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Endowment Fund

What is the Endowment Ftmd'l

Srnce tlie S lrlg f 992 under ad~~ate studen s have conts.ibuited to the E J n d ~ ~ ~ ~ e r i ~ ~ ~m%atedg u i ~ & 'qw ~aoJtla st "Cwrdmated Pla to Improve le Qu rty of student 1 e at UW." To y ie fund stands in excess o f $1 nullion. The interest from the fiuld is wed every year to fmd various projects on carnpu~.The pilonbes for thus chsbumenlerit are as follows: the improve~nentof accessibility on campus the irnproveiiient of safety on callpus the improve~nentof existing lounge space and s k ~ d yspace the renovatiorls of student services Sutrnussion fonris may be picked up at the Fedelation of Students Office (SLC1102). Ifvou l ave an uestions lease contact bre~ldabeatt V~cePresident Student I&ws !or the 8eIeratron 6P~tudentsat 888-4567 ext. %80 or via email at fediss~~fiafeds.uwaterloo.ca The deadhe for sui,nlissions is ~hursdayTJanuary 31,2002 at 4pm -""- . ------."---,-------.-+---w--+-w-v----

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the !l?koe&. ,Short stbia,/ortry, artwort. photography, elc,, by 'UWundergrads tviE be puliihed uring the winter term. Aso. 2 editor aositions are also avaUa6fe.

Good Luck on Exams!


Campaign Waterloo referendum passes Yes side wins despite formal complaints JESSICA W l T M E R Imprint Staff

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he infamous referendum question has found itself in the hot seat of controversy once again this week. Monday's release of the preliminary results revealed 1,348 "yes" votes (60.46 per cent), and 853 "no" votes (38.27 per cent), with 28 (1.26 per cent) declining votes. Out of 21,646 eligible voters, 2,229 cast votes, pushing voter turnout over the 10 per cent required to make the referendum binding. Gregg Milne, chairman of the Yes committee, said that he was "impressed that the voter turnout was so high -higher than the last Feds elections." Milne said, "I think that students recognized that we have a need for these projects, and that is what enabled the Yes side to win." He also credited the "reasonable fee increasen as playing a part in the victory. As for the next step, Milne

wants to "ensure that student input is taken into account as was promised." He said he would like to see the focus groups assigned quickly, "so that we can get these projects started." Peter Cresswell, No committee chairman, was unavailable for comment on the results. Complaints regarding referendum procedures have continued to surface, with the total at five formal complaints filed with the Feds. The initial complaint was brought forward by Jesse Helmer, Imprint president, in a letter to Brandon Sweet, Feds' chief returning officer. Helmer had concerns about rhe changes that were made to the referendum proposal, which was first intended to apply the $13.80 fee only once all four facilities were completed. However, the Campaign Waterloo Committee changed the proposal to begin charging the fee when three out of the four facilities were open for use. After student protests, the proposal

was changed back to the original wording. Even with the proposalchanged back to its initial phrasing, Helmer believes that "this change has irreparably damaged the integrity of the referendum and compromised its validity as a proper gauge of undergraduate student opinion." According to Helmer, if the Feds' goal is to obtain an accurate poll of informed student opinion, the referendum should be declared void. According to students' council rules it was not within the committee's power to change the proposal in the first place. This committee, named the Campaign Waterloo Committee, consisted of Catharine Scott, HR and student services, Ann Simpson, SLC Manager and Judy McCrae, director of athletics and recreation, as well as Yaacov Iland, Mike Kerrigan and Brenda Slomka. This is not the official Referendum Committee, which in Federation of Students Council Procedure 7 is ratified by council to "administer

Shown on the left, 'Yes' committee leader, Gregg Milne, is happy with the referendum results. Peter Cresswell (at right), headed the 'No' campaign. overall aspects of the referendum." Therefore, any committee other than the Referendum Committee does not hold the power to change parts of the referendum.

In a formal response t o Helmer's complaint, the Referendum Committee stated four points. continued on page 7

UW prepares for ouble cohort in 2003 PAM JANTZl special to Imprint

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he Theatre of the Arts was packedwith prospective undergraduate students, their parents and local high school administrators who voiced their questions and concerns about the upcoming double cohort phenomenon to a panel of University of Waterloo representatives. According to registrarand panel moderator Ken Lavigne, an "educational evolution . is occurring across Ontario," and in an attempt to keep the public informed, the university held its first double cohort information night. The Ontario government began making plans to phase out OAC from the secondary school education system, and as a result, there will be two graduating classes that will apply for entrance at post secondary institutions in Fall 2003. David Johnston, president of the University of Waterloo, said that university enrolment has steadily increased over the past few years, and the forecasts indicate that this trendwill continue at anevengreater rate. He also stated that the sudden increase in universitv enrolment is the result of numerous factors, including demographics, increased interest and secondary school reform. Although Johnston says that the higher level of interest in postsecondary education is encourag-

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Parents fired questions at administration about how UW is dealing with the double cohort. Many students and parents are worried about space and the quality of education at the post-secondary level.

ing for the university, he notes that it is important that quality educationis maintaineddespite thegrowth of the school. According to Peter Burroughs, from admission services, the main challenge of the double cohort will be to allow high school students access or opportunity to further their education at a university that provides the highest quality of education possible, given the available resources. When the school reform process began, Premier Mike Harris made acommitment to parents that there would be a place for everyone's son or daughter in Ontario universities. Many parents at the forum were disappointed that this commitment is not being fulfilled. Lavigne admitted that the university is unable to grow at a rate that would satisfy teh needs of the double cohort. Preparation by the university for the upcoming double cohort of students has been a work in progress over the past five years. Burroughs said that the university has been considering everythingin its attempt to find solutions. A plan to increase the number of admissions to the university by 40 per cent began in 1998, and will continue to Fall 2003, when the double cohort students enter college and university, according to Johnston. continued on page 5


NEWS

Here's to the Guinea pigs I

JON WlLLINQ lmprint staff

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n two years, there will be some emotional fireworks igniting all over Ontario as, for the first time, grade 12 and OAC students will graduate high school in the same class. Some of those emotions fizzled controllably during UW's double cohort info session for students, parents and educators last week. Clearly, students and parents and I think especially the university administration - are virtually crapping their pants at the thought of deciding how to deal with the

monster-sized grad classes that will be applying to universities next year. At the info session, university administrators addressed the concerns of stakeholders involved in the double cohort process. The majority of the audience was represented by parents of children who are currently in grades l l or 12, and who will be the guinea pigs; as one mother befittingly put it, for the new admissions systems. Those admissions systems, however, are currently non-existent. For many parents in the audience that night, it was refreshing to hear that the university brass is just as much in the dark as the families

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themselves.This didn't ease theconcern of many parents and students in the audience, though. One of the problems in the cohort year is that Grade 12 students will no longer have the extra year to gain prerequisite courses, which undeniably puts the OACs at an enormous advantage. This was only one of many concerns that surfaced at the forum. HIghes among everyone's concerns was how the university plans to measure a Grade 12 student's and an OAC student's average. Registrar Ken Lavigne and director of admissions Peter Burroughs, answered the question

Imprint, Friday, November 30, 200 1 with complete honesty: they don't know. Right now, there is no measuring formula in place, which is leaving students, especially those graduating from Grade 12, in a perpetual state of paranoia. Some parents' concerns were totally misguided. At one point in the forum, provost Amit Chakma tried to explain how UW is planning to expand admissions for the double cohort year (he's projecting 350 more admissions), but an irate parent called out "You have to do more!" from the back of the theatre. Other questions were received with loud ovations when they questioned how UW was planning for 2003. It was frustrating to watch parents expect the university to admit all students who apply at any cost. They must truly understand deep down that universities can't just open the doors for a thousand extra students in one year. Thisis partly why UW has taken the more "conservative approach,"

as president Johnston explained, to expanding enrolment annually since 1998. Many of the questions fell on theshoulders of Lavigne, Burroughs and presidentJohnston, bbt theques. . . .. .. . . . tlons should have really been amed at the government and school boards across the province. A recurring theme emerged: How can the new curriculum prepare Grade 12 students for competition with their OAC colleagues? All the trio could answer is "we'll try our best," and really, that's all they can do. The ball will be in the students' courts when it comes to impressing admissions committees next year. The provincial government was correct in removing the useless OAC year. In 2003, expect parents of turned down students to come knocking on universities' doors demanding explanations why their children didn't get admitted into their programs. Here's to the guinea pigs of 2003.

Physics students petition BRlTA LAWRlE special to Imprint

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Come to the lmprint Office, Student Life Centre, room 1 1 16 to receive your FREE tickets on Nov. 30 between 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Dec. 3 between 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

hysics 476 -selected topics in cosmology and astrophysics-is not a course for everyone. Yet, it seems that it is popular enough to have created a stir in the physics department. Students approached the department earlier this term and requested that PHY476 be offered in Winter 2002. They brought with them a petition with the signatures of 12 students interested in enrolling in the course. According to Nathan Rowbottom, one of the students who approached the department, the curriculum committee initially approved the course for next term. Nathan says that the students were then asked by the department head and the assistant department head to collect signatures of at least six more students who would enrol in the course. There was a catch - the six students had to be in fourth year. Nathan felt that this requirement was unreasonable, as "those thirdyears that signed the petition had a legitimate interest in the course and there are no requirements for the course that would prevent thirdyears from taking this course." According to Dr. Robert Mann, chair of the physics department, pressure from the university to limit low-enrolment courses brought about this requirement, as students without a fourth-year background would be less prepared for the course and more likely to drop it. He acknowledged that there are certainly exceptions to this rule. The concern that a dropout

Dr. Mann saw lack of orofessors results in fewer course offerines. rate would lead to low enrolment numbers prompted the initial requirement of a petition signed by fourth-year students. In the same vein, non-physics fourth-year students would be more likely to drop a physics course over a course in their major if it came down to the choice, and so fourth-year physics students were preferred as potential students. The fact that the number of fourth-year physics students issmall to begin with, made Rowbottom feel at one point like the department was sending him on a "mission impossible." He did, eventually, acquire the signatures.According to Mann, the two petitions have a total of 23 names between them, including 10 third-year students, seven fourth-year physics students, and six fourth-year students from other departments,mainly mathand engineering. To offer the course, the department needed to make a professor available. From the start, there was a willing professor, but for him to teach the course someone else would have to be found to teach a course he had been scheduled for.

Dr. Mann noted that the request for PHY 476 came relativelv late since teaching duties have been determined. The physics department, like most departments, has lost staff in the past decade due to government cuts. Six physics faculty members have been lost and have not been replaced since the early 1990s. With tighter staffing, undergraduate electives have been put on hold and have even been eliminated in the past few years. Mann says that "the initiative shown by these students regarding PHY 476 is very encouraging, since it demonstrates a genuine interest in physics. our challenge as a department is in responding to such requests with a reduced faculty complement relative to what it was ten years ago." Rowbottom has another perspective. He sees undergraduate courses as unduly affected by the reduction in faculty and makes the point that it is "business as usual for graduate courses." Early this week, it was announced that Dr. Paul Wesson would teach PHY 476 to the 12 students in January.

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Imprint, Friday, November 30, 200 I

NEWS

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Enrolment plan changed in preparation for double cohort -

HALAKHALAC Imprint staff

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he pressure is mounting on Ontario's current Grade 11 and 1 2 students. Come September 2003, admission to the University of Waterloo will be highly competitive, Current requirements are simply not going to be enough. On Monday, November 19, UW's senate met in their chambers in Needles Hall to establish an enrolment management plan that will put the minds of prospective students and their parents at ease. This gathering was the beginning of many meetings and discussions dedicated to find a solution to the50 to 70 per cent increase in first year students ahticipated in 2003. As Perer Burroughs, director of admissions, aptly described the situation, "There is much to consider." UW will increase its base year one intake by 7.5 per cent. Any larger increase wouldjeopardize the university's goal to "best maintain the quality of the university learning and the students' life experience." In which faculties will this increase be most noticable? "Discussions are currently under-way in the faculties to determine how the increases in enrolment will be distributed and managed," said Burroughs. However, applicants are now trying to excel beyond expectation, to stand out and to look exceptional. Admission requirements have been minimally altered. There are now some requirements related to limits on the number of Grade 12 courses that students should be aware of. It is very important for applicants to support their applications in any way that they think will be effective. Glowing letters of reference from academic experts, excelling in competitions and taking the American SAT exams are but a few ways of standing out from other applicants. The admission averages for all programs will definitely have in-

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Double cohort

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One8x10",Two5x7" s i x 2" x 3"

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over the years, limiting the university's resources to provide a quality education for students. Some parents had concerns that the national and international students will have priority over their own children. University representatives stated that U W will not consider decreasing the number of international students in order to accommodate Ontario students. "Students will be treated equally and selected on their preparedness for education at the post secondary level," said Johnston. Bud Walker, director of business operations, explained that oncampus housing has increased over the palt five years and continued renovations and building projects are taking place when parents questioned the quality of UW's student life. H e also stated that three students will not be made to live in a double residence room, as at WLU. Julie Primeau, undergraduate recruiting officer, is involved with developing alternative non-alcoholic programming to enhance the qualityof student life for the younger students who will be enterine" the university in the coming years. When the government began the process of phasing out OAC from the secondary school system, they made a commitment to ensure that there was a place for all studentsin post-secondary institutions. Now everyone wants someone held accountable to assure all students will have equal opportunity.

and students were concerned that these issues will not be addressed. The grading situation is still being dealt with by the Ministry of Education, post-secondary institutions and high school administrators. Panel members said common guidelines will be implemented at all universities to accommodate this challenge. Each faculty within UW has contributed feedback about admission requirements for the new curriculum in hopes that all students of the double cohort will be treated equally, said Burroughs. At this point, Johnston said, UW is not considering implementing entrance exams for prospective students. Many faculties will be increasing enrolment. The faculty of engineering is opting to produce a new program rather than increase the enrolment in present programs. Johnston indicated that professors at UW will be encouraged to modify their teaching material to meet the needs of students, regardless of their secondary school background. As a result of an increased student population and continued inflation, tuition increases are inevitable in coming years, said Amit Chakma, UW's VP academic. He explained that the university receives funding from the provincial government depending on the number of enrolled students, but these subsidies have decreased

continued from page 3

The government has also begun to help universities deal with the cohort by increasing targeted spending and developing the Superbuild Fund, allowing universities to provide more space oncampus to accommodate the influx of students, Johnston said. The panel clarified that the government does not allow schools to spend their funding as they see fit, instead assigning the funding to specific projects depending on the present needs, a strategy known as targeted spending. Despite attempts at the government and university levels to deal with the double cohort, high school administrators, parents and prospective students had many questions and concerns. Students presently in grade 11 are concerned that applicants with OACs will receive preference over them when admission procedures are underway. Years ago when the phase-out plans began, academic institutions became involved in the process by helping develop a new curriculum that would better prepare students for success at the post-secondary level, explained Burroughs. High school administration representatives pointed out that students' math and science marks in the new curriculum are much lower than marks attained by students in the old curriculum. Thisdifference will have a large impact on their overall averages,

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~reasedby 2003, especially in the already highly-competitive programs. "The averages required for admission, as is always the case, will be determined when the quantity and quality of the applicant pool is known," said Burroughs. Furthermore, all applicants, regardless of their geographical background or status in Canada, will be considered "equitably and fairly." UW will be facing many complications as a result of 2003's "double cohort." They will need to find ways of accommodating a larger first-year class while also ensuring that students' first year experience will not be compromised in any way. Resources concerned with teaching and learning, student life issues such as residences and athletic facilities and ancillary services will all need to be taken into consideration. WillPsych 101be heldinlarger classrooms, will more sections be made available, or will more professors need to be employed to teach extra classes? "This is certainly one of the major issues that the university will be addressing," said Burroughs. "There will definitely be need for more professors and actions are being considered regarding the recruitment of more staff and faculty to teach and serve the larger student population," he added. As it is, Friday night and Saturday morning classes might become a reality in order to cope with the students of the double cohort. The double graduating class of Ontario high school students is in part the reason for all the construction and renovation currently underway on campus. A new centre for environmental and information technology, a new building for cooperative education and career services, additions to the engineering lecture hall and modifications to the Engineering 3 building will all enable the university to accommodate, teach and provide services for the growing student population of UW.

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NEWS

Imprint, Friday, November 30, 200 1

Midnight Sun places LAURENANDERSON

special to Imprint

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he final race at the World Solar Challenge in Australia found the University of Waterloo's Midnight Sun VI racing team with a 15th place finish, in spite of somewhat inclement weather and a mechanical failure. According to Chris Urbaniak, business manager for Midnight Sun VI, this is a great improvement over UW's 24th place finish at the World Solar Challenge in 1999. November 22, the day of the final race, began with an overcast sky, an inconvenience for many of the teams, causing a decrease in the available amount of chargmg time for each car. The team set out on the last day of the race for the final 184 kilometres of the race. While traveling at a decreased speed due to the weather, the team experienced mechanical failure only two hours into the race. The motor controller, an imperative part of the motor system, had failed. A motor failure also occured at the solar car challenge in 1999, and raised questions as to whether or

the

not this failure could have been prevented. Urbaniak claims the team could not have prevented the motor controller failure. "We replaced the motor after the last failure. We did everything we could to prevent it from happening again," he said. Apparently, the team had also practised with a mechanism switch to minimize the time necessary to repair or replace piecesof themechanism in case of a failure. "The team showed incredible skill, determination and teamwork by replacing the motor, motor controller and rear suspension post in only 23 minutes," said a Midnight Sun press release. The team attempted to regain ground lost during the repair time but found themselves far behind their competiton, the University of Toronto. U of T kindly waited near the finish line for the Midnight Sun VI

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team, and attempted to cross the finish line with them, declaring the finish a tie. Official results have Queen's University with a sixth place finish, U of T in fourteenth place, and UW's Midnight Sun team in 15th place. Although the team is undoubtedly disappointed -the failure of the same piece of mechanism sealed a similar fate in 1999 - overall,

Camvus clips N A T A L I E CARRUTHERS

Imprint staff

Former UofR professor pleads gurlty Lana Nguyen pleaded guilty to fraud, two counts of forging documents and sixother charges. Nguyen said she had a PhD from the University of Waterloo, taughtsenior level engineering courses and used phoney documents to receive research grants from the University of Regina. Her sentence hearing is scheduled for February.

Isn't that a nice rock

Teacher Awards

COURNY MIDNIGHT SUN

U of T beat the Midnight Sun by one minute finishing at 1057 a.m.

A monolithic rock known as Gneiss (nice) will be one of the features in the new Centre for Environmental and Information Technology that is undergoing construction on UW's

campus. This 30-foot-high rock will be placed in the exhibit atrium with the help of an 180-tonne crane on December 1, weather permitting. The rock is said to be a part of Laurentia, Earth's first super-continent formed 1.8 and 1.4 billion years ago.

Kits for Afghani children Pens, pencils, rulers, toothbrushes, wash cloths and other educational and health-related supplies are being collected by WPIRG for children in Afghanistan. Counterpart International. a humanitarian organization has agreed to ship the kits to northern Afghanistani borders. Students can donate supplies on November 30 at the WPIRG office.

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they are quite pleased with their performance in Australia, according to Urbaniak. The team members spent the days between the final race and the awards ceremony onTuesday sightseeing in Adelaide, Australia. Urbaniak expects that the team members with jobs or schoolwork will return from Australia immediately, while those without pressing commitments will spend some time

touring the land down under. UW's next solar car, Midnight Sun VII, has already been designed and team members will likely begin construction in October or November of 2002. It will be raced at the American Solar Challenge and the World Solar Challenge in 2003, with 5 to 10 of the approximately 25 core members of Midnight Sun VI carrying over.

Co-op jobs down JOHNA. DRUMMOND Imprint staff

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here are 10 per cent more co-op students out of work this year compared to the same time last year. Different faculties have varying results, with some faculties showing even increased employment results compared to last year. According to Olaf Naese, CECS communications and public affairs, there are a total of 1,362 studentsstill looking for work,compared to 915 students this time last year. A total of 4,426 students were scheduled to enter the co-op program last year, while 4,526 students were scheduled to enter the co-op program this year. Naese said that co-op has the "largest number of students without employment in the last 10 years." He related the current situations to the recession of 1997, when co-op jobs were down as well. Naese said that the outlook for co-op students can be very ambiguous. Because of economic factors that may discourage employers from hiring full-time, permanent employees, co-op students may be in high demand at the lastminute. Naese said that it is not uncommon for co-op employers to hire studentsjust before Christmas, or within the first two weeks of January. Naese estimates that by January UW will have 800 student looking for co-op jobs, but said that "the jury is definitely still out." Naese said that "first year students are particulary hard hit" by the economic downturn. He en-

couraged those without jobs to not only participate in the continuous phase and database search, but to also look for their own jobs after the exam period. Different faculties are affected in different ways, particularly because of the economic downturn. While math and engineering have taken the hardest hits largely due to the high tech sector slowdown, the number of students in arts and science that have jobs compared to this time last year have increased. The total number of students who have jobs compared to last year at this time is as follows: math faculty, 61.8 per cent vs. 78.4 per cent; engineering faculty, 82.5 per cent vs. 70.1 per cent; applied health studies, 84.4 per cent vs. 80.7 percent; science, 64 per cent vs. 64.9 per cent; arts, 71.7 per cent vs. 77.5 per cent. Naese explained that several factors can distort the employment figures: the changing number of students entering the co-op program, students finding their own jobs; and students returning to former employers. The last posting for continuous phase expired on Thursday, now a database matches emolovers' , needs with students' qualifications. If students provide CECS with adequate documentation after continuous phase, CECS works on behalf of students to mail out resumes to employers that fit the database match. CECS will continue this process until the end of February. After this time, students no longer qualify for a co-op credit, Naese explained. Students are still eligible to have their information forwarded to potential employers.

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NEWS

Imorint. Friday. November 30. 200 I

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Solution Web site helps students. graduate students registered in 42 fields of study. Around eight UW students are employed by the servith final exams looming, ice. These students are either workpanic and nervousness is ing towards a graduate degree or on a campus-wide stu- have completed a graduate level program within the past year. dent rampage. However, when it's They answer questions cover2:30 am., you have an exam in less than seven hours, and the solution ing almost every subject area, rangto an impossible math equation is ing from anatomy to music to Spanevading you, ridethebellcuwe.com ish, 'engineering, math, science, English and history. is your salvation. On average, the graduates take Grant Goodwin is co-founder and president of this newly-launched less than30 minonline service that allows under- utes to solve each graduate, high school and commu- problem. After nity college students to pose aca- two and a half demic questions, 24 hours a day, hours of posting seven days a week, to graduate stu- a problem, a sodents from over 50 universities lution is e-mailed acrossNorth America, England and to the student. Over the next Australia. "Undergraduates can finally get year, the average direct, individualized assistance responses will when they need it," said Goodwin. fall to less than two hours. A solution bank of all the pre"Graduate students benefit financially and have the opportunity to vious problems and solutions that work in their field of expertise. This have passed through the system is mutually beneficial relationship is currently being compiled and will the primary goal of this new educa- be launched in December. There have been approxitional concept." Goodwin said "With the help mately 2000 postingssince the Web ofridethebellcuwe.com, studentsdo site began operating a month ago. Although there is an average of not have to stop everything each time they are stumped. 65 postings daily, some days have By creating step-by-step so- been known to receive close to 200 lutions to each problem, we create postings. personalized sample problems for Another aspect of the Web site students." is an essay review service. Final There is a charge of $5 for drafts of essays, assignments and every solution the student accepts. lab reports are reviewed and proofOf this revenue, 80 per cent is paid read by highly knowledgablegraduto the graduate student who pro- ate students with refined writing vided the solution. skills. Ridethebellcuwe.com has 211 Concern may arise regarding HALAKHALAF Imprint staff

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the validity and accuracy of the solutions created by the graduate students. Goodwin is quick to reassure: "Each solution is rated by the student who receives it. We flag each poor rating and examine those solutions for validity. We will intercept the student with a free solution as a customer service response and then take appropriate action with the gradute student." "Also, we carefully check the validity of the transcripts that each graduate student must send us before workingonoursystem. "The .graduares know what the students who post the problems require -they're experts." "Our primary goal is to prove that there is a market for this sort of direct, timely, expert assistance over the Internet," said Goodwin. Grant Goodwin was an engineering student at Queen's University before leaving to explore different business opportunities. It stemmed from his own personal frustratingexperienceas auniveristy student searching for the solutions to the endless sample problems found in text books and past exams. "I often found myself unable to begin many problems and found the sample problems in the text books dissimilar enough to cause me confusion. I was forced to copy a friend's assignment or wait a day or more to see my TA during the office hours - a very inefficient process."

The first was that the referendum was never intended to remain fixed after the October 22 special meeting, and authorization was given for its modification. Second, the committee decided that the "clarification" was "made in good faith and not intended to contravene council's intention." Third, the campus media outlets are independent from the referendum committee and therefore responsible for getting the right information to students. Fourth, neither of the chairs of the Yes and No Committees, when interviewed, felt that the discrepancies with the referendum had been detrimental to their campaigns or the referendum process itself. After addressing these particular complaints, the Referendum Committee decided that the results of the voting would stand. Helmer intends to appeal this decision. At an ES referendum forum held November 13, another rule was allegedlyviolated. Council procedure 7.A.2.a states that the referendum committee shall, "act impartial and unbiased on referendum issues and make no public written

andlor oral statements concerning the referendum except in respect to referendum procedural matters." Ryan Chen-Wing, who attended the forum, said that committee member Charles Bergeron did not obey this rule. According to Chen-Wing, Bergeronresponded to a question posed about why the campaign seemed rushed, stating that there was a deadline for it to be approved by the board of governors and to be included in the Campaign Waterloo. The issue of online votingsecurity has also been raised. Before placing their vote, students had to first submit their username and QUEST password. This evoked the question of online security. Daniel Fernandes, a fourth-year systems design engineering student, questions why this particular password was used for identification. "Why do the Feds need [my QUEST password]?" Fernandes also believes that entering a username and password to vote does away with the aspect of a secret ballot. Brandon Sweet explains that the QUEST password was used because it is "ubiquitous with undergraduate students. . . all students have had to use it at one point." Sweet maintained that the Feds

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h CHfCUUP AND CLâ‚ŹANING never see the password, and there is no record kept of how an individual studentvoted-only the number of student voters. Doug Sibley, a 2A computer science student, has written a paper analyzing Internet voting technologies.This document, available on the Web at -dasibley,addressesvoter anonymity along with password security. In his paper, Sibley argues that "confidentiality can be threatened by a system where we have to transmit our voting intent into the computer and over the Internet." He expiains that computer monitors emit electromagnetic radiation, making it possible to reconstruct the image displayed on the screen (the vote) if someone has TEMPEST technology. As described in the document, another threat to anonymity is having someone standing behind the voter while he or she is voting and easily accessing a glimpse of the person's vote. Though the conflictssurrounding the referendum are numetous, the construction of the new facilities will most likely be carried out. As for Chen-Wing, his main concern is "to ensure that [referenda] are conducted properly."

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November 30,2001,Volume 24, Number 20 Student Life Centre, Rm l I16 University of Waterloo Waterlm, ON, N2L 3 G l

P: 519.888.4048 F: 519.884.7800 imprint.uaraterloo.ca

Editorial Staff Editor-in-chief,Ryan Matthew Merkley editor@imprint.uwated6o.ca

Assistant editor, Jason Yu News, John A. Drummond Assistant news, Natalie Catruthers Forum, Amy Potvin Features, Kirika Bussell Assistant features, Kourtney Short Science, Magda Konieczna Sports, vacant Assistant sports, vacant Arts, Lauren S. Breslin Assistant arts, Emily Collins Photos,Janice Jim Assistant photos, Brian Code Graphics, Chris Inch Assistant graphics, vacant Web, Dave Barsam Assistant Web, vacant Systems admin., Talesh Seeparsan Assistant sjuterns admin, vacant Lead proofreader, Hala Khalaf Proofreader, Lesley Burnett Proofreader, Talea Coghlin Proofreader, Adina Gillian Proofreader, Jessica Witmer Contributors Lauren Anderson, Ali Asaria, Adrian Chin, Ryan Edmonds, Nigel Plear, Jason Gutcher, Julian Ichim, Pam Jantzi, Brita Laurie, Aaron Lee-Wudrick, Stella Lui, Greg MacDougall, Mr. Mike, Neal Moogk-Soulis, Kerry O'Brien, Patrick Quealey, Mirna Rakanovic, Neil Randall, Joshua Safer, Mark A. Schaan, Kirk Schmidt, Ian Spitzig, Laura Taylor, Peter Van Driel, Amanda Watkins, Jon Willing. Fiction Supplement Editor, Amanda Watkins Assistant editor, Ian Spitzig Cover Photos and design, Chris Inch Destruction of property, Ali Asaria

Reasons to protest G

lobalization appears to increase poverty and inequality. The costs of adjusting to greater openness are borne exclusively by the poor, regardless of how long the adjustment takes." -The World Bank, The Simultaneous Evolution of Growth and Inequality, 1999. In the 1970s, commercial banks were eager to give large loans to developing countries. This borrowed money was often stolen by corrupt politicians or used to fund oppressive regimes, often with full knowledge of International Monetary Fund officials. The interest rates were initially low, but in the 1980s interest rates skyrocketed due to a global recession. This resulted in the quadrupling of the debt from $568 million US to about $2 trillion US. Developing nations depended on commodities like sugar and coffee for income. Commodities prices collapsed during the recession in the 1980s. The drop in income and the astronomical rise in foreign ., debt was a double whammy for developingnations.These nations were left unable to pay back these loans. Since countries aren't allowed to declare bankruptcy, the interest on these loans has continued to multiply. While industrial nations have grown and prospered since the 1980s, developing nations have never recovered. The IMF got involved when developing countries were unable to make the interest payments on these bank loans. The world's public and private lenders refused to extend these loans unless the countries agreed to strict conditions. These conditions, known as Structural Adjustment Programs, were imposed by the IMP. The main tenants of these programs were the removal of restrictions on trade and investment, promotion of exports, devalua-

tion of national currencies, increase of interest rates, ~rivatizationof state companies and services, and deregulation of labour markets. The adjustment programs have resulted in more misery for citizens of developing nations. The removal of trade restrictions has decimated many local industries. In August 1999, the restrictions on the import of soybeans were removed in India. This resulted in the dumping of subsidized foreign soybeans on the Indian market. Within one growing season, the price of soybeans crashed by more than two-thirds. Thus, the soybean production and processing industry was destroyed, and millions of Indian farmers were left jobless. The "deregulation" of labor markets resulted in the elimination of collective bargaining rights and lower wages. These policies further erode labour standards in developing countries. The increasing privatization of services also harms citizens. Services like water, education, health care, electricity are often subsidized and provided by the state for free or at a low cost. After privatization, market rates are charged for these basic services. Citizens, who are poor to begin with, can no longer afford to pay for these necessities. Young people can't afford the new school fees; families can't pay for basic healthcare. Privatization just increases the suffering of impoverished people. As Mr. Lee-Wudrick stated in his column last week, protesters issued a list of four demands for the World Bank and IMF. One of the demands was to open all meetings to the public. IMF negotiations and votes are conducted behind closed doors by a select group of central bankers and finance ministers. The people affected by the decisions they make have no way of voicing their opinions. They have no say in the process. How's that

for fairness? These meetings might be "an overpriced dinner party" to Mr. Lee-Wudrick, but the decisions made at these meetings are a matter of survival to many people. Mr Lee-Wudrick also suggested that "all the meetings of all the organizations protesting should also be open to anyone." It might be news to you, but the majority of these organizations are non-profit, social interest groups. These groups are funded and run by normal, everyday citizens. Since these groups do not advocate the use of violence, they have nothing to hide. They would probably welcome you to a meeting. Another demand called for the cancellation of all debt of impoverished countries to the World Bank and IMF. As stated earlier, much of the debt was contracted by undemocratic governments and oppressive regimes. A lot of the money was diverted and not used for development. The World Bank and IMF created this situation. They encouraged governments to incur these loans and did not care where the money went. When the global economy crashed, no one was there to bail out these countries. Industrial nations have exploited developing nations, taken their natural resources and profited from them. Is it fair to force the poorest members of society to pay for their own oppression? The loan payments forces governments to reduce spending, resulting in cuts in social programs, health care and education. Impoverished people are left unable to provide for themselves and unable to afford education, thus propagating the cycle of poverty. There is no bright side of things, and no, Mr. Lee-Wudrick, they won't even have fresh air. -Janice Jim 3B biology

Office Staff Business manager, Cachy Bolger cathy.bolger@imprint.uwaterloo.ca

Advertising & production manager, Laurie 'Iigegert-Dumas ads@impriot.uwaterl~o.c~

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Stepping forward, looking back

Board of Directors board@imprint.uwarerloo.ca

President, Jesse Helmer Vice-president,Jay Szymanski Treasurer, Philip Weiner Secretary, vacant Staff liaison, Adina Gillian staffJiai~n@imprinr.uwaterIoo.ca

1mpri"t is the otficial student newspaper of the University ol Waterloo. It is an editorially independent newspaper pub. lished by Imprint Publications, Waterloo, a corporation without share capital. Imprin, is a member of the Onraric Community Newspaper Asvxi~tion(OCNA). Editorial submissions may be considered for publication m any edition of 1 n p . i ~ .Imprint may also reproducethe marerial commercially m any format or medium as p u t of the newspaper database, Web rite or any other praduct derived from the newspaper. Those submitting editorial content including articles, Icrrers, photos and graphics, will grant Inprinr tint publication rights of their submitted material and as such, agree not to submit the same work to any orha publication or group until such time as thematerial has beer distributed in an issue of Im'nr, or Inpin, dedacer theil intent not to publish the material. The full t a r of thi! agreement is available upon request. Imprint does not guarantee to publish articles, photographs letters or advertising. Material may nor bepublished, at the discretion ofInp.int, if that material isdeemed to be libelous or in contravention withInp.int'spolicies with rerpecr toouf code of erhm and journalistic standards. Imprint is publrrhed every Friday during fall and winrel terms, and every second Friday during the spring term Imprmr reserves the rcght to screen, edit and refuse advertis. mg. One ropy per customer. Imprint ISSN 0706-7380 Inrprin~CDNPubMa~lProducrSaler Agreementno. 554677

A-

s we published our last issue of the term and of the year - I took a minute to reflect on the past year. The year 2001 followed the year 2000 like every other year before it; I did notwalk on the moon. I did not drive a flying car. In fact, I did not experience an odyssey of any kind. Disappointed, my thoughts turned back to Imprint, and it seemed appropriate to take a look at our track record so far. Our reporters spend nearly all of their time behind the pen and notepad, but rarely do they ask, "What have we done for you?" Even though the Imprint office is located right in the heart of student happenings, it can be easy to forget who owns this newspaper: the students. Why should students care? Because they aren't just the consumers of this newspaper: they own it. Not unlike the Federation of Students, each fee-paying student is a member of the corporation. The big difference is that Imprint's job is to keep an eye on them. But who watches the watchmen (that means us)? Other campus media have stepped up to fill that role, but I say it should be the students. This kind of taunting has worked before: o y doors are wide open, so if you don't like what we do, or you love what we do and want

to see it continue, please consider pitching in. The newspaper doesn't happen without the dedicated efforts of dozens of volunteers. Getting involved isn't the only option, by far. When people who criticize are told they should pitch in, it's a fair challenge, but reluctance to join the team doesn't remove their right to criticize. This term I've accepted the praises and the complaints; I've been called all sorts of clever names, from corporate media whore to Machiavellian tyrant. At the beginning of the term, as our frosh issue pushed the limits of acceptable content, the moral division was between students and administration, not our readership. If that doesn't mean we're doing something right, then the scarcity of that particular issue certainly does. That said, except for assumptions that this newspaper operates with a corporate agenda and my secret life as an evil despot, the majority of comments I get from students are positive. They like the work that we do; their biggest complaint is that we don't do more of it. Not enough coverage is also my biggest complaint. I wish we had the staff to do more (insert obligatory, yet earnest request for new volunteers). At the end of my second term as

editor-in-chief, I think there's lots of room for improvement, from a more comprehensive sports section to the development of our Web site. Both of those things are coming, but we'll need volunteers to make them a reality. In January, you'll return from the break to find a new and improved Imprint. This term, the editorial board has been doing double duty, not only producing the weekly newspaper, but also meeting in order to develop a new design for the newspaper. Starting with our January 4 edition, Imprint will feature a new style, with several new features and more integration between the paper version and the online edition. Imprint Online will also be getting a facelift, only four months after we launched the first redesign the online edition had seen in over five years. There's lots more on its way in the coming months, and I hope students will keep reading to find out, and send us your thoughts along the way. After all, it was Machiavelli who wrote: "One who becomes prince [or an editor] through the favour of the people ought to keep them friendly."

- Ryan Matthew Merkley editor-in-chief


FORUM

Imprint, Friday, November 30, 200 I

9

The lop-sided multiversitv d

Growth among UW's programs is unbalanced

T

he Latin root of the word university rests in unus, meaning one, and vertere, to turn. It was intended to reflect that universities were all-encompassing and had the ability to shape and turn both individuals and the society as a whole. In the face of significant government under-funding and incentivized growth, the University of Waterloo, and many like it, face the threat of losing their universality and, with this, their ability to shape the whole of society. The path towards significant growth at the university has been hinted at since the appointment of Amit Chakma, the university's new vice-president academic and provost. This is not to suggest that Dr. Jim Kalbfleisch, Chakma'spredecessor, had a remarkably different vision of university education but that successiveyears of painful and tough decisions have finally reached the breaking point. Chakma and president David Johnston have begun a series of "town-hall" meetings with staff and faculty to ascertain information and gauge the appropriate level of growth for UW. Apparently, student consultation is also in the works. Chakma and Johnston have both made references to the fact that the university must "diversify" its revenue streams, which could include new programs and disciplines that are full-cost recovery or profit programs. This type ofgrowth could best be classified as "suprauniversity" growth in that it is intended to grow the university in areas that are not traditional to the

university program. Supra-university growth is not completely benign. These full-cost recovery programs (which already exist in accounting and in speech communication), utilize university resources in both faculty and staff and take up space that is becoming increasingly limited on campus. However, these programs are typically a cash infusion into the university to allow for the maintenance of quality in the university as a whole and provide the necessary funds to 'run traditional programs. Growth within the university really only comes in two forms: asymmetrical and balanced. To understand the choices facing the university it is important to understand how the university is funded. Much to the surprise of many students, they don't actually pay a large portion of the costs of their education. When looking at the overall university, the average students pays 36 to 38 per cent of their total education costs (still higher than the Tory election promise of 35 per cent). The rest is made up by fundraising and government grants. The university does not receive government revenue evenly,though. The university gets a cash injection for each Basic Income Unit (BIU) it takes in. The BIU attempts to put a value on the relative cost of each program. This occursat an approximate value of $2,500 to $3,000 per BIU. But the university cannot simply grow all programs equally. The university is limited to grow each program within a given corridor. The corridor, althoughslightlymore

complicated, basically stipulates 3 per cent growth of a five year rolling enrolment average. Yet corridor midpoints (the median level of funding expected) have not reflected the significant demographic changes in the student population and so university funding increasingly lags both enrolment changes and inflation. At some universities, up to 17 per cent of students are unfunded BIUs, meaning no provincial funding is received for these students. The Access to Opportunities Program (ATOP) and the new growth funding allow for corridors to be expanded. ATOP funds were restricted to students in computer science, computer and electrical engineering. The new growth funds will likely not be restricted, but will simply allow the university to increase enrolment as they see fit. To take advantage of this funding, from a revenue perspective, the university is best suited to grow programs with the highest BIU funding. This means that high-cost programs are likely to expand the most. While on the surface this looks neutral or beneficial to the university as a whole, as overall revenue grows, the consequences become rather large. Growingsome programs at the expense of others creates a false understanding of value within society. High cost programs then create more spots for students, giving them the perception that there is a clear societal need for more graduates in these areas. This relates to future employment and the perception of different degrees within the

economy. More importantly, this lopsided funding is unlikely to translate significantly into the broader university revenue picture. High BIU programs are funded more because they cost more. Increasing university revenue by growing high BIU programs allows lower BIU programs to continue to attempt to subsist on revenue that has not been adjusted for inflation in over a decade. This weakens the unity of the university and creates tension between departments. Perhaps most crucially wrong with this growth pattern is the effect of high-cost programs on other faculties. If engineering grows to take up the university's new funding (as rumours have suggested) these engineering student .all require space in electives (with a significant proportion of these in arts). This places unfair demands on arts faculty members and creates a faculty that can barely move beyond service teaching (the term given to professors who teach electives for students in other faculties of the university). Essentially, asymmetrical growth within the university destroys the original concept of the university and creates a system which is eroding one half of the institution to feed the other. The concept of the university as universal and able to shape the whole of society is in grave danger. Forget the university, here comes the lopsided multiversity. -Mark A. Schaan 4A political science

Get your facts straight about co-op I

nregards to the proposedchanges to the co-op process, I feel that students are making judgments prior to having any knowledge of the facts. Here is a list of the major issues that the new system addresses, in my estimation. First, many of the same students are getting all of the interviews. Did you know that last term, all of the offers were made to less than 40 per cent of the students that had rankings for jobs? This is great if you are in the 40 per cent, but think about the more than 60 per cent of co-op students who don't get an offer in the first round. The new system will promise to distribute the interviews across more students and give a better opportunity to those who are struggling. Second, a ripple effect of the first issue is that a small percentage of employers are getting the students they want. Maybe you are thinking this is not such a big deal because large companies can just pick up students in the continuous phase. However, I think that most UW co-op employers employ three

people or less, and these employers do not have the time or the resources to keep coming back to our school toconduct numerous interviews in the hopes that they OP might eventually get a student. If we don't help these resourcestrapped employers, they will turn On Our elsewhere.If there aren't enough jobs for t h o s e who need them, then it's not going to matter what process is implemented. Third, the number of interviews being wasted is continuously growing, because students are not doing enough research before applying to a job. How many times have you applied to a job just because it sounded good or because

you had a few extra applications? I feel that it's time students made more informed decisions instead of just applying to 20 jobs and CO- then worrying about the consequences later (for instance, not beingable to sign the job off). The new system willmake the job-hunting process more realistic. You apply to a job, you have an interview, you get an offer and either you accept the job and don't have to worry about co-op for the rest of the term, or you can keep looking. The new system will force coopstudents tomakemoreinformed decisions and will limit the number of wasted applications. This will

. . .there are too many cocky students, walking around campus thinking they

are God's gift to co-op employers.

lead to less time wasted by employers as well. Remember. "One man's junk is another man's treasure." Fourth, in my opinion, there are too many cocky co-op students, walking around on our campus thinking they are God's gift to coop employers. These people are hurting the reputation of our school, and our co-op program. Some students actually believe that they can walk out in the middle of an interview or tell an employer that their job is not good enough for them. I understand there are many situations in which someone may not like the job that is being presented, but there's no reason to offend an employer to the point where they will want to hire elsewhere. Finally, employersandstudents have to wait between 8 to 12 weeks just to find out job match results. There are students that would be happy to be employed and not have to worry about finding a job. In addition, this problem is amplified for employers who ace searching for co-ops for the spring

term. because there is much more competition from other students at other universities, who are also seeking summer employment. Often, someone from another university can approach an employer and get hired for the summer before the employer has even interviewed at UW. The result of this is lost job opportunities for us. I think that all students need to realize that these changes will only be made in the interest of all students. These changes will also benefit co-op's other major customer, the employers. Yes, the proposed changes hurt the top students who get a lot of interviews and offers, but change will benefit the student body as a whole, the co-op process, and the reputation of our school. I hope that each of you will think about these things before forming your next opinion on the proposed changes to W s co-op process. -Jason Gutcher 4A math & business


Safety over comfort To the editor,

I

believe that the students in village one who are being forced to relocate should recall an important point. They requested condoms and Vaseline because they are "being fucked over" and wish for safety and comfort. Perhaps they were not warned that the use of petroleumbased lubricants with condoms can damage the condoms, and make them ineffective in protection of STDs and prevention of pregnancy. I would suggest some water-based lubricants (such as KY).

-Peter Lizak Masters computer science Convenience over quality To the editor,

I

n his article last week, "Ready and Willing" Jon Willing poses the question, "Is convenience winning over quality?" I think this is a question that UW decision-makers in all areas need to ask themselves. I have two particular examples in mind. First of all, I would like to know who came up with the brilliant idea to move students out of residence to make room for engineering graduate student offices?How is this, in any way, an adequate solution to the shortage of office-space, other than it is a convenient alternative to taking the time to search for a more appropriate location? Not only is this a complete inconvenience for students living on East E (who have formed friendships and made this floor their home), but I'm sure this can't be good for the reputation of UW residences. Word travels fast, not only from student to student, but also from parents to would-be future UW parents. Also, I can't imagine that the grad students who will be occupying these makeshift offices can be very satisfied with this bizarre location. Perhaps the people who are responsible for this decision need to consider not only the students who are being affected, but also the long-term effects of making choices out of convenience. My second example concerns the proposed changes to the co-op system. I can't understand why the decision-makers at U W do not comprehend the concept of democracy. Is it really that difficult to inform students of proposed changes and seek their input on these issues? Didn't people learn anything from the mess caused by the SLC expansion proposal? Olaf Naese insists that "there are co-op students involved in the process." Really? I find that hard to believe. If this is true, then why have only a handful of students been given the opportunity to be part of this process? And why did it take a frantic e-mail from Geoff Pare to inform me of the new co-op system? Something is a little

fishy here. Can somebody please tell me what needs to be done before the interests of students will be taken into account?

-Laura Dickey political science A%iliations over quality To the editor,

I

have been a satisfied student at the University of Waterloo for three years. Recent tactici employed by professors -in instructing classroom students have, however, begumto elicit some concerns regarding the of my education. Teachers' political and social affiliations are inherent in primary and secondary school education across the country, this we have come to accept. Such a mediocre level of education is one, though, that most postsecondary students expect their college and university institutions to surpass. More and more frequently, professors are failing to deliver their lessons in an objective manner. These methods, bordering on brainwashing, do not encourage the independent critical thought students like myself are looking to develop. It is imperative that, as a significant educational agent,.professors at UW remain neutral in their interpretation of texts and presentation of classroom material. We do not need to be conditioned to repeat the mistakes of our predecessors.

violence didn't work). Well a large number of people have decided that it isn't just the anti-everythings who can organize a grassroots global movement centred on a particular day of action. There's a new rallying cry: D2! For those of you who believe in free markets and free people, December 2 is a great opportunity to participate in a positive action for freedom by joining the global walk for capitalism. This walk on D2 celebrates International Freedom & Prosperity Day and is a positive celebration of the values of capitalism: free speech, liberty from government oppression, technology, individualism, innovation, creativity,haipiness, change,profitand free trade. Marcheshave been arrangedinover 100 cities around the globe, including Stratford, London, Oakville, Mississauga, Brampton and Toronto. More information is available at www.walkforcapitalism.org Join the real humanitarians as we strive to satisb the needs and wants of every individual in the world. Free your mind, free yourself, free the world, celebrate D2! Tell the antis a d the statists that "they may take our lives but they can never take our Freedom!" Kilts and blue face paint are not required to participate in the march, and will likely result in frostbite to important bits of anatomy, but would be entertaining. Leave swords and pikes at home as it will impede on the post-march shopping opportunities.

- Graeme Hein 3B engineering

-Erika Shea

Anger over tranquility To the editor,

Capitalism over anti-everything

E

To the editor,

I

n recent years we have been bombarded by news of protests for MI, S11 . . the righteous were going to Seattle to show the world how non-violent politics, based on sharing, were superior to greedy capitalism (and also trash the place just in case non-

<MORT-

The forum section enables members of the University of Waterloo community to present views on various issues through letters to the editor and longer comment pieces. All letters must be signed by the author, with a phone number for verification, and should not exceed 350 words. They can be sent to: letters@imprint.uwaterloo.ca. Letters received via fax or e-mail will not be printed unless a phone number for verification is included. All material is subject to editing for brevity and clarity. The editor reserves the right to refuse to publish letters or articles which are judged to be libellous or in violation of Imprint's code of ethics. The opinions expressed through columns, comment pieces, letters and other articles are strictly those of the authors, not the opinions of Imprint.

.

WANMIIUIAV

verytime I read one of Greg Macdougall's pieces, I get angry. I've never been exactly sure why, until I read his most recent Crumble 'n' Erb piece ("Brand new world," November 23). In an October 12 piece entitled "Censorship?" he tried to dress up OCAP's trashing of Ontario Finance Minister Jim Flaherty's office in the word "eviction."This time around,

Mr. MacDougall thinks it's all right to destroy an Ottawa McDonald's because that's not really violence. Of course it isn't. And toppling the World Trade towers would have been an acceptable political statement if only they had been empty- with the planes on auto-pilot, of course. I can't wait for Mr. Macdougall to tell us it's okay for pro-lifers (or anti-choicers, or whatever) to blow up abortion clinics, so long as there are no people inside. In short, Mr. Macdougall is either intellectually dishonest, or just a garden-variety idiot. Quite frankly, if the left-wing is to have any credibility at all with voters in this country, it desperately needs to dissociate itself from people like him. He can dress protesters' actions in all the upscale words he likes; but now, when Joe and Jane Canuck hear about upcoming WTO/ IMFIG-somethingprotests, first they roll their eyes, then they speculate on which businesses will get trashed this time. Ultimately they tune out, and the social justice movement takes another step backwards. As a fiscal conservative but social liberal, I find this excrutiatingly annoying, and place the blame squarely on the shoulders of Mr. Macdougall and his ilk. Mr. Macdougall, of course, blames mainstream corporate media bullshit. This is akin to a poor craftsman blaming his tools, since he hasn't figured out yet that the people he has to sell his agenda to -Joe and Jane -are on the far side of the news camera. Quite simply, the media will be there to show every Canadian the mindless goons who trash a McDonald's just as it was there to show us an RCMP officer with an itchy trigger-finger pepper-spraying UBC students. People eventually see all kinds of bullshit for what it is, but no matter how hard Mr. Macdougall tries, even he can't polish a turd. -Mike Habicher UW engineering alumnus

Send your opinion to letters@imprint.uwaterloo.ca


FORUM

Imprint, Friday, November 30, 200 I

I1

An arrestee's storv .. special to Imprint

0

n November 17, at the G-20 protest, police attacked and arrested protesters for the crime of dressing in black. The dogs and police attacked other protesters in the crowd who attempted to defend them. A police dog mangled an elderly woman when she tried to get in the way of the police attack. Later, police stormed the crowd again and arrested more people dressed in black, causing panic and scattering protesters. I was grabbed by RCMP agents, thrown to the ground, and forced to lay face down with a boot on my neck and another on my back. I yelled that I was not resisting arrest, which made the police push down harder. I was handcuffed with plastic handcuffs (illegal under International Law), and forced not to move. When I yelled that I was asthmatic and could not breathe, the police ignored my cries, and told me not to move my face. Later, I was forced onto a side street where I had to continue keeping my face on the ground. The police refused to remove my mask, until about 15 minutes later. After being transported w t h 11 others, we arrived at the police station. After a quick body search, the police put 11 of us in a bullpen. Talking', with the other arrested comrades, I found out that most of us were not read our rights or properly arrested. I was not told why I

J was arrested until after I was processed: obstructing police. We were told that we could talk to a lawyer, not one of our choice, but duty council that were selected by police. They told me that I would be out shortly and promised to call my parents and various professors to tell them about my arrest (it was only after I called my house at 5:OO a.m. that I realized no one was contacted by "my lawyer"). Soon other people began coming into cells. They could not get a phone call or talk to their lawyer either. Later in the evening, we were told thatwe would be released shortly. Two of us in the cell were sick withstrep throat and we needed our medication. So we began chanting and banging, "Give us our medication." An officer came after awhile and said he would see what could be done. When I said I also had strep throat and needed my antibiotics the police responded,"Seriously, fuck off." We responded by chanting his statement. Later we were put into single cells, three of us in one cell with only one small metal board to sleep on. After a lot of chanting, I was released at 4:20 a.m. We were all released without any charges since our arrests were bogus. All in all, this experience further confirmed my understanding of the repressive illegal police attacks on dissent and the power of solidarity in the belly of the beast. We showed resistance at attempts to disempower us.

Gav bashing NlGEL FLEAR

special to Imprint

I

t is hard for me to conceive why someone would hate queer people to the point that they would try to harm or even kill them. Sadly, attacks against queer people do occur on a daily basis. The vast majority go unreported, and those that actually do reach the police and the media are very serious, usually involving a deathwith clear evidence that the crime was motivated by homophobia. Such a case happened earlier this month in Vancouver. Police reported that Aaron Webster, 41, was beaten to death and left naked in Stanley Park, an area known for gay cruising. The queer community jumped into action the following day and the story reached national news. As I researched this article looking for cases of gay bashing, I found over 500matches to the word"murder" on the new queer site, planetout.com, covering the last five years. According to the FBI, GLBT Americans remain the third largest category of hate crime. It has also been well documented that crimes of hatred are more vicious, and more lethal than other types of crime. It is no wonder then, that recent studies show that about 40

The next generation is learning that it is okay to use anti-gay slurs, which is troubling, given that most crimes against the queer communityare by male youths. The recent murder of Aaron Webster serves to remind us as Canadians that we are not immune to the vicious attacks against queer people that we have seen in the U.S. and elsewhere. While the queer community has come a long way in terms of social acceptance, we're still a long way from the same assurances of safety that heterosexual people currently enjoy.

per cent of queer individuals fear personal attack, about 30 per cent have been physically attacked, and almost 100 per cent have been verbally assaulted. With so much documented assault on queer people some US states have added sexual orientation to "hate crime" legislation. Canada's laws do not fully protect queer people with similar legislation. Unfortunately, we live in a society that believes it is socially acceptable to be anti-gay. Millions of teens listen to Eminem, whose lyrics promote hatred and violence towards the queer community.

The paradoxes of humility J

ALI ASARIA

special to lmprint

I

n my study of mysticism, I asked my most qualified teacher "What is true spirituality?" He answered: "It is the perfection of character." I know now that my teacher was in fact teaching me one of the most important lessons of spiritual knowledge. H e wanted me to know that the true human does not seek altered spiritual states, he seeks to change himself. This is the sign of true progression. Some mystics say that the goal of life is to take on the attributes of The Truth. The Truth is beautiful, good, and just. It is peaceful, unified and patient -and we must be all these things. The paradox is that in order to take on these attributes, we must first take on the attribute of humility, which is not an attribute of The Truth! T o explain this paradox, the

teachers will say that humility is the first half of "There is no god, but God." Thus it is our job to negate our ego through humility to make way for the second half, God. Here, my teacher would say that we are like mirrors. We must first polish the dirt away so that we may reflect the light of the divine. This explains why, in truth, humility is the source of, as Jesus said, "riches and honour and life." We know that whoever only seeks riches and honour will never be humble. The solution to this paradox: do not seek power for yourself. Humble your self and seek union with the power behind all things. We live in a society which desperately needs humility at a political, social and personal level. So how can we be more humble? The Muslim mystics say that one of the best ways to achieve perfect humility is by observing the intricacy of nature. Spend some time out of

your day, maybe as you walk to class, to look up in the sky and see how relatively small we really are. Look at the intricate beauty of the leaves on the trees and see that our petty desires are so unimportant. By realizing how tiny we are in relation to the universe, we should begin to spend less time think~ngabout ourselves, and more time thinking about the unifying message behind all things, that movement which connects every atom of the universe. And if we can do this as a society,we will have gained so much. As we push aside our arrogance, we make room for love. When we remember that everyone is connected, we will stop hurting each other. As we decide to stop fighting with nature, we will learn to find harmony with it. And may we all find harmony with the current of the river beneath all things. Peace.

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FORUM

12

Imprint, Friday, November 30, 200 1

In it for the monev?

Wrapping up loose ends GREG MACDOUQALL Imprint staff

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ast week's paper had a fair amount of IMF/World Bank/ 6 2 0 coverage -two news pieces, *ree in the opinions section, and dne more in features. The first piece I'll address is Aaron Lee-Wudrick's. There was too much inaccuracy for me to correct it all, but here are the highlights. How about, "All international trade barriers will be removed, since they undeniably hinder the livelihood of people in d l countries -especially the Third World." That is pure bullshit. Undeniably wrong. Or, "All the meetings of the &ganizations protesting should be &en to anyone." They are. Imprint's editor, Ryan Matthew Eierkley also talked of protestproblems. "The anti-globalization movement . . . has done little to explain their cause to the masses. It's not an easy concept to grasp; most reporters don't even understand it, which may have a lot to do with why coverage usually centres around the dolence." ! They have done a lot to-explain it, it's just they don't have control of the distribution channels to get their explanations to the masses. The people who control the distribution

1

media are the problem. Counter to what Mr. Merkley says, it is an easy concept to grasp. The organizers of the protests against the IMF and the WorldBank embraced a set of four demands of those two institutions, which they released to the media in a press conference on Parliament Hill the day before the meetings began. The problem was, the press didn't bother runnine" them. A lot of effort was put into simplifying and packaging the problems of the IMF and World Bank into four understandablepoints, and over 200 organizations worldwide had endorsed these four demands. Unfortunately, you didn't get to see them in your newspaper or on your TV, and you certainly didn't see a lot of discussion in the media about them. So don't put the blame on the people whose message isn't being covered. Put it where it belongs, on the people in the media who choose to ignore it. In the news article by Janice Jim, these four demands are presented. However, it was a rather short article and simply writing out the four demands took up almost half the space. The other news article, by Liam McHugh-Russell, was longer but blataatly ignorant of the complete story. It was simply a regurgitation

of what the G-20/World BanknMF leaders had to say about the institutions for which they work. I guess that's what happens when you're accredited official press -you are allowed inside, they give you the official press kit, and they tell you want they want you to write. Many people don't notice how wrong it is to do this, because we've been conditioned to accept what our leaders tell us as being important, and that what we have to say is not as much SO.

When the leaders are lying to the people (like saying they'll help the poor, when the past 20 years have shown us the opposite), then hopefully we'll get some responsible journalists and editors who'll make sure that their claims aren't allowed to stand as truth. The last article, by Chris Edey, was a good account from the streets of Ottawa, but the opening sentence was incorrect. The impassioned protests against these types of institutionshave notbeena "ritual for the past half-decade." In fact, it has been exactly two years since the opening day of the 1999 protests in Seattle against the WTO. Only two years ago, pretty much no one (myself included) had heard of any of this stuff. Only 730 days later, a lot has changed. What's in store for the future?

ANY SIZE PIZZAS

AARON LEE-WUDRICK special to Imprint

S

ince the inauguration of this column, I've been called - both verbally and in print a number of interesting names, most of which have either proven amusing or offensive, depending on my mood. Among them is one that seems to be invoked consistently, and it bears repeating: greedy capitalist. Now, those people that would use such a term in the first place would probably agree that capitalism itself implies greediness, so let's just drop the "greedy" part in the interests of keeping out redundancies. So, I am an alleged capitalist. To this charge I enter an enthusiastic, passionatepleaof "guilty, guilty, guilty!" Capitalism certainly gets a bad rap. It has been under heavy assault for decades - bent and twisted by governments of all ideological tendencies into all sorts of oerverted and politically expedient forms. It has also been berated by a dwindling number of hardcore socialist/ communist/anarchists oblivious to its irrefutable virtues. On top of all this, few people even realize that pure capitalism - that is, capitalism completely free from the interference of the state - has never even existed in the world. This is a pity, of course, but the absence of pure capitalism doesn't mean we can't continue to promote capitalism as the social system which will ensure our prosperity as human beings into the indefinite future. I know what you're thinking. Did I mean to say economic system, and not social system? Isn't capitalism just boring old economics money, profit, labour, corporations? Isn't it, as my critics charge, really all about greed? I save my digression on the difference between greed and ambi-

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tion for another time. But in a word the answer is no. Capitalism is not just economics, and it is not premised on greed. The principles which underlie capitalism are crucial, universal humanvalues and whencapitalism is attacked, we should be aware that these principles are similarly under siege. But enough with the abstract bullshit. How is capitalism about more than just the almighty dollar? One of the most important features of capitalism is the salience of freedom. Free markets and free minds are inextricably linked. As Ayn Rand astutely noted, under capitalism "if a man does choose to think, he can act accordingly. No one has the power to neutralize the mind; no one can force on another his ideas, his values or his errors." The point she makes also alludes to a value upon which I think most of us agree: the rejection of physical force as a legitimate tactic, except in self-defense. Capitalism rewards effort and punishes laziness; values innovation and decries stagnation; gives no guarantee you will succeed but always provides the chance that you might. Capitalism is colourblind and gender-blind, and does not discriminate based on religious belief or sexual orientation. Space constraints restrict me from going on, (if you think I'm just wimping out, convince them to give me another 500 words each week and you'll see that I'm not!) but I think I've made my point. Capitalism is the framework in which we all have the potential to succeed as far as our efforts will take us. I urge you to bear this in mind, and investigate it for yourself. Might I suggest www.capitalism.org and consider the Walk For Capitalism this December 2 inToronto. Details can be obtained from the posters around campus or by emailing me at


FORUM

Imprint, Friday, November 30, 200 I

1'3

What's your f avourite form of procrastination?

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Francis Yoon 4 N planning

"Sex, drugs and online chat." Joseph Puopolo 4A planning

"Chasing the ducks outside health studies." Anu Gobin 2B economics

"Playing Tony Hawk 3 on Playstation 2." Reuben Makohoniuk 3A physics

"Boozing!"

LOCAn #A planning

"Having a dance party with my roomates." Mercedes Foulon 4A sociology

"Counting the roaches in i my ashtray." D-Rock Ali 3B psychology

"Answering questions for

"Shopping."

"Making porn movies together!" Jenny & Sarah 2A arts & business

"Shooting hoops."

Imprint." Trisha & Bharna 1A french 62B poli sci

Rachel Stephen 1A science

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Table

Contents

Paetry A Date A Kitchener Night Android Xmas Carol Cow jumped Dance Drowning Eggplant Revolution Femme Fatale Hair Irish Top Me Sanctuary

Charlie Shaw Sheila McConnell Roland Showers Nicole Fawcette Wendy Wang Amy Lam Pete Snow Ian Spitzig Nicole Fawcette Ian Spitzig Roland Showers Pete Snow

15 15 18 15 15 15 17 18 15 18 18 16

Romeo and Juliet St. Thomas That Niaht The serving

Mir A. Tariq Amy Lam Sheila McConnell Ben Guzinski

16 17 17 18

A Kitchener Night

Drowning

Sheifa FAcGorsnell

Amy Lam

On May 20,2001, Howard Joel Monroe, a20 year-old black male was brutally killed by 20 or more white supremacists. After hearing what happened, Kitchener mayor Carl Zehr replied, "We will not let this kind of incident deter us from trying to provide good family entertainment."'

drowning is quite a word it sits heavy on the tongue like his hand sitting cruelly on your shoulder then wraps its thick arms around to bring you to how

That night, you gazed into the sky, saw a flash of fading colours dabbled for your amazement.

dr-how-ning

That night, I spent hours lost in the darkness desperate for direction to the drive-in. You, unaware of the white men behind, remained calm. The pitter-patter of their sounds melted into your intellectual understanding of that moment.

I became aware of a blackened van with an older white couple inside anxious to escort my white self and boyfriend to the drive-in. You, horrified by the white flying monkeys, headed by the warlock Carl Zehr, were left, laying with the stick, stones and mutilated beer bottlesof adolescentdrunkenness.

I, unaware of surrounding cars, undressed to the screeching sound of The Mummy's mediated creatures, on the movie screen, was left, laying with the popcorn grease and condom juice of egotistical dismay.

only to let you go into the thin end yourself

"Where are you now?" I wonder because we're not inKansas anymore, Howard Monroe and maybe we never were. 'Ash and Brent "Fatal stabbing in Victoria Park" (TbeRecord: May 22, 2001, page 1)

endy Wang To fly with no wings, To be intoxicated with no drinks. Flowers blossom on thy hands, Clouds drift under thy feet. Fairy-swift, and feather-light. Move like water, Pose as sculpture. Dream is what thou art wearing, Hearts won for how thou art smiling. The hypnotic snake, The elegant swan. No words for such beauty, Such beauty nedds no words.

it is said that to drown is a painless way to die it is akin to being stuffed with rags there are other words too cottony ones like 'poise' and 'joy' that have no gravity, no weight except for your intention to tie them down of course, by their very nature, they rise again and with his hand on your shoulder 'poised joy' floats around your head a round o, your mouth swallows the ragged cloud stuffed, the expanse of blue around you is so pure you cannot tell if you are sinking or rising

and the cow jumped over the moon icaie Fawcette

A policeman wiped your blood from the ground while I wiped the penis sweat from my hands.

A Date

Dance

I woke up one morning to find that my hands had turned to lead Unyielding to my desperate pulls and grunts, mv hands would not rise You came days after I screamed for your help You let my tears run into your hair

I fight effortlessly but you only smile And drop your pants, you think you're funny Metals: lead and steel are nothing alike

Hair

Charlie Shaw WE SHARE ROBOTIC GLANCES AND THINK HOW MUCH EASIER THIS WOULD BE IF WE WERE BOTH ONLINE

Untitled Charlie Shaw you, sad star in sad sky cheer up we're all fine down here no need to worry we've got contingency plans and pills for depression, great lawyers, cold compress pads, local anaesthetics and oxygen masks.

Rsicafe Fawcese "Why don't you ever tie your hair back?" Your daily quiz. My answer never suffices and you'll ask it again tomorrow. Mash your face together. Let soft wisps of frosted dirt fall against your eyes. If I could I would never wash these locks ever again. Daddy He calls it my "mop" and I only wish that were true. I want to soak up your mess into my thick threads and bury you beneath my mind. I want salts and grains, sticky mud and tinv, oxveen bubbles to nestle in my tangles and create one multicoloured braid of life. I want a collection of unbreakable knots: traveling to the center of the earth Searing lava leaning on the forked tongues of split ends ~ r i ~their ~ ioily n lies ~ in my ear Of beauty salon riches and trimmed fame But I want life freedom from the coarse cuffs of fabric coated elastics and bloated blue bows an escape route from torturous tortoiseshell clips, sharp jagged jaws And bottled dye jobs that strip strands to their skeletons I want liberty and greasy flakes fluttering behind me I want the weight of a mane sopped in frizzed harmony Saved from barbershop barbarianism. ~

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FICTION SUPPLEMENT

Imprint, Friday, November 30, 200 1

Romeo And Juliet ir A Tariq [after Shakespeare) The story is about two-years-old, when Romeo and Juliet were accounting students here a t the University of Waterloo. Romeo was in third-year year while Juliet was in 2B. One day Romeo was surfing the net, When he started to chat with this girl, Juliet. Soon they learnt that both of them were a t Waterloo, &soon they exchanged sweet messages &fell in love. It was a love at first chat! So after a while, the usual chitchat was transformed into a exchange of pledges of love. And i t b i n , they felt that it was irresistible to stay divided, and therefore longed to have a meeting. Romeo was very miserly, a penny saver, who would never take a bus to save a dollar. Romeo: Juliet, my love, my life, you do I worship, For you I have great affection, & my whole heart is in your love's grip, Our love's profound, of high benchmark, So let us meet soon in the sweet Waterloo Park. Juliet loves it when guys take her out to posh restaurants and lavish their wealth to buy hergifts. Juliet:

0'Romeo, my Romeo, my asset Romeo, There isn't a lovely man like you, from London to Tokyo. East Side Mario's is delightful or will it be Mongolian, We shall meet and begin our romance of high premium. Reading these words of expense, the prudent Romeo questioned the affordability, Whether this was true love, or a long-term liability? But love was tender; love was forceful and passionate, And convinced him to deepen the relationship at an elevated rate, So our miser Romeo, the clever Romeo said: Romeo: Juliet this is about love, for you my heart is at stake, Worry not about Mario's; I've a co-op job. Later I'll serve you on a gold plate, Avoid risky strategy, this time we shall not go far, Impatient I am, let's meet tomorrow at the office of Registrar. By this time Juliet is so truly, so madly impatient to meet her love Romeo, that she decides to forego Mario'sand theMongolian. Juliet: 0' Romeo, my Romeo, I agree: to wait is a great deal hard, Therefore, at 5:30 I will be at the Registrar holding my Watcard. So come my love to meet me with a red rose, I'll know you, Romeo, by your handsome pose.

The next day at 5:30 Juliet stood near the office of Registrar, Immensely anxious and nervous, uneasy yet silent, the feeling was bizarre. Tense, she did tremendous nail biting, But with Watcard held forward she seemed inviting. And then from the corner downstairs, emerged a hairy man with hunched back, Was this her Romeo, 0'God it better be some other crack! The hunch-back reached for his pocket to grab a limp-rose, as she fret And soon he glimpsed this girl with a Watcard, and cried Juliet my Juliet. Juliet was now thinking to escape and betray, But Romeo rushed towards the hippie-designed crooked stairway, With great skill, he climbed at a speed unsurpassed, Poor soul, poor Romeo, slipped on the step very last. And right before the gleamful eyes of her lover, Great deal of pain did our rolling-down Romeo discover. For a moment Juliet feared that Romeo might have survived, She gazed down the staircase, to see he had indeed died. Delighted that her fears didn't come true, she was in disbelief, And then she exited from the back door with a sigh of relief, "For never was a story of more woe Than this of Juliet and her Romeo."

Sanctuary Pete Snow Music fills the air for me, The soft words of one maestro's soulful voice, Can not help but elevate my mind, I begin to experience deeper thought A newer understanding of the old world A place that held so many mysteries, And a great organization of sacred shrines, Gold arches, stone masonry, a bronze workers glory, Attempting to steal a bit of glory from above, While protecting it with noble purpose, We all get lost inside the monument, Its mighty walls and coloured windows, Providing an old safety net, Is it true they burned the peasants alive? While they clung to the cloth of martyrs, This place doesn't, But others remind me that the beast always wins, Here on this rock, Maybe its those who create their own hell here, Or their own purgatory, Don't they understand that if they don't enjoy now, And still live like snakes, They will lose after it is all over, Perhaps a visit to the sanctuary is needed, Lock them inside the wooden doors, Resist the urge to burn the new peasants, We are about saving, Not starving.

The Eggplant Revolution Pete Snow Latin dancers swaying in the sky Against a midnight sunrise Flashing little men Filing down their motorized paths Too concrete for me Ever feel the robot spiders, or the soaring platform under your feet, Life is so fast, Why not make it faster? Foreign T.V. signals beamed into your living room Don't you want to think straight? Too many queer messages I lost my Saturday cartoons Someone bought them up whole, Swallowed the whole thing The white suits came Driving their white vans They walked past my wooden fence Sprayed my house Marked it white So I had to leave Next thing, I was looking over the world Off-centre, the green carpet Next time you look outside tilt your head, it makes for a clearer shot.

. ..

...

..

Based on a true story There is a pink elephant that stands by the railroad tracks of this town. He is made of concrete, with steel reinforcing rods, and is painted bubblegum pink. He is this town's claim to fame. I was told the storv, bv, a woman in red jeans and blown out hair that was the cashier of the drugstore. Her words went like this. "Well y'know who P.T. Barnum is right? Well, this elephant was his elephant. Or I guess you can't really say that it was his elephant; do elephants belong to people anyway? "If anything I would say that the elephant made Barnum. But this elephant, his name was Jumbo, the largest African elephant in captivity. So he was one big elephant. I think he weighed around seven tonnes or so, and 12 feet high. One big fucking elephant, and his name was Jumbo." At this point she began fiddling with her blown out hair. "So Barnum brings him over to Canada for a tour or something-I think it was 1885. He brings this poor elephant to our little town, and what happens is, he gets run over by a freight train. The elephant that is. Or the train couldn't quite run him over; more like the train ran into the elephant. "The train got derailed, all that hassle. They had to get 150 people to drag the corpse up the embankment, too. Took apicture with it andeverything. I personally think it's rather morbid to take a picture with a dead thing, never mind if it's Jumbo the elephant or not. It's dead for chrissakes. What good is it for now? But I guess it was a big deal back then.

Circuses and all. But now I'd say we have more sense. It's rather cruel to keep animals in captivity anyway, don't you think?" She looked at me agreeably. "Why yes, yes, they're much better off in the wild," I said. "Exactly. But yeah, Barnumhad the damn thing stuffed anyway, for business I think, and here in about '85 some foundation had this elephant thing built. If you can believe it, it cost quite a pretty bit of money. And now some damn kids went and painted it pink, like those elephants in that Disney movie, the hallucinations you know?" There was an inkling of a conspiratorial smile here, but I had only one question. "So how'd did it get in the train's path anyway?" I asked. She paused "Well there's some story about the elephant wanting to save another smaller elephant named Tom Thumb? But it's too sentimental for my liking. "I like to believe the other story: that he stood firm in the way and refused to budge. Not even for the train. Maybe he was fed up with being towed around for show. Or maybe he thought he was large enough to stop the thing." She giggled slightly. "But1 gottaget back to work. Have anice stay here, sir." I thanked her, and walked out. I looked over to the frivolously pink elephant who wanted to stop a train, as if his simple presence was enough, and in commemoration, decided to go over and take a picture with the damn thing.


Imprint, Friday, November 30, ZOO I Withershins Nadine EIaine Bask in the still aftermath of sidewinding eyes and surprise. Quench the walking smoke-filled lunacy of myself in yourself. To wander night's streets is to concede depression of one's obsession. Wear your head on crooked to see from a different point of view. Dance in crazy cylindric circles of hysteria and mindless mayhem. Find Sanctuary in daily routines while losing your senses methodically and ominously. Paint your face and wear a garbage bag. Plant an oleander - the evergreen Mediterranean shrub. Kill an Olympian by certain serendipity. Lie back indulgently in warmth on the.bathroom floor. Wear only enough postage to send yourself away. Take a train to the arctic and kiss a penguin. Live on jello and sail cellos across the ocean. Find your own archipelago and claim an island on the sea.

17

FICTION SUPPLEMENT

Eat bitter aromatic plants & roots. Shake hands with a puppy and a president. Wear gloves to cook a dictionary. Tear covers off books and burn their insides. Climb to the top of a pyramid to erect a flag. Watch unseeming songbirds fly contrary to the sun's course. Watch them soar.

Untitled adia Efaine It is through the cracks in our brains that ecstasy creeps in. And lord my brain must be faulted like the plates of the earth crashing together. Created worlds like parenthesis in eternity. A little stop. So how very little you should mean to me and logically I to you. A hair perhaps out of place that would divide love and nothinga hair's breathe, that's all Not such a crack like that in the mind

but enough to delineate the two forms which bend in talk as friend or lover. Those only deserve love who do not need love. 1desire the strength to be of my own on my own alone and yet not lonely Faults are thick cracks where love is thin All flesh smells like grass and all men are flowers of the field different by sight and smell or wild, or cultivated, or diseased. I have ventured like little boys that swim in seaside play, far beyond my depths

They say broken hearts hold more. A privileged man indeed must have written this. Kindly girls, are the soft easy cushions on which men repose and flatter interesting lovers. She laughs and so is half-taken already. A woman's Consent lays like an onion to be unlayered by the rings. It is with love as it is with ghosts Many wonder many talk, many books. But few have seen it. And those who do I label mad.

Be good and you will be loneseome I have heard. Yet the good have taken the prize and the bad as well. As god's rain falls the just and unjust.

That Night That night, 1 heard the cracking of live snails under my toes and I went forward. The click-

connection to God and it was me who would vanish.

You crushed my sister into a trance. She sat

did not reply.


-

FICTION SUPPLEMENT

18

The Serving

Me olsnd Showers

Ben Guzinski

As we all know, Americansare very patriotic and they love to flaunt their achievements in everyone's face. One of their biggest failures, which they consider a success, is their justice system. It is stained with flaws and has put many innocents in jail. This fictional tale illustrates the absurdity of that system.

.

..

4

The guest list read like a "who's whon of celebrities. In the first row sat the warden of the Wawa Penitentiary, along with Killer County's district attorney, his wife, and their seven children. The second row was filled with the Infamous 12 (as they were called). These Infamous 12 were the dozen women who were raped by Gordon Bartlett, the man who was being served to hell today. The third row held the likes of Bartlett's family. His obese mother sat on the extreme left corner, followed by his obese father and his three obese brothers. All were on a supervised visit from their respective jail cells. The fourth row was reserved for the many television and print journalists, who were eager to describe to the public, in excruciating detail, every nanosecond of this biblical sacrifice. For an average execution, which occurs in this state about as often as a man sneezes, a room with only four rows is used. However, this execution was open to the public. The reason given was that the educational opportunities that lay with the witnessing of an execution were, of course, endless. However, this was not the real reason. In reality, it all came down to money. Since executions were so common here, their cost was beginning to take its toll on the justice system. So, it was decided that some money could be recouped if tickets for this biweekly event could be sold to the public. The idea worked. Throngs of citizens, eager to learn, bought tickets. Included in this group of future intellectuals was the Smith family: Dalton Smith, his wife of 25 years, and their four kids. Dalton, who was always trying to outdo himself, decided to surprise Jenny on their silver wedding anniversary with tickets to Bartlett's execution. His wife was so pleased with the wedding gift that she pleaded with him to bring the kids along. Having some extra cash, Dalton immediately bought four more tickets. And now, they were here. As they entered the viewing area, they were astounded by the number of seats that were already filled up. Unfortunately, the Smith family had tosettle for the21strow, and not too good a view. When they sat down and Smith noticed the tears on his kids' disappointed faces, he jumped out of hisseat,andwalked up and down the aisle, searching in vain for better seats. Fortunately, he bumped into a woman who offered to sell him some binoculars, just like the ones they sell at Broadway shows. He

gladly accepted her offer, and returned to his family with six pairs of binoculars. The kids, upon seeing the binoculars, wiped their tears away, and jumped up with joy in order to get their hands on them. Dalton handed his kids the binoculars,andfinally,everyonewashappy until the execution began. When it did, and the oldest boy saw that Bartlett was going to die by injection, and not hanged, he was furiom. "Daddy, why is it a lethal injection? I always wanted to see a hanging," yelled 11-year-old Ian Smith. "This is just as good!" Dalton tried to reassure him. "I thought he was going to be gassed, Daddy!" yelled the Smiths' second oldest daughter, 5-year-old Tammy Smith. Dalton, after a careful examination of the situation, conceded defeat. He apologized to the kids, and hoped they'd calm down. Fortunately, within minutes, they did. However, Dalton was not brought up a loser. He wasn't as stupid as he appeared; he was stupider. For Ian's 12th birthday, he bought him two tickets for Vernon Whale's execution by hanging. One ticket went to Ian, while the other was for his 10year-old pregnant girlfriend. Knowing that Tammy wouldn't take that news too kindly, he also bought her and her whole kindergarten class, tickets for Shawn Collins' execution by gas. ~ 0 t hkids were pleased, but first they had to get over the disappointment of witnessing Bartlett's execution. After the curtain was lifted and everyone saw Bartlett's gentle face, Killer County's mostfamous crooner sang the national anthem. That was followed by laser show and a duet between two country singers, who sang "I'll SeeYou in Heaven." After the seemingly endless standing ovation the two singers received, the county's preacher recited a prayer from the Good Book. When all in the audience felt God's presence with them, the doctor arrivedon the scene. He checked all the machines, gave his approval, bowed to the audience, and took his place next to Bartlett.

Imprint, Friday, November 30, 200 I

While everyone waited for Iris' 87-year-old husband to push her into the execution chamber, the organizer of the whole event couldn't hide his pride. He had orchestrated abeautiful thing, worthy of an Academy Award. Iris finallyreached her destination. She then proceeded to push the injection button with all her feeble might. Once released, the toxin entered Bartlett's blood stream. He coughed, drooled and his eyes rolled behind his eye sockets. And that was good. As people walked out of the penitentiary, the reaction was mixed. While some complained that an execution by lethal injection was not exciting enough, others were angered by the fact that they could not see Bartlett's drool before his peaceful death. However, all shared one desire in common. They wanted to see more executions. And so, they district attorney for Killer County and the warden of the Wawa Penitentiary took swift action. They bought more nooses, fixed up the gas chambers with the help of Killer County's most-famous interior decorator, expanded Death Row, and raised ticket prices for the next execution.

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teeth and buteeteth anteet and bulb on stak?d bulteeth and buteeth an bteet andbulb on stalteeth and bulb on stalkk? ulb on stlk? Ib on.stab on stteeth anteeth and blb on stalk? d bteeth andteeth and bub on stateeth and blon talk?? bulb oteeth ad bteeth and bulb on atth and bb n stalk? Ik? ulb oteeth and bulb on alk? n stalk n talk? ulb n stalk?Ik? nd bulbostalk? Ib on stalteeth and bulbonstalkteethateethabulbonstalkd bubonstalk??k?Teethateeth and bulb on stalk? nd bub stak?teeth and bulb on stalk?

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Make anv occasion special J

A look at fine dining in Waterloo

rich with cream and butter, the cold ice cream a delightful contrast to the warm sauce. On a recent trip to Charbries Four Seasons of Dining, I was delighted to find that the owner, Charmaine LaBrie, prepares several dishes table side, including caesar salad and the dessert crirpes I just described. I spoke with LaBrie, who told me that they "do a lot of table side and, for people who look a little nervous, we bring out the fire extinguisher. It's fun." Charbries offers an alternative to the typical dinner-and-a-movie date. "We book three hour seatings .. this is the entertainment for alot of people," she said. There's an emphasis on quality seasonal ingredients. Everything is prepared to order and the menu changes four times per year, with the seasons. This Monday marked the beginning of their winter menu. The pace at Charbries is refreshinglylaid back, leaving the customer plenty of time to enjoy the meal, the ambiance and her companion. Between appetizer and entree, a small scoop of (complimentary) sorbet is served. After dinner, instead of the usual mad rush for dessert, the waitress asked if we'd like to sit awhile with our wine before seeing the dessert menu. Eating at King Street Trio on University is another entertaining way to spend an evening. I spoke with the owner, Brian Plouffe, who

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The bar at Charbries Four Seasons of Dining. KOURTNEYSHORT Imprint staff

T

he air fills with the smell of apples sauteed with brown sugar, cinnamon and butter. Asplash of Calvados, asubtle movement and the pan becomes engulfed in flames. Vanilla schnapps, poured directly into the fiery pan, intensi-

..--.....- .-..-..

fies the fire. Asplash of cream extinguishes the last of the flames before paper-thin crirpes are warmed in the apple mixture. A scoop of gin-' ger ice cream is deftly enclosed in the crepe and quickly moved to a plate before it can melt. The crspes are served smothered with the apple mixture. They're delicious spicy with cinnamon and ginger,

expressed his commitment to "live entertainment as part of the dining experience." King Street Trio features live dinner jazz every Friday and Saturday night from 7:30 to 11 p.m. A pianist plays every Wednesday from 6:30 to 9 p.m. As well, every sixth Tuesday, King Street Trio hosts a dinner cabaret. Plouffe explained that, on cabaret nights, the restaurant serves a fixed menu and hires a "vocalist and a piano accompanist" to put on "a Gershwin kind of show tune." No matter which of these nights you choose, you'll never even miss the movie.

Choosing a restaurant Reading restaurant reviews can help you to make an informed decision about which restaurant to choose. The Record, Waterloo Chronicle and Echo all review local restaurants. Echo is available free in the SLC and the Waterloo Chronicle is delivered for free to Waterloo addresses. The Record's archived reviews are available online at www.therecord.ca. When reading a review, be sure to check the date of the review. Mark A. Schaan, food critic for Echo, prefers to re-review restaurants once a year. This is because regular changes in sous-chefs or even prep staff can cause the food, service or presentation to change. He reviews new restaurants more often because they tend to experience a

lot of change during their first year of business. Plouffe spoke highly of the Record's current reviewer, Trevor Charles, saying, "he is very willing to tell you when he thinks that things are not right." In general, to get the most out of restaurant reviews, Plouffe recommends "[looking] at the pattern that [the reviewer has] demonstrated in the past and see whether they're accurate in their assessments." Although restaurant reviews can provide useful information, LaBrie warns against "[assuming] the reviewer is God. They don't know everything." Restaurant reviewers' tastes may not always reflect your own. This means that the descriptions are as important as the evaluation. A good review will give you a sense of the food. For example, it is far more informative to read. "the mashed potatoes were rich with cream and butter and fragrant with roastedgarlic" than simplythat "the potatoes were delicious." If you don't like garlic and you're lactose intolerant, you know from the first description that you would be unlikely to enjoy the supposedly "delicious" potatoes. Restaurant reviews will usually include information about the ambience, which includes decor, lighting and music. This information continued on page 20

Stretch vour limits J

Breathe easier with tai chi and yoga LAURA TAYLOR special to Imprint

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elebrities, including Christy Turlington, rave about yoga. Gyms schedule tai chi and yoga instruction in addition to the more traditional aerobics and step classes. How-to videos offer do-it-yourself versions of yoga and tai chi. Even our own Campus Rec offers classes. But what might draw students to take the time out of their already hectic schedules to learn a bunch of movements and postures? Overwhelmedwith the responsibilities of school, part-time jobs and social lives, students can quickly find themselves plagued by stress. Sixty-one year old Oscar Oliverio, a teacher of yoga since 1973, suggests that the immune system doesn't appreciate the mental and physical demands we make on it, as we constantly rush around. He believes these intense demands can lead to a depressed thymus, the endocrine gland that he describes as "the commander-in-chief" of our immune system. Although he focuses on hatha yoga in his classes, Oliverio also incorporates moves

from some of the other numerous schools. Yoga is a Sanskrit word that translates roughly to "union." It is a practice that originated in India over 5,000 years ago. Yoga involves controlling the "life force," or prana, to achieve a balance of mental and physical health. Oliverio suggests that we need to work first with the mind, then the body, and then the spirit to arrive at this balance. Emphasizing well-being over aesthetics, Oliverio aims to help students "build a good foundation" that will help them in their daily lives. Oliverio believes that many common problems arise from poor breathing. The class he teaches at Campus Rec emphasizes correct breathing techniques, or pranayama. "Students may never practise yoga again," he says. "But they always have to breathe."The proper breathing technique taught in Oliverio's class involvesthree steps. In the first step, "diaphragmatic breathing," the belly pushes out during inhalation. Next, during "intercostal breathing," the rib cage expands to fill the middle part of the lungs, contract-

ing again with exhalation. Finally, the chest expands, filling up with enough air to provide the entire body with much-needed oxygen. After breathing exercises, Oliverio moves on to practise some ofthealmost200postures,or asanas.

The slow exercises can relieve back pain caused by unhealthy posture, but primarily target the endocrine glands to help students "become healthier from the inside out." During the final 15 minutes of class, Oliverio plays classical music

to help his students relax their entire bodies as they continue to breathe deeply and slowly. Another form of slow exercise, tai chi, engages the mind, forcing continued on page 21


FEATURES

Imprint, Friday, November 30. 200 1

7 I

Dining out can be affordable

3ridge St.

continued from page 19

King St.

wss

can help you to coordinate your restaurant choice with the occasion. For example, a restaurant with soothing music, low lights and an intimate feel would be better suited to a romantic evening than to a family celebration. How you wish to dress may also affect your choice of restaurant. Charbries and King Street Trio have a refreshing attitude towards appropriate restaurant attire. According to Plouffe, "We dress for you and not the other way around." Similarly,LaBriesaid that "it doesn't matter whether you're in jeans or a suit. We would prefer you come in feeling comfortable, and that could be a suit or jeans."

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Don't be embarrassed to ask your waiter about unfamiliar items on the menu. Both Plouffe and LaBrie encourage people to consider dining out as a learning experience. Plouffe "would encourageany diner, when they're out, [to see] it as an education." He adds, "unless you ask the question, you're not going to know.. and you're paying for it so you have the right to ask those auestions." If you have an allergy or intolerance, or if you don't like an ingredient listed in a menu item, let your server know. At Charbries, "Everything we prepare is prepared to order. It's very easy to make adjustments," LaBrie said. Since everything from stocks to ice cream is made from scratch, they can easily tell you whether a menu item contains a problematic ingredient. She emphasized that "we have to know about [food allergies] up front." Likewise,Plouffe said, "Just ask us and we're happy to" make adjustments to menuitems. King Street Trio has been awarded the "Eat Smart!" designation by Ontario's Healthy Restaurant Program, which requires that restaurants be compliant with the non-smoking bylaw, pass health inspections and demonstrate a willingness to substitute items. Visit www.eatsmart.web.net to search for other restaurants with this designation.

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tionally been vegetarian-friendly, restaurants have responded to the increasing popularity of a vegetarian lifestyle. Charbries offers a full vegetarian menu. "All they have to say is "do you have anything vegetarian?" and we have a special menu." said

The piano at King Street Trio on University isn't just for show. Angus beef, has vegetarian menu items and will make items such as a stir-fry to order.

The bottom line Virtually all restaurant reviews will quote a price, usually representing the cost of dinner for two including tax and tip. Although there will be some variation as to whether the price includes cocktails, wine, dessert or appetizer, the review will explicitly say which of these items are included. The quoted price is useful for comparing the prices at different restaurants, but may not reflect how much you will actually spend if you order less expensive menu items. For a complete view of arestaurant's menuitems andprices, many restaurants will post their menus outside the restaurant. How you choose tospend your money when you go out to eat will depend on your preferences. If you love wine but don't care for desserts, you may choose to buy a bottle of wine and forego dessert. Consider these cost-saving strategies, but remember to read the menu with an openmind and be guided by your tastes. Go fo7 lunch At lunch, most restaurants will offer smaller portions of identical or similar items for a lower price thanitems on the dinner menu. This allows you to sample the food and enjoy the ambience at a lower cost. For example, on a recent trip to King Street Trio, lunch for two with entree and pop cost about $30, including tax and tip. Share your entrbe Since restaurant portions are often quite large, consider sharing an entrte and an appetizer with your companion, rather than ordering one each. Some restaurants may charge a surcharge for sharing an entree, but Plouffe chooses not to because "the next time they might

come in and say, it's so good I want the whole plate." Charbries also allows people to share an entrCe at no extra cost. Go for dessert Having dessert in the evening is one way of enjoying a restaurant without paying the full cost of a meal. On Fridays and Saturdays, Plouffe said, "after nine o'clock. it's fine to come in [to King Street Trio] for desserts, cappucciho and to listen to the jazz." At Charbries, "we don't operate on rules." LaBrie added, "if we have the room, nobody's ever turned away." Skip the wine Aglass of wine will usually cost between $5 and $8 dollars. Multiply that by two and add tax and tip and you've just increased your bill by up to $20.Asked what he thought of skipping the wine as a strategy to save money on a meal, Plouffe replied, "I'd just watch and see what the list looks like.. .If you can order by the glass - and to have a nice glass of wine and pay five or six bucks for it isn't unreasonable and, I think, adds a lot to the dining experience, especially if you're out for a special night." LaBrie said, "if you want to save money on a meal, order less expensive items, share something, but if you want aglass of wine, have a glass of wine." Ask the price of the special Often, rather than having daily specials written down, the waiter will simply recite them. You can avoid a potentially unpleasant surprise when the bill comes by asking how much the special costs before ordering it. Don't skip the tip According to LaBrie, tips are "a part of the income earned for [profesional servers]. It's almost like a commission." Although it is standard to tip 15 per cent, LaBrie suggested that students who may be trying to save money should "try not to leave less than 10 per cent."

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Im~rint.Fridav. November 30. 200 I

FEATURES

21

The new Canada Fuel for the body and soul JOSHUASAFER special to Imprint

0

nseptember 28, theunited Nations Security Council adopted resolution 1373. This resolution calls for all member states to prevent and prohibit terrorist activity by criminalizing the financial support of terrorists, by denying them a safe haven, and by sharing information about terrorists with other member nations. Canada's response to the UN resolution was Bill C-36. Justice MinisterAnne McLellan introduced the bill to the House of Commons on October 15.The bill amends the Criminal Code to include terrorist offences and codifies the international conventions. It also specifies the creation of a CharitiesRegistrationAct designed to prevent those who support terrorist-related activities from enjoying the tax privileges granted to registered charities. University of Toronto law professor Kent Roach pointed out that there was "legislation in the works about taking charitable status away from charities that support terrorism" prior to Bill C-36. Hate crimes legislation would be updated to enable the deletion of publicly available hate propaganda, to criminalize the use of communication mediums for hate purposes and to add stronger penalties for mischief against a religious institution which is motivated by hate. Roach feels there is a need for more policing resources, but no such provisions are included in the bill. U of Toronto law professor David Dyzenhaus believes the bill "won't be used against the threat that is supposed to have prompted its enactment." Preventative arrest would become legal and judges would be permitted to seal information for 15years if its release would

endanger any person or national security. Also, citizens may be forced to testify during courtroom investigative hearings. Protesters are safe from being considered terrorists, provided that they do not intend to harm or endanger any person. Both preventative arrest and investigative hearings will expire in five vears. If those sections are not renewed throughparliamentarians, within five years then those portions of the bill will cease to be law. Annual reports to the public will detail how the powers of preventative arrests and investigative hearings have been used. Dyzenhaus claims, "Canada can fulfill its obligations without this bill, and already fulfills most of them." Terrorist groups will be designated by the Solicitor General's office. If there is reasonable belief that someone is acting on the behalf of a terrorist group, or is involved in terrorist activity themselves, then they may be added to the list. Every second year the solicitor general's office would review the list to ensure there was still enough evidence documented to keep each person and group listed. Banks and insurance agencieswould be explicitly responsible to report to thegovernment any listed terrorists with which they d o business. Those on the list would be considered terrorist groups and are subject to having their property seized. Anyone would be subject to arrest if apeace officer believed that they will carry out a terrorist activity. In this case, a person may be detained at most 48 hours and may first have to wait 24 hours before seeing a provincial judge. The bill, according to Roach, will give judges the ability to protect a fair trial. To learn more about this evolving issue, visit the Justice Web site (1aws.justice.gc.ca) or contact your elected officials.

continued from page 19

students to concentrate on controlling their bodies. Dozia Rudensky, who has taught tai chi on campus for 17 years, describes tai chi as "moving meditation." In her classes at Campus Rec, she teaches the first part of the 108-move tai chi set, covering 30 to 40 moves over ten weeks. Originally Rudensky included soft breathing exercises as a warmup, but now she feels that students -accustomed to living in our fastpaced, results-oriented society prefer to learn as many of the actual moves as possible. Frequently translated as "supreme ultimate force," tai chi chuan uses movement to promote the circulationof chi or "life force" through the body to achieve mental, physical and emotional balance. Although the use of "form" to aid meditation can be traced far back in Chinese history, most people credit Chang Sang Fengwith developing what we know of as tai chi chuan in the 13th century. Since then, like yoga, tai chi has branched off into many different styles and schools. Tai chi is calm and tranquil, and lacks the glamour or flashiness of aerobics. Because the slow exercises oppose the high-speed mentality of western society, Rudensky suggests that without an initial interest in the art students won't stick it out. The movements look simple but require concentration and an adjustment in our way of thinking. Rudensky sees a "calming effect" to tai chi. At one time she would notice herself moving fast, and she could feel her mind racing. Yet over time she believes that practicing tai chi can "calm you down." Although she wouldn't call tai chi a miracle cure, practicing the movements "properly, and for a

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long time," can improve one's health. Even over a 10-week session, she observesstudents' flexibility and balance improving, as they move their bodies innewanddifferent ways. Teaching the Taoist form of tai chi to the predominantly young and healthy, Rudensky has little call to emphasizeits therapeutic value. Still, tai chi advocates extol its potential for lowering blood pressure, for easing arthritis pain and for treating any number of other health problems. Although many groups treat tai chi chuan as amartial art, emphasizing self-defense and competition, the Taoist Society focuses on its physiological benefits. Less concerned with aesthetics or technical prowess, the volunteer members of the society suggest that the soft and slow movements of tai chi can ease breathing problems, and improve circulation, digestion and nervous system function. When used in therapy, tai chi formcan be adaptedto workaround a patient's physical limitations. The Taoist Tai Chi Societyoffers special health recovery classes, but Rudensky herself has modified the set for students with specific health problems. Rudensky once worked with a student who had a fused knee that wouldn't bend. Other instructors have worked with accident victims, Fibromyalgia patients and the elderlv. , , altering the movements to accommodate their individual needs. Yoga also has the potential to relieve common health problems. In addition to promoting better breathing techniques and improving circulation, yoga helps students with balance and flexibility, and can increase muscle ton As with tai chi, trained instructors can

troubles such as breathing problems or back pain, using yoga therapy to help alleviate their symptoms. The numerous potential health benefits aside, yoga and tai chi could give students a mental break from the usual pressures of school and work. Along with breathing and postures, yoga involves meditation or "dyana." While exercising, students "focus their mind," improving concentration and relaxing. Requiring concentration on the slow movement of the body, tai chi forces students to apply themselves to something other than school work. Their minds receive a break while, as Rudenskyexplains,they "use their bodies to learn." Oliverio feels that the slow but stimulating exercises of yoga help his students "breathe properly," while they "smile, laugh, and [enjoy] good company." Yoga combines health and fun. Campus Rec offers classes in hatha yoga, as well as classes in tai chi. For more information, check out Campus Recreation's InstructionalProgramsat www.athletics.uwaterloo.ca/ campredinstruct.htm. For tai chi information, visit the Taoist Tai Chi Society's Web site at www.taoist.org.

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Featured Web site 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 q

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MIRNA RAKANOVIC special to Imprint

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ex. This three-letter word seems to be everywhere. It is in our minds, on television and even found within the pages of Imprint. Although the term.and its connotations seem to follow us around, how much do we really know about sex? Often upon hearing the words "syphilis" or "contraception," we may question their meanings. Many times we find ourselves struggling with decisions dealing with our health, boyfriend/girlfriendor sexuality and hesitate to approach people for advice. Wouldn't it be nice to be able to log onto the net and have all of our questions answered? As of this month we no longer have to go further than our computer screens. With just a click of the

mouse, we can jump into a world that is our own -- a world that relates to its viewers and guides them through issues that deal with sex. www.sexualityandu.ca isanew, provocative and confidential Web site intended for Canadians of all ages. Developed by the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologistsof Canada, the site was launched November 8 to empower and educate people about sex. Sexualityandu.ca was carefully constructed to be of use not onIy to youth, but also to adults, teachers, parents and health professionals. It covers a range of issues, everything from puberty and masturbation to menopause anderectile dysfunction. The topics are dealt with professionally and with sensitivity. Youth can explore questions such as: Am I gay? Is it love? What's my risk of infection? It presents a

wealth of information on contraception choices, prevention, avoiding and managing sexual coercion and infection at your fingertips. What is especially great about the Web site is its user-friendliness. Every link seems to be in a language that everyone can understand. It is filled with diagrams and labels to allow for avery comprehensive and easy to follow experience. There is even a section called "Cool tools" at the end of every module that describes the most effective ways to talk to your partner aboutvariousissues, make your first appointment at a health clinic and even locate a clinic in your area. The Web site is plastered with tips, related links, polls and quizzes that are up-to-date and comprehensive. The site gives advice on what to say and do, so they will have the knowledge to feel more comfortable and confident.

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FEATURES

Imprint, Friday, November 30, 200 I

Cultural Caravan UW Clubs come together for charity

We've got gas! PATRICKQUEALEY A N D KIRK SCHMIDT special to Imprint

C

:

2

limate change is an issue that concerns all Canadians; we all contribute to the problem. In the last two weeks, Canada has committed to ratifymg the Kyoto Protocol on climate change. This means that the provisions in the protocol calling for a reduction of greenhouse gases by six per cent below 1990 levels will become Canadian law. The majority of climate altering greenhouse gases are caused by the transportation and industry sectors. So far, the federal and provincial governments have addressed the problem of climate change by funding research and development programs for cleaner energy and by giving tax credits (albeit very limited ones) to those who use climate friendly technologies. Waterloo region is attempting to curb climate change by increasing access to public transportation and by replacing a number of their conventional buses with those that burn natural gas, a significantly cleaner fuel than regular petroleum. Among several types of alternative fuels available for vehicles on the market, compressed natural gas is one of the cleanest burning. It produces considerably less greenhouse gases than gasoline. A natural gas vehicle will release about 70 per cent less carbon monoxide and 20 per cent less carbon dioxide

I

than a gasoline-powered vehicle. Natural gas is also generally cheaper than gasoline.While the cost of a new, dedicated natural gas vehicle is approximately $5,000 more than astandardgasoline, the cost of fuel itself is approximately 15 to 40 per cent lower than gasoline. Since natural gas is abundant in Canada, it is a feasible way to power vehicles. So how does this apply to the University of Waterloo? The Feds Environment Commission, along with Food Services and UW Purchasing, are looking to retrofit two of Food Services' vehicles with compressed natural gas engines in order to help reduce UW's greenhouse gas emissions. The commission hopes that this will raise environmental awareness, while raising UW's profile as a progressive, technologically advanced and environmentally-friendly campus. The project has been met with support and, if all goes according to plan, will be completed by next term. Mark Murdoch of Food Services and Stephen Cook of UW Purchasing have expressed their support for the project. UW already has a slow-fuel natural gas station on campus, which would allow for these natural gas vehicles to be filled overnight. Those interested in reducing UW'sgreenhouse gases and environmental impact are encouraged to consult the Feds Environment Commission's Website at www.student.math. uwaterloo.ca/-kbschmid.

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GO HOME FOR CHRISTMAS!

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Cultural Caravan, which was held in the SLC Wednesday, brought together UW clubs for food and entertainment. All proceeds from food sales went to the Anselma House women's shelter.

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Taking gaming to the next level already chosen PS2 as the long-run winner, citing the fact that the best games go to the most supported platform. After all, it is all about the games, right? In terms of hardware, all you need to know is that the Xbox is going to produce the best graphics, by a longshot, out of the three systems and the oseudo-PC ~latformis already very familiar to developers. However, PlayStation2's extremely complicated Emotion Engine is tremendously powerful and in the hands of a skilled programming team, PS2 will consistently produce the best "must have" games. Don't discount GameCube though; its efficient little design means that software is easy to develop, producing many great games in a fraction of the time it takes to make one PlayStation 2 masterpiece. Microsoft is touting the Internet as the future for console systems, probably because Xbox comes with a built-in Ethernet port. Sony has realized this threat and is preparing its own official network adapter, but as a hint, any standard PC USB Ethernet adapter will do. Nintendo, however, deems online gaming a fad, and is choosing to refine the single player experience. It would seem like someone forgot to put a place for the network port on the 'Cube. Sony has a huge amount of support and momentum going for PlayStation2.Just about every name in the industry is launching their flagship titles on PS2 either this holiday season or shortly afterward. Combined with its original PSI backwards compatibility, PlayStation 2 quickly becomes the

RYANEDMONDS special to Imprint

UW's Dr.James Sloan is part of a NASA-funded project to study dust storms on Mars. Understanding these storms is a large obstacle to robotic or human exploration of the planet.

Unleashing a MAD DAWG o i ~ a r s

UW prof building instrument to study "dust devils" ADRIAN CHIN Imprint staff

I

n hope of someday sending a manned mission to Mars, continual effort and vast sums of money are being put forth to explore and examine the red planet. Dust devils, violent dust storms caused by extreme weather on the surface of Mars, are posing a major problem for robotic and human exploration of the planet. They can be as large as 1kilometer high and 10 kilometers wide, with winds traveling at speeds of 160kilometers per hour or more. These storms need to be understood before a manned mission could ever be considered. Under the Matador experiment, researchers are developing instrumentation to track dust devils. NASA has turned to the University of Waterloo and Optech, a manufacturer of laser-based maopinganddetectionsystems, for help. UW's Dr. James Sloan has been working with Optech's research team to develop state-of-the-art equipment to study dust devils. He is workingonadevice called Martian Dust Characterization by Raman Spectroscopy (MAD CARS) to accompany the Martian Dust Devil Advanced Warning Gizmo (MAD DAWG) being built by Optech. Spectroscopy involves probing the structure of a molecule by shining laser light at it. At the correct wavelength, some of the light will be absorbed and the molecule's en-

ergy will increase. The molecule emits a beam of light as it returns to its original energy. The energy of this beam provides scientists with information about the structure of the molecule. Raman is a specific type of spectroscopy, using infrared laser light, that provides information about symmetric molecules which are difficult to look at using other types of spectroscopy. MAD DAWG is a light detection and ranging instrument, which works like radar but uses a laser instead of sound. "A pulse of light is directed at the dust devils andis reflectedback," Sloan said. "This reflected signal will provide information such as the distance and velocity of the dust devils." The spectrometer will take the signal from MAD DAWG and use Raman Spectroscopy to determine the chemical composition of the dust devils. "With this information we are able to learn more about the geological history of the planet," Sloan said. "Since environments with water evolve differently from environments without, the chemical composition may be able to determine if water was present on Mars. I'm not a geologist myself, but I know that the information that we collect will be very useful in studying the geological history of the planet." The information is also useful for understandingwhy Mars evolved so differentlyfromEarth,Sloansaid.

With some funding from the Canadian Space Agency, Dr. Sloan has already completed a computer model toperform the analysis of the signal and determine the dust composition. Not surprisingly, several companies have already taken interest in Dr. Sloan's work. "The applications of this device on earth are tremendous.You can find out about the composition of anything just by pointing a laser at it," Sloan said. Dr. Sloan is currently working with the Centre for Research in Earth and Space Technology, an Ontario government agency, and Neptec, a Canadian space instrumentation company, to develop a prototype of the spectrometer. The prototype will model the instrument which will be used to measure the composition of dust and aerosol particles in Earth's atmosphere. He is also continuing development of an instrument to be incorporated into the Mars lander. "Due to some funding cutbacks, the [Mars] mission will be delayed for some time. We hope it will launch in 2005, but it looks like it will more likely be 2007," Sloan said. The schedulingfor the Mars lander must take into account the two-year window in which Earth and Mars are in closest ~roximitv. ~ h protoGpe k is scheduled to be complete within 6 to 1.2 months. "The hardest problem that we need ? to overcome is getting a signal from [ the instrument because Raman sig- $ nals are very weak," Sloan said. i?

hat would you say if I told you that the video game industry takes in moremoneyper year than themovie entertainment business? It's true; last year the market was valued at over $6.1 billion US. It has been the only industry to show consistent double-digit growth despite the sagging economy. It's a well-known fact that half of Sony's total earnings come from their PlayStation division, Sony Computer Entertainment. Nintendo's Gameboy, with its 13year life span, proved to be one of the most profitable consumer peripherals ever. Video games mean massive bucks, which is why Microsoft has jumped in with their Xbox. The systemis relatively assured to be a hit amongst homegrown American and European developers. However, unlike PC games, the formula for asuccessful console system requires the support of Japanese software publishers like Konami, Capcom and Square. It's anyone's guess as to how much that will cost, or even if they can be bought. That said, what exactly happens when the world's largest software company, the world's largest producer of consumer electronics and the world's largest video games publisher all bun heads? It's bound to be interesting. PlayStation 2 was launched nearly two years ago in Japan and just over one year ago in North America. With a 20 million unit head start over Nintendo and Microsoft world wide, many have

Microsoft Xbox I

continued on page 24

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SCIENCE

24

Imprint, Friday, November 30, 200 1

Global warming: fact or fiction? PETER VAN D R l E L special to Imprint

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lobal warming is probably one of the most topical and debated subjects in science of the last 20 years. The classic theory states that fossil fuel emissions and manufactured chemicals are harmful to the environment, changing our climate over time. The warming of the climate will cause ice caps to melt, sea level to riseandlowlyingareas to be flooded. But how much of this is really true and how much is a scare tactic to make us panic and want to go back to living off the land? The global warming theory, often called the greenhouse effect, is based on the idea that burning of fossil fuels, grazing of cattle, fermentation of garbage and many industrial processes involpe chemical reactions which consume oxygen and release greenhouse gases to the atmosphere. These gases, including carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide, absorb heat more readily than do the main constituents of our atmosphere, oxygen and nitrogen. The heat is trapped, like in a traditional greenhouse. Greenhouse gases are not at all bad. All of them can be produced and consumed in natural processes and are essential to Earth's well being. Although nature can keep greenhouse gases in balance, considerable scientific research in the last 30 years shows that industrialization, which has involved the burning of fossil fuels, is now producing greenhouse gases faster than the Earth canconsume them. Temperature records show that global warming is a real phenomenon. The hottest summers on record have all occurred in the last 10 to 15 years. A topic which is less discussed, but perhaps more important to humankind, is how global warming impacts precipitation patterns, making some areas drier and some wetter. This summer's droughts in the prairies and in K-W could be a preview of what summers may be like if global warming continues. Although global warming is

Gaming in the 21st century continued from page 23

altering Earth's climate and weather tant part of the solution because it patterns, such changes in climate would slow the greenhouse effect, and atmospheric composition are giving people time to adapt. To limit greenhouse gas pronot a new thing. Geologists have documented time periods when the duction, methods must be develEarth's climate was both warmer oped to consume these gases withand cooler, such as during the last out producing them. Surprisingly, ice age, whenglaciers advanced well greenhouse gases are absorbed just as quickly by crops in a field as by south of Waterloo. Likewise, there have been peri- forest; thus, although trees are good ods with greater and lesser concen- for the environment, agriculture, trations of greenhouse gas. In all when well managed, can be as well. cases, reversible biological and Consumption of non-renewchemical reactions, such as photo- able fossil fuel resources may be a synthesis and respiration, worked more significant one than that of greenhouse emissions. Fossil fuels to restore equil~brium. For example, if the carbon di- are valuable and attempts should be oxide level in the atmosphere rises, made to conserve them. Unfortunately, one of the only plant growth becomes more vigorous, consuming the extra carbon dioxide. Similarly, when oxygen concentrations increase, promoting cold climates, spontaneous combustion increases, re-releasing carbon dioxide and returning balance to the atmosphere. Global warming might just be another variation, or perhaps an offset of an ice age which some scientists argue is due to happen. This certainly is an important issue, but may not be as serious as $ some portray. The solutions to glo- 5 bal warming involve adaptation to new conditions. Limiting green- k house gases, as suggested by the $ 1997 Kyoto Protocol, is an impor- :!

ways to promote energy conserva tion is to raise fuel prices to encour age carpooling, public transit ani other more environmentally friendly lifestyles. Solving global warming doe not mean abandoning technology it means working toward cleane technology and using it in a sustain able manner, and giving the envi ronment a chance to consume th, greenhouse gases we produce. WI need to work towards using alter nate forms of energy and, as state( in the Kyoto Protocol, helping de veloping nations create technolog based on sustainable resources. We can all play a part. Wha kind of world do you want see?

Year

most widely supportedgamingplatform ever. That said, it's fairly obvious why the machine is selling at near exponential rates. Unlike Sony, Nintendo doesn't really require third party software; Mario, Zelda and Pokemon have been enough to guarantee success. Regardless, the big N is trying to shed its juvenile roots and expand into the "mature gamingn market. T o do so, they've bought exclusive rights to the popular PlayStation horror franchise, Resident Evil. However, to many, Nintendo will always be a sheep inwolfs clothing. But Microsoft is creating momentum for their system by buying anything and everything in sight for Xbox. For example, just about every third party PlayStation 2 game is going to show up on Xbox in the next 12 months, providing none of Microsoft's cheques bounce. On top of that, Microsoft is buying exclusive rights to many large franchisesin order tostimulate demand. Case in point, Sega's Shenmue I1 was cancelled a month before its Dreamcast release and rescheduled for 2002 on Xbox. Supposedly that stunt cost MS a cool $25 million. In the end it comes down to you and your preferences, much like how people define computer users. It could be said that Xbox is a PC: big, powerful, inefficient and still made by Microsoft; Gamecube is a Mac: small, smart, with no software you reallytant to run, but avdable in a plethora of fruity colours; and PS2 is Linux: irritating as hell to program for, flooded with shoddy software, but the few wellcoded programs more than make up for it. I'd love to give a drawn out reason about why I bought a PlayStation 2 last summer, but really, it was just to play FinalFantasy X. Let's hope Microsoft doesn't pick that one up on its way out, too.


Imprint, Friday, November 30, 200 I

hconomics of environmental health discussed PETERVAN

DRlEL

special to Imprint

G

uy Dauncey is an author, speaker and activist working to promote environmentally sustainable development. Based in Victoria, B.C., Dauncey has extensivelyresearched the causes and solutions to the global warming problem. He came to UW on November 27 to discuss environmentally sustainable solutions to global warming and the issue of making

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Some nations have already experimented with such systems and are seeing great changes, with people opting for environmentally friendly alternatives. Dauncey demonstrated that the solutions for climate change either exist or are being developed and increasingly,the solutions also make economicsense. If we pressure governments to promote environmentally friendly alternativessuch as developingmore practical public transit, they will comply. Likewise, if we

Solving the problem of global warming involves moving away from the use of fossil

SCIENCE

NEAL

MOOGK-SOULIS

special to Imprint

Wallflowers to become extinct If a Danish company has its way about it, shynessmightsoonbe eliminated. The pharmaceutical company H. Lundbeck is performing clinical tests to study the effectiveness of a new anti-shyness drug. The drug, escitalopram, stimulates the brain to produce seratonin, the neuro-transmitter that controls mood. Doctors carrying out the study say they are encouraged by the results so far, which show that the drug has helped hundreds of people suffering from chronic shyness. Giving people an added boost of confidence will help them overcome situations that create a high level of anxiety. Lundbeck's research concentrates on developing pharmaceuticals that genuinely improve the patient's quality of life.

25 recently, a capsule carrying a monkey, a dog, a rabbit and some snails was sent up. China has long been trying to break into the satellite launch market The Beijing Aerospace Command and Control Centre, the primary mission control centre for the Chinese National Space Administration, has made key technological breakthroughs. These include transparent flight control, high precisionorbitdetermination, flightplanning automation, re-entry and landing control forecasting and visualization of monitoring displays.

Not your average geek New research as part of the latest British social attitudes report contradicts many of the existing stereotypes about those who use the Internet. They go to church more often, are more likely than nonusers to belong to volunteer organi-

zations and are more trusting, according to new research by Professor Andrew Oswald and Dr. Jonathan Gardner from the University of Warwick. This goes against the mid-90s concept of the Internet user, a young, male loner who prefers virtual friends in chat rooms to face-to-face contact. "They don't leave out their friends and family because they spend time hunched over their computer they simply watch less television," Oswald said. "This research should be very useful in overturning some common stereotypes." Research also revealed that large divides still remain between those who do anddo not surf. Those with money and education are far more likely to use the Internet than those without. Three-quarters of university graduates were found to use the Internet, compared to only 10 per cent of those without formal education.

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Chinese space program accelerated as fuel efficient as they could be, livinginsubdivisions that arespread out and buying vegetables trucked in from California. What would happen if governments offered taxcredits for buying more energy efficient appliances, more energy efficient cars or using solar energy instead of gas powered furnaces?

on the shelf, industry will also comply. Environmentally friendly solutions can make economic sense. Locally, WPIRG has a climate change action group that promotes environmentally sustainable living by examining.issues and discussing possible alternatives. To find out more about the group, contact Ray at ray@acebox.uwaterloo.ca.

The first Chinese manned space mission is set to take place by 2005, according China's national space administrator Luan Enjie. China is experimenting with unmanned spaceflights to ensure the safety of manned missions. The country's motivation for taking part in the space race is to raise national prestige at home and abroad. Most

Campus Rec anploys over 250 students! Tennis, Squash, First Aid/ CPR and Skating Instructor applications for W~nter2002 tern1 are now available in the Athletics Oftice. Fitness and Aquatic Instructor applicatio~uavailable on the weh ~m.campusrec.uvrated~).ca

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Warriors battle in the pool LESLIE DOWSON special to Imprint

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his past weekend the Warrior swim team travelled to Brock University to comPete in the Eynon division championships. In a preview to February's OUA Championships, Waterloo took o n McMaster, Western, Queen's, Brock, Carleton and Ryerson in the two day event. The Warrior men were led by Dave Rose who finished first in the 200m and 400m individual medleys, 200m butterfly and 400m freestyle. Richard Hui also had a strong weekend winning the 5Om and lOOm breaststrokes, while finishingsecond in the200m breaststroke. Dave Clarke had a solid weekend, finishing second in the lOOm freestyle and 100m backstroke and fifthin200m freestyle. Peter Londry was third in the 5Om backstroke and eighth in the lOOm backstroke. Malcolm Bonner was fourth in the lOOm butterfly, fifth in the 200m butterfly and seventh in the 1500m freestyle, while Michael Goodwin was seventh in the lOOm butterfly and eighth in the 50m backstroke and 200m butterfly. Other top finishes from the men came from George Dimitrov who finished sixth in the 200m freestyle and seventh in the 200m backstroke. GrahameJastrebski was fifth in the 50m breaststroke, while Carlo Distefano finished sixth in 400m individual medley. Kurt Rohmann was seventh in the 50m backstroke and Dave Zeldin was eighth in the 200m breaststroke. The men's 200m freestyle re-

lay of Jastrebski, Dominic Chow, Rose and Clarke finished third, while Londry, Hui, Chow and Jastrebski finished second in the 200m medley relay. The weekend was topped with a third place finish from Clarke, Chow, Dimitrov and Rose in the 400m freestyle relay. Julie Steinberg turned in the top performance for the women, winning the 1 0 0 and 2 0 0 breaststrokes and the 200m individual medley, while finishing second in the 400m individual medley. Kristen Brawley was second in the lOOm and 200m backstrokes, third in the 5Om backstroke and eighth in the 200x11 individual medley. Jen Sweeney finished third in the lOOm breaststroke and fourth in the 200m and 400m individual medleys and 200m butterfly. Carrie Kilpatrick was fourth in the 100m and 2001-11 breaststrokes, fifth in the 5Om butterfly and seventh in the 5Om freestyle. Other notable performances include Courtney Mitchell who was fifth in the 200m backstroke and sixth in the 5Om and lOOm backstrokes. Melissa Thomas was sixth in the400 freestyle, seventhin the 200m freestyle and 200m backstroke and eighth in the lOOm freestyle, while Leslie Dowson finished eighth in the 800m freestyle. The 200m freestyle relay of Kilpatrick, Sweny, Thomas and Steinberg finished second as did the 200m medley relay of Brawley, Steinberg, Sweny and Kilpatrick. Heidi Pepper, Estelle Dube, Allison Salter and Jenny Nachtsheim turned in the top performance for the women in the 400m free relay.

The dvnastv begins JOE CASCAGNETT~ special to Imprint

W

hat a term it has been for the Aleague basketball BCBB IV team. They have become the team to knock off the pedestal, the team to gun for, the men of men in the Campus Rec b-ball world. They have held the A1 division champs title for three terms and before that they where the B1 league division champs. But this was the term that the new kids on the block, The Bus Drivers, had made the jump to the next level from the top of the B division this past summer to the A division. The two teams finished 1-2 in the regular season with BCBB IV on top. Of course, they came head to head in the finals of the A1 division. The Bus Drivers were leading at half time with a score of 21-17, but the tables turned in the second half and the game ended with a score of 48-34 for BCBB IV. In the A2 final the Mennoknights took an easy stroll over TO with a score of 45-30. The B1 final saw an upset as B1 Loose Change stole one from the talented B20 Steve Kerr team with a 50-43 score. B2 champs were B26 Young Guns with an easy 59-24 victory over B16 Warriors. The B3 division finals saw a nail biter with B25 squeaking one over B15 St. Paul's. And a whole hearted congratulationsgoes out to theB24. The Pheasants, who incidentally are in their 86th consecutive term in Campus Rec basketball and won their B4 Division title easily over B23 Unfit with a whopping 41-14 score. In other B divisions B4 As Master Jacksons, B18 WNBA All-stars and B5 Funky Hoopsters won their titles. In the C1 division C3 Fragile Package took care of their oppo-

nents, C9 Pegasus, witha46-44 win victory in overtime. Other C champs were C18 Pacific Rim, C19 Super Fun Lucky Team, C12 Springroll Chicken Fly and C23 So Fresh So Clean. Finally, in the D Division, the D l Wellesley Court team

claimed the co-ed title. Congrats to C5 The Old Guys who won the Fair Play Award, C23 So Fresh So Clean who received the Rusty Whistle Award and Mike Sop who was selected by the basketball captains as their favourite ref.

Western

MEN'S BASKETBALL Warriors

59

Brock

Warriors

81

WLU

7

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SWIMMING Men's Standings

WOMEN'S BASKETBALL Warriors

63

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Warriors

53

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McMaster

1029 Warriors

Women's Standings l4cMaster

1025 Western

Warriors

550

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Women's Standings Western

21

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Warriors

6

Toronto

Western

10

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Men's Standings

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1093

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3

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9

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Warriors

3

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Toronto

7

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Warriors

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11

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4

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1

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Toronto

Figure skating glides back NATALIE HERR special to Imprint

T

he varsity figure skatingseason started off on Friday, November 23, in Kingston at the annual Queen's Invitational. The Waterloo skaters had a strong showing across all categories of competiton, starting off the season on the right foot. The day began with a first place finish in the junior silver similar dance event, as Stephanie Schmidt and Kristy Bertrand, who later performed well in the senior silver solo dance event, fox-trotted to gold. Dancing continued with a strong effort by Natalie Herr in the gold solo dance, in both waltz and

quickstep styles of dancing, and was followed later with solid dancing from newcomers Hanna Wells and Lindsay Nemeth, who together skated the Starlight and the Killian in ssnior silver similar dance. Overall, the day was filled with notable performances from all five dancers. Freeskate action began with the senior bronzesingles event, in which Lindsay Pugh landed consistent jumps to begin her varsity skating career. Kelly McKinnon and Katie Benkovisch, who are also new to this year's team, skated a program full of double jumps and funky dance moves to come fourth in the gold similiar pairs freeskate. McKinnon and Benkovich skated a strong performance individually as well, as

both fought hard in the short program and gold singles events, respectively. Veteran Amanda Breen, also competing in freeskate, wowed the crowd with a beautiful double loop in the senior silver singles event. The four freeskaters all contributed to the strength of the team's performance. At the end of the day, Waterloo had earned sixth place in the OUA rankings. Competition resumes in the new year at the University of Toronto on January 26, when the rest of the teammateswill join in the action. The varsity figure skating team looks to continue upon its successful start to the season and to contend with long-time rival, Queen's University.


Rockin' for a good cause A Rock Show for Cancer Fed Hall December 14 LAURA TAYLOR

special to Imprint

0

n December 14, Fed Hall will become a meeting place for rock music and cancer treatmentfundraising. While that may, at first, seem to be an unlikely pairing, the founders of FACT (Friends Activating Cancer Treatment) believe that rock concerts provide a great medium to "bring cancer awareness to a younger generation." JoshDobson andScott Williard founded FACT, a local non-profit organization, shortly after Williard's wife died of cancer in August of 2000 at the age of 25. In October of the same year, Dobson, now 23, and Williard, 28, organized and promoted "A Tribute to Nadine Williard." Their second annual cancer benefit, "ARockShow for Cancer," pays tribute to Nadine and to Dobson's 24-year-old friend Ian Bonneville, who recently died from cancer, as well as to "everyone who has felt the consequences of cancer in their lives." Featuring the donated services of five local bands, the concert will

also raise badly needed funds for the Grand River Regional Cancer Centre in Kitchener. Aiming to be operational sometime next year, the centre will provide the only radiation therapy in the region. Withmoney from ticketandTshirt sales, community support and the knowledge gained from last year's show, FACT hopes to surpass last year's impressive fundraising total of $13,000. The Dupes, new-school punk rockers from St. Agatha, will headline the show with their own variety of Blink-182-esque pop punk. The line-up also boasts K-W's Opus Creo, playingfunky rockin the vein of the Red Hot Chili Peppers. Three other K-W bands open the show, including the "wah drenched " rruitar DOD" band the Everyday Faces, and Klutz, playing a blend of melodic pop, punk and rock. Having played last October's "Tribute toNadine Williard" along with the Dupes, Opus Creo and the now-defunct Downshift, the Band From Planet X also returns to Fed Hall's stage on December 14. Featuring Nadine's brother Eric Schulz on guitar and vocals, the BFPX comes from outer space (or K-W) to play low-fi garage punk 'n roll. Schulz, a student at Laurier, says it made sense for Williard and

..

Dobson to ask his band to play because his sister introduced him to all the bands he loves, like the Ramones, the Misfits, the Clash and ACIDC. "I think it was a great tribute to Nadine, who fought so hard against the cancer," he said, speaking of last year's show. "On one hand. it was a sad night for me because my sister wasn't there to see it, but on the other hand we all knew she was watching somewhere and that she was having fun boppin' about." Seeing the "great stage presence" and "real wacky rock out attitude" thesFpxdis~la~edatlast The FACT organizers from last year's show mug it up onstage. year's benefit, Eric and Nadine's cousin decided they newcancertreatmentfacilitiesfirst- Snug, owned by Dobson's cousin, wanted in on the fun. UW student hand when she joined other chemo- incorporate Nadine Williard's and Matt Kieswetter appears on the therapy outpatients in the under- Bonneville's initials into a tribal reband's forthcoming album, You sized and inadequate facilities at working of last year's sunflower Should Never Have Opened That Grand River Hospital. logo. In addition to ticket proceeds, Additional aid to the cause Door, playing bass alongside Schulz money raised from FACT T-shirt comes from Kitchener's Sherwood and drummer Mark Rintoul. sales at the all ages (ID-required) Systems, which will handle the au"ARockShowforCancer"wil1 provide local bands a chance to concert will go toward completion dio needs of the evening. Advance tickets for the show promote themselves to a large audi- of the Grand River Regional Canare available for $15 at Encore ence while helping to raise money cer Centre. The T-shirts, provided at cost Records in Kitchener, or at Waterfor cancer treatment in our area. Nadine experienced the need for by the Toronto-based company loo's Orange Monkey.

Harrv Potter takes it all the way to Gringott's bank H a w y Potter and the Philosopher's Stone directed b Chris Colum us

i

NEIL RANDALL

special to Imprint

I

f you're looking for someone to

trash this movie o r , in fact, the entire Harry Potter phenomenon, look elsewhere. I found the first Harry Potter novel nothing short of delightful, and all I wanted from the movie was enough faithfulness to convey that delight. A few fairly minor flaws notwithstanding, I got what I wanted. For those who don't already know (and there must be somebody), Hany Potter and the Philosopher's Stone is the story of an 11-year-old orphan (Potter, played by Daniel Radcliffe) who discovers in a bizarre way that he is a wizard andis to attendHogwarts, anequally bizarre school of magic. On the train to Hogwarts he meets Ron Weasley (Rupert Grint) and Hermione Granger (Emma Watson), two other first-year students who become his close friends, and with whom he works .his way through adventures and scrapes. At Hogwarts, Harry encounters a host of other magicians both

the resulting punishyoung and old, and ment of the students eventually comes to causes them a kind of grips with the death rejection by the stuof his parents, who dents at the school. were killed by theevil The final scenes sorcerer Voldemort of the book depend (Richard Bremmer). on the reversal of this T o make this direction. So does the movie work for the movie, but the stakes countlessfollowersof are nowhere near as the J. K. Rowling high. That's amistake, books, director Chris not because of faithColumbus (Mrs. fulness but because of Doubtfire, Home the loss of drama. Alone and the mostly charming Adventures Ironically, the inBabysitting) hadto Daniel Radcliffe poses minutes before the owl went berserk. thing wrong with this movie is that c a ~ t u r eboth the litera1 and the figurative magic of the to do so represents the film's only there's too much focus on the plot -which isn't all that interesting real direct miss. Philosopher's Stone novel. Gone are some of the minor and not enough on the book's seemThe literal part wasn't hard: throw enough special effects at characters that give the book its ingly infinite array of funny and something and it will look magical. charm, among them Peeves the pol- whimsical details. Columbusknew he had to make But the figurative part would have tergeist and Professor Binns the (litcaused any director enormous pains erally) ghostly history teacher. Gone a movie for non-fans as well as fans, and Columbus responded by being also are some of the scenes that and this focus reflects that necesalmost obsessively faithful to the draw readers inside the magical sity. But even here he managed to be world - classroom scenes in par- faithful to the book's spirit. For book. example, the books - all four of The movie has received criti- ticular. Of greater significance are in- them to date -refuse to shy away cism for being too faithful, in fact, for missing opportunities to adapt cidents that mean agreat deal to the from the darker side of magic and the book rather than simply film it book and that demonstrably hinder human nature, a refusal that the movie. One major sequence in Columbus insists upon. -but I don't buy it. The film treats very fully the If anything, I would have liked the novel shows Harry and his to see an even longer movie with friends helping the gamekeeper death of Harry's parents, the focus even more of the book's scenes Rubeus Hagrid (Robbie Coltrane) of a brilliant scene featuring a magibrought in and Columbus's failure send a growing dragon away and cal mirror and a sad and longing 11-

year-old boy. Somewhat surprisingly, the actor behind Potter managed to carry this scene off. Why surprisingly? Because up to this point, Radcliffe had done little to indicate that his portrayal of Harry would be much beyond perfunctory, which of course was all it had to be. The mirror scene, however, bumped him up alevel to the degree that some of his acting in the previous scenes coulld be interpreted as understated rather than underachieved. Still, Radcliffe's performance paled beside those of his two main onscreen companions, Grint and Watson, and beside Coltrane's portrayalof Hagrid and Alan Rickman's superb Professor Severus Snape. Then again, with a supporting cast including Richard Harris, Maggie Smith, FionaShaw and JohnCleese, acting isn't a problem here. In the end this movie works. It's a very, very good two and a half hours of fantasy adventure, and it even has a chance to become a much-followed classic. Still, whether or not it accomplishes such a feat isn't important; Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone is well worth the price of admission,and that's way more than I can say about most of the movies I've seen lately.


ARTS

Imprint, Friday, November 30, 200 I

Come on babe, why don't we paint the town? The best venues to hear live jazz in Toronto L A U R E N 8. B R E S L I N Imprint staff

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Montreal Bistro 65 Sherbourne St. 416-363-0179

till cookin' and jazzin' after 22 years, the Montreal Bistro has paved its way to the front lines of Toronto's thriving jazz scene. Charming and upscale, the Bistro is always good for an evening of musical delights, featuring some of the best talent from Toronto and around the world. When you walk into this club there is a palpable sense of class; it's a venue that not only boasts celebrity patrons of past and present (Robert Redford, Norman Jewison, Mary Tyler Moore, etc.), but is also where Canada's jazz elite come to wine, dine and enjoy some of the finest music in the city. Owner Lothar Lang has impeccable taste, and books musicians of only the highest quality. Among the artists I've seen perform there are Dave Young, Oliver Jones and the legendary Oscar Peterson. The menu is also quite fabulous, if, of course, you're willing to drop some cash. Cover is generally $10-$15, but is subject to change depending on the performers. Another plus: the no talking rule is in effect - come for the jazz, stay for the jazz. Careful though; if you don't make a reservation for dinner or get there early, you may be forced to stand by the bar.

Top o' the Senator 253 Victoria St. 416-364-7517

Reservoir Lounge 52 Wellington St. East 416-955-0887

For anelegant night out, and to drop $10-$12 cover charge (or more) on some top-notch performers, visit the Top o' the Senator. Located atop the Torch Bistro near the Eaton Centre at ~ u n d a sand Yonge, this handsome L-shaped club has been a favourite for big and small names alike.

A hip, intimate venue, the Reservoir Lounge is a gem for lovers of toe-tappin', fingersnappin' swing. Located at the corner of Church and Wellington, it's a fancy down. . ht-spot where you can catch some fabulousyoung vocalistsset against swing, jump blues and boogie The club also features a small dance floor for those who want to get jiggy with it; but be wary, everyone will be watching you! Residentartists includeJake and the Blue MidnightsandTyler Yarema and His Rhythm-two of Toronto's best swing groups. And it's not uncommon to see big names such as guitarist Jeff Healy head out the jams

favourite spots in the city because it feels like jazz leaks from the walk, what with its blue-lit ambience and gorgeous jazz portraitsreminiscent of nightclubs from the '20s and '30s. to see Diana Krall perform here up close and personal before her career launched her to larger concert theatres around the world. Jazz tip: look out for Rob McConnell and the Tentet, who frequently play engagements here; it'll be an evening of consummate musical vibrato. Smoker's tip: the smoking section is at the back of the club - far from the stage. Student's tip: Wednesdays are halfprice with student ID.

Cover charge here is generally affordable ($5-$lo), but the layout of C H ~ ~ N C Hthe club leaves something to be desired. A beautiful circular bar extends so that it blocks the stage. If you don't snag one of the good seats, you'll be stuck withouta view of the performers (this has happened to me so often that I've stopped going back). That aside, this is a great place to feel like a real swinger; you can knock back a few martinis, light up a Montecristo, kick back

and groove along with the standards. But don't get all cheesy and show up in a pinstripe suit and fedora. Everybody laughs at those people.

The Rex Hotel 194 Queen St. West 416-598-2475 D\ubbedas "the place where musicians come to hear jazz," the Rex is a landmark in downtownToronto. Located on Queen Street West at University (right across from the Condom Shack), it has a more dress-down, casual atmosphere than the other clubs, and is suited more to the budget-conscious (cover is usually $4-$10, depending on the night of the week). The music is generally high-standard, and like the club's decor. is verv eclectic. offering everything from blues to fusion to free jazz. The plus is that this is one of the only places you can go to hear live music every night of the week -but unlike the Bistro or the Senator, you're not guaranteed to like it. Also, because this club doesn't enforce a no-talking rule, it can get quite loud and-on popular nights -can fill up like a fat man at a buffet. Speaking of which, the Rex has a decent menu of light meals and snacks, and offers a variety of draft beers. Because the rest of the clubs mentioned here attract an older crowd (especially the Bistro and the Senator), this is definitely the best bet for student jazz-fans.

Cellphone hell MR. MIKE special to Imprint

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t's Saturday night, I'm a few drinks in and I'm having trouble thinking of a subject for this week's article. For fun I typed "music" into Google and the first thing that came up was a site to download songs for cellphones. Where to start? I'm not even going to get into my dislike of cellphones except to say that I hate the idea of people being able to find me all the time. But on the subject of everyone else's phones -I find them annoying enough as it is without having to hear some butchered musak version of famous classical songs, or worse yet, hits from the '70s, '80s and today delivered in Atari-like tones. Ugh. I firmly believe the ring of a phone is designed to jar your nerves so that you'll answer it just to shut it up, so I can understand the preference for a tune in its place - but this 8-bit sound is killing me. In my mind there is very little difference between a grating ring and "Hotel California" delivered in a series of blips and beeps. If we do have to put up with personalized rings, can we at least increase the sampling rates? I don't think it would require rocket science to have these phones store an MP3 that way maybe I can hear some musical variation when I'm glaring at the jackass who's interrupting my meal. What if you wanted a metal tune for your ring? Picture standingona crowded buswhen

all of the sudden you hear "rAAAWWWrrr!" Everyone jumps. A baby starts crying. Some kid in a red Yankees cap says "Hello?" Perhaps interactive rings are the way to go. Imagine a specialty scratching phone for DJs. When the phone rings you can sample and play back the ringing for fun until you either decide to answer it or someone around you grabs your phone and throws it out the window. Maybe a ring for fans of hip-hop and scat, where the phone starts playing a simple groove and won't let you pick up the call until you offer an off-the-cuff rhyme or sufficient repetition of "Ska-doodly-bawp." I think that the whole idea of personalized music for cellphones responds to a much deeper need: the desire to have background music as you're touring around. C'mon, admit it. In your head there's a song that you wished everyone else could hear while you walked into that bar. It would be just like living out your life withasoundtrack. I sometimes find myself subconsciously bursting into a strut to the theme song from Shaft. Maybe if I time it right, my cellphone will start playing "He's one bad mother . . . shut yo' mouth!" and I'll get to live out my fantasy of sauntering down the strip with a badass theme song. I'd just prefer it if the sound quality didn't remind me of playing Frogger. Mr. Mike joins Mr. Tim on 100.3 FM every otherFridayat 11p.m. forlgneousRawk. Neither of them owns a cellphone.


The devil made me do it

'Tis the season for theatre A Christmas Story Waterloo Stage Theatre Nov. 22 to Dec. 22 KERRYO'BRIEN Imprint staff

aterloo Stage Theatre (WST) has always been ambitious with picking icripts, and A Christmas Story is no :xception.After all, howmuchmore imbitious can you get than attemptng to adapt one of the best-known md most beloved Christmas moves for the stage? Stephen Degenstine has done i s typically brilliant job of stage iesign. A two-story house complete ,vith kitchen, living room, upstairs ~edroomand front yard is painstakngly detailed right down to the faded wallpaper. Making the most of the thea:re's limited space, a revolving platFormalternatelytransforms thestage nto aschoolhouse-complete with ichoolyard and metal lamp-post 1 Christmas tree yard and Santa's Village. The set changes were mooth and unnoticeable at almost dl points. The script is very close to the novie, with certain adaptations to suit the stage. Fans of the movie will :njoy such familiar sights as Flick stuck by his tongue to a iamp-post md the leg-lamp in the living room ~f the Parker household. There are a number of laughs :o be had, most notably Miss Shields' :GitaPattison) song during thegradng dream sequence had the entire mdience howling. Much of the hunour is contained in a variety of .unning jokes introduced through3ut the first act. Some (like Randy's hiding unier the sink) are still cloying and :Ute at the end, while some (like the recitation of the Red Ryder BB Gun's features) become too predictable and stale. Enough original gags remain to d l the second half of the show :hrough, and by the end, the audi:nce is smiling.

As is to be expected, the cast is primarily made up of actors under the age of 15. Drama novice Cary Jones handles the weightiest part as the withdrawn protagonist Ralphie Parker, whose quest in life is to get an official Red Ryder BB Gun for Christmas. Supporting roles of schoolmates are played by Cory Beetham (Flick),NathanStorring (Schwartz), Kerby Stahlbaum (Esther Jane), Kaela Holland (Helen Weathers), Jonachan Hock (Scut Farcus) and Michael John Cameron (Randy). Jones displays remarkablepoise as the nerdy yet conniving Ralphie, taking a role that demands audience sympathy and milking it for all that it's worth. One minor flaw would have to be his performance in the dream sequences, which isn't quite as humourously over-the-top as the rest of the cast's. In spite of this, however, it was a promising performance from a brand new actor. Dale Mieske marks his return to the theatre as the soft-spoken, ironic and witty narrator, also pulling off minor roles as a tree salesman and a delivery man. It would be a satisfying dramatic experience to watch Mieske read from a calculus textbook; his body language, warm intonations and timing make him an actor suited to almost any role. While all the kids do excellent jobs in their respective roles, Storring's turn as Schwartz stands out among the rest. A lanky youth reminiscent of a young Ryan Stiles, Storring's stage presence and fluid movements belie his years; he is surely a talent to watch out for in upcoming seasons. Ralphie's parents are only referred to as the Old Man (Terry Barna) and Mother (Erin Marian), but both bring an array of subtle (and not-so-subtle, in Barna's case) nuances to their characters. A Christmas Story is an enjoyable play, with a number of bright spots in its cast and no shortage of holiday cheer. Make sure to catch it before it closes on December 22.

anti-hero, one part Exorcist for Satan himself and one part methamphetamine for that extra "zing"! That is, Capcom's latest PlayStation2 blockbuster is the fastest and most extreme action title I have ever played on any gaming platform, period. Max Payne, Unreal Tournament and even good ol' Doom can go to hell (literally). The sheer amount of adrenaline and endorphins produced from an hour in front of Devil May Cry are more than enough to convert console cynics. The premise for Devil May Cry is simple. You run around a gothic mansion back-flipping off walls in your snazzy red trench coat, blastingmonsters with two .45s and dismembering them with swords at breakneck speeds. There are a few puzzles here and there as well, but that's only to let your thumb have a rest. The story is quite engaging, actually. You are Dante, the halfhuman, half-demonoffspringof the legendary Dark Knight Sparda, thesame Spardawho overthrew the Prince of Darkness and banished him to the underworld some 2000 years ago. However, the Prince got the final laugh when his goons murdered Dante's mother and brother shortly after his birth. Nottoo happy aboutthis, our intrepidDevil Hunter has a score to settle with the "man"

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The era~hics:a screen shot of Devil Mav Cw.

himself, and being half demon means he's got superhuman strength, speed, pseudo-immortalityandeven a demon transformation with which to dish out pain. Speaking of pain, Dante has one intimidating arsenal at his disposal -everything from dual .4Ss to shotguns to grenade launchers (includingthe in between). Oh yeah, and just like any good action flick, you have unlimited ammo. For more intimate combat, Dante has a variety of swords to choose from, the most notable being a demonic war sword that retracts into a giant scythe when thrown. However, the most interesting weapon is the pair of flaming gauntlets that shifts the action intoMatrixstyle close combat. The sheer fun of mixing extreme martial arts and shotguns has to be experienced to be believed. The graphics arepartic&ly impressive as well. A third-person perspective is used with static camera angles (a la "Resident Evil"), and the entire world is rendered in real time, ailowing the camera to shift as Dante runs throueh " corridors and such. These gothic scenes are incredibly detailed, easily pushing a million polygons or more per second. Also, edge antialiasing is used to

keep the image "jag" free and clean. Due to the nature of the game, Devil May Cry never slips under 60 frames per second either, meaning blisteringly fast combat in even the thickest of situations. All of this culminates into Devil May Cry's greatest asset: its original and wildly fun game play. From a glance, the combat system seems far too complex and intimidating; but this is misleading. There's a button to "lock on," a button to shoot, and a button to slash/punch. Oh, did I mention you have unlimited ammo? Go to town. That's the simple version. Devil May Cry encourages seasoned players to concoct stylish strings of attacks that, if not for the sheer fun of it, also reward you with more items. This unlimited variety of gameplay in DevilMay Cry is not only fun, but highly addictive. Very simply, the game is in a class all its own.

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Imprint, Friday, November 30, 200 1

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Photo exhibit treats bodv ideals

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Smashing Pumpkins Rotten Apples Virgin

Attomik Self-titled Neptune Music

K I R I K A BUSSELL

LAURA TAYLOR

Imprint staff

special to Imprint

This compilation is a pleasing variety of songs taken from the Pumpkins' past albums. Included are classics from Melon Collie and the Infinite Sadness and SiameseDream, as well as songs from earlier albums. It is interestingto compare their earlier cuts to those released before the band called it quits. The order of songs reflects the band's musical progression, while the songs themselves tend to evoke an introspective, moody feeling - something that is common to the whole album. "Disarm." from Siamese Dream, may have paved the way for the fusion of alternative and classical music (violins are dominant in the song). Some lyrics are disturbing in both "Disarm" ("The killer in me is the killer in you, my love, I send this smile over to youn) and "Ava Adore" ('You'll always be my whore, 'cause you're the one that I adore"). Rotten Apples is a must-have for the collection of any Pumpkins fan, and a good introduction for those less familiar with their work.

Attomik's debut album blends southern country and punk-influenced alternativerock. Lyricscover abroad range of topics rooted in modern North American life, from online romance to social commentary. Although guitars dominate Attomik's solid sound - the four member lineup features the usual guitars, bass and drums- the use of a ~ a m m o n organ d played by aguest keyboardist emphasizes the band's country influences. In contrast, the inclusion of synthesizer tracks infuses the songswith a modern edge. When Attomikcalls uoon their punk influences to play a more upbeat and lively rock 'n roll, they come across with fun, catchy songs like "Praying Mantis." They also succeed when creating a slower and sadder sound, like in the strong but dark "Permanent Depression." This album is a little too stylistically diverse to hold many people's attention all the way through, but when it works,Attomik's catchy choruses really stick in your head.

unmarked, while the photographs of human models ast week, UW student and are scribbled over emerging artist Julianna Yau with criticisms of displayed "How Do i Look," their so-callediman exhibition of photography, in perfections. The quality the SLC Great Hall. The exhibition was sponsored by of the photothe Womyn's Centre and featured graphs could be an array of photographs depicting considered lowthe stark contrast between the aver- grade. Though age human body and social ideal of Yau was originally aiming for a soft the perfect figure. Yau, anindependentstudiesstu- focus and profesdent, used Barbie and Ken dolls to sional quality, she represent the flawless manifestation decided instead to of the human form. Her intentions stray from the were to probe the effects that these "perfect" magacultural icons have on the issues of zine-airbrushed look, and by dobody image. , The photographs compare the i n g s ~established Mattel dolls to four human models a distinction bewith "average" body types. Yau has tween the ideas chosen to use people with "normal" oresented in the body shapes to illuminate the fact media, and the ideas she wished to especiallywith an increasingnumbel of frosh. that many of our conceptions of convey through the exhibition. Taking notice of the vast quan The photographs are accombody images are unjustified. While the human models are fully clothed, panied by creative writing pieces tity of young people - male anc the dolls are unclothed in order to that explore the topic in greater female -who struggle with issue: emphasize them as portrayals of the detail and encourage others to con- about weight, she thinks it is unfor sider it more critically. tunate that our culture promote: ideal body. Yau feels that body image is ideals that are impossible to live u~ As well, both the dolls and the human models are masked. The sig- something that we need to be more to, and hopes to challenge thest nificance of generic masks reinforces aware of in a university setting, ideals through "How Do i Look?" the idea that body image is an issue that affects a wide range of people. Also, by removing the face, both the dolls and persons become objectified. Besides the obvious difference Artist Title Label in the physical shape of the human 1 # Hayden Skyscraper National Park Universal models and the dolls, the two differ2 Gorky's Zygotic Mynci How I Long To Feel . . . Mantra ent subjects are set apart: the pictures of Barbie and Ken are left 3 Hefner Dead Media Too Pure

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Imprint is weekly until November 30101 Voluntary Service Overseas Canada is recruiting for two-year math/science/education teaching placements overseas and for six-month overseas youth IT internships. Visit our Web site at www.vsocanada.org or call 1-888-876-2911. Resumt Builder - Friendly volunteers are needed to provide companionship to people with Alzheimer's Disease, one to four hours per week. Training program provided (with certificate upon completion). Call the Alzheimer's Society at 742-1422. This holiday season, give the gift of your time to help others in need. Many charitable and not-for-profit organizations appreciate.extra help at this time of the year. For more information about any of these volunteer opportunities, please call the Volunteer Action Centre at 7428610. Gift Wrappers needed: by Anselma House at Fairview Park Mall December 1-15 and Market Square December 21-23; by Epilepsy WaterlooWellington at Conestoga Mall during the day December 1-24 and Waterloo Town Square on December 24; by Family and Children's Services at Conestoga Mall December 1-24. Other ways you can help -Amelma House Christmas Bureau at Market Square needs volunteers to accept and sort gifts for women and children from December 1-23. Family and Children's Services are looking for courier volunteers to pick up donations, as well as administrative volunteers to stuff envelopes' and collate information packages. Volunteers are also invited to get involved with the annual CHYM Tree of Hope Radio-thon taking calls on the pledge line and accepting donations. House of Friendship Christmas Hamper Project welcomes volunteers to pack hampers andlor make deliver~es.Packing help is needed December 10-21 and deliveries will take place December 14-21. Great for families, couples or groups; flexible shifts are available. K-W Christmas Bureau is looking for clerical volunteers to answer the telephone and help process applications for christmas assistance. Food Bank of Waterloo Region needs truck drivers and driver assistants to help one morning a week with oick UD and deliveries. So what does it take to be a real man? An as-of-yet unnamed journal aiming to showcase the art and literature of men is looking for submissions from aspiring men, as well as volunteers of either gender. Submissions should be directed to one of asklo@uwaterloo.ca or lsmmchug @uwaterloo.ca. Leisure Support volunteers needed for the following positions (for more info. call Deb 741-2226): Preschool Pal: A busy three-year-old boy requires assistance to participate in a preschool program Tuesdays, 1:15-3:45 p.m. at Forest Heights Community Centre. Swim Buddies: Don't like to swim alone? Become a swim buddy for a person with a disability, once a week. Day and time are flexible. Help kids succeed with homework! The Kitchener Public Library is opening a Homework Centre and needs volunteers to be tutors and provide homework assistance. Two hours per week, evenings and weekends. Call 741-0271, ext. 275. Enelish Tutor Proeram Volunteer - Tutors are needed to tutor students on a one-to-one basis in written and oral English. Tutors meet students on campus for one term, usually once per week for two hours. If you have a good working knowledge of English, are patient, friendly,dependahle, and would like to volunteer, register at the International Student Office, N H 2080. For more information about the volunteer program, call ext. 2814 or email darlene@admmail.uwaterloo.ca.

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Charles University in Prague, Czech Replublic, offers the following undergraduate and graduate programsin English: Medicine, M.D. or Ph.D.; pharmacy; physical education and sports. Czech Technical University in Prague, Czech Republic: electrical, civil and mechanical engineering and computer science. Contact Professor S. Reinis, sreinis@watarts. uwaterloo.ca or watarts. uwaterloo.ca/-sreinis/info.html.

Creatwe? Do you like to write and share your work with others? Our writmg group meets weekly to compare notes and help motivate each other. For more info., contact Lara at Irthomps@uwaterloo.ca. Attennon undergraduate students - Interested in applying for undergraduate scholarships, awards or bursaries, Hurry and check out the Bulletin Board on the Student Awards Office home page at: www.adm.uwaterloo.ca~ mfoawardd for a detaded list of awards open for aool~cationthis term. Further ~nformat~on is available in the Student Awards Office, second floor, Needles Hall. Marnage plans? Join with several others to study Drs. Les and Leslie Parrott's "Saving w Your Marriage Before It Starts." Contact Jeff or Merlene Austen at 725-0265, ext. 224, or e-mail to lausten@ commun~tyfellowship.org. Students Wanted: Everyone is welcome to sell their hand-made jewellery, clothmg, sculptures, drawmgs, palntlngs, etc. at the Unwers~tyof Waterloo Students of Fine Arts Show & Sale on November 29 and 30. Contact Nancy O'Neil, ext. 6283, for more mformat~on. Do you want to learn about the 2417 economy? On Saturday, December 1 in Itchener, (9:OO a.m. to 4:00 p.m.) Snyder & Assoc~ateswill present the free one-day workshop "Marketing Your Skills in the New Working World" to teach partupants how to survive and thrive in the changmg world of employment. Call 725-3676 to reaster and for more mfo. The Applied Studies Student Union needs a logo! Surprise fellow applied studies students by submitting your logo idea this and next term! Stun the students of Waterloo with your beautiful logo for years to come. UndertakP the perilous journey through the underground hallways of PAS to visit the ASSU Executive and decide on your favourite logo. Please submit your ideas to PAS 1282 (located in circular hallway behind the centre area on the first floor) as soon as possible. Contest is open to all current and former AS students. 888-4567, ext. 6074. TOEFL Preparation Course -The Test of English as a Foreign Language course begins January 15 and ends March 21. Classes are held every Tuesday and Thursday from 2-4:30 p.m. This 10-week course is designed for people taking the TOEFL exam. The course fee is $91 and includes the course book. Register at the International Student Office, NH

2080, or call ext. 2814 for more details. The Senate by-elections for one full or part-time graduate student, and one full-time ESIIS undergraduate student closed Tuesday, Nov. 20 at 4 p.m. Here are the results. Graduate student, term to April 30, 2002 -Amer Dawoud, systems design engineering, is the successful candidate with 46 votes. Angela Garabet received 33 votes. ESnS undergraduate student, term to April 30, 2002 -Nayan Gandhi, planning was elected with 26 votes. S t e ~ h e nGardiner received 14 votes.

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Wedrfesday, December 5 Keeping up with your research literature electronically; 9:30 a.m., FLEX Lab, third floor, Dana Porter Library. Offered to graduate students, faculty, and staff with teaching responsibilities, this hands-onsession will show you how to get the most from databases like CISTI Source and electonic journals. Learn how to use Web of Science, a new index provided by t h e m Library. Registration opens on December 1. See IST, Skills for the Academic e-Workplace, for registration form: ist.uwaterloo.ca/cs/courses.html. Fnday, November 30 Impriot staff meet~ngheld at 12:30 p.m., SLC, room 1116. Come out and volunteer for your great school newspaper! 8th Annual Craft Sale today from l0:OO a.m. to 4:00 p.m. at the Dav~sCentre, room 1301. Hosted by University of Waterloo Staff Association. Tuesday, December 4 Guy Dans -Live from St. Jacobs and 100 per cent blues. Davis hits all the right notes all the time. 8 p.m. at the Church Theatre, 1376 Kmg St., St. Jacobs; tickets $18. Call 664-1134. Thursday, December 6 Canada's National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women memorial gatherings will be held in Cambridge at City Council Chambers, 46 Dickson Street from 12:IO-1250 p.m. and in Kitchener at Victoria Park Pavilion, 80 Schneider Ave from 7:OO-8:00 p.m. All welcome. For more information call Laurie-Ann at K-W Sexual Assault Support Centre, 571-0121.

Montreal at New Years. Two n~ghts stay and bus. December 30-January 1. Book 11 friends go FREE! Thames Travel (Todd) 1-800-962-8262.

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Waterloo Inn now hiring. We are looking for hardworking, energetic individuals to join our team in the following positions: banquet servers and dishwashers. The positions are part-time, evenings, weekends and some day shifts are available. If you are interested please contact Waterloo Inn and Conference Centre, Human Resources, Waterloo Inn, 475 King Street, N., Waterloo, ON. Fax 884-0321 or please e-mail: ddoogan@waterlooinn.com. Weekend counsellors and relief staff to work in homes for individuals with developmental challenges. Experience, minimum eight-month commitment. Paidpositions. Send resume to Don Mader, K-W Habilitation Services, 108 Sydney Street, S., Kitchener, ON, N2G 3V2. Christmas gift wrappers -We need creative individuals. Locations are: downtown Toronto, North York, Richmond Hill, Mississauga, Markham, Pickerina. Managers to $9.00/bour olus bonuses. Wrappers to $7.40/hour. FulUpart-time, December 1 to 24. (416)533-9727. Need cash? Domino's delivers! We are now accepting applications for full- and part-time instore service personnel and delivery drivers. Come join our winning team! Apply in person to your nearest Domino's store in Kitchener-Waterloo and Cambridge. Looking for an adventure? Teach English in Korea and make upwards of $2,500 a month with flight

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and accommodations supplied. For more information e-mail us at skagency@antisocial.com. InstructodLifeguards - City of Waterloo promotes excellent customer service in the delivery of swimming lesson instruction and lifeguarding services in a busy aquatic environment. Candidate's aquatic skills will be screened prior to an interview. Resumes can be e-mailed to asiountres@ city.wateroo.on.ca or . pick up . an application at: 101 Father David Bauer Drive (off w&tmount). Math or Science tutors and mentors needed as Dart of Waterloo clinical team working with students ages 8-18 with learning disabilities, 2-4 hours per week. Availability through winter semester, possibly summer. Call 519-837-3169 for interviw. 1985 Mercury Grand Marquis. Fullvloaded, lowkms. Great working order. $1,200. call 576-5649. LSAT-GMAT-GRE-MCAT Contactwww.PREP.com. "Chance Favows The PREPared Mind!" Flexible formats and frequent U of T start Qates. Subscribe to our "Law School Bound" e-mail newsletter at: learn@~re~.com - weekend LSAT P r e ~(see . weekendprep.com) at U of T and Western www.prep.com. 1-800-410-PREP.

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2001 Tom York Memorial Short Story Writing Award. Deadline is December 31. Call St. Paul's College Business office at 885-1462 for details. ZOO1 A.C. Forrest Memorial Undergraduate Essay Award. Deadline is December 31. Call St. Paul's College Business Office at 885-1462 for details. Mondays English Language Lab - A lablclass is held from 2:30-3:20 p.m. in Modern Languages 113 from October 2001-June 2002. The class has an emphasis on pronunciation and listening exercises. Students, faculty, staff, and spouses are welcome to attend. For more information contact the International Student Office, ext. 2814. Fridavs English Conversation Class -the class meets Friday afternoons from 2:00-4:00 p.m. in Needles Hall, room 2080, September to June. Students, faculty, staff and spouses are invited to attend. For more information contact the International Student Office, ext. 2814.

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TERM SUBSCRIPTIONS

Fall or Winter $17.75

Saturday, December 8 Elora Festival Singers, Noel Edison, artistic director, present Handel's Messiah at 8 p.m. at Melville United Church, Fergus. Tickets may be ordered by calling (519) 846-9694 or www.elorafestivalsingers.org. Ancient Noels for Christmas - Grace Church onthe-Hill, 300 Lonsdale, Toronto. 8 p.m. To contact: (416) 494-7889, www.paxchristichorale.org. Sunday, December 9 Ancient Noels for Christmas - Grace Church onthe-Hill, 300 Lonsdale, Toronto. 3 p.m. To contact, see above. Tuesday, December 11 Epilepsy Waterloo Wellington's Christmas Potluck Dinner at Kitchener City Hall, 10th-floor cafeteria from 6:30-8:30 p.m. Contact Melissa at 745-2112 for registration and information. Friday, December 14 Exultate Chamber Singers,John Tuttle, conductor, present An Oxford Christmas. 8 p.m. at St. Thomas's Anglican Church, 383 Huron St., Toronto. Tickets may be ordered at (416) 971-9229, or see h.exultate.on.ca.

Fee-Paying Students: Non-Students: BnsinessIStudents:

+ GST

$3.00 1.15 $6.001.25 $10.001.25

Get your hair braided! Just bring a picture or description of ANY style. Call Rachel at 880-8557; I will do most styles for onlv $IS!!

Room for rent as of January 1, 2002. For a quiet individual in a quiet detached house near both universities. Parking and all amenities. Please call 725-5348. Large room for rent with four other girls, close to University. Available January 1to August 30,2002. Eight month lease -$325/monthplus utilities. Call (416)491-1370 for appointment. Winter sublet available January-April 2002 at Village-on-the-Green, University Avenue, East. $375 plus utilities or best offer. Contact Ross Firla, 883-7506. One unfurnished bedroom available in a four-bedroom apartment for the Winter 2002 term. Located on Philhp Street. Parking and laundry services available. $342/month. Contact Mark at 880-1152 or e-mail at daghammar@yahoo.com. Four person house for lease from January to April 2002. Partly furnished, 10-15 minute walk to UW. Please call 880-9198.


Yours to discover.

http://imprint.uwaterloo.ca/mambo/pdfarchive/2001-02_v24,n20_Imprint  

http://imprint.uwaterloo.ca/mambo/pdfarchive/2001-02_v24,n20_Imprint.pdf

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