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folio LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE IN ILLINOIS 2018


CON T EN TS PRESIDENT’S LETTER. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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KANKAKEE RIVERFRONT MASTER PLAN. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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2018 ILASLA YEAR IN REVIEW. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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LAKEVIEW LOW-LINE PHASE 1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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AWARDS CRITERIA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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SHIRLEY RYAN ABILITYLAB. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

CHICAT. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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SUBURBAN SAVANNAH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

DUNE HOUSE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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TITLETOWN PLAZA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

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GRAND RIVER / NORTHWEST NEIGHBORHOOD FRAMEWORK PLAN. . . . . . . . . . . . .

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URBAN FORMAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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JOHN W. COOK ACADEMY SPACE TO GROW. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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URBAN WILDERNESS GATEWAY FRAMEWORK PLAN. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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LIVING IN THE DUNES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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HUMBOLDT PARK FORMAL GARDEN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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MCKINLEY COMMUNITY PLAY GARDEN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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STUDENT AWARDS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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URBAN WILDERNESS GATEWAY FRAMEWORK PLAN COMMUNITY EVENT . . . . . . . .

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ILASLA PRESIDENTS & ASLA FELLOWS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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WOODLAND RETREAT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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ILASLA EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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BELGIAN BEAUTY. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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ILASLA SUPPORTERS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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CENTER FOR ENRICHED LIVING ENABLING GARDEN. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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IMAGE CREDITS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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CHICAGO RESILIENT CORRIDORS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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PRODUCTION NOTES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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PR ESI DEN T 'S L ET T ER

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s we celebrate another year of the great work of Illinois landscape architects, firms, and students, it is with great pleasure we announce the 2019 design award winners. This year the ASLA Wisconsin Chapter considered 42 professional entries and nine student entries and thoughtfully awarded 19 professional and 9 student projects. Recipients included 10 Honor Awards, 15 Merit Awards, and one Jensen Award. These award-winning projects provide unique and memorable experiences for their users that build resiliency, sustainability, and serve as a catalyst for economic benefits to the communities they are part of. I am, once again, inspired by the talented landscape architects that made these projects come to life with their creativity and originality. The work of Illinois landscape architects shows that Illinois is a leader in design, execution, and the communication of landscape and design excellence. Over my career, I have had the opportunity to meet many influential people that have all contributed to my career. What stands out is how each one of them values involvement in their professional organization, local public involvement, and mentoring of the next generation of the profession. I still call many of them mentors today. As we celebrate the

Show me a successful individual, and I’ll show you someone who had real positive influences in his or her life. I don’t care what you do for a living—if you do it well, I’m sure there was someone cheering you on or showing you the way. A mentor. – D E N Z E L WA S H I N G T O N

outstanding work showcased in Folio, I would ask all members to consider offering your time, talent, and knowledge to mentor one of our emerging professionals. Your knowledge may inspire some great work, and I am sure we will see that inspiration in Folio in the coming years. As I look back at this past year and what our profession has accomplished as a society and as a chapter, I could not be more proud to be a member of such a great organization. The Illinois Chapter ASLA is working hard for you to secure a licensure practice act for landscape architecture in Illinois. A landscape architecture practice act will put us on a level playing field with every state that touches the borders of Illinois. We are not pursuing this effort as a symbolic status. A landscape architecture practice act will help keep the public safe from hazards, protect and maximize the use of natural systems and resources, and prevent damage to public and

private property. It is important now more than ever that we don’t forget about the core principles of our professional education and that we continue to elevate and push the limits of design. I would like to thank all of the generous sponsors for their continued support. Without your generosity the educational, fellowship, and advocacy efforts of the Illinois Chapter would not be possible. Sincerely,

Keven Graham, fasla, pla, clarb ILASLA President

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2018 IL A SL A Y E A R I N RE V IEW Each year, ILASLA provides a foundation to advance landscape architecture through advocacy, communication, education, and networking.

EDUCAT ION

41

PDH EDUCATION CREDITS OFFERED THROUGH ILASLA

ME MBER SHIP

431 ACTIVE MEMBERS

343

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS

N ET WORK I NG

504

ATTENDEES AT EDUCATION AND NETWORKING EVENTS IN 2018

7

ILASLA NETWORKING EVENTS

14

EMERGING PROFESSIONAL & STUDENT EVENTS 2

34

ASSOCIATE LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS

34

AFFILIATE, CORPORATE & HONORARY MEMBERS

20

FELLOWS & EMERITUS

68% SUBURBAN & STATE-WIDE MEMBERS 32% CHICAGO MEMBERS


COM MU N ICAT ION

PA RT N ER SHIPS

A new website was launched. The site and social media continue to increase in views.

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SPONSORSHIP PARTNERS SUPPORTED EVENTS

10

337,909

PAGE HITS TO THE ILLINOIS ASLA WEBSITE (AN INCREASE OF 26%)

4,559

IMPRESSIONS

INDUSTRY PARTNERSHIPS STRENGTHENED AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS (AIA) AMERICAN PLANNING ASSOCIATION (APA) ILLINOIS GREEN INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION (IGIA) ILLINOIS LANDSCAPE CONTRACTORS ASSOCIATION (ILCA)

56,000

IMPRESSIONS

77

1,036

FOLLOWERS

96

POSTS YTD

ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE PROGRAM (IIT) MILLENNIUM PARK FOUNDATION UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE PROGRAM (UIUC) GREENBUILD STORM WATER SOLUTIONS (SWS) FOREST PRESERVE DISTRICT (FPD)

NEW FOLLOWERS

71

POST REACH AVERAGE PER WEEK

800+

MEMBERS & GUESTS RECEIVED STREAM UPDATE BI-MONTHLY

A DVOCAC Y GREAT STRIDES WERE MADE TO REVISE OUR CURRENT TITLE ACT INTO A PRACTICE ACT. THE THIRD DRAFT OF THE ACT IS CURRENTLY BEING REVIEWED BY THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE AND ALLIED ORGANIZATIONS.

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AWA R D S C R I T E R I A

Honor Award Projects are honored with this distinction for superior professional achievement. Only 20 percent of the entries in any of the categories may earn this distinction.

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Merit Award Projects which demonstrate merit in design and environmental responsibility shall be given this distinction. Any number of entries in any of the categories may be given this award.

Jensen Award Recognizes landscape architectural design that exemplifies the ideals and values of Jens Jensen. This category recognizes built or unbuilt projects that use native plants, employ ecological processes, reconnect people to the landscape, or contribute to the protection and management of natural resources. Only one award will be presented in this category annually.


The following categories were used to select this year’s award-winning landscape architecture projects. The jury evaluated projects with consideration for quality and functionality of the design; relationship to context and stated program; environmental responsibility; and relevance to the profession, the public, and the environment. Design Constructed: Recognizes constructed site-specific works of landscape architecture. Residential: Recognizes site-specific, built works of landscape architecture for residential use, whether single or multi-family, new construction or renovation.

Burnham Award for Planning and Analysis Recognizes the wide variety of professional activities that lead to, guide, or evaluate landscape architectural design. Comprehensive plans, master plans, feasibility studies, and design guidelines and standards are examples of submittals for this category.

Communications

Student Awards

Recognizes achievements in communicating landscape architecture technology, theory, or practice to those within or outside the profession. Entries may include: documents on landscape architecture history, art, or technology; educational material for the non-technical consumer; events or public service; or material that increases awareness of landscape design, environmental, or conservation issues.

Recognizes academic excellence and outstanding examples of landscape architecture by Illinois undergraduate and graduate landscape architecture students. These awards honor works that represent the academic forefront of the profession of landscape architecture and embody high levels of creativity and imagination.

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ChiCAT

MCKAY LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS


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ocated in the Illinois Medical District, a former industrial site was recently transformed and re-opened as The Chicago Center for Arts and Technology (ChiCAT) – a community center dedicated to offering arts and technology programs and vocational training for children and adults. The renovation, completed in 2016, was led by Landon Bone Baker Architects and resulted in a creative example of adaptive re-use. The 4-story building now features a cultural performance space, art gallery, teaching kitchen, computer labs, and classrooms. The new landscape, designed by McKay Landscape Architects, is critical to the overall project’s success. It consists of a dedicated pedestrian pathway that leads to the building’s entry, an entry plaza, two wood decks, a tiered bleacher, and a private courtyard. The building’s hidden entry created a design challenge for the new community center. The solution was a trellis-covered pathway that extends to the public way, welcoming residents on foot and leading them to the entrance. Adjacent to the path, green wall panels, adorned with colorful letters, announce the building’s new use: ChiCAT. Seating to the south of the path encourages passers-by to stop and rest, making it feel more like a room than merely a passageway.

Honor Award

A water feature at the end of the path, created in collaboration with ChiCAT, is decorated with handcrafted tiles – an outward representation of the activities happening inside the building. The fountain anchors an entry plaza which offers flexible programming and gathering space. The renovated entry vestibule provides an elevator for accessible access and a concrete stair that leads to another entry half a floor above-grade.

The solution was a trellis-covered pathway that extends to the public way, welcoming residents on foot and leading them to the entrance. A new art gallery now stands in what was once the former factor’s loading dock. An exterior wood deck acts as an extension of the indoor gallery space and serves as a nod towards its past use. A tiered bleacher connects the two levels and doubles as an outdoor classroom. ChiCAT is an excellent example of creative adaptive re-use. The landscape design provides a beautiful entry sequence, outdoor rooms, and programmable space. It demonstrates tremendous respect for the building, its purpose, and for the community that uses it.

TEAM / MCKAY LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS • BULLEY & ANDREWS • LANDON BONE BAKER ARCHITECTS • PRISM ENGINEERING

CATEGORY / DESIGN CONSTRUCTED

CLIENT / CHICAGO CENTER FOR ARTS AND TECHNOLOGY

LOCATION / CHICAGO, IL

COMPLETION YEAR / 2016 7


Dune House HOLLANDER DESIGN LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS


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t this secluded oceanfront retreat, Hollander Design preserved the sensitive ecologies of native dunes and wetlands by containing nearly all landscape elements within the building’s footprint. The result is an on-structure landscape informed by the spirit, forms, palette, and materials of the preserved native landscape beyond. As a secluded oceanfront site located on the coast of Long Island, the client’s vacation home presented several challenges to outdoor living. The site is located between a pond, protected wetland, and fragile dunes, all located in a FEMA flood zone. Two conditions determined the design direction of the landscape and architectural design, including 1) locating nearly all of the home’s landscape within the building footprint to protect the surrounding landscape, and 2) raising the home even more than required by FEMA to capture the surrounding views. The home’s landscape is designed on a split-level mezzanine and on the roof. On the mezzanine, immersive views and materials evocative of the naturalized dune and wetland landscapes are part of every outdoor moment. Entertaining areas include an open-air pool

Honor Award

room, pool with spa, and a series of flexible seating areas for large or intimate gatherings. Intensive collaboration with architect and interior designer created views of the naturalized landscape from within that function as art. The roof provides a private family space, including a yoga deck, green roof, sun terrace, fire pit lounge, dining area, and kitchen. Raising the elevation of the house enhanced the views, but also created a challenge: making the home feel inviting and connected to the landscape at its entrance. A generous, gently graded entry stair draws attention to the landscape through rich textures of naturalized plantings, the sight and sound of water, and a pattern of shifting planes in the stairs, which draws from the architectural concept for the building. At ground level, a custom-designed, open wood-slat walkway allows light to reach dune-stabilizing plants below while organically moving over the undulating dunes to the water. A second walkway brings visitors over protected wetland to the pond. Planting near the home is comprised of native and naturally-adapted species and transitions into all native plants in the dune and wetland areas.

TEAM / HOLLANDER DESIGN LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS • LEROY STREET STUDIO • SILMAN • VICTORIA HAGAN

CATEGORY / DESIGN - RESIDENTIAL

CLIENT / PRIVATE RESIDENT

LOCATION / LONG ISLAND, NY

COMPLETION YEAR / 2017

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Grand River / Northwest Neighborhood Framework Plan DESIGN WORKSHOP


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etroit is undergoing a significant transformation. Since the 1950’s, the City has been in decline, losing more than 60% of its population. A restructured city government and an emboldened private sector have created new momentum, bringing a renaissance to the downtown. Acknowledging the great strengths residing outside of downtown, the City is planning for strategic investments in its neighborhoods. The Grand River / Northwest Detroit Neighborhood Framework Plan was a collaboration with City officials and residents to address two pressing City challenges: large swaths of vacant land and flooding from large rain events. The Framework Plan gives residents a voice in transforming surplus lands into assets to manage stormwater and build vibrant, memorable places that provide new community amenities. The Framework Plan tackled disinvestment through prioritizing community engagement and developing a comprehensive stormwater management strategy that combats flooding, combined sewer overflows, and basement backups. This involved managing more than 500 million gallons of runoff generated from a 100-year storm. Near-term concepts ensure that strategies can be implemented within a short time frame to provide immediate support and revitalize the neighborhood.

Honor Award

The Framework Plan gives residents a voice in transforming surplus lands into assets to manage stormwater and build vibrant, memorable places that provide new community amenities.

TEAM / DESIGN WORKSHOP • LORCAN O’HERLIHY ARCHITECTS • MANNIK SMITH GROUP • VENTRA LLC

PRIOR MASTER PLAN / CITY OF DETROIT CATEGORY / PLANNING & ANALYSIS

LOCATION / DETROIT, MI CLIENT / CITY OF DETROIT COMPLETION YEAR / 2018 11


John W. Cook Academy Space to Grow SITE


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he John W. Cook Academy is a prekindergarten through 8th-grade public elementary school located in Chicago’s Auburn-Gresham neighborhood. In 2017, the Healthy Schools Campaign and Openlands selected Cook Academy as the 12th schoolyard in Chicago to be transformed through the innovative “Space to Grow” program. The program selects schools in communities with significant flooding concerns to transform into inspired play and learning spaces for students. These places become vital outdoor spaces for the whole neighborhood to get together and reconnect with nature. The initiative is a collaboration with the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago, Chicago Department of Water Management, and the Chicago Public Schools. Before the transformation, Cook Academy’s expansive asphalt lot was flooded throughout most of the year and created a hot and unpleasant environment that left little room for creative play. The new schoolyard includes a lush landscape with native plants, walkways, and seating areas, recreation opportunities, and play spaces for children of all ages, including a multi-purpose artificial turf field surrounded by a running track, and two half-court basketball courts. A custom playground nested into hills

Honor Award

and mounds supports children ages 2-12 through a range of challenging and exploratory play features, including climbing structures and a multi-user swing. Chicago’s longest hopscotch court – nearly 100 feet long – guides visitors from the playground to the field. Nearby, game tables attract students and community members alike for study sessions, dominoes, and games of chess. A series of colored concrete seating blocks provide a casual gathering area or outdoor classroom, serving as an extension of the classroom for lessons ranging from science experiments to nutrition education. Green infrastructure addresses neighborhood-scale flooding issues through permeable surfaces and native plantings. A dry riverbed serves as dry stone stormwater storage and infiltration between the playground, basketball court, and multi-purpose field. Since its opening in the fall of 2018, the John W. Cook Academy schoolyard has become the highlight of the school day for students and has helped engage and educate the nearby community. Space to Grow is bringing wideranging benefits to Chicago neighborhoods through a unique partnership and communityfocused process that has garnered attention across the nation.

TEAM / SITE • APPLIED GEOSCIENCE, INC. • RELIABLE & ASSOCIATES CONSTRUCTION CO. • S.M.P. GROUP DESIGN ASSOCIATES, LLC • TECMA ASSOCIATES, INC.

CATEGORY / DESIGN CONSTRUCTED LOCATION / CHICAGO, IL

CLIENT / CHICAGO PUBLIC SCHOOLS. • HEALTHY SCHOOLS CAMPAIGN. • OPENLANDS COMPLETION YEAR / 2018 13


Living in the Dunes HITCHCOCK DESIGN GROUP


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he Indiana dune landscape represents at least four major successive stages of Lake Michigan shorelines. The landscape includes 15,000 acres of open beaches, grass and forest-covered dunes, oak savannas, swamps, bogs, marshes, prairies, and rivers. Its intricate biology is globally unique and is one of the only places where examples of every type of natural community in the Chicagoland region can be found. From arctic bearberry to prickly pear cactus and southern dogwoods, the dunes’ biodiversity is extraordinary. Over 1,200 species of vascular plants and 400 species of wildlife can be found here. Over the next millennia, the dunes will face a variety of challenges, including climate change, invasive plants, shoreline erosion, diminished water quality, and encroaching urbanization. The impact of climate change on the Indiana Dunes could include a shift in the migration patterns of wildlife species, the possible extinction of some species, and the changed timing of many natural processes from bloom times to bird nesting. In recognition of these facts, the client – a regional advocacy organization known as Save The Dunes – retained Hitchcock Design Group (HDG) to develop a guide to provide the tools to help homeowners protect their portion of the dune landscape. By working at this grass roots

Honor Award

scale, the client sought to make a much larger impact at a systemic level. The content includes an explanation of how the dune ecosystem is unique, differentiating invasive and native plants, and laying out some basic design responses to common residential-scale landscape problems. The result was an easy-to-use booklet filled with photos, illustrations, and text designed to walk a homeowner through the design process and create a home landscape using best practices.

Its intricate biology is globally unique and is one of the only places where examples of every type of natural community in the Chicagoland region can be found. As the prime consultant, HDG was responsible for leading the design team, managing the process, outreach to stakeholders, and leading the preparation of the guide. Stakeholder outreach included developing an advisory committee that included representatives from thirteen different public and private interests that provided valuable, informative content and recommendations. Numerous conversations and group meetings were conducted throughout the process.

TEAM / HITCHCOCK DESIGN GROUP • ORBIS ENVIRONMENTAL CONSULTING • PHENIX7 MKTG, INC.

CATEGORY / COMMUNICATIONS

CLIENT / SAVE THE DUNES

LOCATION / DUNE COMMUNITIES ALONG INDIANA’S LAKE MICHIGAN SHORELINE

COMPLETION YEAR / 2017

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McKinley Community Play Garden SITE


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he new McKinley Community Play Garden is an engaging and innovative nature play garden located adjacent to the McKinley Park Library, southwest of downtown Chicago. The play garden is unique in that it is held in a land trust and is maintained and programmed by community residents. The project was initiated by community members that saw potential in an underutilized neighborhood arboretum. While maintaining the existing mature trees and natural topography on the site, creative play elements were incorporated into the landscape to encourage interaction, play, and exploration with nature. A unique aspect of this project is that salvaged building materials, rubble, and architectural details were sourced from neighborhood demolition sites, helping to preserve the industrial heritage of the community. A new park entrance greets visitors with an arbor and custom signage. To the north, a repurposed shipping container serves as park storage, a “play-tainer,” and gathering place. In the mud kitchen and build area, a miniature marketplace and loose-parts storage area create opportunities for creativity and imaginative play. Nearby, a crane rail was bent to create a curving track and disused art

Honor Award

shipping crates were repurposed for play. The rail leads visitors through a prairie maze to the shipwreck gravel pit, where an old wooden boat is tipped on its side. Surrounding play elements include a log obstacle course, balance beam, and log tunnel. On the south side of the site, a forest climbing zone has nests, tree climbers, and stump obstacles for adventurers. Encircling the play garden is an accessible path with additional play features, including a central climbing structure and play deck. Nearby, a working runnel with a water pump is surrounded by outcropping and stump seating. Reclaimed building artifacts are organized in a rectangular pattern to create a ruin-like setting. Lastly, a fortress area provides birds-eye views of the play garden for those daring enough to climb the repurposed iron spiral staircase. A true community space, the play garden was made possible through countless volunteer hours not only in the design phase but throughout construction, planting, and ongoing care of the site. The project was a collaboration between NeighborSpace, site design group, ltd. (site), GRG Playscales, and design/builder Alex Enarson. The McKinley Community Play Garden has become a valued community resource for the surrounding area, a community with limited access to nature and open space.

TEAM / SITE • ALEX ENARSON • GRG PLAYSCAPES

CATEGORY / DESIGN CONSTRUCTED

PRIOR MASTER PLAN / MELINDA M. APPOLD, PURDUE UNIVERSITY

LOCATION / CHICAGO, IL

CLIENT / NEIGHBORSPACE COMPLETION YEAR / 2018

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Urban Wilderness Gateway Framework Plan Community Event PORT URBANISM


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In the early 1980’s, the Tennessee Department of Transportation (TDOT) began constructing the James White Parkway, a controlled access four-lane highway which bisected South Knoxville to link the downtown to a broader highway network and series of destinations southeast of Knoxville. Only a 2-mile portion of this seldom used highway was constructed, extending from Downtown Knoxville south across the Tennessee River where it terminates in a dead end. In and around the property, a series of outdoor recreation destinations began to develop which have evolved over the last two decades to become Knoxville’s Urban Wilderness. In 2017, Knoxville Mayor Madeline Rogero announced an agreement with TDOT which

Honor Award

would transfer the terminus of the Parkway to the City, ending the potential for the roadway to cut through the Urban Wilderness. With the acquisition of this property, the City envisioned this “Highway to Nowhere” as the Gateway into this amenity so many had worked to protect. In 2018, the City issued a Request for Qualifications for the design of a new park location on this newly acquired parcel. Once selected, the design team proposed extending the scope of the project to the full length of the highway corridor, including the bridge across the Tennessee River. The goal was to expand neighborhood connectivity while helping to tie developing Urban Wilderness amenities and resources to Knoxville’s downtown and inner city neighborhoods. With support from the City and surrounding neighborhoods, the framework

TEAM / PORT URBANISM • SANDERS PACE ARCHITECTURE

was expanded and the vision for the project became much more than just an access point. On Saturday, June 2, 2018, the City of Knoxville and Urban Wilderness Project Team hosted a public exhibition and block party at the Parkway terminus. The event aimed to share project ideas and gather input from the community. Visitors were invited to learn about the project through visual displays, including diagrams, drawings, aerial photographs, and a fifty-foot-long matchbox car scaled plan. Most importantly, attendees had the opportunity (for the first time ever!) to experience the James White Parkway terminus as a pedestrian and imagine the space as a park for people, rather than as a dead end.

CATEGORY / COMMUNICATIONS

CLIENT / CITY OF KNOXVILLE

LOCATION / KNOXVILLE, TN

COMPLETION YEAR / 2018

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Woodland Retreat CRAIG BERGMANN LANDSCAPE DESIGN


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Chicago couple desired a retreat from the busy urban environs of city life. They found the perfect quiet woodland lot close to the eastern shoreline of Lake Michigan. Inspired by mid-century modernism, the home and landscape is nestled in a wooded clearing in southwest Michigan. The woods serve as an artful and enchanting backdrop for the built spaces through all seasons. One of the owners, Randy Shingledecker, is the principle of his own interior and architectural design firm (RS Designs, Chicago). He brought in Craig Bergmann Landscape Design to collaborate with on the exterior design. In tandem, they worked on the overall site planning, custom wood fencing, and configuration of the driveway, pool, and spa. The landscape is designed to be a year-round sanctuary and entertainment space. The raw concrete walls and integral wood gates create public (front entry, parking, driveway) and private (pool, spa, terrace) spaces. The landscape acts as an extension of the home; promoting the indoor/ outdoor lifestyle requested by the owners. To maintain the ‘woodland’ part of their new home, care was taken to site the house with minimal disturbance to the surrounding woods. The house and pool courtyard are built above the existing grade to reduce the amount of excavation required. This brings the woodland

Honor Award

surround into close proximity to the built spaces. Sustainable techniques were employed for stormwater management, where all hard surface runoff is collected in the planting beds and allowed to percolate into the ground. Beyond the modernist approach, the design focuses on utilizing bold contrast between natural and built forms. This includes a limited building color palette of pale gray and black/brown tones, which creates maximum contrast with the greens of the landscape and the woods. Plantings are used as ‘green’ architecture which reinforces the clean-lined, bold design aesthetic. Living walls of bald cypress and yellow groove bamboo provide year-round interest, screening, and movement. Clipped boxwood and horsetails further emphasize the ‘green’ infrastructure, while large, hardy evergreen bonsai in contemporary containers act as significant focal points. Their asymmetric habits play off the clean lines of the walls. The centerpiece of the pool courtyard is the swimming pool. In conjunction with the brightly colored furnishings, it provides light and color in the otherwise neutral palette of the space. The success of the project can be summed up in the following quote from the owners: “The forest is our art”.

TEAM / CRAIG BERGMANN LANDSCAPE DESIGN • JPD CONSTRUCTION • RS DESIGN • SPOELSTRA POOL & PATIO, INC.

CATEGORY / DESIGN - RESIDENTIAL LOCATION / FENVILLE, MI

CLIENT / RANDY SHINGLEDECKER AND ANDREW KNECHT COMPLETION YEAR / 2014 21


Belgian Beauty MARIANI LANDSCAPE


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he owner of this 1923 Belgian Tudor, an avid gardener, came to Mariani Landscape requesting English perennial borders and a safe, comfortable space for family entertainment. Since the yard is located on the front of the house along a busy street, it was essential to create outdoor spaces that felt enclosed and offered separation while creating curb appeal and maintaining views to the house. Working with the homeowner, Mariani Landscape developed a design intent of accentuating the style of the house, while incorporating functionality with a casual but chic aesthetic. The landscape architecture team was tasked to handle all aspects of the project from schematic design development through the oversight of installation for the entire property. The design firms worked closely through the process to ensure dollars were allocated in a manner that provided the most value to the client while meeting a specific budget. The landscape architect began by separating the front yard into four garden rooms: the front door and drive, an entertainment terrace, an open lawn space, and a play fort. The front door is accentuated with a bluestone walk and simple, galvanized steel planters. To create

Merit Award

a casual entertainment space, a pea gravel terrace was installed and anchored with a steel fire bowl for friends and family to gather around. A rustic fence encloses the terrace and contains the family dog while allowing views of the gardens and open lawn. The fence design is a combination of cedar and galvanized wire mesh which contributes to the casual vibe. A new stoop added functionality to existing French doors, adding connectivity between the terrace and the interior spaces. The formal lawn is surrounded by perennial gardens and separated from the front drive with a Belgian fence formed with espalier pear trees. The fruiting pear fence, which is visible from the street, has been a source of interest from the community and highlights the creative solutions that a landscape architect can integrate into a space. Tall arborvitaes anchor the corners of the property and provide a background to the perennials borders. The staggered arborvitaes also create an enclosed reading nook within a hidden fort for their young children to run and explore. The resulting landscape is a perfect place for this young family to entertain and play. The Belgian Beauty successfully creates a garden oasis and safe space for the entire family.

TEAM / MARIANI LANDSCAPE • BERTUCCI CARPENTRY • HIRSCH BRICK AND STONE • MORGANTE-WILSON ARCHITECTS

CATEGORY / DESIGN - RESIDENTIAL

CLIENT / PRIVATE RESIDENT

LOCATION / WINNETKA, IL

COMPLETION YEAR / 2018

23


Center for Enriched Living Enabling Garden OLSON LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE


T

he new enabling garden at the Center for Enriched Living (CEL) has greatly impacted its members, a group of people whose needs are each individually unique. With big ideas and a small budget, a community of volunteers and professionals came together to create an enabling garden patio for CEL members, staff, and guests with a goal of providing nature experiences and enjoyment of the outdoors.

including a butterfly garden and water feature. The patio is easily accessible for all to enjoy with raised planters to facilitate growing vegetables, herbs, and flowers. Moveable furniture and a seatwall with low lighting are located throughout for flexible seating for socializing and activities. A living tree chair was planted, which will soon enable members to sit within the tree’s canopy, providing direct sensory interactions with nature.

The garden celebrates CEL members by giving them the space to interact socially, the opportunity to be outside in a safe space, and the ability to connect with nature.

In response to a limited budget, the CEL enabling garden patio design is simple and the materials are basic. However, the new patio is loved for its inclusivity and flexible opportunities for connecting with nature and the outdoors.

The garden celebrates CEL members by giving them the space to interact socially, the opportunity to be outside in a safe space, and the ability to connect with nature. CEL’s goals for expanding programming opportunities outdoors include activities such as gardening, art through nature, and access to fresh air outdoors. Volunteers helped create the garden patio through donations and labor by planting trees, shrubs, perennials, and ornamental grasses. The new plantings enhance the building and the patio area,

Merit Award

TEAM / OLSON LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE • BRECKENRIDGE FENCE COMPANY • BURNHAM DESIGN GROUP, INC.

CATEGORY / DESIGN CONSTRUCTED

CLIENT / CENTER FOR ENRICHED LIVING

LOCATION / RIVERWOODS, IL

COMPLETION YEAR / 2016 25


Chicago Resilient Corridors AECOM


I

n early 2017, the City of Chicago used grant funding to implement the Chicago Resilient Corridors project, concentrated stormwater landscapes (green infrastructure) on City-owned vacant lots in flood-affected neighborhoods. The project was a direct response to a severe rain event in 2016 that caused damage throughout the City. The storm resulted in 2,500 “water in basement” and 800 “water on street” complaints, damage to and shutdowns of businesses, and flooding at train stations and bus stops across the City. AECOM assembled a multi-disciplinary team that partnered with the Department of Planning and Development (DPD) to create a visionary, efficient, technically rigorous, and inclusive community process. Chicago’s West Side was selected due to its representation of the City’s urban landscape through its diverse populations and variety of land use types. Ten sites across three transitional commercial corridors (Chicago Avenue, 16th Street, and Ogden Avenue) were developed through analysis of available data and resources to identify optimal locations for stormwater detention infrastructure. The design process included a range of green infrastructure strategies, including permeable pavements, rain gardens, and bioswales

Merit Award

that accept stormwater from streets, alleys, and adjacent properties. Active community engagement generated the programming for each site, which included passive gardens, active recreation areas, and public plazas. Construction was completed in the fall of 2018. Stewards such as a local business owner, the Chicago Botanic Garden, and the YMCA are expected to lease the constructed parcels and maintain the specialized landscapes in the future. A project manual was developed for the stewards, covering technical components such as site plans, volunteer tasks, resources, and maintenance logs to facilitate long-term project success. This project worked with communities to design memorable spaces, both active and passive, and to strengthen the public realm. It also introduced a new City paradigm – to create resilient places with long-term community stewards – that can be replicated in other neighborhoods. Any geography facing similar resilience issues can benefit from interdepartmental and regional collaboration, and a robust community engagement model. By integrating the Resilient Corridors with other diverse strategies of scale, the City can begin addressing its complex urban challenges with innovative solutions merging design and infrastructure.

TEAM / AECOM • HEY AND ASSOCIATES, INC. • QUERCUS CONSULTING • GREEN METRO PLANNING LLC • DB STERLIN CONSULTANTS, INC. • GSG CONSULTANTS, INC. • UI LABS • FRIEDLER CONSTRUCTION CO. • BEVERLY ENVIRONMENTAL

CATEGORY / DESIGN CONSTRUCTED LOCATION / CHICAGO, IL

CLIENT / CITY OF CHICAGO DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT COMPLETION YEAR / 2018 27


Kankakee Riverfront Master Plan HITCHCOCK DESIGN GROUP


T

he City of Kankakee was founded along the Kankakee River in 1854. For decades, the river was central to the City’s image, culture, and prosperity. The river is an ecological gem and is considered the cleanest river in the State of Illinois by the Illinois Department of Resources. It is one of only 21 designated National Water Trails in the nation. However, over many years of economic and social challenges, the City’s relationship with the River – at least from an urban design standpoint – was characterized by benign neglect. That changed in 2016 when newlyelected Mayor Chasity Wells-Armstrong put riverfront improvement at the center of her “Kankakee Forward” agenda. The Kankakee Riverfront Master Plan was the initial result of the initiative. City leaders engaged Hitchcock Design Group (HDG) and a design team of allied professionals (Piggush Engineering, S2O Engineering, Market & Feasibility Advisors) in 2017. The primary goals were to consider riverfront improvement opportunities, create a compelling long-term riverfront vision, and develop a multi-dimensional strategy with a series of incremental and implementation actions. Collaboratively, the design team, City leaders, and key public/private sector stakeholders on the Riverfront Task Force developed a strategy to create and sustain an extraordinary riverfront

Merit Award

experience. Through this vision, the riverfront is the catalyst for Kankakee’s renaissance as a premier Illinois riverfront community. Key elements of the plan include 1) developing new and revitalized recreation attractions that appeal to residents and regional visitors, 2) improving safe, convenient, and barrier-free access and connections to the river, riverfront attractions, downtown, and surrounding neighborhoods, 3) catalyzing economic development, and 4) advancing stewardship of the City’s natural and cultural resources for future generations. As the Master Plan is implemented, the resulting riverfront will become a powerful attraction, a multi-dimensional connection, a

TEAM / HITCHCOCK DESIGN GROUP • MARKET & FEASIBILITY ADVISORS • PIGGUSH ENGINEERING, INC. • S2O DESIGN AND ENGINEERING

compelling economic catalyst, and a positive brand builder for the community. The riverfront will attract residents, area workers and regional visitors to hike, cycle, and discover nature in a genuinely exceptional river environment. The riverfront will safely and efficiently connect patrons to the existing regional trail system, the nearby downtown, and adjacent mixed-age, mixed-income neighborhoods. The riverfront will be a powerful catalyst for philanthropy, additional public-sector investments, and for private-sector land redevelopment. Following the lead of dozens of other successful riverfront communities, the City is committed to making its majestic river and improved riverfront the centerpiece of its economic development and community enhancement strategy.

CATEGORY / PLANNING & ANALYSIS

CLIENT / CITY OF KANKAKEE

LOCATION / KANKAKEE, IL

COMPLETION YEAR / 2018

29


Lakeview Low-Line Phase 1 PORT URBANISM


I

n Spring 2017, the Lakeview Chamber of Commerce (Special Service Area #27) awarded the Lakeview Low-Line project to PORT to establish design guidelines and a long-term strategy for the Low-Line. The Low-Line is an underutilized Chicago Transit Authority (CTA) maintenance route and rightof-way below the Brown Line tracks. The long term project will transform the Low-Line into a continuous, half-mile-long garden and art walk that will become a new community amenity and connector between the Lincoln Avenue and Southport commercial corridors.

furniture in collaboration with Landscape Forms Studio 431. The resulting bright yellow rectangular boxes are a playful take on a vendor booth, a picnic table, a wavy bench, and a leaning wall. To further distinguish the space, PORT took advantage of the existing CTA lighting/debris canopy to introduce a bright yellow gateway ribbon, signage, and scalloped light diffuser. Murals by artists Yollocalli and Lauren Asta transform the walls of the two adjacent buildings, framing each side of the plaza.

The Paulina Plaza called for a new take on public furnishing that takes into account the need for an overhead cover, sound mitigation, additional lighting, seating, and vending. The first phase of the project – Paulina Plaza, the west anchor of the Low-Line – was completed in the summer of 2018. The Paulina Plaza called for a new take on public furnishing that takes into account the need for an overhead cover, sound mitigation, additional lighting, seating, and vending. Taking formal cues from the track structure itself, PORT developed a collection of custom urban

Merit Award

TEAM / PORT URBANISM • LANDSCAPE FORMS STUDIO 431

LOCATION / PAULINA BROWN LINE CTA STATION, CHICAGO, IL

CATEGORY / DESIGN CONSTRUCTED

CLIENT / LAKEVIEW CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AND THE CHICAGO TRANSIT AUTHORITY

COMPLETION YEAR / 2018

31


Shirley Ryan AbilityLab HDR


I

n March 2017, the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago – a specialty, nonprofit rehabilitation hospital that serves adults and children with the most severe, complex conditions – became the Shirley Ryan AbilityLab. With this change, they opened a $550 million, 1.2-million-square-foot hospital by the same name. It is the first-ever “translational” research hospital in which clinicians, scientists, innovators, and technologists work together in the same space, surrounding patients, discovering new approaches, and applying (or “translating”) research in real time. Nature has the power to delight, calm, and heal, and as such, it was essential to connect patients and staff to the outdoors at the new AbilityLab, even in a constrained urban setting. Program-flexible outdoor spaces are located at both ground level and at the 10th floor Sky Lobby. Gardens flow both inside and outside of the building and can be used for therapy, conversation, events, and conference break-out spaces. At ground level, landscape architects were responsible for creating a $1.5M streetscape and site design that differentiates patient from public spaces. Patients and guests are drawn in by the facility’s energetic palette of color and pattern. Ease of access and clear entrances

Merit Award

distinguish the patient drop-off areas, which are surrounded by landscaping that frames the streetscape and buffers patients from vehicular and pedestrian traffic on the surrounding streets. The design team worked with the local community and stakeholders to establish a design that fit into the neighborhood both aesthetically and functionally. The relationship of the multi-million dollar Sky Lobby gardens are linked to the interior program and provide different views of Lake Michigan, Chicago’s skyline, and beyond. The concept of “frictionless” design is woven through the design of interior clinical spaces – demonstrated through curved walls that provide ease of movement for those with functional impairments. The landscape architects replicated the concept and architectural features in the form of custom precast, sanded-finish seatwalls that provide a frame for lush plantings. HDR balanced interests from a diverse group of stakeholders, including client leadership, multiple donors, the client design liaison, affiliated institutions, and the architectural design team. All of these efforts were in service of the end goal: to create a facility that advances each patient’s ability, enhancing the mind, body, and spirit.

TEAM / HDR | GENSLER • ARCADIS • CLIVE WILKINSON ARCHITECTS • EGG OFFICE • ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEM DESIGN • JENSEN HUGHES • POWER CONSTRUCTION • THORNTON TOMASETTI • V3 INTERNATIONAL

CATEGORY / DESIGN CONSTRUCTED LOCATION / CHICAGO, IL

CLIENT / SHIRLEY RYAN ABILITYLAB COMPLETION YEAR / 2017

33


Suburban Savannah SMITHGROUP


C

hamberlain Group’s new corporate headquarters in Oak Brook consolidates employees from multiple facilities to one verdant, park-like setting. The new 223,000-square-foot facility features state-of-the-art engineering and testing laboratories as well as conference and training centers for customized employee and vendor education, a product showroom, a 200seat cafe, and fitness center. Previously, the 20-acre site featured a 1970’s corporate office building and a landscape of utility: expansive asphalt parking lots, mowed lawns, and scattered, neglected ornamental plantings. SmithGroup’s design transformed the site into an adaptive and flexible campus that supports the Chamberlain Group’s company values and culture by creating a space that promotes collaboration. The design focused on employee health and wellness, including amenities such as a shaded lakeside dining terrace, wildflower gardens, and a looped-trail network that connects to the building in multiple locations. The trails link the company’s 600+ employees with outside amenities designed for a full spectrum of uses, active to passive, and gathering spaces sized for a range of employee, family, and corporate gatherings.

Merit Award

Visitors entering the campus move through a series of treed berms and a rolling allee of maples to the building’s entrance. This formal sequence is the exception on the site, which is otherwise covered with native grasses and a restored oak savanna ecosystem. Ecological components are a valued experiential amenity for employees, who can take breaks or meetings amidst the abundant butterflies, crickets, and songbirds that inhabit the grasslands. Generously sized bioswale medians permeate parking areas, cleaning and slowing storm runoff while also helping to minimize their visual impact. A truly interdisciplinary effort, SmithGroup provided a full range of services for the project, including landscape architecture, civil engineering, ecological planning, architecture, and interior design. Together, the building and landscape have led to a marked increase in recruitment and retention for Chamberlain Group. The trails and amenity areas are intensely used daily. Additionally, employee groups have organized a series of 5K runs which have included over 200 employees and have raised thousands of dollars for local charities.

TEAM / SMITHGROUP • ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS DESIGN • PEPPER CONSTRUCTION • TGRWA STRUCTURAL ENGINEERS

CATEGORY / DESIGN CONSTRUCTED

CLIENT / CHAMBERLAIN GROUP, A DUCHOSSOIS FAMILY COMPANY

LOCATION / OAK BROOK, IL

COMPLETION YEAR / 2017 35


Titletown DESIGN WORKSHOP


F

or the residents of Green Bay, Wisconsin, the Packers NFL team plays a significant role in the community, especially on Sundays between October and February. In order to enhance the quality of life for Green Bay residents and extend Lambeau Field’s tourism and impact throughout the year, the Packers had a vision for a new public plaza and mixed-use development: Titletown.

Merit Award

Titletown is built on the site of a former parking lot and conceived as a public amenity, an extension of Lambeau Field into the community, and a way to enliven the area on non-game days. Titletown includes a destination playground, ice skating rink, sled hill, football field, a game area, and flexible plaza space that allows for a variety of community events. On the opening day, the design team saw evidence of the park’s success. The plaza was full of people - young and old, couples and families - enjoying the day, having fun, and celebrating in the familiar green and gold.

TEAM / DESIGN WORKSHOP • FRS DESIGN GROUP • ILLUMINART • PENTAGRAM • PETER OSLER • RA SMITH • STERLING PROJECT DEVELOPMENT • STEVENS

Titletown is built on the site of a former parking lot and conceived as a public amenity, an extension of Lambeau Field into the community, and a way to enliven the area on non-game days.

CATEGORY / DESIGN CONSTRUCTED LOCATION / ASHWAUBENON, WI

CLIENT / ROSSETTI COMPLETION YEAR / 2017

37


Urban Formal

BARKER EVANS LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE


A

multi-level garden renovation in a dense urban neighborhood created the opportunity for family-focused space, yet the client’s imperatives for an expanded garage, kitchen access, privacy, shade, and a formal aesthetic – all on the north side of the home with poor site drainage – presented challenges. The resulting elegant, three-level garden by Barker Evans Landscape Architecture feels surprisingly spacious within tight confines and a full program. The garden level is a simple, yet formal mix of gravel, Indiana limestone, evergreens, and lawn. Six pear trees just off the kitchen soften

the sun for al fresco dining, provide privacy, and welcome guests to a gracious meal. A new balcony allows the chef direct access to herbs and the dinner table. A rectangular lawn of fescue remains lush even in the limited northern light and offers open-play space for children. Atop the expanded garage, the family’s green thumb tends an enviable vegetable garden that is five times its original size yet, tucked away out of sight. This functional urban garden is easy to maintain and remains elegant throughout the seasons.

NEIGHBORING HOUSE NEIGHBORING COACH HOUSE

ROOF TOP DECK AND VEGETABLE GARDEN

ALLEY

KITCHEN BALCONY

PARKWAY

MAGNOLIA AVENUE

LAWN

DINING TERRACE

FAMILY ROOM DECK HOUSE

MAIN ENTRY

PROPERTLY LINE

Merit Award

TEAM / BARKER EVANS LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE • CALVENE, INC. • EISERMAN AND ASSOCIATES • SP ENGINEERS • SPACE ARCHITECTS + PLANNERS

CATEGORY / DESIGN - RESIDENTIAL

CLIENT / PRIVATE RESIDENT

LOCATION / CHICAGO, IL

COMPLETION YEAR / 2015

39


Urban Wilderness Gateway Framework Plan PORT URBANISM


T

he James White Parkway was once envisioned as a four-lane highway to link Downtown Knoxville to a broader highway network and destinations southeast of Knoxville. However, only a twomile stretch was completed. In and around the property, a series of outdoor recreation destinations began to develop over the last two decades. These destinations have evolved to become Knoxville’s Urban Wilderness, one of the most popular and dynamic outdoor recreation destinations in the United States. The Urban Wilderness is a spectacular 1,000acre outdoor adventure area that includes over 50 miles of trails and greenways, a nature center, lakes, historic sites, quarries, adventure playgrounds, five city parks, and a 500-acre wildlife area. It is composed of two major areas, the South Loop and the Battlefield Loop. Because of the Urban Wilderness’s expansive scale that grew organically over time, navigation and access is unclear and there is no primary entrance or connection between the two loops. The dead-end terminus of the incomplete James White Parkway was identified as an ideal site for an Urban Wilderness Gateway because of its accessible location and position between the loops. During the planning process, the project team proposed extending the gateway along the full length of the Parkway to open up opportunities for increased public space, connectivity, and ecological enhancements.

Merit Award

The design unites the two worlds of the site – urban and wild – and celebrates the underpass as a framing divide and a place for play. The Urban Wilderness Gateway Framework Plan envisions the entire James White Parkway as a 2.2-mile and 112-acre gateway to the Urban Wilderness. This spatial and processional experience extends and expands on the traditional concept of a gateway and connects the Urban Wilderness to the heart of downtown Knoxville. The linear park culminates in the highway dead end and underpass bridge. The design unites the two worlds of the site – urban and wild – in order to create a strong, distinctive threshold that accentuates these differences and celebrates the underpass as a framing divide and a place for play. Improvements at the Baker Creek Preserve Trailhead create a more open and public entrance to the site’s famous mountain biking trails with a large sloped lawn, soft plaza gathering space, picnic pavilion, and parking.

TEAM / PORT URBANISM • EQUINOX • GRESHAM, SMITH & PARTNERS • SANDERS PACE ARCHITECTURE • VAUGHN & MELTON

CATEGORY / PLANNING & ANALYSIS

CLIENT / CITY OF KNOXVILLE

LOCATION / KNOXVILLE, TN

COMPLETION YEAR / 2018

41


Humboldt Park Formal Garden HITCHCOCK DESIGN GROUP


T

he Chicago Park District and Chicago Parks Foundation partnered with the Garden Conservancy to make improvements to Humboldt Park’s historic Formal Garden. The beautiful and iconic circular garden was completed by the internationally renowned landscape designer Jens Jensen in 1908. The historic composition included an iconic circular garden and a transition landscape that slopes down towards the Prairie River. The renovation aimed to repair the garden’s deteriorated infrastructure, rehabilitate its important design features, and integrate stormwater best-management practices. In addition, it proposes a new planting design that re-interprets Jensen’s historic planting palette and famous Prairie Style. The project sponsors engaged Hitchcock Design Group and Piet Oudolf to prepare rehabilitation plans. Lush native perennials are incorporated throughout the site to create year-round seasonal interest, attract birds, and make the garden more interesting, beautiful, and sustainable.

Jensen Award

“We are proud to be home to Jensen’s ‘living green parks,’ which continue to serve as natural havens amidst the city bustle,” said Chicago Park District General Superintendent and CEO Michael P. Kelly. “With the Conservancy’s assistance, not only are we restoring the important design features and spirit of Jensen’s beloved garden, but we are enhancing it by transforming it into an inviting four-season gathering space accessible to patrons all year round.” The improved Formal Garden and new Transition Garden adjacent to the Prairie River will be characterized by Piet Oudolf’s signature style of hazy swaths of perennials and grasses. The style embodies the essence of four-season gardening through layered planting. Members of the Humboldt Park community, including the Humboldt Park Advisory Council, are also joining the Chicago Park District, the Chicago Parks Foundation,

TEAM / HITCHCOCK DESIGN GROUP • ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN INTERNATIONAL • PIET OUDOLF

and the Garden Conservancy in efforts to help provide financial support and advice on a new planting plan and design for the popular park amenity. When complete, the revitalization project will enhance this outdoor green space for families and friends who often gather for special occasions, transforming this once vibrant garden into a spectacular display of perennials.

CATEGORY / THE JENSEN AWARD LOCATION / HUMBOLDT PARK, CHICAGO, IL

CLIENT / CHICAGO PARKS FOUNDATION COMPLETION YEAR / ONGOING 43


HONOR AWARD / GRADUATE

MERIT AWARD / GRADUATE

MERIT AWARD / GRADUATE

Interfaces–Rethinking The Boundaries

A Flow to Enliven the Life

Kickapoo Rail-Trail: Convergence

ZHIYU MA University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

HUONG DINH University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

The project is based on the concept of flow – to revitalize the site through a dynamic process. The design transforms the forgotten rail line into a valuable public amenity that contributes to the community’s sense of place. Stormwater collection allows water to flow along the surface of the land and reduces the risk of flooding. Invasive species are removed, and native species are planted and protected. Community-oriented public spaces are located throughout and are connected by curving structures and vertical bridges – encouraging everyday use.

The idea of Convergence inspired the design of this project, attracting people and wildlife from the surrounding urban areas and encouraging interaction through three primary themes: Fluidity, Interaction Zones, and Dynamism. Fluidity refers to access and movement throughout the trail. Interaction Zones are open spaces where multiple groups can gather. Dynamism deals with the spaces in between Interaction Zones. Throughout the trail, rainwater management elements such as street bioswales and rain gardens are revealed, and the planting plan links habitat patches across the site, making it truly function as an ecological corridor.

XI WANG, NING ZHANG, AND ZHAOYUE FANG University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Interfaces amends the Chicago Landscape Ordinance by rethinking a wide range of urban and natural boundaries across the City. The project proposed that animals can utilize new boundary conditions for passage and habitat. Instead of unilaterally introducing wild creatures to the urban world, this proposal considers both humans and animals.

Student Awards


HONOR AWARD / UNDERGRADUATE

Environmental Assimilation in South Holland XUELING HU University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

MERIT AWARD / GRADUATE

MERIT AWARD / GRADUATE

NaCl Prairie Public Works Project

Posthuman: Designing A Framework for Multispecies Encounters

MATTHEW CALLONE Illinois Institute of Technology

The NaCl Prairie is a 15-acre green roof park over a City of Chicago salt storage facility, adding ecological, economic, and social value where it is usually lacking. The proposed topographical conditions also create a unique opportunity for permaculture-focused urban agriculture, where a variety of crops and restorative plants can be grown. In addition, as these facilities are commonly located along the city’s rail network, the prairie parks also function as ecological refuges for wildlife utilizing the rail lines as corridors.

YANG XIA, ZEYUN ZHENG, AND XINYUANG LU University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

The project imagines urban space through a perspective that includes not only humans but also other forms of life. The objective is a flexible urban habitat organized by three systems: technological environment, metabolic landscape, and informational network. The three strategies frame each section of the city. The quantity and variety of each strategy are based on the existing condition of the urban living environment. The ordinance impacts everything from existing building structures and urban landscapes to transportation infrastructures.

The primary design goal was to mitigate flooding. Through rainwater stimulation experiments, design strategies were selected to slow the water and convert a vacant concrete parcel into a channelized river and pools that feature island habitats for wildlife. In addition to alleviating flooding, the design provides multiple recreation opportunities for residents and visitors, including fishing, boating, walking, and camping. MERIT AWARD / UNDERGRADUATE

Adapting the Riparian Corridor of the Little Calumet River ZIYAN WI, MAX STUBER, AMANDA LERMAN, AND SEAN O’CONNOR University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

The design proposed prototypes to address flooding through topographic manipulation at four typical locations: a mixed-use river fork, a residential property, a vacant parcel at the outskirts of the City, and an agricultural property in a frequently flooded area. The prototypes serve as a toolkit for other communities facing similar challenges. Strategies include slowing the river, increasing water storage capacity, and redirecting river flow.


46

I L ASL A PR ESI DEN TS

A S L A F E L L OWS

2018 2017 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1999

2017 2015 2015 2013 2010 2009 2009 2009 2009 2007 2006 2000 2000 1999 1999 1998 1997 1996 1996 1996 1995 1994 1993 1993 1992 1992 1991 1989 1989 1981 1966 1960

Keven Graham, fasla Jack Pizzo, asla Alan Watkins, asla Darrell Garrison, asla Bradley McCauley, asla J. Christopher Lannert, asla Christopher M. Gent, asla Steven Halberg, asla Amy Olson, asla Greg Stevens, asla Erin Fiegel, asla James Gamble, asla Ann Lindsay Viger, asla Carrie Woleben-Meade, asla Brian Hopkins, asla Jay Womack, asla Eric F. Hornig, asla Richard Hayden, asla Keven Graham, fasla Gerald J. Milewski, asla Scott Mehaffey, asla

1998 1997 1996 1995 1994 1993 1992 1991 1990 1989 1988 1987 1986 1985 1984 1983 1982 1981 1980 1974-79

Lori Lyman, asla Lori Lyman, asla Ann Lindsay Viger, asla Ann Lindsay Viger, asla Steven Halberg, asla Steven Halberg, asla Gary B. Kesler, fasla Gary B. Kesler, fasla Robert Zolomij, asla Susan L.B. Jacobson, fasla Susan L.B. Jacobson, fasla James Ash, asla James Ash, asla James Gamble, asla James Gamble, asla Mark Hunner, fasla Mark Hunner, fasla James Elson Jr., asla Carl L. Goetz, asla John Cook, asla

M. Elen Deming, fasla Richard C. Bumstead, fasla Keven Graham, fasla Ernest C. Wong, fasla David Yocca, fasla Paul H. Gobster, fasla Theresa Guen-Murray, fasla Scott Mehaffey, fasla James M. Patchett, fasla Douglas Hoerr, fasla Peter Lindsay Schaudt, fasla Bernard P. Jacobs, fasla Anthony Tyznik, fasla Allen R. Edmonson, fasla Brian Orland, fasla Gary B. Kesler, fasla Terry Warriner Ryan, fasla Franklin C. Clements, fasla Mark Hunner, fasla Joseph Nevius, fasla Susan L.B. Jacobson, fasla Terence G. Harkness, fasla Robert B. Riley, fasla Robert Zolomij, fasla Joseph P. Karr, fasla Debra L. Mitchell, fasla Donald J. Molnar, fasla Vincent Bellafiore, fasla Jerrold Soesbe, fasla William Nelson, Jr., fasla Clarence E. “Bish� Hammond, Wallace B. Atkinson, fasla

fasla


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2 0 18 -2 0 19 I L A S L A E X E C U T I V E C O M M I T T E E EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Susan Ragaishis, affiliate asla, earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts from the University of Arizona, where she studied Theater Performance, Directing, and Art. After 10 years of professional theater, she changed her focus to nonprofit management and worked in administration for the Latino Institute, corporate development for Brookfield Zoo, and as a Regional Director for the American Cancer Society. She joined the Illinois Chapter ASLA in 2011 and works with the Executive Board and Committee Chairs to provide rich and meaningful experiences for members, advocate for the profession and engage allies for the chapter.

48

PRESIDENT

PAST PRESIDENT

PRESIDENT ELECT

Keven Graham, fasla, pla, clarb, is a Senior Landscape Architect with TERRA engineering based in Chicago. Keven leads the landscape architecture group at TERRA, overseeing four offices providing service throughout the Midwest and Internationally. Keven received his Bachelor of Landscape Architecture from Iowa State University. He has served the Illinois Chapter ASLA in the past at various levels, including Chapter President and Trustee. Keven serves on several national committees focused on policy, government affairs, and leadership.

Jack Pizzo, asla, is a renowned ecologist, landscape architect, and owner of The Pizzo Group of companies. He graduated from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign with a Bachelor’s degree in Ornamental Horticulture as well as a Master’s degree in Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences. Jack serves as the ecological knowledge base for his companies setting the philosophies, ethics, techniques, and principles that have made The Pizzo Group the industry leader in Ecological Restoration.

Rob Reuland, asla, pla, is the Studio Director at site design group, ltd. (site). He earned a Bachelor of Science in Landscape Architecture from Purdue University. As a licensed Landscape Architect, Rob’s professional experience is diverse, with a focus on planning and visioning, historic preservation, parks and recreation, and riverfront design. Before serving as President-Elect, he served the Illinois Chapter ASLA as the External Communications Chair.


TRUSTEE

SECRETARY

TREASURER

COMMITTEE CHAIRS

Brad McCauley, asla, pla, cdt, is the Managing Principal at site design group, ltd. (site), who specializes in construction detailing and contract documentation. Through Brad’s extensive knowledge in transforming design into buildable projects, he has helped facilitate numerous award-winning public spaces. Brad’s leadership is exemplified through his position as Trustee of the Illinois Chapter ASLA, as well as his service as the 2014 Illinois Chapter President, on ASLA’s National Member Services and the Financial and Investment Committees, and as a member of the Stewardship Council of The Cultural Landscape Foundation. A licensed landscape architect, Brad has also received Construction Document Technology certification from the Construction Specification Institute.

Renee TeVogt, associate asla, is a landscape designer at Daniel Weinbach & Partners. Her responsibilities at Daniel Weinbach & Partners includes design for streetscapes, commercial developments, and residential projects, with a focus on amenity decks. She earned her Bachelor of Landscape Architecture from the University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign, and is working towards licensure. Prior to her role as Secretary for Illinois Chapter ASLA, she served as the Internal Communications Chair. She is currently active in the Public Awareness committee. Serving as Secretary, Renee keeps detailed records of chapter correspondences and is reorganizing chapter records for better use within the organization.

Steven Halberg, asla, pla, clarb, is no stranger to leadership within the Illinois Chapter ASLA. He has previously served the Chapter as both a twotime Treasurer and as a two-time President. Steve earned a Bachelor of Landscape Architecture from the University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign, and also holds a Master of Business Administration from Illinois Benedictine College. He is a licensed landscape architect in Illinois, Indiana, and Wisconsin, and is CLARB certified. During his more than forty-year career as a landscape architect in Illinois, Steve has served as Superintendent of Parks and Planning with the Elk Grove Park District; Director of Planning and Development with the Forest Preserve District of DuPage County; President and Principal Designer with David Gill/Steven Halberg Limited - Golf Course Architects; and Landscape Architecture Manager for Bonestroo. He is currently serving as Assistant Director of Landscape Architecture with Planning Resources Inc.

Advocacy Chair: Mark Jirik, asla Awards Chair: Eric Braun, asla Celebration Co-chairs: Sarah Dreier, asla; Jenna Pfau, asla Communications Co-chairs: Jim Forrester, asla; Lara Remitz, asla Education Chair: Amanda Arnold, asla Emerging Professionals Co-chairs: Camille Applewhite, asla; Cassandra Rice, asla Fellows Nomination: Susan Jacobson, fasla Fellowship Chair: David Traphagen, affiliate asla Membership Co-chairs: Adam White, asla; Magdalena Aravena, asla Service Committee Chair: Michael Finn, asla Sponsorship Chair: Amy Olson, asla Webmaster: Deborah Steinberg, asla

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2 0 18 C O R P O R AT E S U P P O R T E R S Annual Sponsorships

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PRODUCT ION NO T ES FOLIO 2018 IS AN OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE ILLINOIS CHAPTER OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS.

This publication’s goal is to increase public awareness of landscape architecture as a profession and recognize the works of our profession that bring honor to us all. With this year’s issue, we offer our readers a glimpse of a number of unique projects that highlight the exemplary work of Illinois landscape architects. The entire contents of this issue, including the plans, photographs, and all artwork are under copyright agreement with the Illinois Chapter ASLA and may not be copied or reproduced except as specified under contract with the Illinois Chapter ASLA. To the best of our knowledge, all information at the time of publication is accurate. The Illinois Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects, the publisher, the copywriter, the designer, and the production firm are not liable for omissions or errors.

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ILLINOIS CHAPTER OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS

P.O. Box 4566 Oak Brook, Illinois 60522 630.833.4516 www.il-asla.org 2018 FOLIO COMMITTEE

Jenna Jones, asla Jim Forrester, asla Susan Ragaishis, affiliate asla EDITOR / COPYWRITER

Jenna Jones, asla CONCEPT AND DESIGN

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I L- A S L A . O R G

Folio 2018  

Landscape Architecture in Illinois 2018

Folio 2018  

Landscape Architecture in Illinois 2018

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