primary and secondary water, pg 75

303-3 Water recycled and reused

Primary and secondary water, pg 75

103-1 Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary

The importance of biodiversity, pg 77

103-2 The management approach and its components

The importance of biodiversity, pg 77

103-3 Evaluation of the management approach

The importance of biodiversity, pg 77

304-2 Significant impacts of activities, products, and services on biodiversity

The importance of biodiversity, pg 77

Material Topics 200 series (Economic topics) Economic Performance GRI 103: Management Approach

GRI 201: Economic Performance Procurement Practices GRI 103: Management Approach

300 series (Environmental topics) Materials GRI 103: Management Approach

GRI 301: Materials Energy GRI 103: Management Approach

GRI 302: Energy Water GRI 103: Management Approach

GRI 303: Water Biodiversity GRI 103: Management Approach

GRI 304: Biodiversity


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GRI Standard

Disclosure

Page number(s) and/or URL(s)

103-1 Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary

Climate, pg 52-56

103-2 The management approach and its components

Climate, pg 52-56

103-3 Evaluation of the management approach

Climate, pg 52-56

305-1 Direct (Scope 1) GHG emissions

Impact: emissions and impact in 2019, pg 61-74

305-2 Energy indirect (Scope 2) GHG emissions

Impact: emissions and impact in 2019, pg 61-74

305-5 Reduction of GHG emissions

Impact: emissions and impact in 2019, pg 61-74

305-7 Nitrogen oxides (NOX), sulfur oxides (SOX), and other significant air emissions

Impact: emissions and impact in 2019, pg 61-74

103-1 Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary

Materials, pg 39-46

103-2 The management approach and its components

Materials, pg 39-46

103-3 Evaluation of the management approach

Materials, pg 39-46

306-1 Waste generation and significant waste-related impacts

Our service provision pg16-18, The Indaver Group in Europe, Volumes managed, pg 19; Safe Sink, pg 57-60; Impacts pg 61-78

306-2 Management of significant waste-related impacts

Our service provision pg16-18, The Indaver Group in Europe, Volumes managed, pg 19; Safe Sink, pg 57-60; Impacts pg 61-78

103-1 Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary

EcoVadis 2019: Gold for Corporate Social Responsibility, pg 17; Sustainable suppliers and partners, pg 82

103-2 The management approach and its components

EcoVadis 2019: Gold for Corporate Social Responsibility, pg 17; Sustainable suppliers and partners, pg 82

103-3 Evaluation of the management approach

EcoVadis 2019: Gold for Corporate Social Responsibility, pg 17; Sustainable suppliers and partners, pg 82

103-1 Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary

Sustainable deployment of talented staff, pg 24-31

103-2 The management approach and its components

Sustainable deployment of talented staff, pg 24-31

103-3 Evaluation of the management approach

Sustainable deployment of talented staff, pg 24-31

103-1 Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary

Safety: our priority, pg 32-37

103-2 The management approach and its components

Safety: our priority, pg 32-37

103-3 Evaluation of the management approach

Safety: our priority, pg 32-37

403-2 Types of injury and rates of injury, occupational diseases, lost days, and absenteeism, and number of work-related fatalities

Together our employees and third-parties ensure a safe work environment, pg 33; Monitoring safety performance, pg 34;

103-1 Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary

Structured learning, pg 30

103-2 The management approach and its components

Structured learning, pg 30

103-3 Evaluation of the management approach

Structured learning, pg 30

404-1 Average hours of training per year per employee

Structured learning, pg 30

103-1 Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary

Investing in relationships in the environment and society, pg 83-84

103-2 The management approach and its components

Investing in relationships in the environment and society, pg 83-84

103-3 Evaluation of the management approach

Investing in relationships in the environment and society, pg 83-84

413-1 Operations with local community engagement, impact assessments, and development programs

Investing in relationships in the environment and society, pg 83-84

Emissions GRI 103: Management Approach

GRI 305: Emissions

Waste GRI 103: Management Approach

GRI 306: Waste Supplier Environmental Assessment GRI 103: Management Approach

400 series (Social topics) Employment GRI 103: Management Approach

Occupational Health and Safety GRI 103: Management Approach

GRI 403: Occupational Health and Safety Training and Education GRI 103: Management Approach

GRI 404: Training and Education Local Communities GRI 103: Management Approach

GRI 413: Local Communities


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GLOSSARY Anaerobic composting (digester)  A method to convert organic waste into compost via bacteria. This method does not require oxygen.

Climate neutral  Achieving net zero carbon emissions by balancing a measured amount of carbon released with an equivalent amount sequestered or offset.

ARP  Acid Recovery Plant

Co-operation Agreement  The agreement ensuring that Indaver’s operating procedures and service provision are the same across the regions in which it operates.

Bedding Down /Settling   The process of volume reduction for soil. This can occur through drying, dewatering or settling. In the case of settling, the soil is weighted down to squeeze out water and air. Biomass  A feedstock for energy generation which replaces fossil fuel. BREF or BREF document  Provides background information and clarification for implementing the Best Available Techniques (BATs) a business can use. When approving an environmental permit, the permit provider must take the BAT conclusions into account. Chain responsibility  Chain responsibility is part of corporate social responsibility. It is intended to give insight into sustainable behaviour (origin of raw materials, production process, service provision) in the chain between companies, suppliers and customers. Circular economy  An economic system in which primary raw materials and waste and energy loss are minimised by slowing, reducing and closing material and energy loops. This can be achieved through sustainable design, maintenance, repair, re-use, re-manufacturing, refurbishing, and recycling.

Dioxins  Compounds that are toxic environmental persistent organic pollutants; often, they are the byproduct of industrial processes. EcoVadis  Independent assessment agency that evaluates the commitment to corporate social responsibility of businesses worldwide under assignment to purchasing departments. Emission limit value  Emission standard; the maximum volume/concentration that may be emitted. Emission measurement  The measurement of the volume/ concentration of a particular substance emanating from a particular place. Emission  The release of a particular substance from a particular place (e.g. a chimney) expressed in volume/m3. Enabler (facilitator)  Indaver’s role in the circular economy in which we recover energy and high-quality materials from waste safely and efficiently. Energy cluster  Heat from Indaver’s plants supplied to neighbouring companies and residential areas.

Environmental performance  The performance of an organisation with respect to the environment. Frequency rate  Legally determined safety indicator that charts the number of accidents involving more than 1 calendar day off work Fr = (A*1,000,000)/B A = number of accidents involving time off work B = number of hours exposure per year (sum of all personnel) Gatekeeper  Indaver’s role in the circular economy, in which we must keep hazardous components out of the food and materials loop before, during and after waste treatment. Grate incinerator  Incinerator with energy recovery for thermal treatment of non-recyclable fractions of nonhazardous household waste and commercial waste. Green gas  Gas reprocessed from biogas, which in turn is obtained from digested wet organic residue. This green gas is of a very high quality and can therefore replace fossil natural gas. Green heat  Heat derived from renewable energy sources, in Indaver’s case the source of renewable energy is biowaste. IED  Directive 2010/75/EU of the European Parliament and the Council on industrial emissions (the Industrial Emissions Directive, or IED) is the main EU instrument regulating pollutant emissions from industrial installations. Indachlor  Recycling facility for chlorinated waste residues


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GLOSSARY Indaver Molecule Management  Recovering molecules from pharmaceutical and chemical waste for re-use in industrial processes. Industrial symbiosis  System in which raw materials are recovered from one company’s waste to be used in another company’s manufacturing processes. Intermodal transport  The combination of different modes of transportation, i.e. road, water, rail, to transport waste. IPPC  The IPPC directive, or Directive 1996/61/EC, stands for Integrated Pollution Prevention and Control. It is part of European environmental law. It consists of a set of rules for monitoring industrial facilities. ISO  International Organisation for Standardization

Physico-chemical treatment  Immobilisation, fixation, solidification and stabilisation - techniques or methods for the treatment of hazardous waste, so that the waste can be stored safely in a class 1 landfill site. PMD  Plastic bottles, metal packaging and drinks cartons (selectively collected). Pollutant volumes  Pollutant volumes equate to the quantity of contaminated components that the incinerator stacks emit a year. These volumes are expressed in tonnes. QESH  Quality, Environment, Safety and Health – usually referring to an Indaver policy or department. Residues  Waste materials that cannot be further recycled or treated after sorting, purification or treatment.

IWS  Industrial Waste Services LSS  Lean Six Sigma Mass balance  The mass balance is the visual representation of each thermal process. The ‘in’ side shows the quantities of additives, water and energy needed to treat the waste efficiently. The ‘out’ side shows the quantity of solid residual materials remaining after the process, the quantity of flue gases emitted and the quantities of waste water and energy released during treatment. Materials loop  System in which raw materials are being constantly recovered, reused or recycled in a safe manner.

Rotary kiln incinerator  An incinerator with energy recovery for the thermal treatment of hazardous waste. Safe Sink  Destruction by Indaver of unrecoverable elements in waste and capture of the remaining potentially hazardous components in our high-tech final treatment facilities, thus removing them from the materials loop. Safety index  Weighted average of the number of accidents (in which the severity of the accident is the determining factor for the weighting assigned) relative to the number of employees.

SDG  Sustainable Development Goals defined by the United Nations. SEVESO  European Directive on the management of risks associated with the storage and handling of hazardous waste. Sustainable employability  HR-policy for sustainable measures for healthy, pleasant and productive long-term participation in the work process. Total Waste Management  Service model which provides industrial clients with a worry-free customised solution. VGF  Vegetable, fruit and garden waste. Waste-to-energy  Recovery of energy from the thermal treatment of waste, which is then converted into steam or electricity and supplied to neighbouring companies, commercial users (district heating) or the electricity grid.


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DECLARATION OF VALIDATION BUREAU VERITAS


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