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I DEAS FOR rURBAN IND [Inter.National.Design] LIVING N

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O T Y D A

E US


Introduction Page 3

INDEAS Biodiversity Bridges [INDEA BB.01] Agriculture Firewall [INDEA AF.01] The Ideal Hectare [INDEA IH.01] Bioproduction Module [INDEA BM.01] Organic Dress [INDEA OD.01] Compost Loop [INDEA CL.01] Rurban Oasis [INDEA R0.01] Thermal Green House [INDEA TGH.01] Integrated Water Resource Management [INDEA IWRM.01]

Page 7 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 15 Page 17 Page 20 Page 21 Page 24

[INDEA AP.01] [INDEA AP.02]

Page 28 Page 29

Applications Placement 01 Esc 1:5000 Applications Placement 02 Esc 1:2000

Team Page 31

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W

hen you travel from the center to the outskirts of Casablanca you clearly have a feeling that there is not a center and a periphery in the way most cities expand in the development world. The most usual scene for such emerging cities is to see -as you drive outwards- an endlessly loose arrangement of buildings next to the highway that progressively disappear as you drive further out. In Casablanca you experience something rather unusual, the city has a clear border that is as dense as many areas of the city. Outside this border (mostly of multi level apartments) there is pastureland. Control of land evidently is at work here done by authorities. The city is not anarchic in general; it follows guidelines, policies, and zoning. Although congested in many areas already Casablanca remains under control of planners. The exception to this dominant panorama is the slow and progressive appearance of Douars in some areas of the

periphery. The Douars are rather young settlements that mainly attract inhabitants from congested and ever more expensive Casablanca. Its inhabitants are urban in that sense, but share in common a recent pattern of migration from the countryside to the city. The people are also from very various origins of Morocco and it is argued that they abandoned their rural living due the problems that agriculture is encountering recently in Morocco for many small farmers. The city of Casablanca offers them a wider possibility for work that include construction sector, manufacture, port activities but also near the Douar agricultural jobs. The Douar is also an interesting place to settle due to its affordable land price, the possibility to build and finance your own home in relation to your income. The Douar offers as well basic level education, electricity and soon complete system of drinking water. Nevertheless the Douar faces

many challenges as growth follows, for instance the school is starting to feel the pressure of student capacity, already with 3 school schedules. Lack of planning also will lead to the over densification of houses in certain areas, lack of public recreation grounds, and the slow but relentless pressure of agricultural land that is being affected first by fragmentation of ownership which results in smaller and disconnected arable lands and the pollution of underground water by the lack of sewage of the Doaur. People in the Douar despite the advantages of being close to the city still suffer from poor income and a highly polluted environment. Besides commuting to the city is costly and their daily food requirements consume up to half of their revenues. The project in this sense marks as a priority the immediate and progressive reduction of food costs by the enabling of adequate techniques for agriculture in a context of progressive urbanization of the rural landscape. That is the ideas presented here

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are not intended to preserve the existing agricultural practices in the periphery of Casablanca but instead advocates for the adaptation of specific techniques that are more compatible with the type of property (highly fragmented and small scale), existing pressures of urbanization such as the pollution of ground waters, lack of connectivity between big parcels, food production based on priorities of community spending in contrast with the offer of the city to name a few. The aspect of occupation of agricultural land by city dwellers is controversial because what seems to be a dynamic of poor citizens in search for affordable living can turn easily into an speculators game in which the small humble self built houses are replaced progressively by bigger and more profitable real estate operations. The project in this regard argues that the legalization of property is needed in order to give more tools to the inhabitants against easy displacement. The city on the other hand is

4

already providing drinking water; electricity and a middle size school therefore should complete the operation by recognizing property rights but also making inhabitants responsible of paying tax to the government making urgent services such as garbage collection or treatment of black water possible. Our proposal is not intended to be a masterplan. Rather it could be understood as brainstorm of ideas that could be used to stir up discussion between the parties involved. That should not be considered to be a list of random ideas; the list we propose is according to our reading of the place a package of realistic proposals that the inhabitants could immediately put into practice. In this regard our criteria has been to diminish the import of complex and expensive technologies in most of the proposals, the adaptation of the ideas to existing resources. Another important point to mention is that in our perspective urban agriculture is not the priority of the community, but it has a great potential to become

the main driving force in which economy, health and community strengthen can be behind. Urban agriculture can serve also as tool to prevent and diminish the impacts of real estate speculation, reduce the damage to existing biodiversity and contribute to the preservation of open spaces that can serve other purposes such as recreation and recycling besides cultivation of food and trees. The ideas package or toolbox is also a relevant format that is highly suitable for inhabitant’s adaptation and implementation. That is once the tool potential has been discussed with the inhabitants it is up to them to define the extent and the priority of such idea. We don’t propose a linear plan that once completed guarantees a successful neighborhood, we chose instead to accelerate and decentralize power decisions in order to overcome bureaucratic hazards that can discourage further community involvement


What can urban architecture do in the different subjects ? Land Use -Secure areas for open Space -Nursery to improve open spaces -Structure of land management -Contribution to efficient planning -Protection against erosion / floods -Less urban footprint Health -Ecological services biodiversity More balanced diets Cleaner air if the trees are considered Society -Collective needs for more social cohesion -No division urban / rural, society interaction -Participate in management -Creates awareness and promotes knowledge

-Sense of pride in ownership of business

Current resources and opportunities

Economy -Fight against speculation Job creation for locals Food as source income Pepiniere (Nurcery) as source of income public green for grand Casablanca -Cooperation / Joint Venture with municipality -Defeating food price inflation

Land use Free space to maneuver More productive land use

Houses -Better views / Ventilation / Light -Better sanitation by sewage Water Water quality improves Renewable water resources Secure wells from pollution Energy Windmill / PV cells for well pumps and supports public light Transport Less commuting needs

Health No traffic pollution Society Young people Free time Self-reliance for basic needs Economy Existing knowledge in agriculture Garbage as income potential Close relation to Casablanca Houses Possibility to grow and modify your house in direction following of your needs Water Ground water, existing aquifer and wells Potential of harvesting rainwater (surface water)

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INDEA BB.01

INDEA DOCUMENT Urban Agriculture

(10)

(22)

Biodiversity Bridges

(fig 01)

Concept Scenario Plan

(31)

Abstract

(11) INDEA (21) Date

(31)

As the urban footprint of the douar expands following the logic of accessibility to infrastructure there is a tendency to close the perimeters in a near future. This would close the possibility of biological corridors between farming sectors. The location of the biodiversity bridges could also follow existing natural draining lines when present. The section of the bridge includes reinforcing the draining capacity by securing a stone

1. Existing urban footprint 2. Future expansion 3. Main roads 4. Agriculture parcels 5. BB. Biodiversity bridge

No. BB.01 by: of INDEA:

AKMASAMANOBALA Sep. 23, 2010

a stone and gravel at its base. At both sides the introduction of typha and phragmites would secure the containment of the draining system, generating biological corridors and improving the filtering of water in rainy seasons. Another advantage its their sift capacity for organic and inorganic solids. The proposed biodiversity bridge could also help to secure future shortcuts for pedestrians and bicycles (perhaps even tractors) and serve as a linear park for the douar. The corridor can be complemented with cercidium trees attracting other species of animals. This tree is highly resistant for dry hot climates. .

4. 2

1. 3.

Current scenario 2. 4.

4.

3.

5.

1.

3.

2. 4.

Scenario without action

1.

4.

Scenario with bioversity bridge

fig.01

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INDEA BB.01 (10)

INDEA DOCUMENT Urban Agriculture

(22)

Biodiversity Bridges

(X)

Concept Section

(Y)

Scenario visualization

Current situation

Scenario with implementation of Biodiveristy Bridge

8

(11) INDEA (21) Date

No. BB.01 by: of INDEA:

AKMASAMANOBALA Sep. 23, 2010


Cercidium Typha

Existing Road Natural draining Pipe as biodiversity conector between agriculture sectors Bench

Phragmites

fig.01

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INDEA AF.01

INDEA DOCUMENT Urban Agriculture

(10)

(22)

Agriculture Firewall

(fig 01)

Concept Plan

(31)

Abstract

(11) INDEA (21) Date

(31)

No. AF.01 by: of INDEA:

AKMASAMANOBALA Sep. 23, 2010

The agricultural firewall could be managed by the government but run by locals, in this way the city secures its demand of trees, wins diversity and the tree pepinere has a fair chance to compete with market in a cooperative model. .

Organizing tree pepinieres as an agricultural firewall the urban tissue generates its own barrier as it grows. The strip works as ecological corridor connecting agriculture, forestall and natural patches in one single system of green. This pepiniere works in network a s the casa blanca’s green storage produce local trees, endangered species, valuable wood as well as cultural significance.

Agriculture Firewall Conceptual section 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Intensive agriculture reservoire Small warehouses Pepiniere Gravel path Greenhouse Free planted trees Fruit tree gardens/ vegetables Urban Area

Agriculture Firewall Intensive Trees Production Urban Gardens Reforestation Future Urban Expansion Forestation Green Belt Natural Corridor And Connector

6 1 2 3

4

5

7 8

fig.01

10


INDEA IH.01 (10)

INDEA DOCUMENT Urban Agriculture

(11) INDEA (21) Date

No. BM.01 by: of INDEA:

AKMASAMANOBALA Sep. 23, 2010

(31) (22)

The Ideal Hectare

(X)

Concept Plan

(31)

Abstract The ideal hectare contemplates local and regional production according to the scale of plots and adapts to changing demands by means of diversification. - fruit trees garden. Typical feature for leisure and family production - vegetables. Rotating process for various greens - green house for plant and seed germination (pepinieres and vegetable) - pepinieres for low water requirement shrubs and succulents - collection tree pepinieres produced in larger tree pepiniere (see agricultural firewall) All pieces interact featuring a healthy balanced productive module The production of local, low maintenance vegetation secures easy-tomaintain pepinieres as well as city gardens and public space.

1

2

3

4

5 6

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Casa Blanca`s green storageTM Linking urban agriculture to the city itself blurs limits and secures both commercial and social interaction as a rururban production landscape. The production of local, low maintenance vegetation secures easy-tomaintain pepinieres as well as city gardens and public space.

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Ideal Hectare Concept Plan 1. Intensive agriculture reservoir 2. Agriculture Firewall 3. Pepiniere warehouse 40 m2/ compost generation/ liquid organic fertilizer generation 4. Pepiniere 40%/ succulents pepiniere 30%/ 5. Scrubs pepiniere 10% 6. Pepiniere green house/ vegetable green house 7. Vegetables 20%/ Greens/ Medicinal herbs and Spices 8. Urban area 17%/ housing/ playground/ leisure

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INDEA BM.01

INDEA DOCUMENT Urban Agriculture

(10)

(22)

Bioproduction Module

(X)

Concept Axonometric

(Y)

Diet analysis vs Price

(31)

Abstract Current practice We take as a starting point of departure a practice seen on site and in some places in Morocco, the use of apuntia borders to define and protect cultivation surfaces. Advantages The advantage of this organic border is multifunctional.

(11) INDEA (21) Date

(31)

No. BM.01 by: of INDEA:

AKMASAMANOBALA Sep. 23, 2010

Biology From a biological point of view it contributes to fixate nitrogen in the ground, reduces erosion and protects to diminish floods. The nitrogen component allows a new symbiosis scheme with the potential introduction of non-water demanding fruit trees such as figs and olives. Biodiversity and rurban relations The border also creates a microclimate that can enrich the biodiversity. We propose to also incorporate aromatic shrubs such as jasmine or brugmansia, so the division between production and ornament is blurred contributing also to improve the urban quality of the borders.

10-20m 20-50m

Local Casablanca Super shop market Oulad Slope

Organic barrier Vegetable production

fig.01

12

Banana Avocado Carrot Tomato Paprika Potatoe Overgine Onion Grape Melon Orange Olives

9 16 7 3 6 6 4 4 12 5 10 20

9 16 7 3 6 6 4 4 12 5 10 20

8 14 6 2 5 5 3 3 10 5 8 20


INDEA BM.01

INDEA DOCUMENT Urban Agriculture

(10)

(22)

Bioproduction Module

(X)

Concept Section

(11) INDEA (21) Date

AKMASAMANOBALA Sep. 23, 2010

surface reserved for vegetable agriculture production could use existing wells to irrigate efficiently.

(31)

Crop selection The selection of crops should obey rotation practices, promote diversity (in Cuba they recommend a minimum of 10 products) and respond to price inflations in local markets and Casablanca. .

The apuntia border also contributes to the production of kalmos fruit.

(31)

No. BM.01 by: of INDEA:

Investment and results The proposed organic border requires a minimum investment, requires very low maintenance and no irrigation is needed. The results can be seen in a very short period.

Plastic base The advantage of introducing a recycled material plastic base for the agriculture is that the urban farming can be implemented in non arable or damaged areas usually already absorbed by the urban footprint.

Security Finally the biological border contributes to the security of the vegetable production from animals and humans, a concern mentioned by local farmers to urban agriculture. The

X. Organic Barrier Y. Intensive vegetable production area 1.. Olive / Figg 2. Jasmine / Brugmansia 3. Opuntia 4. Stone barrier 5. Plastic channels

1 Y

2 3

X

1.50

1.50

1.00

1.50

1.50

1.00

1.50

1.50

5 4

Onion

Garlic

Potatoe

Overgine

Nitrogen fixation Rotation / Season / Demand

Pumpkin Letuce

Nitrogen fixation

fig.01

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INDEA BB.01 (10)

(22) (Y)

INDEA DOCUMENT Urban Agriculture

(11) INDEA (21) Date

No. BM.01 by: of INDEA:

AKMASAMANOBALA Sep. 23, 2010

Bioproduction Module Scenario visualization

INDEA OD.01 (11) INDEA (22) (Y)

Organic Dress

Scenario visualization

Scenario with implementation of Biodiveristy Bridge

14

(21) Date

No. OD.01 by: of INDEA:

AKMASAMANOBALA Sep. 23, 2010


15


INDEA OD.01

INDEA DOCUMENT Urban Agriculture

(10)

(11) INDEA (21) Date

(22)

Organic Dress

(X)

Organic Dress - Succulent Roof

(Y)

Organic Dress - Vegetable Wall

(31)

Abstract One major issue in the DOUAR's present landscape is the presence of garbage, particularly plastic bags. Along with the compost loop, the organic dress aims to solve this problem by: -recycle garbage into a processed material generating profits out of plastic bags. -produce a roof system out of recycled plastic planters generating 20cm thick soil insulation for succulent plants. -produce a vertical garden system out of recycled plastic planters.

No. OD.01 by: of INDEA:

AKMASAMANOBALA Sep. 23, 2010

green areas where they lack the most.

(31)

With this proposal the more architecture is built the more opportunities the bidonville has to build out of vegetation.

The expected result is the capacity to incept

6 5

2

1

X

X

3 7

3 4

4

2

Y

Y 8 1

fig.01 Organic Dress. 1. Recycled lastic planter for vegetable wall 2. Recycled plastic pannel for succulent roof 3. Recycled plastic I beam 4. 20cm soil insulati贸n

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fig.02 X. Organic Dress - Succulent roof 5. 20cm soil insulati贸n 6. Succulent plants nursery Y. Organic Dress - Vegetable wall 7. 30cm soil insulati贸n 8. Vegetables or ornamental plants


INDEA CL.01

INDEA DOCUMENT Urban Agriculture

(10)

(22)

Compost loop

(X)

Concept Plan

(Y)

Sequence

(31)

Abstract

(11) INDEA (21) Date

AKMASAMANOBALA Sep. 23, 2010

-reduces the amount of garbage municipal transportation and facilitates the process of parallel recycling activities such as the production of the plastic organic dress -raises consciousness in the community.

(31)

In order to generate this activity it is important to follow parallel operations such as: -create UAW. Urban agriculture workshops instruct and advice population on the use of compost and provide them with tools, seeds and materials. -define authorized dumps for organic non processed, inorganic and organic processed garbage - connect DOUAR's organic garbage production with Gran Casa Blanca’s in larger compost generation points.

Integrate local organic garbage (existing and daily bases generated) into a closed system -prevents soil from nutrients impoverishment. -worm composting can generate revenues by selling soil about five times the cost of regular soil and producing dried worm flour as animal feed resource. -soil enrichment increases urban agriculture production.

1. 1a 1b 2. 2a 2b 3. 3a 3b 3c 3d 4.

No. BM.01 by: of INDEA:

COMOST LOOP DOMESTIC PRESELECTION organic non processed material processed organic and inorganic material AUTHORIZED DUMPS keep compost material further recycling ORGANIC SEPARATION lignified material (local) wood (local) lignified material (gran casa blanca) wood (gran casa blanca) SEPARATED TRITURATION

5. COMPOST GENERATION (3 MONTHS) 6. 6a 6b 6c

DISTRIBUTION urban gardens retail. (5 times regular soil cost) UAW. urban agriculture workshops

6a

6b

6c

3c

1a 1b 1a 1b 1a 1b 1a 1b

1a 1b 1a 1b 1a 1b 1a 1b

5 2b

3d

4a

4b

2a

3a

3b

2b

2a

3a

3b

fig.01

17


INDEA CL.01 (11) INDEA (22)

Compost loop

Scenario with implementation of garbage management (before and after)

18

(21) Date

No. BM.01 by: of INDEA:

AKMASAMANOBALA Sep. 23, 2010


19


INDEA R0.01 (10)

INDEA DOCUMENT Urban Agriculture

(22)

Rurban oasis

(X)

Concept scenario view & section

(31)

Abstract Existing Palms clusters should be maintained and new ones can be located at pedestrian path crossings.

(11) INDEA (21) Date

No. RO.01 by: of INDEA:

AKMASAMANOBALA Sep. 23, 2010

(31)

The qualities obtained from the rurban oasis are: -Improvement of location and orientation -Space for recreation and leisure -Contribution for fruit production -Low maintenance without need for irrigation.

6

fig.01

Rurban oasis

Phoenix dactylifera Local stone bench

Gravel / Stones

fig.02

20


INDEA TGH.01 (10)

INDEA DOCUMENT Urban Agriculture

(22)

Thermal Green House

(X)

Concept scenario axo & section

(31)

Abstract

(11) INDEA (21) Date

No. TGH.01 by: of INDEA:

(31)

The more efficient system of farming nowadays is green houses. There are some environmental concerns such as energy consumption (usually gas) for heating the green houses when temperatures drop below 21 degrees. New technology developed in Holland shows that it is possible to develop a closed green house (copyright) and store underground the exceeding heat from summer insolation in warm water chambers. This hot water then is released to heat up the green house in winter.

AKMASAMANOBALA Sep. 23, 2010

The exceeding warm water can be stored and used for other purposes beyond the green house. The main technology of a closed green house is the ‘heat trans- fer’ that converts warm air into hot water and vice versa. The increase of productivity with a close green house is 20% in Holland and up to 100% in warm dry countries. Casablanca mild climate would not require much of this warm water in winter so the exceeding warm water can contribute to several activities: for example: hamman, urban pools and heating of public buildings such as schools or mosques.

Scenarios

Green House City Pool

1

Green House Public Laundry/ Food Market

4

2

3

6

7

Agriculture Firewall

Public Laundry Aqufier Cool water Warm water/ air transfer 8. Food Market 4. 5. 6. 7.

1. Greenhouse 2. Crops 3. Urban Pool

3

8

6

7

4

5

fig.01

21


INDEA TGH.01 (11) INDEA (22) (Y)

Thermal Green House

(21) Date

No. BM.01 by: of INDEA:

AKMASAMANOBALA Sep. 23, 2010

Scenario visualization

INDEA OD.01 (11) INDEA (21) Date (22) (Y)

Organic Dress

Scenario visualization

Scenario with implementation of Thermal Green House & Organic dress

22

No. OD.01 by: of INDEA:

AKMASAMANOBALA Sep. 23, 2010


23


INDEA WRRS.01 (10)

(22)

(31)

INDEA DOCUMENT Urban Agriculture

(11) INDEA (21) Date

Integrated Water Resources Management

No. IWRS.01 by: of INDEA:

AKMASAMANOBALA Sep. 23, 2010

(31)

Water management System for villages that, a) Are located at topographic depression points exposed to flood risks. b) Do not have water waste water treatment nor sewage system. c) Situated on top of phreatic aquifers d) The population are dealing with

Abstract The water management system is an integrated water system that includes surface water, ground water and treated waste water. The goal of the system is to have zero deficit in water balance. This means that we could use all available resources on site.

1

3a 3b

+80

Water management model for a village on a existing water resources

+70 +60

1. Direction Atlantic Ocean 2. Surface water collection trenches 3a. Electricity - Outflux 3b. City fresh water resources - Influx 3c. Waste water collection from other villages 4. PV cells 5. Wind mill 6. Water treatment center 7. Reservoir recharging aquifier 8. Ground water flow direction 9. Open Reservoir

ii

i

2

i. Village ii. Urban Agriculture iii. Nursery (Pepieniere)

iii

9

4

5 7

6 3c

8

Wind

Selling extra energy produced Water treatment plant

PV Cells

Open Reservoir

1 well can produce water for 10 hectars

Existing Aquifer

Aprox. 178200 liters / day

%40

Pepiniere 4000 liters / day

%20

Green House 6000 liters / day

%20

Vegetable Gardens 4000 liters / day

Waste water

Urbanisation > Organic dress 2000 liters %20

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

fig.01

10 LYDEC Supply for drinking water

24


INDEA IWRM.02

INDEA DOCUMENT Urban Agriculture

(10)

(11) INDEA (21) Date

Integrated Water Resources Management

(22)

(X)

Conceptual Section

(31)

Abstract

(31)

The proposals offer to give solution considering 3 major systems 1. Surface water management system 2. Ground water management system 3. Waste water treatment system 1. Surface water management system Surface water would protect the village from floods and contribute to recharge the aquifer. This will be done through trench systems that allow water to infiltrate to the aquifer.

No. IWRM.02 by: of INDEA:

AKMASAMANOBALA Sep. 23, 2010

. 2.Ground water management system Ground water is the only source for agricultural irrigation. Currently ground water is being pump up at 2-4l/s. This will ensured by surface water recharge and waste water treatment recharges. Waste water treatment The waste water should be collected from the village to be drained to water treatment plant. After treatment water will be distributed to recharging ponds at selected locations based on the ground water flow direction. See figure. The waste water treatment will also prevent the aquifer from being polluted from existing septic tanks that will

Water management model for a village on a existing water resources Conceptual section 1. Preciptation 2. Surface water collection trenches 3. Infiltration to ground water 4. Groundwater flow towards wells 5. Village 6. Waste water treatment 7. Treated waste water 8. Flow to aquifer 9. Aquifer reservoir (calcareous-sandstone) 10. Aquifer bottom (schists)

11. Phreatic piecometric level

1 7

2 5

3 11

4

6

8 9 10

fig.01

25


INDEA IWRM.01 (11) INDEA (21) Date

(22) (Y)

Integrated Water Resources Management

No. BM.01 by: of INDEA:

AKMASAMANOBALA Sep. 23, 2010

Scenario visualization of treatment plant

INDEA OD.01 (11) INDEA (21) Date (22) (Y)

Rurban Oasis

Scenario visualization

Scenario with implementation of water treatment plant and rurban oasis

26

No. RO.01 by: of INDEA:

AKMASAMANOBALA Sep. 23, 2010


27


INDEA AP.01 (10)

INDEA DOCUMENT Urban Agriculture

(22)

Applıcatıon placement

(X)

Concept Scenarıo plan

(31)

Legend

(11) INDEA (21) Date

No. AP.01 by: of INDEA :

Monoculture INDEA IH.01

Aquifer recharge INDEA IWRM.01

Agrıculture fırewall INDEA AF.01

Treatment plant INDEA IWRM.01

Agrıculture reserve INDEA RO.01

Rurban oasis INDEA RO.01

Biodiversity bridges INDEA BB.01 Water trenches INDEA IWRM.02

Urban expansion sceneario Urban zone

Pepeniers INDEA IH.01 INDEA OD.01 INDEA TGH.01 INDEA BM.01

N 10 0

28

AKMASAMANOBALA Sep. 23, 2010

50 20

100

200 meters


INDEA IWRM.02

INDEA RO.01

INDEA IWRM.02

INDEA BM.01 INDEA IH.01

INDEA BM.01

INDEA RO.01

INDEA TGH.01

INDEA IWRM.02

INDEA RO.01

INDEA BB.01 INDEA IWRM.02

INDEA AF.01

INDEA IH.01 INDEA BM.01

INDEA OD.01

INDEA OD.01

INDEA BM.01 INDEA RO.01

INDEA BM.01 INDEA OD.01

INDEA RO.01

INDEA CL.01

INDEA IWRM.01

INDEA OD.01

INDEA IWRM.02

INDEA OD.01

INDEA IWRM.01 INDEA IH.01

INDEA TGH.01

INDEA BM.01

INDEA AP.02 (10)

INDEA DOCUMENT Urban Agriculture

(22)

Applıcatıon placement

(X)

Concept Scenarıo plan

(31)

Legend

(11) INDEA (21) Date

No. AP.01 by: of INDEA :

AKMASAMANOBALA Sep. 23, 2010

Green house INDEA TGH.01

Agrıculture fırewall INDEA AF.01

Water trenches INDEA IWRM.01

Bıoproductıon model INDEA BM.01

Bıodıversıty brıdges INDEA BB.01

Sewage system

Trees INDEA RO.01

Treatment plant INDEA IWRM.01

Pepiniers INDEA IH.01

Recharge ground water INDEA IWRM.02

INDEA IWRM.01 INDEA BM.01

Underground water flow INDEA IWRM.01

Future expansion

INDEA IWRM.02

N 0

10 20 30

50

100 meters

INDEA IWRM.01

29


INDEA IWRM.02

DOCUMENT Agriculture

(11) INDEA (21) Date

No. IWRM.02 by: of INDEA:

AKMASAMANOBALA Sep. 23, 2010

AKdogan.MAdrazo.SAnchez.MArtinez.NOvas.BAntal.LArabi.

ed Water Resources ment

(31)

Section

als offer to give solution considersystems rface water management system ound water management system aste water treatment system

water management system ter would protect the village from d contribute to recharge the his will be done through trench at allow water to infiltrate to the

. 2.Ground water management system Ground water only source for agriculINDis the [ Inter National tural irrigation. Currently ground water is being pump up at 2-4l/s. This will ensured Arman Akdogan by surface water recharge and waste water Felix Madrazo treatment recharges.

Design]

Alvaro Novas

Waste water treatment Architects IND The waste water should be collected from the village to be drained to water treatment Hugo Sanchez plant. After treatment water will be distributed to recharging Tonatiuh ponds at Martinez selected locations based on the ground water flow Landscape Consultants Entorno direction. See figure. The waste water treatment will also prevent the aquifer from Prof. Abdelkader Larabi being polluted from existing septic tanks that will Water Engineer Consultant

Samir Bantal Real Estate Consultant & Architect Water management model for a village on a existing water resources Conceptual section 1. Preciptation 2. Surface water collection trenches 3. Infiltration to ground water 4. Groundwater flow towards wells 5. Village 6. Waste water treatment 7. Treated waste water 8. Flow to aquifer 9. Aquifer reservoir (calcareous-sandstone) 10. Aquifer bottom (schists)

11. Phreatic piecometric level

7 5

4

30

6

8 9

InDEAS FOR rURBAN LIVING  

What does the concept of urban agriculture as a productive green infrastructure for an urban area and as a new form of urban-rural linkage w...

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