ILC Better Tomorrow - New Generation in Claims 2023

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ILC

Better Tomorrow

NEW GENERATION IN CLAIMS 2023 HEADLINE SPONSOR SPONSORS


Contents ILC NEW GENERATION IN CLAIMS 2023 ILC Welcome

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Sue Whyte

An individual approach to the skills crisis

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James Lambert

Is hybrid working the best of both worlds ?

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Panel Session

A Wiser approach to recruitment

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Crescens George

Learning from the best

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Donna Scully

A long term strategy for workforce wellness

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Edwin Van Rooyen

Changing the point of reference

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16 Edwin Van Rooyen

Susie Thomson

Changing the narrative around

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apprenticeships Pete Milsom I&D still a work in progress

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Ashley Hever

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06

James Lambert

10 Crescens George

08 Panel Session

12 Donna Scully

20 Pete Milsom

18 Susie Thomson

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Ashley Hever

DISCLAIMER Contributors The views and opinions expressed within Better Tomorrow are reported from live events and are those of the individual contributor/s. They do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the contributor’s employer, organisation, committee or other group or individual. ILC While every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of information, ILC will not accept responsibility for errors or omissions or for consequences arising from reliance on information published. The opinions expressed in Better Tomorrow are not necessarily the opinions of, or endorsed by ILC unless otherwise stated. COPYRIGHT All rights reserved. No part of the material contained within this publication may be reproduced or copied in any form or by any means without written permission from ILC.

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Welcome to to ILC’s New Generation in Claims

S U E W H Y TE Chief Business Office & MGA Lead ILC

Welcome to the first of ILC’s New Generation in Claims initiatives under ILC’s Sustainability umbrella of specialist, future-focused events. The Sustainability programme of events covers key subject areas we – as an industry – need to focus on in order to create a ‘better tomorrow’ and ensure the claims sector is fit for the future. How can we get better at attracting, developing and retaining talent in our industry is a clear and recurring theme throughout the ILC community and beyond, and our aim with this inaugural New Generation event is to provide the launch pad by which we can all contribute towards that brighter future.​ The theme of New Generation is not only to ensure the sector is fulfilling the needs of attracting and nurturing young people into kick-starting their careers but so too explore and understand how the sector can become a ‘go-to’ destination for fresh, untapped talent pools ​and alternative skillsets. A key overriding aim is to change the way people respond when we say: ‘we work in insurance’.

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This event is only made possible with the support of our sponsors – those who, from day one, aligned with the New Generation concept. First of all, our Headline Sponsor Wiser Academy, who collaborated with ILC on various events in 2022 and this year have wholeheartedly supported the New Generation concept. On a mission to develop the next generation of insurance sector talent, it is great to be working with Wiser Academy on such an important project. ​ ellow event sponsors: Carpenters Group​; Enterprise; F and Zurich Insurance​are all major names within the claims sector synonymous with a focus on ‘people’ – be it bringing new people into the sector, career development amongst existing teammates or creating environments for people to thrive. Thanks too must go to our contributors for this event – helping to bring the whole thing to life and sharing enthusiasm, insight and knowledge for a ‘better tomorrow’. Enjoy this New Generation in Claims event review – another first from ILC. Kind regards

Sue Whyte

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ILC

NEW GENERATION IN CLAIMS 2023 HEADLINE SPONSOR

SPONSORS

INSURER PARTNERS

INDUSTRY BODY PARTNERS

INSIGHTS PARTNERS

www.iloveclaims.com


An individual approach to the skills crisis With more people unemployed in the UK than there are vacancies in the job market, recruitment and retention should be fairly straightforward – but that is not the case in most sectors, and it is certainly not the case in insurance claims.

JA M E S L A M B E RT Global Director of Talent Acquisition Capita

“Unemployment is at 1.2 million in the UK and there are 1.12 million jobs,” said James Lambert, Global Director of Talent Acquisition, Capita and owner of Engage to Succeed, which supports individuals and businesses attract and retain people. “There is more than one person available for every vacancy, but despite that it is a very challenging landscape for recruitment. Attracting talent is incredibly tough.” Meanwhile, retaining that talent during a cost-ofliving crisis is not so simple either, James added. These days money is not always regarded at the number one consideration for employees. Work flexibility, career development and company culture are given equally as much credence by new starters. However, the end salary is a factor and during a costof-living crisis it inevitably rises up the list of priorities. As a consequence, more and more people are moving jobs to secure higher salaries. James said, “Pay rises are not in line with inflation, and the best way to get a pay rise is to change jobs, so attrition now is above average.”

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New Generation During his address, James urged employers to revitalise their recruitment strategies and then, once they have attracted new talent, put individualisation over organisation in an effort to retain them. “Our recruiting methodology is largely the same as it was 20 years ago,” he said. “We need to be disruptive and humanise the process.” He explained how Capita recruited nearly 28,000 people last year and did so by changing approach from ‘brand marketing’ to ‘candidate marketing’. In other words, rather than using the brand to attract people, Capita advertised its people and culture. He said, “When advertising we often make the mistake of starting with the company name, but it’s unlikely your brand name will attract anyone. Candidate marketing is about leading from a human perspective, promoting the people, the culture and working environment. We developed a new campaign called ‘Be brilliant, be you’, looking for the right people with the right behaviours, and have already noticed an increase in interest from the market.”

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Retention

Development

However, recruiting new talent is only half the battle; winning the war for skills is about engagement and retention.

The same is true for career development. Priorities and life circumstances change and James urged businesses to remain relevant to the individual’s ambitions through regular conversations, refreshed milestones and the support – both at a managerial and organisational level – to help them achieve their goals. “The individual needs to own this process and be accountable,” he said, “but if they don’t feel like they’re being supported you’ll struggle to retain them.”

“The top three things people want when looking for a job are money, career development and wellbeing – and people leave for the same reasons. Unfortunately, there is no one-size-fits-all solution to engagement, it needs to be individualised.” That means getting to know your employees on an individual level and developing engagement strategies and work development plans bespoke to them. The days of engagement surveys, James believes, are over. They are too generic, too standardised, and often inaccurate, with many employees either not bothering to fill them in or only providing the answers they believe their employer wants to hear. “Engagement must be about continuous communication with the individual, placing them at the heart of the conversation,” James said.

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Ultimately, he concluded, the people problem within the sector must be addressed one person at a time, with flexibility, understanding and consistency. He said, “Don’t be corporate. You need to humanise everything you’re doing from recruitment to engagement, and put individualisation over organisation.”

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Is hybrid working the best of both worlds? The working environment and working habits have changed irrevocably in the last five years, with many companies having to completely rethink their employee strategies – first out of necessity and then out of choice.

A N DY C A I N

S H A R N A TH O M S O N

RO B C H I LCOT T

A N N E PA S S

Head of Claims, Customer Operations Saga

Head of Customer, UK Claims Zurich

Learning & Development Manager Claims Consortium Group

Head of People & HR S&G Response

The shift towards hybrid working is perhaps the most significant change to workplace culture in the past 50 years and in many cases it’s fair to say both the employer and employee and are still trying to find the right equilibrium. Certainly this flexible approach brings opportunities to both, but it is not without challenges, particularly in an industry such as insurance claims, where communication and customer service go hand in hand. “Attrition is a key challenge of hybrid working,” said Andy Cain, Head of Claims, Customer Operations, Saga, who was joined on stage by Sharna Thomson, Head of Customer, UK Claims, Zurich, Rob Chilcott, Learning &

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Development Manager, Claims Consortium Group, and Anne Pass, Head of People & HR, S&G Response. “Different cohorts have different attrition rates but during the pandemic we definitely saw a higher percentage of attrition among new starters. We’re now focusing on our onboarding process so we can better connect with those employers. Face-toface is one option because that human connection is so critical, but we’re still exploring virtual onboarding so we can expand recruitment across the UK and not be restricted to local talent.”

Talent Access to a much wider talent pool is a key advantage of remote working and Zurich has already felt the benefits. Sharna explained, “For us it’s still very much about maintaining the relationship in the office, but flexibility matters and from a Diversity and Inclusion perspective hybrid working allows you to open doors to individuals who might not have applied for roles. “Only 12% of jobs advertised now are offering flexible working, but at Zurich 100% of our jobs are advertised on a flexible basis and we’ve seen a 95% increase in female part-time workers off the back of that.”

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Downsides

Customer

However, there are downsides: remote working rarely suits apprenticeships, where on-thejob learning and mentorships are critical; engagement among the workforce can also drop off dramatically; and there remains a fear that a ‘traditional’ mindset can count against and hinder the career development of employees who are not visibly at their desks.

But what of the customer? Can service really remain unaffected by a sporadic workforce? The simple answer is yes. In fact, applied correctly, technology can help companies deliver an even better service in certain key ways.

Furthermore, many remote workers who jumped at the workfrom-home lifestyle initially are now feeling isolated and drifting back to the office – at least for part of the week. Anne said, “We’ve noticed that the percentages between purely remote, hybrid and office working have started to change, with more people moving from 100% remote to hybrid.” This though, is part of the challenge and employers are now expected to be adaptable to the different needs of their staff. Rob said, “No one size fits all and flexibility is about opening all the doors and letting the individual walk through whichever one they want. It’s up to the company to support them through that. But in our industry we have leaders who have stuff to do, and when they’re not doing that stuff they lead. That needs to flip because if you’ve got a team of 10 people all 10 will need something different and require a slightly different skillset. Hybrid working can be the best of both worlds, but to get the most out of it team leaders need to adapt and realise that leadership isn’t something they do when they’re not doing their day job – it is their day job.”

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While many claims can be automated, the more difficult ones will always need a human voice on the other end of the line to support the customer in their time of stress. That puts the emphasis on soft skills, and remote working enables insurers to tap into a demographic that may naturally have more empathy – as Zurich has discovered to its benefit. Sharna said, “Simple claims can be handled by tech, but complicated claims will always require the human touch and recently there has been a shift in how we recruit. We would always look for a technical skillset. But now you don’t necessarily need a background in insurance claims. If you have the right approach to consumers you can learn the technical side of the role.”

One area where progress is being made though is in speech analytics. By inviting behavioural psychologists to analyse claims calls, insurers can separate good and bad examples and identify specific areas where improvements can be made. Based on the results, companywide training tips can be produced or one-to-one support offered to raise the overall level of service. Research suggests that upwards of 80% of employees now favour hybrid working, while less than half of companies offer it. The gap is not insignificant, but presents a real opportunity for employers to gain a competitive advantage in a tough job market, while at the same time increasing engagement and, consequently, customer satisfaction.

Soft skills These soft skills are often the hidden ingredient to delighting the customer, but they are the most difficult to identify and develop. Rob said, “Insurance is a compliant, process-driven industry with a huge amount of emotion. The national curriculum was written 60 years ago so you can’t expect people to come out of education with a higher level of emotional intelligence then previously. Often it’s just pot luck if the candidate has it or not, so we need to train it. But it is far more complex than training the technical side of the job.”

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A Wiser approach to recruitment

C R E S C E N S G E O RG E CEO Wiser Academy

Businesses have been urged to consider emerging and future skills rather than focusing on those that are already needed when planning their training and development strategies.

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Crescens George, CEO, Wiser Academy, said that technology and insurance is evolving so rapidly that only by thinking ahead in terms of talent and training can businesses stay in front of the curve. Crescens said, “When we talk about training and development, we usually talk about skills that have arrived, such as customer services and complaints handling. But we don’t often focus on skills that are in progress, that are not yet mainstream but happening, and we completely avoid skills that are in anticipation.” He pointed to prompt writing, which means understanding the structure of AI well enough to get the relevant answers to questions, as a case in point. “We’ll all need this skill in 12-18 months,” Crescens said.

Attitude However, yesterday’s digitalisation and today’s prompt writing will be something else again tomorrow, and Crescens suggested that more important than the technical skills is the attitude and willingness to keep learning. He said, “The sorts of people who will thrive will be those who have embraced life-long learning and who have developed skills around critical thinking, problem solving, attention management, and emotional intelligence. “These are the neutral skills that we need to develop to stay afloat and be ahead of the curve. Technical skills will continue to evolve, but the confidence and courage to embrace that comes from these neutral skills.”

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Numbers For many though, it is hard enough to recruit anyone let alone the right one. The elite among graduates and schoolleavers tend to gravitate towards more aspirational industries than insurance, meaning the sector has an uphill struggle to bring in fresh talent. Wiser Academy is aiming to tackle this with a social campaign called ‘Rise Up’. As part of the campaign, it intends to reach out to 10,000 school and college leavers by the end of October and promote insurance as a meaningful career option.

the industry gain an overview and understand the jargon before they continue their learning with work mentors. Crescens concluded, “As an industry we need to constantly reach out to people; 500,000 people have expressed an interest in apprenticeships so it’s just that one door we have to open and we can find the next generation of talent.”

Those interested will be invited to attend a two-day insurance bootcamp which will give them a better understanding of the sector and the jobs within it, while also helping them prepare for interviews and then placing candidates in front of employers. The final part of ‘Rise Up’ focuses on employers themselves. Crescens explained, “There is a generational gap between insurance professionals and those entering the industry. Most 18-year-olds have different value systems and they will need to be taught even the most fundamental aspects of working in an office, such as turning up on time. Employers need to be warned and prepared for that to give themselves and the new starter the best chance of being successful.” The support from Wiser Academy does not stop there. It also offers a free kickstart training programme to employees, a two-day introduction to help those new to

History Wiser Academy began life as an internal training arm for a large brokerage. To reduce costs insurance professionals from other companies were invited to attend its soft-skills courses. Introducing CII qualifications added a more substantial element to the training, but it came at a cost. However, Crescens discovered that there was government funding available for dedicated training providers, and Wiser Academy was formed.

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Learning from the best

D O N N A S C U LLY CEO Carpenters Group

Carpenters Group CEO Donna Scully discussed the power of mentoring and shared her own experiences at ILC’s New Generation in Claims 2023.

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She explained that she did not have time to be a mentor until recently, but in the last few years has been able to support a number of initiatives primarily targeting women and girls from disadvantaged backgrounds, and has even benefited from some mentoring herself despite her achievements.

Charity One of the charities Donna supports is The Girl’s Network, which was set up 10 years ago to help young girls from disadvantaged backgrounds. Last year it supported 1,164 girls aged 14-19, with 97% saying their mentor had a positive influence on them. Donna said, “I saw The Girl’s Network on social media and saw myself because I never had a mentor growing up. I’m now working with a 16-year-old girl from Liverpool who is doing her GCSEs. We meet at a coffee shop on Saturday mornings and we’ve discussed leadership, gender equality, wellbeing, and empowerment; the belief that you can do it no matter where you come from. “That’s important because mentoring is all about social mobility. If you’re from a disadvantaged background you might not have role models or know people who have gone to university and are ambitious, so one of the things I hope I bring to mentoring is a network. “But it’s also reverse mentoring because I’m learning a lot from her too, particularly about the adverse effect of social media and how it impacts her.”

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Aspiration Donna is also part of the Insurance Business Club, which has been set up to help established women in the insurance industry progress their careers from operational level and middle-management. “There are more women in insurance now,” Donna said, “but we’re not very well represented at top leadership level. The Insurance Business Club asks, why can’t you be the next CEO?” Meanwhile, by making the shortlist in the ‘Person with Purpose’ category at the Northern Power Women Awards, Donna was offered a mentor herself, and despite her own success in business says the experience has been a positive one. She said, “I didn’t know what to expect but it was really good. My mentor is quite different from me and has done things I haven’t done, so it’s been interesting. There is no downside to mentoring.”

Development It’s no surprise with Donna at the helm that Carpenters Group places a great emphasis on finding and developing new talent. It now boasts more than 20 apprentices within the company and is proactive in inspiring the next generation through school and college visits. Carpenters has also established its own legal and insurance academy. Donna said, “We’re growing our own. One of our office juniors is now the second in command in finance. They’re the stories you want to tell.”

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“Great day at the ILC New Generation in Claims 2023 conference - 100% fab day.”

ILC NEW GENERATION IN CLAIMS 2023

“It was refreshing and helpful.” “It was an outstanding effort, and I appreciate all the hard work ILC put into making the event a success.”

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“All sessions and networking were excellent.” “I felt part of something and I hope I get the opportunity to attend more ILC events in future.”

“Had a brilliant day with some wonderful speakers.”

“I enjoyed every part of the day – great to get the chance to listen to other companies and to leave feeling inspired.”

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A long-term strategy for workforce wellness Sustainable wellbeing among the workforce cannot be addressed in isolation – it requires culture change and consistent focus. That was the message delivered by Edwin Van Rooyen, CEO of T-Cup, at ILC’s inaugural New Generation event.

E DW I N VA N RO OY E N CEO T-Cup

T-Cup, which stands for Thinking Clearly Under Pressure, was founded by Edwin when he himself was at a low ebb. After his rugby career was cut short by injury he built and then sold his first business, but then found himself at a loose end and lacking purpose. “I just wanted to be happy, successful and healthy,” he said, “but what does that mean?” With the support of co-founder Lea Mears, a former teammate, he began trying to answer that question and T-Cup, a science-backed wellbeing platform founded on the World Health Organisation’s definition of wellbeing, was born. Edwin said, “T-Cup isn’t an app. The world doesn’t need any more wellness apps and they don’t work anyway – at least not in isolation. What the world needs is more awareness around wellness and a better culture within the workforce, because one thing we’ve learned is that wellbeing and culture are close together. But often organisations get fixated on the next new app and that doesn’t drive sustainable wellness.”

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Culture Instead, he said that businesses should focus on achieving lasting wellness among colleagues by creating a culture of sharing and empathy. He explained that the new generation of talent entering the job market values empathy far more than previous generations, and often creating an empathetic, supportive environment from the top down will be enough to improve engagement and help companies overcome the retention challenge. “People don’t leave jobs,” Edwin continued, “they leave managers. That requires real change because wellbeing must become part of our conversation, we must become comfortable talking about our mood, our relationships, our stress levels. Those conversations create empathy and that’s really important.”

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Objectives He explained that rather than just relying on surveys, which don’t work for the individual and often take too long to bring about change, employers should focus on four objectives: •

Immediacy – a wellbeing model needs to provide results for the individual instantly.

Sharing – tackling objectives collectively is far more effective than facing them alone; you have a five per cent chance of achieving your goals in isolation, but a 70% chance working in a shared environment.

Data – companies need validation that their wellness models are working, and that requires tracking and data.

Culture – caring about wellbeing should not be something we do, but something we are.

Edwin said, “T-Cup is a tool that helps people reflect on their wellness. It builds a profile model and then supports you with content. The content is often our client’s own client, but the main difference is we don’t ask employees to go and log into an Employee Assistance Programme (EAP), we log the EAP system into the technology so the moment people reflect we can get instant data on their wellness and provide instant support that is relevant to them. “The key driver though is the cultural impact. This is not something you can do for a week, it needs to be introduced to the core of your company. It’s as much a cultural change as a wellbeing change.”

During the event T-Cup took a snapshot survey of the wellbeing of the ILC New Generation audience. See the appendix for the results.

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Changing the point of reference

S U S I E TH O M S O N Managing Director Security Watchdog

A company’s culture has never been more critical, and finding candidates who share similar values is fundamental to both retention and organisational reputation.

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However, the traditional methods of candidate screening are no longer fit for purpose. They take too long and often fail to uncover the relevant information.

Development This, she says, has resulted in accelerated development around instant activity verification and social media checks.

Instead, Susie Thomson, Managing Director, Security Watchdog, has urged managers to embrace two new methods of screening that she believes will shortly become commonplace: instant activity verification and social media checks.

Instant activity verification is FCAregulated and enables a screening company to access a candidate’s online bank account, with their consent, and gain an immediate picture of employment history through pay dates.

Speaking at ILC’s New Generation event, she said, “Times have moved on from the old ways of background checking and referencing. There are slow turnaround times, up to 10 working days for a one-year check, and often all you get back is the name and dates of employment, so you have to ask what the value is.

Meanwhile, social media checks can help employers better understand the candidate. Screening tools can measure an online profile against the company’s own values and then produce a report that is either green, amber or red – highlighting clearly which candidates may need additional human investigation.

“Also, it can be a soul-destroying job. You’re chasing all the time, trying to fill in timeline gaps and then seeking the documentation to support it.

Susie concluded, “I think the reference is dead. The future of screening is all about social media and instant activity verification and these two products are definitely what new generation candidates expect and want.”

“All this turns the candidate off. They don’t want to be screened by every new employer. They want a technical experience that is ‘Amazonesque’ and there is real talk now about developing screening passports and porting them to new employers. “This means screening businesses have had to look at their technology and make it faster, more intuitive, and more individual, and with a human touch where necessary.”

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Changing the narrative around apprenticeships The route to university is well informed and well supported, but a lack of understanding and awareness is hindering the number of young people considering apprenticeships. On top of this, those who do know about apprenticeships invariably have a negative opinion of them.

P E TE M I L S O M Partnerships Manager – Apprenticeships UCAS

According to research carried out by UCAS, which has been helping school leavers progress into higher education for more than 30 years, a third of people said they received no information about apprenticeships while at school. It also found that only 57% believe an apprenticeship can lead to a good job and just four per cent associate the word ‘prestigious’ with apprenticeships.

Investment

Pete Milsom, Partnerships Manager – Apprenticeships, at UCAS, said, “There is a lot of work to do to make apprenticeships a credible option for people; awareness is low and there are many negative misconceptions associated with apprenticeships. Compared to those entering university, the apprenticeship journey isn’t well supported and there is no single source of truth for anyone trying to find out about it.”

Pete said, “University admissions is still one of our core services, but we’ve transitioned from an admissions brand to a discovery brand and when it comes to apprentices, we decided to give our work some real heft about two years ago. It’s now incorporated into our corporate strategy as we want to empower people to discover their next steps across all higher education pathways.”

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However, UCAS is trying to change that. In the last few years it has committed both time and resource into developing its apprenticeship services and now this area is its biggest single investment. Its ultimate objective is to provide the same level of support to apprentices as it does for undergraduates.

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This sharper focus on apprenticeships has been driven both by demand and by necessity. Pete says more and more young people joining UCAS are expressing an interest in apprenticeships, while UCAS itself recognises the role this oftenoverlooked talent pool can play in addressing the wider skills challenge. Pete said, “Having apprentices as part of the workforce allows employers to shape how their team is trained, so the skills relevant to their organisation are developed and a pipeline of talent is created for the future.”

Development To harness this latent potential, UCAS has spent the last 18 months updating and developing its advice and guidance around apprenticeships. It has also developed a range of bespoke tools to help apprentices and employers find each other, such as industry guides which include case studies, career paths and average salaries, and employer

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profiles, where companies can promote themselves to individuals. It has also developed an apprenticeship search tool, allowing young people to seek out and then apply for apprenticeship vacancies based on sector and location, and this autumn it plans to introduce a similar solution for employers which will enable them to search registered users on the hub according to their own preferences. Meanwhile, by next year UCAS hopes to have linked the hub with its talent-finding tools to provide a personalised service which also offers recommendations for both individuals and companies. Pete concluded, “Everything we do for an undergraduate applicant, we want to do for an apprenticeship applicant as well. We want to make it easier for everyone involved to make the best choice they can about their next steps.”

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I&D still a work in progress Businesses have made significant strides forward in terms of promoting diversity, equality and inclusion within the workplace, but more needs to be done to create environments where everyone feels recognised and respected.

A S H LE Y H E V E R Talent Acquisition Director Enterprise Holdings

Speaking at the inaugural ILC New Generation in Claims 2023 event, Ashley Hever, Talent Acquisition Director at Enterprise Holdings, suggested that the industry is missing out on key talent pools by not doing more to attract skills from under-represented groups. He said, “We’ve come such a long way. There are so many great employers leading the way on this but the job is far from done. I appreciate that the topic is broad and sometimes it’s hard to know where to start, but there are so many people that employers can work with to develop their Inclusivity and Diversity (I&D) strategies, and so much data to help them understand the business case for developing a more diverse workforce.” The session, ‘I&D – a gateway for talent,’ pointed to statistics from a Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development survey which highlighted the areas where companies could do more. It found, for example, that less than half the workforce in the sector has a bespoke development plan.

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Further, with a challenging economic climate set to continue, it warned that investment into personnel development could well be less in the next five years than it was in the previous five. Ashley said, “There is a lot of work we still need to do. I work with our procurement and sales teams to help our suppliers and work in partnership to share our experience to help educate them about the importance of having a strategy for actively engaging with their colleagues.” The report also found that 21% of employees think senior leaders just pay lip service to I&D in their organisation, while among those who think their companies do take it seriously, the focus is not always broad enough with mental health (29%), ethnicity (23%) and gender (21%) prioritised over disability and social mobility. Ashley continued, “We know about the challenges around attracting and retaining skills, but the industry is missing out on a lot of people by not attracting diverse talent. They key is not to focus on one single area but to create a strategy that brings it all together.

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“To do that you have to really get to know your employees and understand them individually. You need to be aware of their personal challenges and seek out ways you can help them. You might also discover that there are community leaders within your workforce who can help you develop and deliver a successful D&I strategy.” He urged leaders to not be overwhelmed and instead take small, practical steps that can move them towards a fully inclusive workplace. For example, he suggested putting job descriptions through a gender decoder which will identify if the wordology appeals to one gender over another, and then ensuring the interview panel is always diverse.

If you want to be a senior leader, this is something that you have to focus on going forward.” New Generation was aimed at everyone involved in HR, recruitment and training and considered recruitment in the current economic climate, the challenges and opportunities of hybrid working and how technology is reshaping the skills needs of the insurance claims workforce. Industry experts shared insights during a full schedule of presentations, with panel discussions focusing on key issues such as equality, engagement and empowerment.

“You can’t do everything at once,” he said, “but you can do small, simple things that can really make a difference. At Enterprise all our senior leaders take a lead on D&I and when it comes to internal promotions consideration is given to what they’ve done on a D&I level as well as their job-specific skills.

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Appendix

Demographics

• 78 people reflected today • The Gender split is 53% Female and 46% Male, 1% Other • The Team Split is Insurer 47% and Supplier 53% • The Location split is 60% from the North and 40% from the South

ILC

These tables wellbeing data on a • 78 people reflected today • 78 people reflected today • The Gender split is 53% Female and 46% Male, 1% Otherof 0 - needs work to • The gender split is 53% female and 46% male, 1% other • The Team Split 55 is Insurer 47% 5753% 60 and Supplier thriving • 57 The team split is Insurer 47% and Supplier 53% ILC Demographics Demographics

• The Location split 60% the North and 40% from The location split is 60% fromis the northfrom and 40% from the south

the South

Overall

Health

Happiness

Success

ILC

T-Cup Community Data

61

57 Overall

55

60

57

Health

Happiness

Success

63

64

61

T-Cup Community Data

ILC wellbeing trending a little of 0 - needs 100 than work tothe ILC wellbeing data trending a little thriving lower thancommunity the T-Cup community data. data. More detail on this on the page below. More detaildata on this o ILC wellbeing trending a little lower page below. These tables show wellbeing data These tables show on a score of 0 - needs work to 100 wellbeing data on a score thriving

than the T-Cup community data. 64 63 61 61 More detail on this on the pagedata below. on p1 in more Reviewing the high level ILC wellbeing Overall

Health

Overall

Happiness

Health

Happiness

Success

Success

detail below, we can see that Relationships is the highes Reviewing the high level ILC100, wellbeing on p1 more subcategory atwellbeing 70 out and data Stress is in the lowest at Reviewing the high level ILC data on of p1 in more detail below, we canbelow, see that Relationships is the highest subcategory at detail we can see that Relationships is the highest 70 out of 100, and Stress is the lowest at just 47. just 47. subcategory at 70 out of 100, and Stress is the lowest at just 47. Health

OW

24

RelHappiness Sleep

Mood

Hyd

Activ

Rel

53 53 5757 57

57 57

70 535359 59 70 47

OW

57

Health Hyd Activ

Diet

Success

Happiness

Diet

Sleep

Mood

Stress

Success

Stress Fwb

Fwb

Amb

Amb

47 6956 56

69

N E W G E N E R AT I O N I N C L A I M S 2 0 2 3


Age Review Contact Centre Health

Happiness

OW

Diet

Hyd

20's

58

61

59

56

30's

57

54

60

52

Age Review Contact Centre 40's 56 50

Age Review Contact Centre

50's

OW

60

Diet

51

Health Hyd

Activity Mood

Success

Sleep

Rel

Fwb

Stress

59

43

65

46

43

ILC 87

53

54

75

46

54

69

52

54 60

51

69

48

56

67

59

Happiness 69 62

58 Success 68

42

64

65

Activity Mood

Sleep

Rel

Fwb

Stress

Amb

20's

58

61

59

56

59

43

65

46

43

87

30's

57

54

60

52

53

54

75

46

54

69

Amb

• Across the 4 Age groups Overall Wellbeing trends fairly similar. • As we delve into some of the sub categories, 50's trend very highly in 40's 56 50 52 54 60 51 69 48 56 67 Activity and looking at Sleep the 20's trend much lower than the other Age Groups. 50's 60 51 59 69 62 58 68 42 64 65 • Reviewing the data from the Success category, Financial Wellbeing is • Across the 4 Age groups Overall Wellbeing trends fairly similar. • Acrossfor the 4those age groups wellbeing trends are fairly lowest inoverall their 20s, yet they have the highest Ambition, and similar. up 50's through thehighly age brackets to those •gradually As we delve increases into some of as the we sub move categories, trend very in • As we delve into some of the sub categories, 50’s trend very looking at Sleep thethe 20's trend lower than the other highly and in Activity and looking at Sleep 20’s trend much much lower inActivity their 50s. Agethan Groups. the other Age Groups. •

Reviewing the data from the Success category, Financial

Wellbeingthe is lowest forfrom those the in their 20s, yet they have the Financial Wellbeing is • Reviewing data Success category, Males trend higher than females across most categories with highest Ambition, and gradually increases as we move lowest for those in their 20s, yet they have theup highest Ambition, and through the age brackets to those in their 50s. gradually increases as we move up through the age brackets to those Hydration and Activity having the biggest difference, Sleep is the in their 50s. Males trend higher than females across most categories with hydration and activity having the biggest difference, sleep is the only area where females trend slightly higher.

only area where Females trend slightly higher.

Males trend higher than females across most categories with

Hydration and Activity having the biggest difference, Sleep is the Happiness only area where FemalesHealth trend slightly higher.

Gender Males Gender

25

Diet

Hyd

Activ

Rel

Sleep

Mood

Stress

Fwb

Amb

60 Health 53

62

Happiness

64

74

51Success59

49

61

71

45

53

67

OW

OW

Success

Diet

Hyd

Activ

Rel

Sleep

Mood

Stress

Fwb

Amb

Female Males

60

55 53

53 645374 5151 62

67 4953 61 5871 59

Female

55

53

53

58

51

67

53

45

53

67

N E W G E N E R AT I O N I N C L A I M S 2 0 2 3


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