Issuu on Google+

Hagey by Grant

interview Gordon

Gory news editor

President Hagey refused, in an interview Monday, to give a definite priority in university plans to the campus center. Although stating that he recognized the urgency of the center, he would not even suggest a tentative starting date for the project. He did say, however, that “the priority of the campus center has not changed.” The president added, “We have a plan which is quite acceptable to all.” He was then referring to part of the plan, Brief for a campus center, prepared by an 18-man committee in-

Volume 6, Number 17 UNIVERSITY OF WATERLOO,

revecds ‘Still no priority

cluding his own vice-presidents, A. K. Adlington and T. L. Batke. The Brief states: “The following schedule shall therefore be maintained: Aug. 1, 1965 start construction; Sept. 1, 1966 - complete construction and commence installation of furnishings.” President Hagey’s reply was, “This is only a plan and does not represent the official policy of the university.” The president was particularly upset over questions concerning the $30,000 of student money now in the university’s trust. The questioning went as follows: REPORTER: Did you request the Wednesday meeting with Student

Waterloo,

b

Ontario

Thursday,

Council $30,000

in order to turn over the to the students? HAGEY: I have never been asked officially to return the money. The first I heard of it was when I read it in the Coryphaeues. REPORTER: If the students go alone on the campus center will the money be returned? HIAGEY: How can you expect me to answer that question? Do you really expect me to be able to tell you just like that!? REPORTER: Apparently Mr. Adlington had no problem telling a faculty member that the students would not get their money back. [See story below].

January

20, 1966

for campus

(into intercom) Adlington, did you ever tell anybody that the students would not get their $30,000 back? ADLINGTON: No. The professor who told the Cory of Mr. Adlington’s statement refused to change his story after he learned of Mr. Adlington’s denial, The interview also revealed that plans for the math and computer building are still “indefinite.” Final preparations are not complete and thus it is not yet known when tenders will be called. Plans for financing the building are still at the same point as a week ago when President Hagey said, “We are hopeful that financial arrangements will be completed shortly.” President Hagey also confirmed the delay in the food services building and when pressed, admitted that the planned completion date was not until Sept. 1967. The president later stated, “We have reached a stage when we place

stu

Phrases such as “a very foolish project” and “shocked at the university’s plans” were used by faculty members in discussing the university’s announcement.

This is a model of the new mathematics and computer building announced last week. Cost of the 287,000-square-foot building is estimated at $6,000,000. The building, which will be the largest teaching building on campus, will be located north of present chemistry-biology building.

Food

The food services building, originally scheduled for completion in the fall of 1966, will not be ready on time. In fact, it may not even be started by then. The reasons are primarily financial. The lowest tender, $2,27 1,000 was $777,000 or about 52 percent above the university’s original estimate. The

administration is just not prepared at this time to pay that much for the food services building. As it now stands the building will be redesigned on a smaller and more economical scale. It is hoped that it will be ready for classes in September 1967. An interim plan has been suggested by Mr. Adlington, university vicepresident, whereby students both in the Village and living out would eat in the Village cafeteria. Plans to close the arts coffee shop and use the old cafeteria as a coffeeshop remain unchanged as we go to press. An interview with Bob Mudie, food services director, was interrupted by a call from the administration. After the call, he was unavailable for further comment. Left: Allyson Edward, 5’ lo”, arts I will be one of the nine girls auctioned 08 tonight in the village dining room at 7:30. Hairstyle by Capri.

President Hagey further stated: “I feel that the facilities of the university, if and when the math and computer building is completed, can provide adequate space until the campus center can be built.” The Brief says, “This building is the physical embodiment of a role which cannot be played by any other building in the campus complex.” President Hagey said, “The social facilities are not of academic importance.” “The idea,” he said, “that this is going to contain a pub is leading to a lot of the student concern over the future of the campus center.”

Inside

More stories l on l thel campus appear on pages 10 and 11.

center

-

kgey

-

- -

expressed at center delay

Reaction from both students and faculty to the continuing delay of the campus center has been thrown sharply into focus, by the .announcement of plans for the math and computer building.

Students stcwve in ‘66? services delayed

The reported then reminded him of delays in the physical education complex, food services building and campus center.

-

Dismay campus

center’

facilities for social and athletic events to be equally as important as facilities that might be required for further expansion of university enrollment.”

HAGEY:

As one senior faculty member put it, “The general understanding was that no other building would be put up before the campus center, unless someone else gives all the money.” Another professor told of “expressions of dismay in all faculty councils at the university not building the campus center at the present time.” A. K. Adlington, university vicepresident, was quoted by a faculty member as saying, “We do not have to give back the $30,000 because we never made any express commitment

as to when we will put the building up.” (Student Council resolved last week that the $30,000 put in the university’s trust by Council in 1962 be returned and used if a student-financed campus center became necessary.) But the dominant feeling was one of total loss at the university’s plans. As one prof put it: “Everybody here in engineering is completely in the dark. What it boils down to is that we have no idea what the score is.” Especially dismayed were the, members of a committee, including SC president Gerry Mueller, which visited President Hagey in December. They learned that because of lack of funds, the campus center project was being “advanced” i.e. delayed. Less than a month later they received the news that the university was planning more building construction, but that there was still no word on the campus center.

answers (?) Council

STOP PRESS - BULLETIN (THURSDAY MORNING) The administration will not build a campus center in the immediate future. This was the consensus after a special Student Council meeting afternoon, yesterday at which Council spent two and a half hours questioning university president, J. G. Hagey. President Hagey had requested to attend the meeting. Student Council president Gerry Mueller said, “The university has not committed itself to providing the necessary facilities to the students. We are forced to follow the policy statement approved at the last Student Council meeting.” This statement calls for incorporation of the federation. Council could then build its own campus center.

At yesterday’s meeting however, President Hagey felt this would imply “a splitting - a parting of the ways” between the students and the administration. Patrick Kenniff, president of the Canadian Union of Student, who was also present at the meeting, pointed out to President Hagey that many other student unionshe named nine-had successfully incorporated: “Essentially it has not meant in any of these cases a parting of the ways between the administration and the students.” When pressed about the $30,000 campus center fund which Council turned over to the administration in 1962, President Hagey assured the meeting that the fund would be available for the campus center whether built by administration or federation.

As an alternative, President Hagey suggested space in the proposed math building might be allotted as a temporary campus center. When a council member accused him of only dangling a carrot before the students, Dr. Hagey denied it. He could not, however, make any definite promises. He said this would be the decision of the math department, which is planning the building. (Dr. T. L. Batke, university vice-president, intimated Wednesday night however, that the math building might not be built after all.) The meeting ended on an inconclusive note. The feeling among Council members was that little had been learned and less accomplished.


Here and there today Lecture

dent in psychology, will discuss the problems of inferiority feelings, frustration and’ how it can be of value, and St. Paul’s advice to Christians to have an objective opinion of themselves. The lecture is in CB 27 1 at 7: 15. Opportunity for discussion and questions will be given.

on sex

Today, Dr. Mary K. Lane, psychology professor at Waterloo Lutheran University, will be discussing the topic ‘Sexual Morality’ with specific emphasis on the problem of premarital sex. Place: 148 University Ave. W., at 12: 15. This series is sponsored by U of W SCM and WLU Social Work Club.

Turkey

Inter-faith

vigil

Sunday the Newman national chaplain will be on campus in connection with the Church Unity Octive. The Session commences with an interfaith Bible vigil at 8 p.m. in the Notre Dame chapel. Later in the lounge of St. Jerome’s men’s residence, Father Sherlock, Rev. Klassen of Conrad Grebel, and Rev. Findley of Renison will speak. A discussion period and refreshments will follow.

seminar

An aft&noon seminar entitled “Turkey today” will be held in the board room of Renison College Saturday afternoon at 1. The seminar will be attended by both students and professors from Turkey who will discuss political, economic and social conditions in Turkey today.

ISA

IVCF Needham:

self-evcduution:

The second of series on religion Richard Needham Mail, Jan. 22, at Mr. Needham will religion.

“Self-evaluation” will be the topic tonight in the second lecture on psychology and Christianity in a series sponsored by Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship. Neville Marsoon, a graduate stu-

Authorised

Uome

the ISA lecture will be given by of the Globe and 8 p.m. in P 145. talk on Canadian

ONLY 35 ATTEND

Peace

eeting lacks appeal

by Sandi Dunham What is Canada’s role in world peace? Don’t worry if you have trouble in answering this enduring, perennial question. You’re not alone. The newly formed K-W Peace Committee which held its first public meeting Jan. 12 on campus also floundered when confronted with the question. As a result of poor publicity the turnout consisted of only 35 less-thanenthusiastic listeners. Students were the one group obviously absent. (The K-W Record erred in stating most of the 35 were students). That the meeting had genuine potential, for peace is - or should be - a major concern of every human being. Un,fortunately the gathering failed to give any apparent statement of issues or policy.

In fact Dr. John H. Morgan, minister of First Unitarian Church in Toronto and past chairman of the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament, couldn’t see any issues at the moment intense enough to stir public support for a world peace movement. He recognized a definite Canadian concern about Vietnam and other world trouble spots but he did not feel that these problems would bring any Canadian involvement. He used the evening’s small turnout as proof of his statement. Other speakers for the program ineluded U of W Prof. Walter Klaassen of Conrad Grebel College, a confirmed pacifist, and Lynda Britton, chairman of the Student Christian Movement at the university. A participation form was passed out to the audience as well as a pamphlet entitled World affairs bulktin 110. I which provided a condemna-

Undoubtedly the peace meeting had good intentions. Nevertheless its future attempts will need a great deal more organization before the group will have the public appeal it requires to succeed.

Eng Sot bush A unique bash takes place tomorrow night at the banquet room of the Breslau Hotel for the Engineering Society. Activities include skating, a sleigh ride and ski-doos. Inside there is a dance band, buffet and a bar (extra) all for only $2.50 a couple. For transportation, ask your Eng. Sot. rep.

in Kitchener-Waterloo New

and

Used

V.W.

Sales

CENTRAL

-

Specialized

Service

Complete

BALL J66

Parts

ONLY TWO

VOLKSWAGEN

2500 King East, Kitchener. We

-

Welcome

Anyone

from

U of

W with

SH 56881 “special

-

GRA

Vokswugen

of the

-

tion of the American stand in Vietnain. The bulletin is factually correct but entirely one-sided. It fails to find any fault with the Red Chinese, who cannot be ignored in this controversy.

consideration”

DAYS LEFT!

DOMINION LIFEHASPLANSFORYOU

GRAD

Dominion Life’s GRADED PREMIUM LIFE insurance plan is ideally suited to many university people . . . because it starts at a greatly reduced premium (50 per cent of ultimate premium) which gradually increases throughout the first five years. “Buy now pay later” city to pay premiums

Life insurance will be limited

for people whose for the next few

include dividends nor estimates.

at current

scale

and are

neither

Yes, a dollar or two a week NOW will help provide substantial protection and will also return many dollars of retirement income - at a time when you will need it most! FOR

FURTHER

INFORMATION

744-5205

OR

THEDOMINIONLIFEASSURANCE

The Compaqy INTERCOLLEGIATE

2

The

CORYPHAEUS

that

HOLIDAY

ARTS Those

a.m.

FOYER wishing

ENGINEERING to attend

Grad

The Super F-5 pictured below is just one of the many new exciting things that are happening in the air, on the ground and at sea in the Canadian Forces. IVE IT SOME THOUGHT, . . . .

OMPANY,WATERLOO,ONTARIO

Your TOURNAMENT

Authorized department,

MUST

OR -

BE

PURCHASED

TOMORROW

2:00 p.m. FOYER

Ball

‘66 must

PHYSICS purchase

a ticket

FOYER

option.

Take udvcmtuge of this visit by CANADIAN FORCES CAREER COUNSELLOR All Day January 27 and 28

PHONE:

HOCKEY

NS

in the

745-8463

Sponsors

QPTI TODAY WOO

A payment of $79.40 in the first year (gradually increasing to $149.80 in the fifth and later years) will provide $10,000 of protection on a male aged 21.

*Figures guarantees

TICKET EITHER

capayears!

At age 65 such a plan will have.accumuIated excellent cash a lifetime income, values - $15,682.50* - or, it will provide starting at that age, of $124.38* per month.

BALL

as second-class mail by the Post Office Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.

Opportunities young men commissioned Forces. CONTACT

are better than ever for of university calibre as officers in the Canadian

PLACEMENT

OFFICE


“She said, ‘Why don’t you get dressed then and go to pieces like a man?’ ”

bring

Les Jeunes Cundi&w charm

and life of Quebec by Joachim

Surich

:

A sellont audience in the Theater of the Arts was treated to an excellent display of acting talent Saturday night. Legons d’amour, from Moliere, and Hommes et betes were performed . in an outstanding fashion by Les Jeunes Canadiens, a group of FrenchCanadiens currently on tour across Canada. There can be no doubt that the I audience was presented with a group of professionals. The show was amusing, in places hilarious, and was understandable even to those who spoke little or no French. A masterpiece .of biculturalism, it brought a little bit of the charm and life of Quebec into the heart of cold Ontario. After Saturday evening’s performance, the answer seems to be that Quebec makes the difference. Les Jeunes Canadiens were like ambassadors; they brought us something uniworth-while, someque, something thing that will stand out from the “American” cultural jungle.

Un des 1eCons d’amour

de M.

Why is it that something similar has not come out of English Canada? DO we not have the ability, or are we merely lacking the drive necessary for a production of this kind? I salute the cast of Saturday’s program.

Moliere

e house enioys by Wayne Tymm A large audience was treated to an enjoyable evening when the Chamber Orchestra and opera group offered program of Mozart Friday at the Theater of the Arts. , Bastien and Bastienne was a treat to the audience. This light little opera, when handled with ‘style and grace,

ATERLOO Thurs.,

Fri.,

DQRIS

DAY,

Sat., Jan. 20-23 ROD

“DO

NOT

DISTURB”

TAYLOR

Special Program Sat. & Sun Matinees

“‘SKI “SERGEANT

Only

PARTY” & DEADHEAD”

SUNDAY

EVE.

THE

ONLY

GEORGE SEGAL TOM COURTENANY

“KING RAT” & ‘“MOUSE THAT ROARED” COMING

SOON

TO

AUDREY

‘cMY

The dance by content Two Tones. January 29.

DANCE that dares to be known alone - featuring the Seagram Gym, Saturday, 50 cents. 8:3‘0 p.m.

FOLK -

JAZZ -

Coming

Records Discount

Waterloo

A Thurber The

*

prices

SH 4.3712

Square

DANCE THIS

LADY”

carnival

February

will

marriage-go-round

Weber

6:30 - 12:00

by 24, 25,

Shirt Admission

$1.00

and Tie

Snow’s theme overdone but other two ‘vibrant’ by Charlotte Cahill One’s first impression of Michael Snow’s work - now on display in the gallery - is that it is an experiment, and that the artist has tried every approach and attitude in his work that comes to his mind. Unfortunately Mr. Snow apparently has not learned to judge which of his experiments are successful and which are not. In several of his works he. shows sensitivity and originality, well executed in the medium, as in his Test focus field figure. and his painted collage, Seated nude. One feels, however, that his theme of the walking woman is overworked. It seems he has attained a certain measure of success with it and then gets carried away. Certainly his transference of this theme from the medium of oil to metal sculpture is an indication of this. The graphics display in the gallery is excellent. The linocuts of Claire Shoniker show much familiarity with

FORUM Waterloo Req’d. Membership

$1.50

a technique that is difficult to master, and there is feeling and significance in the religious theme of her work. Rosemary Kilbourn also shows the same mastery of technique in her wood carvings, as well as insight and imagination of theme. The work of both of these artists is vibrant and alive. In all of it there is a display of professionalism which unfortunately there is not in all of Michael Snow’s work. Perhaps the key here is potential versus potential achieved.

Join the Glee Club Because of the nature of the music performed by the Glee Club a series of choral pieces, some sacred, some profane (but not too!), with orchestra - a large choir is required. The music ‘is not difficult and is a pleasure to sing. Rehearsals are Wednesday evenings from 7 : 30 to 9 :30. Anyone wanting to join in song should come along.

Folk Festival weekend traces story of songs is Folk

Festival

weekend.

Tomorrow evening’s concert tures talent from the University Waterloo, Waterloo Lutheran, Toronlto.

be at

St. Ext.,

IN THE GALLERY

This

-

CAESAR’S

by James 17, 18, 19.

Leslie Stevens. February 26.

SATURDAY

THE REEFERS

up in

Theater Thunber.

POPULAR

HEPBURN

FAIR

The orchestra provided a rather heavy and unsympathetic accompaniment but in the finale proved it has the potential to become a sensitive, well-disciplined instrument. The performance of the chamber orchestra was very promising. For the most part, the orchestra performed well in the straightforward, quick movements of the first selections. The opening movement of the symphony was spirited, and the thlird movement was relatively well controlled. The opening movement of the divertimento, however, suffered badly from lack of incisiveness. In several spots the tempo dragged noticeably, especially in passages where runs were exchanged by the first and second violins. The slow movements of both the symphony and divertimento were disappointing also. Both were unsustained, even laborious, and the shaping of phrases seemed incidental. Fortunately, the final movement of this part of the program was delightful. The orchestra played with precision and spirit, except for minor slips. On the whole, however, firm control of the orchestra seemed to be missing in many vital passages. In spite of the unevenness of the effort, the Mozart evening was enjoyable. We look forward to future concerts with interest.

Ge,orge Kadwell

THE

LYRIC

Mozart

is very entertaining. For the most part, the soloists captured the gently mocking air which the whole opera requires. Miss Heather Hymmen acted and sang the role of Bastienne with grace and spirit and delighted the audience with her stylish singing. Hans Joerg Stolle, as Sir Colas the magician, held the performance together with a perceptive interpretation of his role. Not only has he a strong clear voice but he employs it with flexibility and sensitivity. Charles Martin displayed a rather light voice. Although it was at time overshadowed by the orchestra, it had a pleasam lyrical quality. Unfortunately his rather heavily romantic interpretation of the inconsequential Bastien seemed out of place in a light Mozart opera.

The U of W’s counterpart to Spring thaw, FASS Nite, will run for three nights this year, Feb. 1 O-l 2. Tickets will be on sale Jan. 27, and 28 in all foyers. Out-term students may reserve up to two seats only through the creative arts oflice until Jan. 26. Reserve seats will be held until 7:30 of the evening of the performance, or will be mailed if money and stamped self-addressed envelopes are sent with tickets requests.

feaof and

Saturday afternoon, a program of contemporary folk music will show the development of the contemporary folk song and review the leading modern contemporary folksong writers and singers.

Sunday afternoon will be an instrumental workshop with various folk instruments - guitar, banjo, mandolin, and harmonica. The weekend concludes Sunday night with a program of folk blues, showing its origins, development and offshoots. All the events will be held in B 116. Admission is 75 cents to the Friday night concert and 50 cents to the other events.

L

“He’s having into French.

all his books translated They lose something in the original.”

Thursday,

January

20, 1,966

3


ADAM & LIVIO

GRAD BALL ‘66 -

FORMAL WEAR FITTINGS WEDNESDAY

AND

THURSDAY,

9:00 a.m. MAIN LOWER Those

has

unable

to attend Downtown,

-

26 and

27

to

MORROW’S CONF.

HAIRSTYLING HAIR CUT

103 UNIVERSITY

$2.50 1.50

THEATER

OF

ARTS

may be fitted at WASHBURN’S Kitchener - BEFORE FEBRUARY

MEN’S 4

AVE. W.

post office groceries and magazines toilet articles

ROOM THE

SWAN CWWERS LTD. WEAR

Talk over your future with the Bell employment reps when they visit your campuson JANUARY 26 & 27 GRADS-TO-BE

three hairstylists serve you

CO. LTD. 47 Ontario St. S. Kitchenet, Ont.

109 Erb St. W. - past Seagram’s open from 8 -8

- 5:00 p.m.

DRESSING

FLOOR

JANUARY

MERCHANTSPRINTING

SHIRT LAUNDERERS Corner King and University 10% Student Discount

FQRD MOTOR COMPANY OF CANADA, LIMITED

Invites YOU to meet its representative on campus

JANUARY

24,1966

Graduating

IN:

ENGINEERING-Electrical, Civil, L Mechanical,Eng., Physics,Atts, Science, Commerce.BusinessAdministration

Seniors

In

ENGINEERING Learn

What

FORD

Offer

YOU

Can

Set up that interview appointment through your Placement Office now ! Arrangements

Bell Canada

For

Further CO-ORDINATION 6th

4

The

CORYPHAEUS

Can Be Made And

Interviews

Information AND FLOOR

Obtained PLACEMENT

ARTS

BUILDING

At OFFICE


Pie-eyed

ATTENTION 1966 GRADUATES GENERAL SCIENCE and ARTS with PHYSICS

courses and

Canadian

Government

WITH PRUDENTIAL

in

representative

JANUARY

26 and

Physical Sciences Booklet, reservations available at OFFICE.

for

while

WISH’

and interview PLACEMENT

WANT

Details

applications controls and

Station

design

TO BECOME

summer

Available

work

in Your

in this

ACTUARIES field

Placement

company

INTERVIEWS

WILL

and in

THE PRUDENTIAL

Insurance

of America

Company

Toronto

\ Waterloo

compressor

-

743-4842

ORR AUTOMOBILES LIMITED 130 Weber

benefits.

Good

BE CONDUCTED

JANUARY

The board of external relations regrets to announce that the conference on Confederation and Canadian goals has been cancelled by the University of Saskatchewan. To those students who have shown a willinlgness to attend this conference, the representations commission expresses their thanks.

‘67 grads)

Office

St. S., Waterloo 450 King SALES $r SERWICE ,CHEV, CHEVELLE, CHEV II, CORVAIR, 745-6815 744-8125 Kitchener

Communications Comprehensive

for

Conference off

WED. JANUARY 26

from CIVIL, MECHANICAL graduates who are interested

Hydraulic

MANAGEMENT

OFFICE or

LIMITED

Computer

who

TOWARD

IN THE

Trans-CanadaPipe lines

Pipeline

TO WORK

Graduates

27, 1966

application forms your UNIVERSITY

are requested engineering

1966

on your

(Also

Applications ELECTRICAL

Want to be pie-eyed for a swinging winter weekend? Come to Renison on Feb. 5, at l&30 a.m. and slosh your way through two pies. Each college, faculty and grads are urged to enter a team. The team is to consist of one man and one woman. Contestants will be hand-tied and the winners will be those who devour two pies in the shortest time. Place entries between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. before Feb. 3. A prize will be awarded to the successful twosome. Complete rules will be available upon entering.

MATHEMATICS

A professional career in Meteorology with an opportunity to use your training in physics and mathematics is available to you. See the campus

Winierland

EMPLOYMENT INTERVIEWS

IN

for

starting

salary.

ON CAMPUS

28, 1966.

SH 4-2781 Custom gunsmithing Rebarreling Rechambering Restocking Guns and shooting supplies is our business, not a sldeline.

St. E., Kitchener OLDS, Waterloo

CAD

WENDELL MOTORS 861 KING KITCHENER, Deal With

GET

A LOT

STREET

ONT Confidence

MORE

CAR

EAST

-

PHONE

With

FOR

742-3514

Dependable

YOUR

WENDELL

MONEY.

GET

DODGE!

l

CHRYSLER CANADA

wh G. Fawkes, CLASS

OF ‘08?

Representatives

Voted the student likely to rise highest in his class, Guy will be remembered for his major thesis “The Raising and Lowering of Buildings by a Revolutionary Method”. Cognizance was taken of this project by Parliament. Always keenly interested in problems of rapid movement of mass, Mr. Fawkes became attached to an early space programme which failed due to non-ignition of the propellant. Results of some of his earlier experimental space work are clouded due to excessive blastoff. However-who knows?-due to good old Guy, this college might well have been the first to put a man on the moon. Conclusive evidence must await more sophisticated lunar exploration.

LTD. of

THE

International Nickel Company OF CANADA Will with

LIMITED

visit the university to discuss graduating and post graduate

career opportunities students in

ENGINEERING

•~~*~0.*~~~e.aem~eeee.~e~

0

CHEMICAL

0

ELECTRICAL

0

MECHANICAL

l

CIVIL

and CHEMISTRY

Whether you are aiming for the moon or some less ambitious obiective, your chances of success will be enhanced by a Savings Account at “MY BANK”.

ON JANUARY We invite you to arrange

25

an interview

your Placement

through

Office

THE

THE

BANK

THAT

VALUES

STUDENTS’

International

ACCOUNTS

OF CANADA

U4-68 0

COPPER

LIMITED

CLIFF,

ONTARIO

Thursday,

January

20, 1966

5


Thursday HOCKEY NIGHT At Waterloo The Warriors U of T Blues Game

time

cl

Arena battle for top

spot.

is 8:30

Tickets in pat kage at arena.

DANCE Discothkque Seagram from

lo:30

Program

at its best Stadium till

1 a.m.

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3 :“Oh, dad, etc. (Renison Players Guild] Hockey (Warriors Dance (casual)

FRIDAY,

Friday

FEBRUARY

Concert :Concert

SATURDAY, RICH

LITTLE

master

leaders

(?>

of today

famous blues

FEBRUARY

Gallery opening Jazz concert

TRIPJACKS recorders and

folk

4

(Rich Little and the Tripjac: (Toronto Woodwind Quinte

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY THE

Blues)

5

Snow sculpture judging Buses leave for ski area Powder-puff hockey . Winterland Olympics Pancake fry Faculty-student game 3 SNOW BALL

impressionist

of the

vs. Toronto

6

(Mennonite

folk art>

of music

Saturda theme:

on sale in all main Jan.

6

The

CORYPHAEUS

24,

foyers 25,

31,

Concert (Rich Little j Bus fare to ski area Pancake fry Snow Ball Feb. 1 Jazz concert <<Tickets from Oh, dad and woe


66

9

and, Sunday GALLERY OPEIWVG Mennonite at 2:30

folk

art

p.m. 0

FREE JAZZ CONCERT Theater, Walk

8 p.m. right

in

If Events Theater of the Arts Waterloo Arena Seagram Stadium

8:30 p.m. 8:30 p.m. lo:30 p.m. .

Seagram Stadium

8:30 p.m.

Saturday

night

SNOW

BALL

Semiformal

dance

at beautiful

PARADISE

from

Arts I Lake Lake Lake Lake Paradise Gardens

lo:30 lo:30 10:30’ 1:00 3:lS 3:15 8:30

a.m. a.m. a.m. p.m. p.m. p.m. p.m.

GARDENS

8:30 till ?

CORONATION OF WINTERLAND QUEEN and

presentation

of awards

Saturday Theater of the Arts Theater of the Arts

3:30 p.m. 8:00 p.m.

WINTERLAND

SKIING Buses

leave

HIDEAWAY Return

SO each SO each, .75 couple 2.00 each 1.00 each .25 each 4.00 couple free

OLYMPICS ‘DER-PUFF

mornbg

,

afternoon

A package

time

at lo:30

a.m.

RESO RT

SKI 4:30

for

GAMES OF ALL KINDS starting at 1 p.m. at the lake speed skating l three-legged skate race l egg-tossing contest @ pancake-eating contest

Winning plays against (Ralph’s

\

student tegm broomball the faculty Rink Rat:,

\ I

il

I /

p.m.

Bus

fare

$1.00

Tow

fees

$1.50

deal for

the entire

wee’kend

is offered

at

$10 per couple

concert from theater box office Thursday, January 20, 1999

7


What is the value of n

CDA?

You don’t have to be able to solve this problem to build a rewarding career with IBM Not everyone at IBM is a mathematical wizard. Not that we don’t have a lot of bright people . . . people who are generating significant advances which help man cope with today’s information explosion. For some, theirs is a world of algorithms, microelectronic circuits and automatic programming techniques for multiprocessing systems. To others-in the Office Products Division -the challenge is to discover and implement ways of improving the flow of vital communications through an office. They call it “word processing” -the use of modern equipment to increase word output, making more productive time available to time-conscious business and professional men. And thanks to IBM’s talented development engineers, product planners and industrial designers, Office Products people have some fascinating devices to work with. These are some of the latest: Selectrb typewriter-15 years of engineering research resulted in the development of this revolutionary, unique typewriter which has no type bars and no moving carriage. Magnetic

Tape

Selectric

typewriter

-

stores typing work on magnetic tape and can later retype the desired material on command, at a speed of 180 words per minute, “proofreading” its work as it goes. Dictation Equipment -a full line, rang-

8

CORYPHAEUS

ing from the 224, small enough to fit in your coat pocket, to full-scale dictating systems which can channel dictation from any number of executives to a central typing pool. The growing market for these and other IBM office products creates rewarding career opportunities for imaginative individuals who wish to sell a dynamic product line. A comprehensive training program is provided. Upon its completion, you, as an IBM Sales Representative, would be assigned your own exclusive territory. There you maintain direct executive-level contact with IBM’s present and prospective customers, analysing their typing and dictation requirements and making recommendations on what equipment should be installed. Naturally, salary prospects-immediate and future-are important to everyone. You receive an attractive salary throughout the training program, and upon taking charge of a territory, your earnings potential is extended through a salary and commission plan. Bigger jobs await those ready to take on bigger responsibilities. Promotion to positions like industry specialization representative, field manager, branch office manager and others of sales.or general management responsibility can be attained. IBM is noted for its progressive employee benefit plans. Life insurance, family hospitalization, retirement benefits and many others are provided-all paid for by the company.

Now that you know a few facts about the work, the company and its future-measure them against your own criteria for a future career. If you seek a satisfying and rewarding future in a dynamic, thriving, rapidly-expanding industry, we’d very much like to talk with you. Make it a point to discuss what IBM’s “room for achievement” could mean to you with the representative who will be visiting the campus on Monday, January 31. Your placement officer can make an appointment with our interviewer. If you cannot attend the interviews, please write or visit the IBM office in Kitchener at 259 King Street West. Just in case- you’re still puzzling over the size of /! CDA, don’t feel badly. It took an IBM computer nearly three minutes to solve. Here’s the solution: Draw a line from A to intersect BD (point E) so that angle EAB is iTOo. Connect points C and E. Now it’s just a matter of discovering equalities and adding and subtracting angles.

Trade Mark

International

Business Machines

Company

Limited


KINGSDALE

RIVIERA MOTEL 45 Ultra-Modern

MOTORS

Rooms

2808 King E., Kitchener

2100 King

St. E., Kitchener,

100 King St. N. Waterloo,

Ont.

Phone 742-1547 or 742-2111

SH 5-1196

MCDONALD,

Canada Limited

KITCHENER LTD. RAMBLER SALES & SERVICE

LICENCED

CHARTERED

Phone 742-1351

Ont.

MECHANIC

These positions are available Commerce, Arts and Science,

in a after graduation?

Further are

An outstanding

record

2.

Responsibilities seniority.

and

3.

of individualized, promotion

based

on a man’s

ability

-

Among

benefits,

highly

competitive

Obviously, you need to know facts before making We’d like to tell you more about us. Descriptive ment Office and company representatives will

FRIDAY,

IN -Honours

BUYING,

FINANCE,

positions SALES

PROCTER

and profit

The Government of Canada offers professional careers, competitive salaries and excellent apportunities for advancement in fields such as: *Atmospheric Sciences *Marine Sciences *Geological & Geophysical Sciences *Metals & Mineral Research *Analytical & Research Chemistry *Export Trade Promotion *Geographical Research A booklet describing some of the current projects in “Phy sical Sciences” is available at your Placement Office. representative while on

Physics

-Maths

and

Physics Physics

-Geophysics

not

-Metallurgical -Geology

sharing.

Chemical Engineering

and

Mining

-Geography

an intelligent choice of your career. brochures are available at your Placevisit for interviews on

JANUARY for

ADVERTISING,

salaries

of

information and arrangements for interviews available through the Placement office.

-Chemistry and Engineering

other

for the graduates in the Faculties Engineering and Law.

ATTENTION 1866BACHELOR GRADUATkS

-Engineering

training.

A growth company which controls 30% - 65% of all the major product markets in which it competes; at least one of our brands is in 95% of all Canadian households.

4.

-

on-the-job

be on campus Thursday, January positions available in offices of

L

Graduates who’ve been out a few years say the important things to look for in choosing a job are good training, an unrestricted chance to grow in a solid, recognized company, income, early responsibility and a stimulating environment where intelligence and enthusiasm are recognized. The points are not always in that order, but these are the main ones. What, then, can Procter & Gamble offer you? 1.

& CO.

ACCOUNTANTS

Representatives from our Firm will 27, 1966 to interview students for our Firm throughout Canada.

What do you want company

CURRIE

28

See the Canadian Government your campus JANUARY 26 and 27, 1966 Application forms and interview reservations your UNIVERSITY PLACEMENT OFFICE.

available

at

in MANAGEMENT

and

TRANSPORTATION.

Employment

& GAMBLE

(Regular P

Opportunities and Summer) in

GRADUATING ENGINEERS in the Mechanical EngineeringPhysics and Metallurgical options: l

ment

You will find opportunities

challenging engineering work, recognition, with United Aircraft of Canada Limited.

and

above

average

advance-

Exploration

Geophysics with

PAN AMERICAN PETROLEUM CORPORATION (CALGARY,

ALBERTA)

InterviewsTuesday, January25,1866 for

For over 35 years, United Aircraft of Canada Limited has played a key role in the growth and development of the Canadian commercial aviation industry. As a member of the it manufactures, sells and services in Canada the products of United Aircraft Corporation, United’s Pratt & Whitney Aircraft, Sikorsky Aircraft, Hamilton Standard and Norden Electronics divisions. 1957, the Company formed the nucleus of a design and development organization which has since expanded into a 400-man engineering force. Among this group’s many accomplishments are the preliminary design of the Pratt & Whitney Aircraft 3000-lb. thrust JT12 (J60) engine (used in North American Saberliners and Lockheed Jetstars) and the development of the now mass-produced PT6 (T74) free turbine engine (used in the Beech King Air and the De Havilland Turbo-Beaver and Twin Otter).

POST

GRADUATES GRADUATES

UNDERGRADUATES in

In

United Aircraft of Canada now employs approximately 3800 in its manufacturing, overIn addition, the Company’s long-term haul, supply, research and development operations. plans and its pre-eminence in the gas turbine field have created exceptional opportunities which will prove to be well worth the detailed consideration of graduating engineers. For further information, please contact your Placement Office. Our

recruiting

team

will

be on campus

JANUARY 21 EXCEPTIONAL

UNITED

AIRCRAFT

OPPORTUNITIES

AT

OF CANADA

LIMITED

HONORS

PHYSICS

HONORS ELECTRICAL

MATH ENGINEERING

Pan American, a member of the Standard Oil Company (Indiana) organization, has several challenging career openings in the Canadian Division Office in Calgary. We are a rapidly growing major attractive salaries and benefits portunity and advancement.

oil company in addition

Appointments for interviews are being Student Placement Office. Company formation booklets are available there.

Thursday,

offering to op-

made at the and Job in-

January

20, 1966

9


_.-_..--

by Ed Penner student emeritus 1 %

After Christmas exam results came out I decided to give up the tremendous work load of running the newspaper (behind the scenes of course, I let Tom :Rankin the editor-in-chief take most of the credit) and the pressure of trying to turn out a column of such high caliber every week. Instead, I decided to fill up my cell with wine (Catawba ‘65, a good year for grape stems), books (no year is good), pen and ink (Waterman’s washable blue “66, a very good year) and stay there in an effort to improve my marks. Now those people who know me personally also know the great conc,ern I have for my schoolwork and my scholastic standing. Therefore it can be imagined that only a great amount of pressure from people

in high places ,could force me to return to the strict discipline and ordeals of writing. (Arnold, the janitor on the seventh floor of the library, said he liked the column and would cut off my washroom privileges if I didn’t begin writing again). <.:.>~py*$p ~..:.:.:.~:~:.:.,:...~~

don’t really know if we have a shortage, but it seemed like the proper thing to say). Imagine, only a four-month school term, and we can send the boys out on the job. Now of course, a certain degree of caution must be exercised

So here is the first effort of the new year. I 0 I stole a great idea for a new faculty the other day and now I am going to tell you about it as if I thought it up myself. Co-op meds. Think of it - what a solution to the shortage of doctors. (I

here. The hospitals would’nt want to start the first-year work-term students on anything too difficult perhaps just a right away couple of the simpler appendectomies or tonsillectomies. At this rate, by the end of the second or third work terms they should be capable of minor brain surgery at least. As a check against careless-

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ .2,...... ... ,.-.v.*,. J........

A ~cunp~s cenfer now is Ccln macy in a moderately elegant fashion. “An absolute necessity!“lsays Gerry In short, it will be a pleasant place Mueller, speaking of the proposed campus center to be built in the ’ in which to linger. The focal point of the center will heart of the university grounds. be the Great Hall. It will normally Both the exterior and the interior be used as a general meeting place, of this building to serve as the “parlor of the university” will but may also serve as a ballroom or banquet hall. It will have plush carcreate the effect of warmth and inti-

peting, except for the dance area. It will open on a flood-lit terrace and will be overlooked by a balconymezzanine. A sound-proofed music lounge will have a stereo hi-fi and a grand piano for the music lovers. A readinglounge, carpeted writing-browsing

The

campus

center

includes

ness and sloppiness and to keep the young med students up to the mark, it will be a standard rule that any student who performs an operation resulting in the death of his patient will immediately be liable to the failure of his work term. In cases where the liability for the death is in doubt, students will be given the chance to perform a supplementary operation. So here is a chance for some budding Hagey to form his own faculty, if the rest of the administration doesn’t like the co-op med idea. Just march a half-mile south and form a new university. Let’s run this idea up the flagpole and see if anyone sits on it. e I was just looking over the plans for the proposed and longdelayed campus center building which the Student Council now plans to finance, and I noticed there is going to be a pub included in it. This is good news, as pretty

and also sound-proofed, will be supplied with periodicals and newspapers for the intellectual. A games lounge will be reserved for those who wish to play cards, chess or other games. Also included will be a women’s lounge and a private lounge. Of special interest will be the

facilities

for

all university

members.

DALHOUSIE UNIVERSITY

Lord Beaverbrook

HALIFAX, GRADUATE

Scholarsh’ips in Law tenable THE

FACULTY

OF LAW NEW

Seven scholarships Application forms

at OF THE

UNIVERSITY

BRUNSWICK

valued at $1,500 per year may be obtained from:

The Secretary, Selection Committee, Lord Beaverbrook Scholarships University of New Brunswick, Sommerville House, Fredericton, N.B. Applications

(110

The

\

must

CORYPHAEUS

be made

OF

not

later

are available.

in Law,

than

March

31, 1966.

CANADA

STUDENT

AWARDS

Physical Sciences Oceanography Biological Sciences Medical Sciences Social Sciences Humanities The Faculty of Graduate Studies invites applications by March 15 for Dalhousie Graduate Awards, Dalhousie Research Fellowships and Dalhousie Post-doctoral Fellowships in the Sciences, and by May 1 for Visiting Fellowships for Terminating Graduate Students and new Ph.D.% in the Humanities and Social Sciences. !$3erXJC)jO0 Honours Graduate Entrance Scholarships (12 month * Up to $2,400.00 for Master’s Students. (12 month period). Dalliousie Centennial Fellowships of $3,600.00 for Post-Masters candidates in all fields. Up to $4,000.00 for continuing Ph.D. Students. * Up to $5,000.00 for Visiting Fellowships in the Humanities. * $6,000.00 for Postdoctoral Fellows in the Sciences. $7,000.00 for Research Associateships. % Travel Allowances for Canadian Students. Research Allowances for Postdoctoral Fellows. z The Dalhousie Graduate Awards, the Dalhousie Research Fellowships, the Visiting Fellowships for Terminating Graduate Students and new Ph.D.% in the Humanities and Social Sciences, and the Dalhousie Postdoctoral Fellowships are open to Graduates of any recognized university in any Degree Program for which facilities are available, and are awarded on the basis of academic standing. Additional special awards are open to Canadians only. Application forms and further information may be obtained from the Dean of Graduate Studies, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia. $

soon now 01’ Penner will be 21, which means I’ll be a man and will be able to drink, smoke and say lzell and damn,, and things like that. Actually though, if the student center pub keeps regular pub hours, I can see the possibility of classes being missed by a few over-enthusiastic students. This shouldn’t be a real problem however, as university stcldents have a reputation for being quite conservative in the amount they drink and are rarely seen in a drunk and disorderly condition - are they? So tea-baggers, you have been warned: better start your antibooze-on-campus campaign right away. It should’t be too difficult to veto the pub on campus. After all, look at the success you’ve had in making the Ontario liquor laws the most laughable and ridiculous regulations in Canada, if not the world. (Gawd! Such hard-hitting stuff should be on the editorial page.)

ssif 7 .

faculty lounge, connected to the senior common room. Exciting is the word for the planned high-caliber dining lounge with table service, adjacent to licensed lounges with service from the bar. This will be a special novelty, not likely to be found on any other campus across Canada. Also helping to alleviate the food problem will be a self-service coffeeshop opening onto a terrace, to serve 150. Four meeting-dining rooms with movable walls to permit combinations for varying’ size rooms will meet the need of places for assembly. These rooms will have motorized screens and speakers for movie projection. , The council and debating chamber, a small amphitheatre, is planned for various uses including debating, informal dancing, listening to music and movies. Several other large club rooms will also be available. The commercial area, planned for the basement floor, will relieve many campus residents of wearying trips downtown. The area will provide such “A college is not only a body of studies, but a mode of association; . . . its courses are only its formal side, its contacts and contagions, its realities. It must become a community of scholars and pupils.”

-Woodrow

Wilson,

1909

things as a barbershop and beauty salon, a student store, two banks, and a mail-distribution area. Such recreational facilities as a billiard room and a tabletennis room, each with eight tables, will be found on the bottom floor. There will also be an arts and crafts room, set aside for painting, drawing, sculpturing and the like. Student administration ‘offices including Council, faculty societies, Board of Publications - will be in a separate wing. Our present facilities are “as bad as, or worse than, the worst of them,” says Mr. Mueller. In order to encourage a liaison between student and faculty - in order to make this fragmented university more of a community of scholars we need the campus center. And we need it now!


Hindsight

Student

directories

To the editor: In the middle of December I went to the Board of Publication office to get my student directory. I was informed that none were left, except

QUIT

for a few kept for the incoming engineers. I was told only 3,000 were printed. I feel that having paid my fees which help pay for these student publications I am entitled to a copy as is every other student. Obviously about a thousand of us are only allowed to cover the cost but cannot get anything in return. A fine way to run a business. Unique by any standards. Perhaps the Board of Pubs or Student Council has a logical and reasonable explanation. I would certainly like to hear it.

critics

To the editor: After reading the derogatory editorial about Grad Ball, one would surmise that the editorial staff is somewhat displeased with the planning of this year’s Grad Ball. Where were you when Grad Ball was being planned in early November, gentlemen? You could have come down from behind your typewriters and played an active and constructive part in the organization of Grad Ball ‘66. To the editors and any other hindsight critics I would like to make a suggestion. If you are not satisfied with Grad Ball - or any other student activity for that matter - rather than moaning or complaining about how you would have planned it, condescend a little’ bit - plan it! MICHAEL MOGAN 4B civil engineering

GRlPlNG

AND

GUNTHER 2B electrical

T. PETERSEN engineering

This year enough directories were published to supply three out of four students. We did not publish enough for every student because our funds are limited by Student Council and we can only estimate what the total demand will be. Last year’s demand for the directories was not heavy. We anticipated the same reaction this year, but to be safe, we allotted instead of the three for five published last year an increase to three for four. - Board of Publications.

HELP

like to do the stuff If YOU think the Coryphaeus is doing a sloppy job of covering some important campus events - and we admit several instances - why don’t YOU join the staff and help US do it better? Complaining on the outside doesn’t help much. Our main problem is lack of staff. The few people who have been listed on the masthead the past few weeks can do only so much without failing in their studies. GO to the Cory Office in the little building near Laurel Creek now. State your name, interest and telephone number. We can use you. Writing ability is not essential. News writing is not like writing literature. The aim in news is simply to string the facts together you don’t even need a formal conclusion to your story; just stop. It is the copyeditor’s job to smooth the rough edges. There is a job on the Coryphaeus for every talent and interest. Two or three hours per week is all the time you need spend. The news department is in serious need of a reporting staff. Meetings of the various councils and boards deserve better coverage. Interviewers are needed. This would be an opportunity to get to know key people in the faculty, administration and student government. We’d like a regular opinion column. We need better sports coverage. This facet has been especially criticized. Why not volunteer to write the report on games you regularly attend anyway? Interviews with the coaches and players before and after the games would make interesting reading, if the Cory only had the staff to gather and write them. You can

cover out-of-town pense.

events

at our

ex-

We need photographers to cover news, sports and entertainment events. The Coryphaeus will provide or subsidize the equipment and supplies. The Coryphaeus receives copies of all newspapers of the Canadian University Press. Perhaps some graduate students would be interested in keeping up with their home campus including sports standing’s. They could help in the job of culling interesting articles for reprint. We’d like to exchange coverage on entertainment events with Waterlootheran: Did you know that the Rising Suns are there this weekend? Neither did we. We’d tell you in print if someone would join the staff to write about it. We’d like to review more books, plays and music.

current

There seems to be a perennial lack of typists. All that’s required is ten fingers and one or two spare hours a week - anytime Friday, Tuesday or especially Monday. Copyeditors - people with a sharp eye for grammar, spelling and circumlocution are needed. If you have a flair for words you can help write headlines. A sense of balance and of what makes an attractive poster would make you useful as a layout technician. Advertising keeps us in business. But selling it takes personnel - and this job pays a commission. Again, your job on the Cory staff is what you make it. You can limit it to your interest area and your timetable. You are.

can’t be any busier

than

we

“I’ll sit on it for a whiW’

cmsecond Now just a damn minute there with that new math building. It was just a matter of days ago that President Hagey himself told federation officials the university did not have a single cent for construction of the campus center right now. Then the administration turns up with a million dollars or so for a new math building. Did President Hagey suddenly find a million dollars he had misplaced or did he just mislead the federation officials? Now a new math building is grand. But you just can’t ignore the students of this campus who want and need a center. Nor can you ignore the head of counselling service, who says that not having one will produce devastating effects. Nor can you ignore that most of the faculty have indicated they consider the center of prime importance. Yet the administration seems to

have flagrantly ignored us all. If they think they can do this and get away with it, we say that they’re liable to find out they’re wrong. We’ve been pretty good up until now about the whole matter. We waited for years while we listened to excuses. Even last week when council finally decided to take things into its own hands, everyone was polite about it. But now we’ve been slapped in the face. In effect the administration has said, “You know what you can do with your campus center building; we’ll do as we like with our money.” Well, we’re sorry but we just can’t accept that. If there is an explanation for all this, if we haven’t presented your side fairly, we think you’d better tell us quickly. We have a right to be informed and considered you know. Or do you?

in

Once

The days when the University of Waterloo led Canada’s universities with new ideas have quickly passed. With Guelph already on the trimester system Waterloo still hasn’t given this idea much thought. Toronto recently announced that their 1967 admittance requirements will call for only seven grade 13 credits, but our institution is still calling for nine and has no idea of when it will change its standards.

Published every Thursday afternoon authorization of the Federation of located in the federation building, editor-in-chief: assistant

Tom editor:

managing

editor:

Rankin

Stewart Jim

Nagel

Tex Houston Rawls

and

Board of Publications Member of the Canadian

the

annex

chairman: University

fine

arts:

It seems a pity that our youth has flown so quickly and conservatism descended upon us. Once, not long ago, campuses and administrations all across Canada were talking about our co-op program. Seeing this modern innovation we were applauded by others. They looked to us for more of the same. At the moment we’re failing them.

academic University Telephone

1.

photography: Saxe

news: Grant Gordon-with Janice Arthur, Anita Bugara, Ginny Cooper, Sandi Dunham sports: Hazel

of

Students,

Bob Wayne

year by the student Board of Publications, under of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. Offices are 744-6111 extension 497 or 744-0111. Glandfield

advertising:

Tymm

c.u.p.: Joachim Surich-with Carla Armstrong typing: Francis Goldspink-with Ruth Bower, Fred Girodat, Else Knudsen, Mary Kolynko, Arla Oja, Don Shaughnessy copydesk: Dianne Cox, Dave Curzon, Bob Davis, Macey Skopitz David Press.

R.

Witty

by

ys gone

-

advertising:

Ekkehard

Thursday,

printed Kitchener

Ken

Baker,

by Merchants

Ron Printing

Bakker Ltd.,

car-y-phae-us . . . L, leader, fr. Gk koryphaios, fr. koryphi! summit; akin to L cornu 1: the leader of a chorus 2: the leader of a party or school of thought -Webster Heidebrecht.

January

Circulation

4000.

20, 1966

,11


rriorstakefwo, ntrreal

and

Wrestlers

Bob Murdock

Mae gets 2,000 fans

meet

Entries are to be given to your intramural representative or the director of intramural athletics. Up to three entries per unit will be accepted. If more than sixteen entries are received, the first two entries per unit

-

the

power

world’s

leading

transmission be

on

LOOKING FOR Call 743-9809. ANYONE swim office,

12

a furnished 449 Hazel,

from contact

The

CORYPHAEUS

Winners of the intramural archery tournament held Jan. 13 were: Hazel Rawls, Libby Uttley, and Karen Reinhardt. Our volleyball and basketball teams won 15-8 and 15-7 against WLU on Jan. 15. The basketball Bananas won 35-27. Referees are needed for intramural basketball games and the pay is $1 per game.

-

materials

JANUARY mechanical

of

mechanical

handling

machinery

28 to and

discuss civil

career

engineering

at the to

that

tell you

placement

office.

all about

Link-Belt

are available

Windsor on sale at 8:15 original-

blew coach joins faculty William “Neil” Widme;er, coach of the KC1 Raiders has joined the faculty as a lecturer in the department of physical and health education. He will take over as service program director and will serve as assistant basketball coach for the remainder of the season, As a result of his success in coaching the KC1 Raiders track and field team to three consecutive championships, he will coach the Warriors’ track and field team this year. Neil received his BA at Western in 1958 and his BPE through McMaster extension courses in ‘63. He studied for an MA in physical education at the University of California.

fitness

On- Tuesday from noon until 3 there will be a physical fitness appraisal clinic for both men and women students in Seagram Gym. The test takes approximately 30 minutes to administer. Students are requested to come to the physical education office and sign up for a tee-off time. Sixty-six faculty and staff members were tested last Tuesday.

Track

and

field

There will be a short organizational meeting at 5:15, Jan. 24 in the student lounge, Seagram Gym, for all male students interested in participating in track and field. If you are interested in competing but unable to attend please contact Mr. Neil Widmeyer of the physical education department.

Neil Widmeyer, Lecturer, Physical and Health Education

I

Are you a candidate for assistance under the

CANADASTUDENT LOANSACT?

---.

--.-

Under this Act, each qualifying student may present a Certificate of Eligibility to the bank branch of’his (or her) choice. Royal Bank, with over 1000 branches across Canada, offers you convenient service cowtbined with practical counsel. Visit your nearest branch.

graduates.

Brochures

learning education tomorrow.

sporfs

win

against the league-leading Lancers. Advance tickets are now for this crucial game. It is p.m., not in the afternoon as ly scheduled.

the Jim

apartment? Apt. 2.

INTERESTED in contact the physical local 356, today or

for

Women’s

manufacturers

and

campus

opportunities FOR CORY WANT ADS: first 15 50 cents, each additional word 5 Ads for articles found are free. MISSING RECORDS Van sale should at 576-2797.

narrowly out-pointed Roger rozza Doner 4-3 to give the Warriors a commanding 2 l-3 lead. Neil Patterson lost a decision in what was probably the best match of the day. Bruno Kukujuk lost a 2-O decision in the 191 pound class and Wayne Houston was pinned in the eighth minute of his match. This put the score at 21-14 and a happy bunch of Wariors headed for home to join the other victorious Waterloo teams. The Warriors next see action on Jan. 29 at the Guelph Invitational.

will be accepted. There are no eligibility restrictions. Closing date for entries is Feb. 11.

will

ANYONE Treasure Lindsey

t

triumph

The wrestling Warriors had to leave home in order to score their first dual meet victory. The Warriors defeated U of T Blues by a 21-14, score the first victory for the Warrior wrestling team. Neither team had an entrant in the 123 -pound class. In the 130-pound matches, Bruce Durrant lost a close decision to put the Blues ahead 2-O. However, Steve Harris made up the lost ground by winning his bout by a decision, thus tying the score 3-3. In the process of pinning his OPnonent. Bob Heinrichs, caused an injury to the man, thus earning a victory by default. This put the Warriors ahead 8-3. Bauer Ray Peters and Gunther won their matches by forfeit in the 152 and 160 pound class. Joe Irrga-

Warriors

The Warrior basketball team moved into a second-place tie with the University of Toronto by defeating them in a thrilling come-from-behind victory last Wednesday night. The Warriors eased a 12-point half-time deficit to go on to win a real squeaker 80-79. Dick Aldridge sank two clutch foulshots to put the Warriors ahead with 25 seconds remaining. Even at this stage Lady Luck had to put her hand into the outcome. In the last few seconds of the game a Toronto lay-up circled the rim and finaly fell out giving the gasping Warriors a tough win. Bob Eaton once again led the Warriors, scoring 19 points. Neil Rourke added 16. Dick Aldridge and Bob Pando sank 12 ap.iece. Stan Talesnick had 11 while Power, and Kuntz had four each. Mike Kirby rounded out the scoring with two points. In an exhibition match on Saturday night the Warriors waited till overtime to score a 67-58 decision over the K-W Coronets. Next home game is Saturday night

Physical

Sunday

The men’s intramural curling bonspiel will be held Sunday, Feb. 20, at the K-W Granite Club. There will be three eight-end games with a playoff between the two top teams. The first three draws will be at 9 a.m., 2 p.m., and 5 p.m.

RATES words cents.

but the Carabins again gained the lead, only this time by two goals. Art Bacon replied by scoring on a low hard drive through the Montreal goalkeeper’s pads. Montreal carried a 4-3 lead into the third period. The Warrior’s rallied in the third period. They skated and bodychecked the Carabins to a standstill while shelling their ,goalie with 42 attempts. Murdock completed his hat trick by scoring after a goal mouth scramble. Stan Sharman scored the winner at the midway mark of the period and Art Bacon added the insurance with his second goal of the game.

I

McMaster gets 2,000 fans out at each of its home hockey games. McMaster’s enrollment is smaller than Waterloo’s this year. How many will cheer the topplace Warriors tonight and Saturday?

Curling

B-bd

Laval

The hockey Warriors left for their their game in the third period. A toughest road trip of the season, Jan. combination of hard skating and 15 and returned winners and still foul-checking kept Lava1 bottled up leading the way in the O.Q.A.A. in her own end for most of the period hockey league. as Waterloo counted two goals to Friday night the Warriors met the Laval’s one. Lava1 Red and Gold and came out At the five minute mark, Mark swinging on the long end of a 4 to 2 Buest picked up a Don Mervyn rescore. bound and fired it past the prostrate The first period was scoreless alLava1 goalie to give the Warriors a though Waterloo was shorthanded two goal lead. three times in the first ten minutes. George Belajac picked up the WarDespite a very wide margin in terriors fourth goal of the night as he ritorial play held by the Red and came up with the puck in front of .,.....................................................I .,........................................f................. ....................... ,.,.A.. ........*..*.. ........Z........... ..................................................................t.... ..................................+.......... ..........................i..f..~.~.~f.~.~.~.~.~.~. .......~.~.~.SfS~.~.f~.~.~.~.~.5. .................................‘...V............... the Lava1 net and slapped it home. With five minutes left in the game, The Warriors face Guelph tonight at Lava1 scored their second goal after the Waterloo arena, 8:30, in a home Arlon Popkey caught a blazing drive game. Saturday the University of which he couldn’t hang on to. Montreal plays here at 2:30. ,,.,..,.......................................... ....... ............ff’...f..~.~:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.~~.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.: ............. ................,............*.*.+...*.........f.. ......(.... .*.*.f*.,.*.*., Only some more excellent goalf.., ...............f............................... ............,......*................ ............f... .........,..........,...............i......5f..f................‘..Z tending by Grenier kept the score at Gold, the Warriors finished the se4-2. cond period with a 2-l lead even At Montreal on Saturday afterthough they were outshot 17-8. noon, Waterloo scrambled through Art Bacon opened the scoring on two periods of hockey and then once a breakaway at the 10 minute mark, more came to life in the third frame flipping the puck home over a sprawlto down the U of M Carabins 6-4. ing Lava1 goalie. The first period Waterloo was Lava1 came right back to knot the badly outplayed but managed to hold score while the Warriors were short the Carabins lead to 2-l on a score by Bob Murdock. Murdock got another goal early in the second period to tie the score

handed. Ron Smith put the Warriors ahead again on a long hack drive from the blueline. The Warriors once again saved

COME FROM BEHIND

ROYAL BANK


http://imprint.uwaterloo.ca/mambo/pdfarchive/1965-66_v6,n17_Coryphaeus