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The Ikoyi Club 1938 Magazine

special anniversary/yuletide edition 2011

RICE

at

73, vision

alive, mission on course

TO THE OCCASION WHOLE ROAST GOAT,

ANYONE? -wole soyinka go ahead,

imbibe

Where there’s a will


11375SCB_Time_Sap_267x200w.ai

4/14/11

3:01:15 PM

Can a bank balance its ambition with its conscience? We’re working harder to create a brighter future for you. Our global guiding principles and ethical banking practices influence everything we do, from the customers we work with to the businesses we finance. By pursuing initiatives such as sustainable ventures, responsible forestry management and safer workplace conditions we’re making a real difference to communities and the environment. Because as important as it is to deliver results, delivering them with a conscience matters more.

Here for progress Here for good

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Date In / Out & Rev No: 12 – 14 Apr 2011, R2

Insertion date: 30 May 2011 Material date: 25 Apr 2011 T/Junction, 5 Kadayanallur Street, Singapore 069183

Initial / Name: wìnníe CMYK

Telephone: (65) 6324 3002

Suit: Aivonne Chong


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Update

Harmony magazine gets aired as halfyear AGM is held and schools visit;

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14 Cover

At 73, what would the founders of Ikoyi Club 1938 think of the club today? Dr Christopher Kolade has the answers. Toast...and view the gallery in the ‘priceless state called Harmony.’

Contents 32

Section Reports Results from the anniversary tourneys; and other actions in the Sections

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38Feature

Golf unites two great clubs on the West Coast; plus Facts of Life vs Thrills and Frustrations of Golf

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42 Insight

With archival materials, Nkanu Egbe, goes back in time to the evolution of Ikoyi...from 1917. Get ready for The Ikoyi Centenary.

44 Law

Who says dead men don’t talk? Otunba Abiodun Olufowobi answers as Akeem Babatunde argues that the mortgagee’s ‘power of sale’ is being threatened.

48Travel

Omotola Obagbemi invites you to paradise. You can’t afford to miss out. No, you shouldn’t.

51Special Report

Will you Tolu Ogunlesi’s burnt rice? No, then check out our rice recipes from around the world introduced to remove the monotony of the usual during this festive period.

54Bar & Delicacies

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Noble Laureate Wole Soyinka has a feast for you. It’s called RWG. Salivating already? Then Laura Clay talks about the pleasure of drinking wine.

57 Health

No matter the aroma or the look, you can’t but run from some foods.

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F R O M T H E H O N O R A R Y S E C R E TA R Y

We have departed from Egypt

T

“…therefore the Honorary Secretary lied.”

THE TRUSTEES • Mr R.L. Kramer • Mr Alaba Okupe • Engr Akin Laguda GENERAL COMMITTEE MEMBERS OFFICE BEARERS • Chairman – Mr Richard Giwa-Osagie • Vice Chairman – Mr Babatunde Akinleye • Honorary Secretary – Otunba Abiodun Olufowobi • Honorary Treasurer – Mr Olusola Adeosun • Golf Captain – L Frank Gboneme Other Members Chairmen of Sections • TennisMr Wale Opejin • Swimming – Mr Freeborn Okunowo Erherede • Squash – Arc Sanya Akindele • Table Tennis – Mr Tony Owolabi • Billiards, Snooker & Pool – Mr Frank Irabor • Badminton – Reginald Ezebube Udeagbala • Other Sports – Mrs Ify Onukwuba • Entertainment – Mr Jide Adeola • Premises Adviser – Engr Sunmade Agbe-Davies • Bar Adviser – Adeniyi Adesegun Sowemimo • Catering Adviser – Olabimpe Esho Publications Sub Committee Chairman: Otunba Abiodun Olufowobi Members: Olasunkanmi Adefope, Segun Afadama, Lanre Idowu, Ted Iwere, Taiwo Obileye, Tony Onyima, Dayo Sobowale Editorial Consultancy, Design and Production: Harpostrophe Limited, 2 Anifowoshe Close, Surulere NG101211, Tel: 01-6283223, 08186935900 email: info@harpostrophe. com. Printed in Nigeria by Printpro Projects Limited, 2 Anifowoshe Close, Surulere, Lagos, Nigeria NG101211. Tel: 01-6283223

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Due process in carrying out tasks in the club has come to stay and trust me, although we may not yet be in the Promised Land, we have long left Egypt.

his was a sour grape hurled at me by a member at the Annual General Meeting in August. In the circumstances, there existed no justification for the broadside, considering that I acted lawfully within my office as the Honorary Secretary. Mum was the word from me, and I swallowed the misguided ad hominem with the proverbial glass of water. But, I remembered the relevant portion of the good Book “…and Aaron shall cast lots upon the two goats; one lot for the Lord, and the other for the scapegoat.” (Leviticus 16:8). No hostages taken, hatchet buried and no marker on the site. Some members of the General Committee have been verbally attacked and called names in the course of service to the club, but it does not matter and the ball in sight is: sustaining the traditional values of Ikoyi Club 1938, regardless. We must strive to recreate the values that have made our club the quintessential international family club in Nigeria. I report that the demand for membership of your club is still all-time high but we strive to separate Paul from Barnabas in the process of availing membership. We also ensure that most of the members on the premises are financial, hence the commonwealth (and the free hors d’oeuvres served on induction nights) are not shared with non-financial members. The non-financial members’ list had been pasted long enough in consonance with the Rules and presently, the membership strength of the club will shrink by the time the General Committee pulls the plug. Please pay up your subscription to avoid being a victim of the looming purge. The two very important projects on the card: the Parking Pavilion and the computerised access control are underway and the General Committee has begun the constitutional drive by seeking and obtaining members’ approval at the August Special General Meeting for the Car-park pavilion and the approval for the Access Control shall be sought at AGM next February. We believe that it’s never late to do the right thing, but we must comply with due process and ensure that we get both projects right the first time.. Also, the toils of the present committee are beginning to manifest appreciably in other facets of the club and I plead more patience from members; for though our pace may not be Messific, we are certainly not walking backwards. Due process in carrying out tasks in the club has come to stay and trust me, although we may not yet be in the Promised Land, we have long left Egypt. We give the Almighty God the glory for the journey so far and we are certain things will only get better for our club. Let’s thank God for the crop of dutiful gentlemen in the current General Committee. We also thank God for the uncommon commitment and sacrifices of our Trustees. May their tribe increase. I plead patience and commend the wisdom of Abraham Lincoln: “A man watches his pear-tree day after day, impatient for the ripening of the fruit. Let him attempt to force the process, and he may spoil both fruit and tree. But let him patiently wait, and the ripe pear at length falls into his lap!” Please enjoy this Harmony – and ensure that it doesn’t leave your sight. You sure won’t with the package herein.

Otunba Abiodun Olufowobi (PABIEKUN)

editor-in-chief/Honorary Secretary, Ikoyi Club 1938 pabiekun@yahoo.com. Mob: 08060934000


u p d ate

Update

all about the club , outside and within

FEEDBACK

Harmony Magazine: what they say Thoroughly enjoyable Review by Tola Adenle

B

eing forever an upcountry girl, I should not ordinarily be gifted with a copy of the magazine of Nigeria’s premier club, Ikoyi Club 1938 (Harmony). I might not have been to a manor born, but one way or the other, I did find myself in one and I’m also often surrounded by quite a few who flaunt such credentials. An e-copy of the current issue (July-September 2011) of the club’s magazine, which I understand has been around for quite a while, recently arrived in my mail box via one of such links. While I do not have any of the older issues of the magazine to base a comparison, it does look and read like a world-class production.  I’m sure it won’t do the Ikoyi Club 1938 (IC) reputation any harm if it could get a country girl a copy of the real thing so that I can feel its justification for my belief that IC has really hit the ball way out of the park with this well-put-together and thoroughly enjoyable club’s magazine! From the opening statement of

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Otunba Abiodun Olufowobi (Pabiekun), the club’s Honorary Secretary, Sustaining the Values that give us the Edge to the copy (the words) in the last ad on the Outside Back Cover by Nigeria LNG Limited, evidence abounds that IC is “the flagship family club in Africa” as members believe – pardon me – if this description came via an Africa-wide search for a primus inter pares of African clubs. The cover grabs your attention, and if it was displayed for sale among other mags at Tinubu or downtown New York or London by a vendor, it would be the choice pick.  There is no model that looks like she needs to be fed a rich veggie soup containing orisirisi (assorted meat) and iyan (pounded yam) to fill out a gaunt look but with businesstype members all in a joyful mood.  Mark you, this may contrast quite some with the mood in most parts of the city of Lagos but hey, this IS about Africa’s flagship club. The cover beckons: good complementary colours, all cap letters but one hardly notices the unusual choice of style because everything goes well together.  And the cover leads?  I wondered

THE IKOYI CLUB 1938 MAGAZINE

JULY - SEPTEMBER 2011

NEW

LEADERS HOMAGE TO THE KING MANY FACES OF IKOYI

If it was displayed for sale among other mags at Tinubu or downtown New York or London, it would be the choice pick

READING - FOR LIFE ALL SURPLUS, NO DEFICIT

which king would be ‘THE king’ although after checking out the Contents, I chose to follow reading Olufowobi’s intro which was very to-the-point with “The many faces of Ikoyi”; ANYTHING by Tolu Ogunlesi never disappoints. I must mention Olufowobi’s intro which surprises me as it shows that even in such a storied organisation as IC, there are members who are in the Club for what they can get or, as Olufowobi more delicately puts it, “if we can be proud of our membership of Ikoyi Club 1938 everywhere, the club too should enjoy the fruits of the success it has been part of.”. Ogunlesi’s essay, and the accompanying wonderful pictures


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by Richard Enesi, is a great and refreshing look-back at things lost, especially the short-circuited memories of those who knew Ikoyi before every old singlefamily colonial building with its spacious premises became the abode of scores of people after conversions to multi-family apartments. Ikoyi was a place that an upcountry school girl would walk to sight-see from Lafiaji back in the late 1950s and early 1960s but not even the most hick/countrified person today would ride an okada to visit Ikoyi:  no slums in sight but the newly-arrived hick would see at Ikoyi about the same type of chaotic environment s/he has at any part of Lafiaji – commercial activities everywhere. Now, that’s an upcountry girl veering off to offer unsolicited and irrelevant opinion; so, pay no heed, please. Mr. Olufowobi contributed almost a third of the sections- three of 10.   He submitted an essay on Law: When next you park in a public place and another on Travel, UK, here you (don’t) go. How to get a UK visa. With ‘parking’ ranking high on Lagos motorists’ Nightmare List, and even though many of IC’s members may not have been faced with this problem, since there are always drivers running engines to power auto airconditioning while they sleep as their bosses are away, it is a very helpful and well-researched essay.  Law, his day-time job, comes in very handy as Olufowobi uses cases from the Nigerian and English legal systems to buttress or make points. The U.K. visa story is well-illustrated and the colours – even before one notices the wheel-along with a UK flag, that is if you could miss it – screams UK.  Olufowobi looks at visa rejections, perhaps with a lawyer’s lens, because if you ask the average guy who has been rejected many times at most Western embassies – the Secretary speaks from the position of one who is privileged

and merely strolls in and out of embassies with visas always secured. The suggestions and ideas offered, though, are quite useful and those who have been turned down or are contemplating applying for one at the British High Commission or any foreign embassy could find many useful ideas about putting together proper documents and giving consistent answers at interviews. It is very encouraging to find the essay by Fisayo Soyombo, Weaned in English, waning in mother tongue, in a magazine belonging to a club whose members are most guilty of weaning their kids ON English while their mother tongue WANES because the Nigerian languages, especially Yoruba as a “disappearing language,” as I’ve long described the subject in several essays, is dear to my heart.  Yoruba seems the most guilty of the ethnic groups in Nigeria as it seems there’s never anything foreign that we do not take to beyond imbibing; we get assimilated by languages, ideas, fashions, fads, etcetera v. easily.  The interviews by Mr. Soyombo with the named kids are eyeopening.  I always wonder when I meet kids, say, in Lagos who, though from nearby Ogun State, have never been to their ancestral homes. Language is intricately woven into a people’s culture; we lose it, we lose who we are.  Speaking Yoruba to your kids at home would not make them less fluent or less sound in the grasp of the English Language.  I always illustrate to parents that I find falling into the English-only trap – it IS a trap – about those of us who first had to learn “proper” Yoruba, then English – and yet, we are okay at the end.  OR, the Ibo or Hausa kids in Yoruba-land who not only master their mother tongue but also become very fluent speakers of Yoruba and English.  A kid spoken to in Yoruba at home in the United States would still have an American accent as long as s/he

Finally, I must mention that unlike the general review style around, I find nothing that must be criticised to complete this review. The magazine is a welldone job.

interacts with the dominant language outside the primary social environment. The Chinese, other Asians AND Spanish-speaking Latin Americans in the U.S.A. bear testimony to this. There are many other excellent features in the magazine, including sports and even fashion.  Okay, you are too down by Nigeria’s ever gloomy financial news?  How about cheering yourself up with the incredible report of All Surplus, No deficit (!) from IC’s Treasury?  Now, that’s something Nigeria can learn from:  just use the same template of not spending what you do not have and get off the list of most corrupt countries in the world. From Olufowobi’s opening essay is this:  “This objective (of succeeding generations of members being proud to hold up the banner of Ikoyi Club 1938) is inconsistent with abuse of office, subscription evasion, trampling on the moral values of the club, impersonation and sundry other despicable acts by some members who have had cause to be invited upstairs (via the no elevator route) in recent times.”  Okay, Nigeria is a much bigger stage but the weapons for fighting the evil are also more than IC has to fight the slight problems of subscription evasion and the like.  If Nigeria fights its supposedly huge problems that consistently qualify it as a “crime syndicate masquerading as a nation,” as a blogger famously describes the corruption-ridden country, it would shake off its starring position on thwworld’s Corruption Index. Finally, I must mention that unlike the general review style around, I find nothing that must be criticised to complete this review.  The magazine is a welldone job, including the ads many of which appear next to suitable essays. Culled from emotanafrica.com, Adenle’s blog. A prolific writer/ public affairs commentator, she also edited her magazine, Emotan – A Woman’s magazine.

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Living in HARMONY By Omayeli Diana Odeli

E

very now and again I come across something that ‘tickles my fancy’. Today I saw such in the manner of a new(ish) magazine, the official publication of Ikoyi Club 1938. I say new(ish) because there is one in existence but the new powers-thatbe have decided it needs revamping. The new rag is a glossy, eye-catching venture which is free to all members of Ikoyi Club 1938. It reminds me of a song by Paul McCartney and the late Michael Jackson, “Ebony and Ivory”-Ebony and Ivory, go together in perfect harmony, side by side on my piano keyboard, O Lord why don’t we. We all say, people are the same where ever we go, there is good and bad, in everyone, where we learn to live, and we learn to give each other what we need to survive, together alive..Ebony and Ivory work together in perfect harmony, side by side on my piano keyboard o Lord why don’t we...” I had a quick look through it, reading just a few lines of one or two paragraphs of each feature as I went along, before settling down to read the magazine in earnest. The first thing I noticed was the layout. Quite good by all standards but with room for some alterations. If you pay attention to detail you will notice on the ‘Section Reports’ on the Swimming Section, the water of a swimming pool as the background (p.13). On the following page where Other Sports and activities are mentioned, you will see a photograph of the game of “Ayo”. I called a friend and said, ‘It’s the little things that count.’ Perhaps because this is a new magazine, it is fairly business in content. I would think this is to draw more sponsors to the sections and to encourage more companies to show their wares in the magazine. There are approximately 17 adverts, but guess what? In a club of 10,000+ members certainly there is

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Imagine what a boost each person’s business will have if 10,000+ people are reading each advertisement.

room for many more adverts. I like the call to advertise in the magazine which ends with “You will thank us for this.” And because the club has such a huge number, there should also be a variety of adverts which will entice people from its community. Imagine what a boost each person’s business will have if 10,000+ people are reading each advertisement. This has nothing to do with adverts that would have been placed in other national publications though. Also, what has happened to a children’s section? Surely there are events which feature children? This should have been highlighted in this issue. I believe this particular issue is a review of events from the last quarter. I am pretty sure the club must have been rather busy, but not all aspects have been highlighted. I would have loved to see the calendar for the next quarter. There are photographs which should have been numbered especially where there are three or more on the page. It makes for easier reference. Show me also a few events which show the community in Ikoyi Club 1938 living together in harmony. Perhaps the editor of the magazine will take note of these suggestions. All in all, I enjoyed glancing through the magazine. The actual read was not tedious, although I would have preferred to read a couple more articles that had nothing to do with business; simply for relaxation. Apart from a few grammatical errors, each piece was well written. Can we live in HARMONY? Yes we can. Omayeli, a seasoned broadcaster, lives in London, UK. She was home recently on holiday and wrote this review which was published in The Guardian newspaper.

The ‘next level’ By Akinbayo A. Adenubi (A995)

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he July-September 2011 issue has successfully taken the Harmony magazine to the next level indeed.

Glossy, attractive, featuring captivating articles interspersed with beautiful advertisements, the club’s journal has become a collector’s item-a journal that the club can be justifiably proud of. The striking headlines of the stories make the journal a mustread. For me, the ace feature is “Ikoyi” by Tolu Ogunlesi. Professionally crafted in poetic prose, it succeeded in giving a balanced picture of that unique, adorable part of the city in which Ikoyi Club 1938 is located. Permit me to make a few suggestions for the consideration of your Editorial Board: 1. Would you like to explore ways of ensuring that every paid-up member of the club gets a copy of the journaleven if you have to deliver a copy at our doorsteps, despite any additional cost? 2. Please introduce a Readers’ Comments column in the journal so that you can have feedback from your readers and encourage a healthy interaction between your contributors and their readers. 3. If you want to sustain the very high standard you have set, can you afford to produce the journal four times a yearwithout undue delay? Let me end by commending the members of your Editorial Board for doing an excellent job. Looking at the formidable list of veteran wordsmiths profiled in “Behind Harmony”, we cannot expect anything but the very best. Keep the flag flying We are working with the leading Nigerian custom publisher, Harpostrophe Limited, so we have some confidence that we will continue to raise the bar. We welcome your suggestions, comments and questions. Thanks. Editor-in-Chief


?

shall We

Get the glasses out…. Since 2006, every media readership survey* has shown that, in virtually all of Nigeria, The SUN is read by one out of three newspaper readers. Not only that, the readership cuts across every economic class; in other words, The SUN has more mass appeal. Be in good company, advertise in and read The SUN every day. ...now fill up….Cheers…. *Surveys by Research and Marketing Services (RMS) Limited and mediaReachOMD.

THE

Voice of theNation


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Half-year AGM

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he Ikoyi Club 1938 held its Half –Year Annual General Meeting on 25 August 2011 with, among others, all Office Bearers, General Committee members, the three Trustees and 90 members in attendance. The meeting began at 6:55pm once the statutory quorum of 50 members was formed.

club chairman richard giwaosagie

Oluwole adeosun, Honorary Treasurer

Tunde HassanOdukale, Chairman, Investment Committee

Aare Tunji Oni, member, Audit Committee

an official of akintola williams & delloitte Vice Chairman Tunde Akinleye, on Access Control

Trustees Dick Kramer and Alaba Okupe

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Members’ deliberated on: • The Club Rule Book – there are resolutions that have not yet been included in the book because the club was “more than six years in arrears” on filing its annual reports at the Corporate Affairs Commission in Abuja; a condition for updating documents at the CAC. The Chairman, Mr. Richard Giwa-Osagie, said the Honorary Secretary, Otunba Abiodun Olufowobi, was working on reversing this, and the sitrep would be reported at the next AGM in February 2012. • The General Committee Report for the period ended January-June 2011. Matters arising from this report, which was adopted, included the proposed parking pavilion – the number of parking spaces, cost, funding options, and date of completion. Resolutions were, however, shifted to the Special General Meeting (in October 2011) convened purposely for the matter; Implementation of Access Control – a member had asked that, with the passage of the Electronic Evidence Act, “who would have access to the data and how long the data would be stored because the Access Control (will) track the movement of members….” In response, Mr. Tunde Akinleye, Club Vice-Chairman and immediate past chairman of the ICT Sub-Committee, noted that implementation would be in line with global standards on access controls and should give “total comfort” to members. • The Honorary Treasurer’s Report, which was also adopted. Members discussed e-payment which members hardly used, even as there were POS terminals at every sectional bar; sponsorship of entertainment in the club, believing that it had ebbed, but the Honorary Treasurer pointed out that the Sponsorship Fund had actually swollen from N35.6m to about N80.5m; “worrisome” energy cost and the need for power management by using energy-saving bulbs, switching off equipment when not in use and alternative “cheaper” energy sources. The club’s new Finance and Admin Manager, Mrs. Oluway-

emisi Samuel, was introduced to members. The Audit Committee Report noted, among others, that there must be full disclosure in the Accounts on the Club’s donations to charity, including the names of the beneficiaries. • The Audited Accounts, for the period ended 30 June 2011, by the firm of Akintola Williams & Delloitte. Based on a member’s observation, the chairman noted that the General Committee had resolved that the club’s accounting policies be reviewed and that the Audit Committee and external auditors would be duly consulted on the exercise. • The Investment Committee Report read by the Chairman of the Investment Committee, Mr. Hassan-Odukale, received sustained applause as Mr Giwa-Osagie observed that it was the “best presentation” he had ever seen in the club. It was adopted after few comments on asset portfolio and the club’s funds placed in the money market and on bonds. • The Budget for July 2011 to June 2012 was presented and approved. An observation that the Honorary Treasurer should avail members’ budget performance every half year was noted. • Presentation of Regulations made by the General Committee in accordance with Rule 17. After discussions on whether the club was being over-regulated or not and the extant powers of the General Committee to make new regulations, Regulation 12411 was voted for by a majority and carried. • The adoption of Trustees’ Report, which contained rulings on diverse investigation panels and disciplinary actions. The Report generated some heat as there were accusations and counter-accusations of misreported statements and falsehoods. The report was subjected to a countermotion, which was moved but failed as more members voted for the decisions of the Trustees. The meeting was ended by a motion for adjournment at about 11.50 pm which was duly carried.


u p d ate a l l a b o u t the c l u b , o u ts i d e an d w i th i n

CARMARADERIE, QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS...

Schools’ Visit

A

HEAD of 2012, 10 international college-prep schools with renown and history staged an expo at Ikoyi Club 1938 on 16 October, 2011. The participating schools were Darlington School (established in 1905), a co-ed in Rome, Georgia, Atlanta, USA; Ross School (founded in 1991) with campuses in East Hampton and Bridgehampton, both in New York, USA, and serves students in pre-nursery through grade 12; Hawai’i Preparatory Academy, Kamuela, Hawai’i, founded in 1949, which offers a four-week boarding confidence-building experience during kau wela (summer in the Hawaiian language); and Bosworth Independent College, a co-ed boarding school in the United Kingdom, admitting students between the ages of 14 and 19. Others are King’s Academy, Jordan (founded in 2007), modelled after a traditional New Englandstyle boarding school (an inspiration by HM King Abdullah II who had attended boarding school at Deerfield Academy, New England), admits students for grades 9-12; Ridley College, Canada (founded in 1889), which curriculum includes AP courses and SAT preparation; Rosseau Lake College, situated on Lake Rosseau in one of Canada’s most spectacular natural settings, is a co-ed, day and boarding, university preparatory school for students Grades 7 to 12; St James School, the oldest US Episcopal boarding school founded on the Oxford Movement, with its Anglican traditions dating back to 1842; St Michael’s School, a co-ed school, first established in 1923 and has been situated in Bryn, Carmarthenshire, England, since 1928; and St Johnsbury Academy, an independent boarding and day school in St Johnsbury, Vermont, New England, USA. harmony

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co v er ann i v ersary s p ec i a l

ou an e should give y w t gh ou th b oyi Clu en here the modern Ik you have not be of e ce n w , si s en r em ea y tl to e “Gen remained true have been in th as gs h in b th lu C ay r w e ou ow that e have account of th delighted to kn on, and that w ti be ea ld r ec ou r w gh ou ou e moved mony thr with us. Y jective. We hav ing global har ob er at st fo th of to e t iv en s ct m the obje e best example ate our commit th r of st e on on e em d m co to l d have be done so much drawn from al gners only, an ei ip r sh fo r r be fo b em u m cl t h curren Club, from being a nature of our the world, wit in ly d bs n u ie r cl -f l y ia il ac m the fa the of multir have maintained ted (mainly) by e la W u e. op p ob gl be e to th s s d around ers at weekend s, the Club ten h ay ot d m k r ee ei w th on d , ildren an and although ticipation of ch ar p d an ce en es men, the pr ent. physical derable excitem expanded our e av h e w , 00 generates consi ,0 rmed ey can be perfo roll of about 10 th ip at sh r th be so em s m ce With a me servi and outsourced so cal structures en si y ev h d p an in , st es r ju u struct s have as been not l. Our member Our growth h . el y w tl as en e ci iv fi ef at e it mor ent accounts of has been qual ll it ce s; ex r be ve m gi u to n e ery d continu membership of the Club, an hole, we have ev w it e ir th sp n e O th . es ed is you enterpr assimilat and values that businesses and r on ei si th vi e in th es ed lv n themse ave sustai eful that we h at gr be to n s so rea r Club occupie e Club. ou th g at in th h n is io bl it ta os ership p shared in es is derives roud of the lead p ly r la cu e believe that th ti W ar . ia er ig N We are p in r ensuring the fo al institutions s ci so em e st th sy g st on am of the be om one at we have one e transition fr h T b. lu C e th from the fact th ithin appens of leadership w n to the next h io at tr is in sustainability m re ad Club y, and we ensu bl ta ec p es r d k record smoothly an a credible trac h it w e os th n to the that only ce and dedicatio an m r fo er p al of actu bility. ership responsi ad le to d n ce as e of Club ecessarily tru n ot n is is th , ons Regrettably ns or instituti io at is n ga or er many oth in this often feel that, e w d an s, u d of aroun s in the middle si oa an e k li e es respect, we ar one of your hop at th e ev li be e et w and a real desert. Y at our values th as w b lu C i ing oy te to the build in founding Ik u ib tr n co to s help u adership methods would ng the right le ti ec efl r t en m we of an environ not lost hope; e av h e W s. d dar e to values and stan will still com y et ci so al er n ds, e ge es and standar believe that th lu va t h ig r e erish th tain good manifest and ch ntinue to main provided we co Club, pline in Ikoyi ci is d d an s d standar od places where go and in the other truly is dy exists. This ea r al ip sh er pray lead d we ask you to an , s” es r og r p “work in s. rive for succes y” for us as we st Yours sincerel

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B

y now, you are probably wondering who the “gentlemen” here are, and who the signatory to the letter is. If you guessed that the gentlemen have to do with the founding of the Ikoyi Club 1938, take a bow. The gentlemen are Sir Donald Kingdom, Henry Stewart Feggeltol and David Duncan Gibb – the nominated trustees of the new club formed on 29 September, 1938 from the official merger of the then European Club and Lagos Golf Club, and christened Ikoyi Club 1938.

It was Dr Christopher Kolade, CON, Nigeria’s High Commissioner to the Court of St James’s (2002-2007), who composed the letter as he imagined what members of Ikoyi Club 1938 would tell the founding fathers if asked to give “a true account of all that has taken place, and what advances (have harmony

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been made) in the years since 1938.” Because, to the current pro-chancellor of the Pan-African University, at Ajah, on the outskirts of Lagos, “history ought to be defined, not just by the number of years, but, more importantly, by the content and value of activity, and by the significance of achievement over the period.” You would be delighted to know that our Club has remained true to the objective of fostering global harmony through recreation, and that we have done so much to demonstrate our commitment to that objective. Kolade, born six years before the birth of the club, gave the Anniversary Lecture as part of the celebration of the club’s 73rd anniversary. His verdict: the club not only has an “impressive history,” it also should be counted among the few “oases of good leadership performance” in Nigeria which need to be enlarged and their influence strengthened. (See full text on page 19.) Considering that he is an outsider looking in, that statement surely calls for a clinking of glasses.

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A lot of that was done from Monday, 26 September to Sunday, 2 October, as the club celebrated 73 years of its founding with a variety of events under the general theme, “It’s A Family Affair.” The focus was to celebrate “in a manner that would excite and involve as many members of the club as possible,” according to Babatunde A Akinleye, vice-chairman, Ikoyi Club 1938 and chairman, 73rd Anniversary Sub-Committee. The anniversary started on Monday, 26 September with a visit by the Akinyele-led Anniversary Sub-Committee to the Modupe Cole Memorial Child Care and Treatment Home for Handicapped Children, Akoka, Yaba. The sub-committee presented a N300,000 cheque for the financing of a borehole at the Home. The Patrick Speech and Languages Centre, based at Fani-Kayode Street, GRA Ikeja, and providing structural and educational support for autistic children, will be the beneficiary of laptops valued at N300,000.

a member of the audience asks a question at the anniversary lecture

Women, being the bedrock of families, it was therefore imperative that a special evening would be dedicated to them. And so it was on the evening of 26 September; with a lecture at the Rotunda and live entertainment at the Main Bar, with music by De Eagle Band. Didn’t the women take over? Prof Bomi Ogedengbe, the only female professor of obstetrics and gynaecology in West Africa, gave a well-attended lecture on “Medical Disorders in Women.” Children and youth had their own day on Saturday, 1 October – Nigeria’s Independence day – with decent parties. As the tradition in the club goes, a day was also devoted to the club’s treasured elders. The Elders’ Day was on 28 September, with entertainment made for elders. There was more entertainment on Tuesday, 27 September as Lagos’s rave band, The Sharp Band, belted out jazz music at its, er, jazzy best, and, finally, on Sunday, 2 October, 9ice, of the Gongo Aso fame, showed why he is popular with the young and old as he bobbed, weaved, and sang his lungs out at the grand finale. The master of ceremony, Omo Baba, also lived up to the billing as a comedian extra-ordinaire. The anniversary would have been incomplete without sports. Each Section held the 73rd Club Anniversary Tournament. (All the results are ahead). An innovation, however, was the InterSection Games, involving the club’s eight sporting sections being paired off against one another at their respective sports. This resulted in four winners who have “bragging rights” over their opponents for the next one year. It was definitely a delightful week, made even more so, with support from such corporate bodies as Guinness (Diageo Spirits), Consolidated Breweries, Red Bull, Virgin Atlantic, Ekulo Group of Companies, Hemmingway’s Safaris Africa, Multiserve International, Southern Sun Hotels, and Eko Chiv Ventures. No doubt, Sir Donald Kingdom, Mr Henry StwartFeggeltol and Mr David Duncan Gibb, would have given the Akinleye-led Anniversary Organising Committee several pats on the back – for a job well done. Until next year….


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... at the feet of Ikoyi Club 1938

I

By Christopher Kolade

We believe that the general society will still come to manifest and cherish the right values and standards, provided we continue to maintain good standards and discipline in (the) Club...

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would like to begin by offering my congratulations to the Chairman, Executive Committee, and all Members of Ikoyi Club 1938, for the grace that you have been given to mark the passing of another year in the impressive history of your Club. These days, it is not common experience to find many organisations or institutions that have been around since before Nigeria became a sovereign nation, and which have remained strong and relevant to the purpose that they were created to serve. The history of your Club is now all of 73 years long – and counting! – yet we should note that history ought to be defined, not just by the number of years, but, more importantly, by the content and value of activity, and by the significance of achievement over the period. Suppose I suggest that we write, in our imagination, to the original founders of Ikoyi Club, to give them a true account of all that has taken place, and what advances we have made in the years since 1938? What might we have to say in such a letter to Sir Donald Kingdom and Messrs Henry Stewart Feggeltol and David Duncan Gibb? Would it go something like this: “Gentlemen, we of the modern Ikoyi Club thought we should give you an account of the way things have been in the years since you have not been here with us. You would be delighted to know that our Club has remained true to the objective of fostering global harmony through recreation, and that we have done so much to demonstrate our commitment to that objective. We have moved from being a club for foreigners only, and have become one of the best examples of multiracial clubs in the world, with current membership drawn from all around the globe. We have maintained the family-friendly nature of our Club, and although, on weekdays, the Club tends to be populated by the men, the presence and participation of children and their mothers at weekends generates considerable excitement With a membership roll of about 10,000, we have expanded our physical structures, and even outsourced some services so that they can be performed more efficiently. Our growth has been not just in physical structures and membership numbers; it has been qualitative as well. Our members have assimilated the spirit of the Club, and continue to give excellent accounts of themselves in their businesses and enterprises. On the whole, we have every reason to be grateful that we have sustained the vision and values that you shared in establishing the Club. We are particularly proud of the leadership position that our Club now occupies among the social institutions in Nigeria. We believe

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that this derives from the fact that we have one of the best systems for ensuring the sustainability of leadership within the Club. The transition from one Club administration to the next happens smoothly and respectably, and we ensure that only those with a credible track record of actual performance and dedication to the Club ascent to leadership responsibility. Regrettably, this Is not necessarily true of many other organisations or institutions around us, and we often feel that, in this respect, we are like an oasis in the middle of a real desert. Yet we believe that one of your hopes in founding Ikoyi Club was that our values and methods would help us to contribute to the building of an environment reflecting the right leadership values and standards. We have not lost hope; we believe that the general society will still come to manifest and cherish the right values and standards, provided we continue to maintain good standards and discipline in Ikoyi Club, and in the other places where good leadership already exists. This is truly “work in progress”, and we ask you to pray for us as we strive for success. Yours sincerely” – and I feel confident that the Chairman and members of the Executive would have no problem appending their signatures to that letter! The leadership wilderness The letter to our Founders reflects, in a way, the mood that overtakes us whenever we examine corporate performance of our country Nigeria. Our day-to-day experience features many trends that are truly disheartening. Let us take the following as a mere sample of what I am talking about: There is a distressing decay of the value system of our society, and this is demonstrated by the fact that we no longer seem to care about the need to aim for excellence. Rather, poor performance is often readily accepted as the inevitable norm. It is difficult to find any of our nation’s public institutions or systems that has not deteriorated in quality since Independence Day in 1960. The corruption in our land is now practised with such brazen impunity that those who are determined to stand upright look like people in need of asylum accommodation. Someone in high office, public or private, acknowledges that he has been corrupt and then proceeds to negotiate a ‘plea bargain’ escape from justice, or gets the judicial system to discontinue prosecution without offering any explanation to us, the stakeholders. You must have noticed, however, that such escape mechanisms are available only to the high and mighty, not to the ordinary citizen! We are no longer outraged by the fact that we have to provide our own ‘public services’ in our private homes. If we continue at our current rate of decline, you and I may need to pick up shovels and pickaxes to maintain the roads on which we must travel between Lagos and our home villages. Our representatives swear oaths of office in which they promise that they will not allow their personal interests to overwhelm their duty to the nation. We, too, pledge to Nigeria – our country – to be “faithful, loyal and honest,” and to serve Nigeria with all we have. And that is the end of that! Our distress is aggravated by the fact that we end each oath with the words, “So help me, God”, even though we know that we have no intention of taking our pledge seriously. And we expect God Almighty to take no notice of such awful behaviour! We could go on, but there is really no point; none of this is news to any of us. Join any group of ordinary Nigerian citizens discussing the station of their nation, and all you hear is a never-ceasing tale of agony and dissatisfaction, from which we seem unable to find the way out. We know that we are in a bad place, but since the holders of responsibility do not consider themselves


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accountable to us in any way, we do not feel empowered to do anything effective about our situation. We seem to exist in this wilderness, this desert of perennial under-performance from which we long to free ourselves. But we also know that giving up is not, and can never be, an option. And this evening, I want to give two good reasons why we must continue to strive for victory over our problems. Some oases of good leadership First, we have no other country, nor can we offer our children any other, in the face of current trends in the management of immigration in other countries. Second, we are fortunate to have some examples of good leadership, even in this land of ours. Consider: yy The performance of professionals, individually and in their associations, and their use of peer monitoring and collective discipline; yy The discipline and standards within our indigenous communities, both in the past and now; yy The government of Lagos State under current leadership; yy The performance of clubs like Ikoyi Club 1938. These few examples represent what I call our ‘oases of good leadership performance.’ If these cases can exist and show such viability, all we need do is to enlarge them and strengthen their influence. To do this successfully, we need to understand the nature of oases and the pressures to which they are naturally exposed. Each oasis of good leadership demonstrates certain attributes: yy A continuity of good values, the origin of which can be traced to the values that we received in the family, now constituting a renewable source of goodness; yy A recognition of the fact that responsibility is more important than title or position, both of which are sterile when they are not used to enhance the performance of responsibility; yy High standards of work and conduct in a few areas of business and governance, bringing respectability to our achievements and reliability to our inter-relationships; yy Good discipline applied to a few situations such that those who have to deal with us do so with true respect and confidence; yy A passion for the high productivity of our assets, since we know that failure to make them optimally productive jeopardises their effectiveness in serving the purpose of national development. Question: Do these now constitute a disappearing aspect of our national culture? Are we correct in regarding them as “oases of good leadership performance?” The endangered oases Oases face the common danger of unrelenting pressure from desert encroachment; they are constantly under severe threat from the environment. In the case of good leadership, consider the following threatening trends: yy Our concept of personal success – (relying on wrong criteria, comparing ourselves with one another instead of realistically appraising the results we produce); yy Our preference for patronage over performance – (no need to perform well if you know the right people, even in entry processes for tertiary education); yy Our promotion of politics over governance, generating a disdain for truth and justice – (witness the number of ‘leaders’ who become legally disqualified after some years because they

cheated their way into office, but proceed from court to church to ‘give thanks’) yy Our sacrificing of corporate good on the altar of self-interest – (what is the real remuneration of political office holders, and how accurately does it reflect the decision of the body set up to determine all remuneration in the public service?); yy Our desire for wealth acquired by any means available – (we even create constitutional ways of allowing leaders to acquire and spend money for which they do not have to give account!); yy Our hunger for undue advantage instead of seeking (first and always) ‘the kingdom of God and His righteousness’ (see our distorted implementation of seemingly good policies, e.g. federal character). Every one of these tendencies moves us in the opposite direction from both local and good harmony! Enlarging our oases How do we stem the tide of unwholesome encroachment and extend the influence of the oases? yy Restore family as the most reliable and renewable source of positive values. Actively promote parenting best practice for securing the prospects of creating a society in which a good quality of life will be assured. Consider the fact that only when the water table – source of replenishment – is high enough will the oasis self-replenish. yy Treat leaders as “tenants of time and context” – institute (like Ikoyi Club 1938) fair and credible arrangements for succession and transition. yy Emphasise the fact that leadership is earned in order to carry out some responsibility – diminish the importance of title, status, position by giving pride of place to the right activities – teaching, health delivery, etc, over political positions. yy Adopt selection systems that require people to grow into leadership – create opportunities for people to acquire necessary cognate experience; give leadership training and development; promote only those who utilise fruitfully yy Empower and involve stakeholders – provide opportunities for insisting on true accountability; establish freedom of access to accurate information; encourage civic education in all institutions. yy Renew a culture of faithfulness to the noble societal provisions in our national Constitution. yy Remember that Almighty God is the Supreme Stakeholder in leadership performance, and will demand an accounting in His own time. He cannot be deceived, hoodwinked or lobbied into making an erroneous judgment. The future – our yet available territory of opportunity Going forward, we should test ourselves and our compatriots against the following checklist: yy Are we agreed on what our core values really are? yy What are our reasons for adopting these values? yy How do we ensure that the values are truly shared by every member? yy How do we ensure that they are applied? yy How do we pass on our values to new entrants? yy What happens when our values are violated? yy How do we defend our culture against negative environmental trends?

If these ‘oases of good leadership performance’ exist and show such viability, all we need do is to enlarge them and strengthen their influence.

Anniversary Lecture by the highly revered Dr Kolade, one-time high commissioner of Nigeria to the Court of St James (20022007) and pro-chancellor, Pan-African University.

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TOAS T

Roots of the

feats I

BY CHIEF LANRE LADIPO

n Africa, and indeed the whole world, Integrity Ikoyi Club 1938 is a force to reckon and dignity are key with in the hospitality industry in genconsideral and in the comity of international erations clubs in particular. Since its formation in in 1938, the club has remained progressively member- dynamic. ship ad- The club has become a point of reference and a source mission of pride to its members and associates, and a wonder to those who behold its achievements from outside. All these are attributable to some salient traditions instituted by the founding fathers. These traditions

have become legacies which have stood the test of time and have to be preserved and passed on to our children who in turn will pass them to their successors. We need to constantly remind ourselves as well as our children about the legacies which make the club what it is today. Thus, Ikoyi Club 1938 will wax stronger for as long as the sun exists. Some of these legacies are stated below: Outstanding membership quality

The value and standard of any club is necessarily a reflection of the quality of its membership. This is the main reason why successive General Committees of Ikoyi Club 1938 pay special attention to the quality of people being admitted as members. Integrity and dignity are key considerations in membership admission; to ensure that the aspirants have a clear understanding of the club’s values. For these reasons, rigorous screening procedures are applied to intending members before admission. Responsible leadership

To ensure the club doesn’t ever experience stagnancy or decline, members ensure that people elected to manage its affairs are individuals who have been proven to be reliable and who will continuously maintain the honour, dignity and continuity of the club. Elections of members into the General Committee (officers of the club) are always conducted in a transparent and democratic manner. Elections and the preceding political awareness campaigns have been considered outstanding and a true example of a democratic institution, worthy of emulation at the national level. Recreational facilities

Ikoyi Club 1938, arguably, has the largest number of sporting sections under one roof in Africa, namely, Golf, Tennis, Squash racquet, Badminton, Table Tennis, Billiards/Snooker, Swimming and Other Sports. Each of these sections is big enough to be a standard club on its own and has modern sporting equipment. For example, no golf course in Nigeria compares with that of Ikoyi Club 1938. Each sporting section in this club works toward being the best in Africa. To achieve this, each of the sections has its own chairman, other elected executive members and a management team that run its affairs. Each section benchmarks its operations and activities with those of its equivalent international sporting outfit. In effect, the size of Ikoyi Club 1938 is a great advantage which, when considered on sectional basis, has become synergic. This is a legacy that must be nurtured and preserved. Infrastructure

Ikoyi Club 1938 is located in a country where power supply is erratic and epileptic. Within the club, however, there is a constant supply of electricity and water, for 24 hours per day, seven days a week. In our club, electricity and water supply fluctuation or failure is almost impossible. Members’ admiration of this legacy becomes obvious whenever there is a crucial football match to watch. Although admission into the club is restricted to members and their registered guests, the club is always filled up dur-

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co v er ann i v ersary toast

ing major events such as the European Football Premiership Leagues, Africa Nations’ Cup matches, World Cup competitions and major boxing bouts. Satisfactory Services Delivery

To ensure maximum satisfaction for our members and their guests, service delivery in our club is superb and competes favourably with what obtains in five star hotels in any part of the world. The club has a highly-experienced chef and other well-trained cooks who prepare delicious meals (local and foreign). The meals are always tasty and nourishing. At any time, assorted drinks (non-alcoholic, wine and spirits) are readily available at appropriate temperatures. They are served by trained waiters who fill the orders of members and their guests. Other standard services are efficiently provided within the club. These include ATMs available 24/7, Barbing Salon, Internet Services, Business Centre, Spa (Steam, Sauna, Facial, Massage, Manicure/Pedicure), 24/7 Ambulance Services, Clinic for Staff and Members, Lebanese Continental Cuisine Restaurant, Gyms, Children’s playground etc. Commitment to Standards

Ikoyi Club 1938’s premises is a beautiful environment to behold. Every piece of item on the premises is of high quality and well-maintained. The purchase of a “fairlyused” item is a taboo that must not be heard. In all aspects of operations and for all materials and equipment, there is a commitment to high standard. Competent Workforce

To maintain and constantly improve on the standard of this club, the services of trained employees are always upgraded for different functions within the club. The management team comprises different professionals such as accountants, hospitality managers and lawyers. Club Rules

The club has well-spelt-out rules. There have been improvements to the rules over the years, and all approved rules are expected to be strictly applied and adhered to by members. As it has always been, any member, no matter how influential, who contravenes any of these rules, would face the disciplinary committee and be sanctioned appropriately. This is a value that has made other values functional. Family Club

One of ourgreatest legacies is that of being a family club. From the inception in 1938, emphasis had been placed on ensuring that the club is a place for the entire family. Our children could be swimming at the pool section or at the Other Sports section while father is playing

squash. The whole family can be at the club at the same time recreating, eating, dancing etc. On Sundays, for instance, buffet is served; members come from church services to have their lunch and stay till the rest of the day participating in other activities. Ikoyi Club 1938 is a family club; our children are Junior Members. “The hope of the future,’’ said the Bishop of Orleans, “lies in her children.” The junior members will succeed their parents and will certainly be the adult members of tomorrow. It is therefore imperative that we properly hand over to them the excellence, the standard, the culture and the tradition we inherited from our predecessors. It is only by this that this heritage can be secured. Global Harmony

The club is committed to fostering Peace and Harmony between people of diverse tribes, tongues, colours, cultures and nationalities. Hence, we have as our motto: “Global Harmony Through Recreation.’’ While in the club, all members are equal. Every member is seen as an essential member of a larger family whose rights and welfare must be protected. Ask any member,‘’Why did you join Ikoyi Club 1938?’ s/ he would tell you, “for recreation and a place to bring the family for relaxation.” Ikoyi Club 1938 is not a political arena; it is a socially responsible club of people committed to harmonious recreation. As we mark our 73rd Anniversary this year, we want the next generation of our members to know that they belong to a Club that is deeply rooted in culture, standards, excellence and prosperity. This is our heritage and we must preserve it and pass it on to our children.

From the inception in 1938, emphasis had been placed on ensuring that the club is a place for the entire family.

Chief Ladipo is a past chairman of Ikoyi Club 1938. harmony

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co v er ann i v ersary ce l e b rat i ons i n p i ct u res

n o i t a r b e l e C y r Anniversa in photos

guests enjoy the celebrations

Adeniyi sowemimo, bar adviser presenting a gift to a winner during the celebrations

guests serve themselves

scenes from a cultural performance

sowemimo poses with another member

young guests clicking away during a performance harmony

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chairman snooker & billiards section frank irabor present s a gift

bar advisor sowemimo presenting an award to godwill iyamu, badminton treasurer

club chairman richard giwaosagie

a musician performs

former chairman, akinbayo adenubi presenting a prize

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dance, dance, dance

raffle draw

9ice sings to a young member of audience


co v er ann i v ersary ce l e b rat i ons i n p i ct u res

going for ice cream

roller skaters perform for the kids

a juggler performs for the kids

kids queue for gifts

the kids party hard

a boy collects his gift

pulling a pinata

a family at the children’s party harmony

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dancing time

mr brume sings with a musician...

...and dances with another

member at the celebrations

Premises Adviser Engr Sunmade Agbe-Davies with other sports section chairman Ify Onukwuba

from right: bar advisor sowemimo, chairman giwaosagie, musician 9ice, and vice chairman akinleye

lawn tennis chairman wale opejin (right), presents an award to a member

catering adviser Olabimpe Esho presents an award to dr christopher kolade, while club chairman giwa-osagie watches

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dr J. e. ighologba

vice chairman babatunde akinleye

a family poses with a mannequin in traditional dress

entertainment officer, golf section akin semowo

members sitting at the anniversary lecture


member? Want to be a

Ikoyi Club 1938 is a premier family club of highest standards in Nigeria with eight sporting sections in one location. Home to all nationalities, its motto is ‘Global Harmony Through Recreation’ and it strives to retain the elitist status of the founding fathers with members who must be on top of their professions. How to join

Step 1 An intending member must first obtain and complete the White Form at a cost of N7,000 through a financial Ordinary Member, whose membership must not be less than two years, or a Life Member as a condition for being considered as a person who can join Ikoyi Club 1938. Step 2 The intending member will complete the White Form and obtain sectional Chairmen’s signatures on it; before submitting the form to the Subscription Manager. Step 3 At this stage, the Membership Sub-Committee will screen the candidate through an interview with the proposer in attendance. At the interview, the sub-committee is at liberty to call for relevant documents, such as marriage certificate, evidence of professional and educational qualifications, audited accounts/reports etc, after which the successful candidate will be issued the Green Card at the rate of N10,000. Step 4 The successful candidate will complete the Green Card which shall be sponsored and seconded by two Ordinary Members who are: yy Paid-up yy Of not less than two years standing. yy Are personally acquainted to the candidate for five years or more. Step 5 The Green Card will be forwarded to the Subscription Officer for preparation of the bill. Step 6 The candidate makes payment

to the club and is issuedis made to the club and the candidate is given a temporary membership card which is to be surrendered on the day of induction. The Green Card is valid for three months from the day of issuance. CATEGORIES OF MEMBERSHIP

Membership in Ikoyi Club 1938 comprises the underlisted categories: ORDINARY MEMBERS

This category of members comprises persons over 25 years of age and they must go through Ikoyi Club 1938 Membership joining process according to the Rules. SPOUSE AND LADY MEMBERS

This category is made up of persons over 21 years of age, having fulfilled all conditions in Rule 2.2 of Ikoyi Club 1938. Members under this category have no say in the management of the club, except having gone through a process of election as provided for in Rule 3(g) of Ikoyi Club 1938. LIFE MEMBERS

A member who has been elected an Ordinary Member of Ikoyi Club 1938, on attaining the age of 65 years and having been a paid-up member for 25 years without break, with his spouse and children who are junior members, shall be entitled to a Life membership. Such a member shall be exempted from paying subscriptions or other fees in respect of the use of the club facilities and shall be entitled to all membership privileges. HONORARY MEMBERS

Members under this category have the honour conferred on them at the discretion of the General Committee who will propose such a person for election as Honorary Member. Such persons must have rendered an exceptional service to the club or the country, and will have their names displayed on the Club Notice Board for seven days prior to the consideration of such a proposal by members at the February General Meeting of the Club. JUNIOR MEMBERS

A Junior Member is a child, aged 12 to 25 years, whose parents are Life, Honorary, Ordinary or Spouse/Lady Members of the Club. A Junior Member, on attainment of 25 years of age, who wishes to continue as an Ordinary Member shall be granted 50% rebate on the entrance fee, provided such Junior Member satisfies conditions stipulated in Rule 2.5(i), (ii), (iii) and (iv) of Ikoyi Club 1938. BENEFITS OF A LIFE MEMBER

Benefits of a Life Member are as prescribed in the Club’s Rule. These include exemption from payment of membership subscription bills, and some other statutory fees or levies, as may be approved from time to time by the General Committee through the February Annual General Meeting. Such exemption covers children who are Junior Members, as well as the Spouse of such a Life Member.

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j o k es

HAHAHA! I was in the restaurant yesterday when I suddenly realised I desperately needed to pass gas. The music was really, really loud, so I timed my gas with the beat of the music. After a couple of songs, I started to feel better. I finished my coffee, and noticed that everybody was staring at me.... Then I suddenly remembered that I was listening to my iPod.

• A divorce court judge said to the husband, “Mr Geraghty, I have reviewed this case very carefully and I’ve decided to give your wife $800 a week.” “That’s very fair, your honour,” he replied. “And every now and then I’ll try to send her a few bucks myself.”

• A woman and her little girl were visiting the grave of the little girl’s grandmother. On their way through the cemetery back to the car, the little girl asked, “Mommy, do they ever bury two people in the same grave?” “Of course not, dear.” replied the mother, “Why would you think that?” “The tombstone back there said ‘Here lays a lawyer and an honest man.’”

• When NASA first started sending up astronauts, they quickly discovered that ballpoint pens would not work in zero gravity. To combat the problem, NASA scientists spent a decade and $12 billion to develop a pen that writes in zero gravity, upside down, underwater, on almost any surface including glass and at temperatures ranging from below freezing to 300 C. The Russians simply used a pencil.

• SOUR TASTE

E get this particular restaurant wey I dey chop for Victoria Island,

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e get one oyinbo wey dey always com chop there too. Any time dis oyinbo chop finish he go shout “HEY”, so I wonder wetin dey make am shout, I decide to chop wetin the oyinbo dey always chop so dat I go shout too. When I reach the restaurant last week Friday, I order wetin the man dey chop. They tell me say na chicken and red wine, so I chop am, but I no shout, I collect extra plate, but still I no still shout. Na then I just vex ask for my bill. The waiter tell me say one plate of chicken na N35,000 & red wine na N25,000 then the extra plate na N20,000 na then I shout heyyyyyyyyyy! heyyyyyyyyyyyy!! heyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy!!!

• DON’T COPY IF YOU CANT PASTE

A motivational speaker was entertaining his audience. He Said: “The best years of my life were spent in the arms of a woman who wasn’t my wife!” The audience was in silence and shock. The speaker added:”And that woman was my mother!” ...Laughter and applause… A week later, a top manager trained by the motivational speaker tried to crack this very effective joke at home. He was a bit foggy after a drink. He said loudly to his wife who was preparing dinner, “The greatest years of my life were spent in the arms of a woman who was not my wife!” The wife went; “ah!” with shock and rage. Standing there for 20 seconds trying to recall the second half of the joke, the manager finally blurted out “...and I can’t remember who she was!” By the time the manager regained his consciousness, he was in d hospital bed nursing burns from hot water. Moral of the story, don’t copy if u cannot paste.


essay

A priceless state called

Harmony

I

By Adidi Uyo

f there is one thing that causes grave harm to society or any of its four basic entities, it is the lack of harmony. To be sure, the four basic entities of society are individuals, groups, organisations, and institutions. Like society, any of its vital quartet has various elements or parts. And, like society, none can function properly or prosper if its elements or parts are not in a state of harmony. That assertion can be readily demonstrated by using the lowest member of the social quartet, the individual. Just take yourself as an example. In our body, certain elements or parts – whether concrete or abstract - must FIT together for us to do anything. When these parts do not FIT, that is, do not MATCH, you cannot do anything. So, if your mind, your eyes, your interest, and your hand were not working together, you would not be reading this article right now. The Greek have a word which means, “to fit together, to join.” It is the verb, harmazo, from which comes the noun, harmonia, meaning “joint, agreement, concord.” In essence, harmony is a state of agreement. From the smallest unit of society to the largest, and beyond society to the world, harmony is a sine qua non. The opposite of harmony is, of course, disharmony, whose synonyms, to cite the Concise Oxford Thesaurus, include: discord, friction, strife, conflict, hostility, acrimony, bad blood, bad feeling, enmity, dissension, disagreement, feuding, quarrelling, disunity, division, and divisiveness. Whenever parts of any single unit, or any two or more units, do not exist in the state called harmony, the result is trouble, ranging from squabbles to war. Manifestations of disharmony, cynics might gloat, are the stuff of the news and, even, the entertainment media. Harmony does not sell, seemingly. Just take a look at any day’s newspapers or newscasts, or discern the plot of your favourite drama on any of the electronic media – film, radio, and television - and tell me whether it is based on harmony or disharmony. At national and international levels, whenever you read or hear names like Boko Haram, MEND, MASSOB, Hamas, and Al Qaeda, you can be sure that harmony is amiss, and disharmony is on a roll. Whenever General Ibrahim Babangida is at loggerheads with General Olusegun Obasanjo, it makes front-page news, and newspapers sell, as they say, like hot cakes. Come to think of it, what would life be like if it were a tale of only harmony? When marriages of the high and mighty are sailing in the state of harmony, society does not seem to bother. But when disharmony sets in, society

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becomes interested and excited. When concord reigns among members of families of the high and mighty, their state makes no news. But when bad blood starts to flow between or among their members, it makes front page news, not only in celebrity media, but also in mainstream media. The prevalence of messages that dwell on discord, strife, conflict, and their ilk in the mass media makes it look as if disharmony is the rule in society. But, actually, the opposite is the case. Harmony may not be the toast of the media, or even the toast of society, for that matter, but harmony is the glue that holds society, as well as any of its basic units, together. Unfortunately, like order in the universe, harmony is one thing that we do not appreciate until it is absent. How many of us give any thought to, much less, appreciate, order in the universe. If you do think about it, I hardly do. For you to get the import of that point, let us illustrate and underscore it. One major example of order in the universe is sunrise and sunset. Can you imagine what would happen if the sun shone for 24 hours, refusing to set to bring forth night? If that were to happen, you can only guess the amount of attention it would get from the media – the same media that never report anything about sunrise and sunset. What is true of order in nature is equally true of harmony in society, or any member of the social quartet: we do not think about, much less, appreciate it, until it is absent. Because of the vital value of harmony, however, mankind, from time immemorial, has always endeavoured to devise mechanisms and set up institutions to ensure, establish, maintain, or promote harmony. Examples abound, but let’s consider just one. Some States in Nigeria may disagree over the payment of the minimum wage to their workers, and may actually go ahead to implement it. But if some states in Nigeria decide to drive on the left, and others on the right, that would leave the country in a state of disharmony, the reason, perhaps, nobody would contemplate doing a thing like that. The law that ensures that all parts in a country, and even some sub-regions, drive on the same side of the road is but one mechanism for ensuring harmony within given societies. Harmony is agreement; it is concord; it is different parts combining orderly as a whole. Consider the order of the rainbow, despite its different colours! The Bible underscores the precious state of harmony in Amos 3:3, with this telling question: “Can two work together, except they are agreed?”

Uyo, PhD, retired from the University of Lagos, and is now a teacher at the University of Swaziland.


sect i on re p orts

SECTION REPORTS

what the sections are doing

Results from the 73rd Anniversary Tournaments GOLF even prizes. Two categories. That is the highlight of the Golf Section’s 73rd Club Anniversary Sectional Tournament. In the Men’s Category, the Net Prizes winners were: Heroian T. – 72 Net (Winner/Trophy); Odedina T. – 73 Net (Runner-Up/Silver Medal); Akinsanya A. S. – 74 Net C/B (Third Place/Bronze Medal); Walsh M. – 74 Net C/B (Fourth Place/Bronze Medal) and Erard – 74 Net (Fifth Place/Bronze Medal). Ayonmike T. was the trophy winner of the Gross Prizes with 81 Gross C/B while Wessling G. was the runner-up/silver medalist with a score of 81 Gross C/B. The trophy went to N’jie Y. in Veteran Prizes, with 75 Net and the silver medal went to Azinge with 78 Net. Macaualy M. won the trophy in the Longest Drive, Hole 18, while Panella C. won the silver medal in Nearest to the Pin, Hole 12. In the Ladies Category, Mrs Y. Aruwajoye got the trophy in the Net Prizes with 73 Net C/B. The silver medal went to Mrs G. Joel, with 73 Net C/B and the bronze to Mrs C. Olateju, with 74 Net. Mrs P. Pinotsis was the trophy winner in Gross Prizes, while Mrs L. Walker won the trophy in Longest Drive, Hole 14. Mrs Pinotsis also went away with the silver medal in Nearest to the Pin, Hole 4.

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SWIMMING en’s, Ladies’, Boys’ and Girls’ were the categories under which the contests were won and lost. In Men’s, there were competitions in Breast Stroke - for 40 years & under - won by Ayo Grillo (Gold) and Lee Kangho (Silver); 50 years & above – won by Erhenede Freeborn (Gold) and Obiora Dibinezne (Silver); and 40 years & above – won by Ojo Dapo (Gold). Ojo Dapo also won the Free Styles (40 years & under). In Free Style 40 years & above, the winners were Erhenede Freeborn (Gold) and Ayo Grillo (Silver). In Ladies,’ Yewande Sadiku won two gold medals for Breast Stroke (40 years & under) and Free Styles (40 years & under) while Makhija Priya was runner-up in both events with silver medals to her credit. The boys contested for Breast Stroke (10-11 years), won by Akpofure Erhenede (Gold), Afolabi Olumide (Silver) and Ezra Lee (Bronze). The sole medal (Gold) in Breast Stroke (9-10 years) went to Deji Roberts Tishe. He also was the sole winner (Gold) in Free Styles (9 years & under). The winners in Free Styles (13 years & above) are Lee Livingstone (Gold), Neiles Makhija (Silver) and Abimbola Kiiti (Bronze). The winners in Free Styles (10-11 years) are Akpofure Erhenede (Gold), Ezra Lee (Silver) and Afolabi Olumide (Bronze). In the Girls’ Category, Breast Stroke (9-10 years), Sophia Ekundayo won

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the gold medal, Esther Lee (Silver) and Afolabi Ajayi Mosope (Bronze). Ekundayo also won gold in Free Style (9-10 years) while Lee also picked up the silver medal as Ojo Eniola placed third to win bronze. The overall winners, with a trophy each to the bargain, were Erhenede Freeborn - yes the Section Chairman - as Best Male Swimmer; Yewande Sadiku, Best Lady/ Swimmer; Akpofure Erhenede, Best Boy Swimmer and Sophia Ekundayo, Best Girl Swimmer. BADMINTON en’s Singles. Veteran Singles (50 years & above). Group ‘B’ Double. Group ‘A’ Double. Veteran Doubles (50 years & above. Mixed Doubles. Ladies’ Singles. Boys’ Singles. Girls’ Singles. Those were the events which produced winners and losers. Here are the winners: Francis Orbih (trophy), Lawal Bello (silver) and Rakesh Yadav (joint third/2 bronze) – Men’s Singles. Michael David (trophy), Goodwill Iyamu (silver) and Sola Erinle (joint third/2 bronze) – Veteran Singles (50 Years & above). Rotola Williams/Goodwill Iyamu (trophies), John Duru/Chikwendu Ogbonna (silver medals) and Kishor Vaswani/Ashok Yadau – Group ‘B’ Doubles. Francis Orbih/Michael David (trophies), Lawal

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LAWN TENNIS here were six contests in the Men’s category – Men’s Singles, Veteran Singles (50-59 Years), Super Veteran Singles (60 Years & Above), Men’s Doubles, Men’s Veteran Doubles and Mixed Doubles - while the Ladies had only one – Ladies’ Singles. The results are as follows: Men’s Singles: Winner (Trophy)- Bimbo Okubena; Runner-Up (Silver Medal) -Tochukwu Aghadinonu and Semi-Finalists (2 bronze medals) – Ede Osewengie and Manga Enwezoh. Veteran Singles: Winner (Trophy) – Sylvester Obika; Runner-Up (Silver Medal) – Obidi Ezenwa and Semi-Finalist (2 Bronze Medals) – Akin Adesokan and Olaleye Olowe. Super Veteran Singles: Winner (Trophy) – Sabir Sharif; Runner-Up (Silver Medal) – Abdulsalam Umar and Semi-Finalists (2 Bronze Medals) – Smart Anene and Bob Nwachukwu. Men’s Doubles: Winners (2 Trophies) – B. Okubena/Nandal; Runner-Up (2 Silver Medals) – F. Fanoiki/Nwokocha and Semi-Finalist (4 Bronze Medals) – M. Enwezoh/Akpaso and W. Opejin/ Ajayi. Men’s Veteran Doubles: Winners (2 Trophies) – O. Ezenwa/S. Obika; Runners-Up (2 Silver Medals) – A. Umar/Nwoye and Semi-Finalists (4 Bronze Medals) – S. Sarif/Nwachukwu and A Adesokan/Olowe Mixed Doubles: Winner (2 Trophies) – B. Okubena/S. Momoh and Runners-Up (2 Silver Medals) – W. Opejin/ C. Falase. Ladies Singles: Winner (Trophy) Clara Falase and Runner-Up (Silver Medal) – Sharon Momoh.

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Bello/Vitus Akudinobi (silver medals) and Adhi Narto/Daven Mojani (bronze medals) – Group ‘A’ Doubles. Sola Erinle/Goodwill Iyamu (trophies), Kishor Vaswani/Ashok Yadav (silver medals) and Ben Aber/ Sharma Prakash (bronze medals) – Veteran Doubles (50 Years & above). Ramaa Shankar/Francis Orbih (trophies), Rotola Williams/Lawal Bello (silver medals) and Bonny Orizu/Priya Makhija (bronze medals). – Mixed Doubles. Ramaa Shanka (trophy), Rotola Williams (silver) and Debola Falade (bronze) – Ladies’ Singles. Vivik Genash (trophy), Nelish Makhija (silver) and Nasad Chugani – Boys’ Singles. Ehuibema Iyamu (trophy), Trixy Agiaye (silver) and Sahaita Chugani (bronze) – Girls’ Singles.


sect i on re p orts 7 3 r d ann i v ersary to u rnaments

BILLIARDS, SNOOKER & POOL SECTION n Pool, Victor Olabode Munis won the trophy while Jacqueline Ozieh was runner-up, winning the silver medal. Tunde Fashakin came third and took away the bronze. In Billiards, Chuka Okeke won the trophy, Bimbo Okubena, in second place for the silver medal and Victor Okobi took home the bronze. In Snooker Single, the trophy winner was Shola Akerele, while Shina Oduyemi was the runner-up and recipient of the silver medal. In Snooker Doubles, the trophies went to Akin Kongi and Chuks Oyeka, the two silver medals to Victor Okobi and Shina Oduyemi and the two bronze medals to Kischo Vaswani and Biodun Akerele.

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OTHER SPORTS xpectedly, this section had the most events and the largest haul of trophies and medals in the 73rd Anniversary tournaments. The events contested were: Ayo, Scrabble, Draught, Chess, Aerobics, Bridge, Taekwando and Judo. Notably, Dr (Mrs) Yinka Phillips won in three of the events. In Ayo, she was the trophy winner, and she won silver each in Scrabble and Draught. Other winners in Ayo were Adesola Obafunmilola (silver) and Olatunde Balogun (bronze). Biodun Olaleru won silver in Scrabble, while Mrs Eunice Mbojikwe came third to take away the bronze medal. In Draught, Kayode Phillips was the trophy winner. The trophy in Chess went to Theophilus Criafas; the runner-up was Owolabi Oduguwa and the bronze went to Godson Odita. Mrs Mercy Brown was the trophy winner in Aerobics. Adesola Obafunmilola was the silver medalist, while Section Chairman, Mrs Ify Onukwuba, took the bronze medal. The following were the winners in Bridge: Deepak Mahtani/Lanchan Dani (trophies), Manu Thadani and Sabre Sharif (silver medals), Fad Basbous/Praveen Meduri (third place/ bronze medals) and Kanwai Dhody/Jean Luc (fourth place/bronze medals). The results in Taekwando are as follows: Middleweight: Stephanic Okoli (gold), Suleiman Isaiah (silver) and Sophia Ekundayo & Ved Chandwani (joint third/bronze medals) Lightweight: Obinna Ebubechukwu (gold), Monu Gerunde Ngozi (silver) and Egbo Mary Precious & Victor Philips (joint third/bronze medals). Welter weight: Ikechukwu Maduike (gold), Bong-Anne Moukoh (silver) and Agozie Nwogbo & Femi Fadare (joint third/bronze medals). Heavyweight: Ikennereri Jefferson (gold), Ehizogie Eugene (silver) and Ese Obohor & Ikennereri Emmanuel (joint third/bronze medals). Tinweight: John Igo Justin (gold), Emmanuela Effiok (silver) and Leroy Musa & Elizabeth Ogboji (joint third/bronze medals).

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Bantamweight: Oroma Denzel (gold), Deji Fafunwa (silver) and Remen Eugene, Gabriel Otuposo & Mutanda Effiong (joint third/bronze medals). Flyweight: Joseph Jolomi (gold), Shina Afolabi (silver) and Imran Ismail & Banjomo Ezekiel (joint third/bronze medals). Feather weight: Maduike Kenechukwu (gold), Obinna Chinedum (silver) and Ezigbo Nathan & Keziah Aye (joint third/bronze medals). Welter weight –Division Two: Vincent Okodu (gold), Jegede Tomiwa (silver) and Isichei Osecok & Joshua Jolomi (joint third/bronze medals). Lightweight –Division Two: Seth Aye (gold), Dayo Ogboji (silver) and Tayo Fafunwa & Kapil Chandwani (joint third/bronze medals). The results in Judo are as follows: yy Featherweight - Male: Babatunde Balogun (gold), Naman Bhavwani (silver) and Asque Bronze (bronze). yy Featherweight – Female: Elizabeth Nwogu (gold), Mary Jonathan (silver) and Mater Uthamachandan (bronze). yy Bantamweight - Male: Muazu Hassan (winner), Modebe Chukwunonso (silver) and Nathaniel Oputa (bronze). yy Bantamweight – Female: Elizabeth Edward (gold), Victoria Obi (silver) and Ananu Uthamachandan (bronze) yy Lightweight – Male: Awogu Onyia (gold), Dominic Nwogu (silver) Popoola Tofarati (bronze). yy Welterweight – Male: Ezeilo Oke (gold), Babafemi Babalola (silver), Jonathan Nwogu (bronze) yy Middleweight – Male: Malik Mohammed (gold), Babalola Balogun (silver) and Odelana Obalola (bronze). yy Flyweight – Male: Osubele Oghenetaga (gold), Ajayi Tomisin (silver) and Charles Obi (bronze). yy Flyweight – Female: Chioma Joshua (gold), Blessing Okoro (silver) and Mary David (bronze) yy Heavyweight - Male: Moyo Adewole (gold), Sola Idowu (silver) and Obirianara Charles (bronze).

BILLIARDS, SNOOKER & POOL SECTION n Pool, Victor Olabode Munis won the trophy while Jacqueline Ozieh was runner-up, winning the silver medal. Tunde Fashakin came third and took away the bronze. In Billiards, Chuka Okeke won the trophy, Bimbo Okubena, in second place for the silver medal and Victor Okobi took home the bronze. In Snooker Single, the trophy winner was Shola Akerele, while Shina Oduyemi was the runnerup and recipient of the silver medal. In Snooker Doubles, the trophies went to Akin Kongi and Chuks Oyeka, the two silver medals to Victor Okobi and Shina Oduyemi and the two bronze medals to Kischo Vaswani and Biodun Akerele.

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TABLE TENNIS he following were the categories in contention: Men’s Singles Divisions I & II, Men’s Doubles, Veteran Singles – 50 years & above, Super Veteran Singles – 60 years & Above and Ladies’ Singles. And the winners: Men’s Single Division I – Dr V. Dacosta (Trophy), Femi George (Silver) and A. A. Owolabi/ Gbolahan Okuneye. Men’s Singles Division II – Kong Hoo Lee (Trophy), Taiwo Obileye (Silver) and Seyi Adesanya/ Wole Ikotun (2 Bronze). Men’s Doubles – F. George/S. Adnan (2 Trophies), O. Soetan/G. Okuneye (2 Silver) and L. Atabansi/T. Shobande (Joint Third/4 Bronze). Veteran Singles – 50 years & above : V. Dacosta (Trophy), G. Okuneye (Silver) and A. A. Owolabi/F. Ola-Azeez (Joint Third/2 Bronze). Super Veteran Singles – 60 years & Above: L Dada-Bashua (Trophy), Taiwo Obileye (Silver) and Femi Oduntan/B K Abayomi (Joint Third/ 2 Bronze). Ladies Singles – Mrs Doyin Rahman (Trophy), Mrs Anna Lee (Silver) and Mrs Tolu Onakoya/Dr (Mrs) Y. Philip (Joint Third/2 Bronze).

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SQUASH he winners are: Men’s Group B – Sope Roberts (Trophy); Olumide Sojirin (Silver) and D. Ofili/ Will Anyaegbunam (Joint Third/Bronze). Men’s Group C – K. Bakare (Trophy); Abdul Umar (Silver) and Akinola Ojo/T. M. David (Joint Third/Bronze) Veteran Group – Okey Nnaobi (Trophy) and Seyi Wright (Silver). Ladies – Wunmi Ogunbiyi (Trophy) and M. A. Ladipo (Silver)

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sect i on re p orts

BADMINTON

Indomie...for young and old

I Children learning to serve...at the clinic

THANK YOU, SIRS: Section Chairman, Reginald Udeagbala presents a plaque to indomie Brand Manager, Mr Kathik

MISS OSAMUIDAME IYAMU SAYS THANK YOU, INDOMIE

n continuation of its support for nurturing young badminton players in Ikoyi Club 1938, Dufil Prima Foods, makers of Indomie noodles, held its yearly Badminton Children Summer Clinic for two weeks, ending on Friday, 2 September. The clinic, for children aged 2-15 (broken into beginners 2-5, intermediate 6-10 and senior kids 11-15 yrs), teaches basic skills and knowledge of the game. Dufil Prima Foods provided playing T-shirts, lunch/ drinks, lots of Indomie noddles and mouthwatering prizes for the children and parents. Playing rackets were given to outstanding families whose children attended the coaching clinic regularly. The

company also paid the officials' allowances. ...and soon after the clinic, precisely, on 8 September, Dufil Prima was back in the club, this time, to support senior players in the first-ever Indomie Badminton Tournament. The finals came up on 18 September. Listen to this: the tournament will now be a yearly affair. Hurrah! This one featured Men's Singles, Group A Doubles & Group B Doubles events. Dufil Prima threw in the tournament t-shirts and the prizes. It also served its latest product - the Indomie Box noddles - to all players and guests. Just as at the conclusion of the clinic, Mr. ADhil Nato represented Dufil Prima's managing director, while Mr Kathik, the Indomie Box Noddles brand manager, was also on hand to dole out the prizes and goodies.

Section Chairman's wife, Mrs christina Udeagbala, presenting racket and indomie noddles/gifts to a family which actively participated at the clinic

Mr Kathik and Mr Udeagbala pose with a participating family...at the clinic

L-R: Frank Obih, Dven Mojani, Michael David, Goodwill Iyamu (Badminton Section Treasurer), Lady Member Ramah, Rotola Williams (Lady Captain) and John Duru

Mr Kathik, flanked by Club Chairman Richard Giwa-Osagie (left) and Mr Udeagbala

Club Vice-Chairman Tunde Akinleye (right) presents prizes to Group A Doubles' winners, Francis Orbih and partner Pastor Mike david

L-R: Group B Doubles winners Mr. Goodwill Iyamu and Miss Rotola Williams and the runners-up Maxwell Offor and Henry emenike

Mrs tayo Orbih presents prizes to some Group B Doubles' players

The 1st, 2nd & 3rd Group A winners with their trophies with the Section's present and past chairmen and Indomie's manager

Club Chairman Riichard Giwa-Osagie presents trophy to a Group A player

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sect i on re p orts w hat the sect i ons are d o i n g

table tennis

Hemingway’s Safari Africa Table Tennis Tourney

H

emingways Safari Africa Table Tennis Tournament kicked off on Monday 19September, 2011 with 64 participants in the only available category of Men's Single event. The grand finale day of the tournament, Friday, 23 September, 2011, was graced by the Club Chairman, Mr Richard Giwa-Osagie, the Hon. Treasurer, Mr Olusola Adeosun and some General Committee members. From Hemingways Safari Africa (sponsors) came Mr Billy, a company executive; Mr Ebenezer Fashola, media consultant) and Miss Aisha (PA to Mr Fashola). Mr Robert Templeton (Hemingways Marketing Director Hemingways) sent his apology.Mr Femi George beat Mr Oluseye Oki in the finals and he went home with the star prize - a Samsung Galaxy tablet plus a trophy while Mr Oluseye Oki,- the runner up went home with a Sony Hand Camcorder plus a trophy. The joint third winners, Mr Shiek Adnan and Mr Adeyinka Adeyemi, went home with a Blackberry plus trophy each. There were two tickets for all losers in the tournament to compete for by a raffle draw. At the end, Messrs Muyiwa Kayode and Tayo Oshuntogun won two-night stay including breakfast at 4points Sheraton and Le Meridien Ibom respectively. After the presentation of prizes won, social activity commenced with a DJ in attendance while members of the section and well wishers wined, dined and danced till the early hours of Saturday, 24 September, 2011, courtesy Hemingways Safari Africa.Indeed, it was a memorable event.

July Birthday

Cutting the July

Barrister Seye Oki, secretary, Table Tennis Section, in a supremacy battle with Femi George

Barr Seyi Oki slugging it out with Sheikh Adnan

Hemingsway chieftain discussing with Table Tennis Section Chairman, Mr Anthony Owolabi

Applauding...club Secretary Otunba Abiodun Olufowobi with club chairman richard giwa-osagie

Table Tennis Captain Lloyd Atabansi, and Femi George

birthday cake

of the section J O Immediate past chairman Alli and others.... Ojo (left), Mr Oluwole

, Richard Giwal-r Sunbo Ibiyemi a guest and wife his , Osagie Chairman of Section Owolabi and wife , Mr Anthony Members relaxing birthday bash

during the

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sect i on re p orts w hat the sect i ons are d o i n g

swimming

Mandilas' cool evening

T

he Section felt, er, cooler on 10 November. That's what you get when the occasion is “An Evening with Mandilas Group.� Lots to eat and drink. It was fun galore. The Mandilas folk used the event to show off their Carrier air-conditioner and thank their customers in the Club. The event was graced by the Who's Who in the club. Guess what? The Mandilas Group GM/ Director, Mr David Edwards, pledged that there will be an encore. That's cool. Mandilas Angels: Ms Binta Osamor, Mrs Bola Olaibi, Ms Blessing Adaka, Mrs Shade Salvador, Ms Linda Okonji, Mrs Rose Osude and Ms Esther Adewole

Engr Pal Singh (3rd right), Head of Aircond. Service Division); Mrs Shade Salvador, Credit Control Supervisor (2nd left, among others

Mandilas Group General Manager/ Director Mr David Edwards

Mr Gregory Ezeokafor (Group Financial Controller/Company Secrtary/Director)

Engr Pal Singh with Swimming Section Secretary, Ajibade Fashina

Mandilas GGM/D, David Edwards; Chairman, Swimming Section, Freeborn Erhenede; and Gary Grix (Carrier Product Specialist)

mr ezeokafor flanked by Chairman, Other Sports Section, Ify Onukwuba (right) and a guest

Paul Okome, Head of Personnel, Mandilas Group/Coordinator of Events) with Mr Ezeokafor

Mr Stephen Gladwin, General Manager, Mandilas Motors) in white t-shirt, behind some guests

Mr David Edwards, GGM/Director with prince akinsemoyin

Mr Erhenede chats with ifeanyi Onwukuba, and Club Member, Endy Nwana

Club members having a good time....

...and Mandilas staff and others too....

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F eat u re

Regional harmony through

golf By Abiodun Olufowobi

H

istory was re-enacted yet again from 26-27 November 2011 when two age-old rivals rekindled their rivalry in an atmosphere of a friendly golf tournament. The Ikoyi Club 1938 Golf team engaged the Achimota Golf Club (founded in 1934) in a transnational match play. The twoday tournament was preceded with a cocktail organised by the Ghanaian Team Sponsor (www.labeachtowers.com) The tournament proper kicked off at the Achimota Golf Course situated in a pleasant wooded country, some 10 kilometres north of Accra (same precinct with the famous Achimota School) and the buzz of camaraderie and sense of competition in the air could be sliced with a knife – it was simply the Utopian state envisaged by the founding fathers of these two African nations. The Ikoyi Club 1938 was led by Golf Captain, Frank Gboneme and the Achimota team by its Captain, Rene Gamau-Kwame. At the end of each match day, the visiting team was hosted to a sumptuous lunch parading Continental and Gha-

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F eat u re re g i ona l harmony thro u g h g o l f

naian traditional foods. At the end of the two- day tournament, the Ikoyi Club 1938 graciously conceded victory to the Achimota side on the aggregate in the spirit of the friendly tournament. The tournament was rounded off with the presentation ceremony on 27 November at the Achimota Club house with both sides exchanging gifts amid palpable courtesies. It must be reported that some copies of the Ikoyi Club 1938 Harmony were part of the gifts presented to the Achimota Club and the gesture was expressly appreciated; even though the Achimota Club’s Tournament Secretary conceded that the club had never published a magazine. Otunba Abiodun Olufowobi was in Accra.

participants' views • Frank Gboneme - Ikoyi Club 1938 Golf Captain: “I should respond to Achimota’s claim to being older: lets us bear in mind the historical fact that the Lagos Golf Club was actually founded in 1924 and was only amalgamated with the European Club in 1938 to form the Ikoyi Club 1938.”.

• M. Damulak – Past Golf Captain Ikoyi Club 1938: “Very well-organised tournament with a good turnout from the Ikoyi Club Golf section. Hospitality was also very good and a good networking platform was provided. No winner – no vanquished, all in the spirit of African brotherhood.”

• Arc. Chief Oghenovo Charles Majoroh – Honorary Member/ Past Golf Captain Ikoyi Club 1938 “An annual ceremony that has grown by leaps and bounds. A tradition that should be continued as a medium for friendship, exchange and fun. Nice place to be in November.”

• Adelaide Owusu- Adjapong (an amazing lady golfer who played straight from the bunker into the cup in holes 1 & 5 during the tournament and whose prowess retired the match play of an Ikoyi Club 1938 past Captain) “Golfers from Ikoyi Club were very friendly but were also very aggressive. Next time they should come better prepared. Wish you luck. Thanks”

• Otunba Olufemi Olufowobi – an avid golfer, member, Ikoyi Club 1938 Great Golf Course – good tournament. Was a lot better than the last time. I am sure with this standard, Ikoyi Club 1938 will win next time.

Kudos to the Captain of Achimota – he has shown tremendous leadership and the excellent service delivery edge. Long live Ikoyi and Achimota brotherhood.”

• Mohammed Oyibo – member , Ikoyi Club 1938 “Interesting tournament. Well-behaved and cordial relationship and opportunities for building bridges of friendship and brotherhood between two African brothers.”

• David Hampton – member of Achimota Golf Club, although he claimed to have also joined Ikoyi Club 30 years ago when he was with Mandilas Nigeria. “It is a most enjoyable weekend. Very pleased to renew old acquaintances from Ikoyi Club.”

• Michael Ikpoki MD MTN Ghana (Member AGC but also a member of Ikoyi Club 1938) “Well-organised event, great bonding for the golf communities in Ghana and Nigeria.”

• Bode Augusto

unds o B f o ut (OB) O the going rate in Gohuat-

b is y, what king me a • Ol' bo ought he was as na? (I th d he (I guesse e) ? t a g r in x h e t r fo that you get Dunlop tyre?) , g e b A day) • t ing abou ory for another k s a s a w ) St fine oo ( relation to food? r m a d a M o (Ba N • Search a Okro ( e n t a a r c im c • A e Ult cting th u d n o C • se?) man plea

– Member, Ikoyi Club 1938 Has been a good weekend in Accra. Golf good, atmosphere relaxing and spirit of friendship in the air.”

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h u mo u r

FACTS VSOF LIFE

THRILLS & FRUSTRATIONS

GOLF OF

- For Golfers & NonGolfers alike BY AKINBAYO A ADENUBI

1. Golfers & Cell Phones

he was in a bad mood and played badly - so we nicknamed him “tiger Mood” 4. A Nasty Caddy & the Fumbling Golfer

Perhaps no need to ban cell phones on the golf course. Perhaps no need for golfers to ensure “internal discipline among group members “by awarding stroke penalties -for phone calls made on the golf course.” Phone calls are self-destructive and great distractions most times. Recently a golfer on the 7th hole in Ikeja Golf course, about to tee off, received what obviously was a most annoying call. Instant Justice: Played three balls - OB - (Out -of bounds) and finished with 11 strokes on a par 4 hole.

Why are you abandoned, ignored, neglected, deserted, left severely on your own by your heartless caddy after struggling to get on the green of a par 3 hole after the 10th stroke? Haven’t you suffered enough?

2. What a Difference Courtesy can make to your game!

We - 3 balls - teed-off after waiting for some time for a 4th ball who never showed up. We then asked the starters to tell anybody playing alone to join us. Being a Saturday morning, we had no chance of going through many sets of four balls ahead. We waited and waited and waited from Hole 1 for the four balls playing immediately ahead of us. By Hole 5, we had resigned ourselves to their slow pace. What a great surprise when these courteous golfers asked us to go through on Hole 7. We were dumbfounded. To our great delight, the four balls ahead were already on Hole 9 when we teed-off on Hole 8. Thereafter, we had an enjoyable round blessed by a pleasant weather. 3. The Golfer & Inclement Weather

Every keen golfer ends up being an amateur meteorologist, they say. In the rainy season, golfers will strive to predict if it’s going to rain and hardly foresees heavy rainfalls until they are drenched and have to be regrettably chased out of the course! A few addicts might even go to the practice range to hit a few balls while hoping against hope that the rain would subside. And it hardly does! he went to play golf in this weather... incredible. i didn’t know he like playing with cold, cough & catarrh

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5. Looking after the Elderly on the Golf Course

You observed on Hole 13 that an elderly golfer in his late 70’s could no longer keep the pace, so you decided to look back and realised that he was very much behind other three balls on Hole 13. The elderly guy greatly appreciated your concern and then told a true story when another elderly golfer got locked up in a toilet by Hole 11 and no-one realised that he was missing in action until they (3 other balls) were about to puttout on Hole 11! He’s still an active golfer at 75... he plays the game with two sticks... golf club and walking stick 6. Caddies Again

A single handicapper in his early 60’s who plays 3/4 times a week does not take a caddy when he plays his round of golf. Smart guy! He has a slim well-packed golf bag which he drags on the course. No big deal, you will say. After all when some Nigerians play overseas, they


h u mo u r facts of l i fe v s thr i l l s an d fr u strat i ons of g o l f

can hardly afford to hire cadd1es-:-Here, it is a different ball game altogether! He simply stands out in the crowd by his inability to pay for the services of a caddy. One lovely evening when his tee shot hit a tree and bounced into a thick rough, all the caddies in his team couldn’t care a damn. He was severely on his own! 7. The Great Debate

Recently had a fascinating game with an accountant, a retired senior army officer and an architect. The game was so much stress-free that from Hole 12 a great debate ensued. Topic: “Is Nigeria a nation? Would Nigeria ever be a nation? Have we got what it takes to build a nation? “And all these on a beautiful evening, in a cool weather “specially made for golf.” Did we care about scores?

12. Does your handicap matter?

Yes, depending on whom you are playing with. A handicap 14 golfer was so worried about your handicap (22) that he shouted, “Jesus wept” at the beginning of a golf competition. No, it doesn’t matter when you are playing with a delightful handicap 4 golfer who is adelight-to play-with. And he still grossed a score of 77 at the end of the game without any fuss whatsoever and you are happy with your score of 98. 13. Fun: a stumbling block to improvement?

Ask our team members (a group of 12 golfers who play together regularly). We all learnt the hard way after one year of very lively round but with dismal scores. Surely, some concentration when putting, teeing off or when you are in a very tight position helps.

8. Golfers’ Inhumanity to Golfers’

Three balls were playing a competitive round in a birthday kitty. The celebrant had a sudden ankle problem on Hole 13 and was in visible pain. Golfer A, best of the three, arranged with golfer B to get the injured golfer C taken back in a cart to the Club house. Before the cart arrived, A wanted B to abandon C so that they could continue with their game, though C would need to be helped to the cart. A was so focused that winning the round was the most important thing at that time. Or so he believed.

14. Caddies, can they ever be right?

A caddy cheering another golfer in a team apart from the guy he was working for got into a very big trouble. His “employer” got very mad and asked, his voice shaking, “who is paying you after the round? I or....?” the fellow i’m working for is an ex-boxer... he gave me an uppercut because i cheered another golfer in the team

heart attack? no cause for alarm, fred... as soon as I finish this putt, i’ll call a doctor 9. Mood swings

Why does your mood have such a great effect on your game? Why is it that when your mood is low, you make obvious mistakes like failing to keep your head down? Why? Why? Why? 10. What is golf?

“Long ago when men cursed and beat the ground with sticks, it was called witchcraft. Today, it’s called golf’’. - extract from Jokeof-the-Day.com come on, zazrrrah... let’s have a round of golf

11. A mind Game?

We - golfers all - are reminded from time to time that golf is a mind game. A game that demands your total attention if you want to play an impressive round of golf. But we also know that we ignore this fundamental point at our own risk. Have you taken a close look at some of the holes where everything fell apart? Your honest assessment? You goofed because you did not do the right thing at the right time! Admit it!

15. Golf & Alcohol

A lousy round after a night of heavy booze teaches some lessons which will last you a long while. beer and golf don’t go together... he mixed them and ended up in a big hole

16. See you again!

What a delightful feeling when someone you’ve played a round of golf with for the first time asks for your phone number - with a view to playing with you another day! Adenubi, mni, is a past chairman of Ikoyi Club 1938

now, here’s my phone number... let’s meet for another round of beer, sorry, golf next week harmony

41


i ns i g ht

M. Jefferies

22 Cameron road, ikoyi in 1951

IKOYI a view from

1917

P

By Nkanu EGBE

re-1900s colonial life around Nigeria constituted commercial activity primordially carried out by the United African Company (UAC) along the river routes of southern Nigeria. The allure for the colonialists was Nigeria’s oil palm and rich timber. The enactment of the 1885 General Act of the Berlin Conference delineating trade regions in Africa, which came after the abolition of slave trade years earlier in 1847, would see the whole of southern Nigeria come under the command of the Royal Niger Company effectively taking over colonial administration on 1 August, 1885. On 1 January, 1900, after the conquest of the slave bastions of the northern hinterland, the Protectorates of Northern and Southern Nigeria were declared. In 1917, three years after the amalgamation of the two Nigerian

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Protectorates on 1 January, 1914, the Europeans who had been living off moored ships which lined the old Marina thought to settle on land. The land they selected was a labyrinth of lakes and marsh dotted with fisher men’s settlements bounded at the south by sand spits, which would later be dredged to form Victoria Island. Two moles, the eastern and western moles along the Lagos coastline had earlier been built around 1907 to create deep harbour waters to create way for the Apapa port. Perhaps, it was a pronunciation error recorded wrongly by the cartographer who drew the layout maps (obtained specially by Harmony for this piece), the land mass was named Ekoyi. The selected area was a whole mass stretching from the Five Cowries Creek to what is today known as Simpson Street. The government land developers would chop up marsh and lakes into 650 plots of 100 X 70 metres (300 X 200 sq. ft), totalling a land mass of 455 hectares (1124 acres). This whole area unlike its Victoria Island counterpart would eventually be filled manually. The planned European quarters were to be majorly residential. The major area marked for immediate development was divided into large lots of 16 plots each. Each plot was to have a bungalow sitting at a precise spot off the centre of the plot. The Ikoyi Club 1938, formed 17 years later, would occupy lots 21, 22, 30 and 31. Even though the European Reservation Area was planned for all the land on the map, which included a great chunk of today’s Lagos Island, it would eventually shrink slightly eastwards to present-


british archives

i ns i g ht i k oy i a v i e w from 1 9 1 7

british archives

map showing bungalow site layouts

map showing layout of plots in ikoyi

founded and took up space at Obalende. The army barracks at Obalende was surrounded by settlers who had come from Northern Nigeria. Most of these settlers would eventually be absorbed into the colonial army to fight in the Great War of 19141919 and World War II of 1939-1945. The spot where Ikoyi Club 1938 is located provided a buffer zone between military life and the civilian suburbs. Houses sprang up at the areas bordering the club, including Macgregor Road, Forest Street, George Street and Mulliner Road, Lugard Avenue and Glover Road. Kingsway Road bordered the club and would be the major spine to major streets traversing the area and living quarters that stretched westward toward Bourdillon Road. Towards the east, at Onikan, the King George V stadium (now known as Onikan stadium), the colonial administrator’s residence and the Race Course, where horse races and official ceremonies were held till 1991 (European recreation was said to have started here since 1861), would be built while offices, including the colonial secretariat, began to sprawl from the Race Course down the Marina to the warehouses at Apongbon. In the next six years, that mesh of adjoining plots on canvas, which became home to the power that held the contraption of two protectorates, formed, as a matter of necessity, to keep the spirit of the Berlin Act alive, and now home to prime lucre and wealth, will notch the 100-year mark. Isn’t it time to start preparing to celebrate The Ikoyi Centenary? M. Jefferies

day King George V Road. Amalgamation brought with it a union of northern and southern civilian and military colonial administrations. The Royal West African Frontier Force with the merging of the Northern and Southern Nigerian regiments needed a place where they could operate from. It was convenient that the royal forces would be located at the centre of the settlement beside the coast to offer protection to the many Europeans that would soon swarm the area. The spot selected was a settlement called Obalende. The locals there were soon relocated to a place much further inland, a village called Surulere (meaning: “Patience has virtue” or, as the Surulere Local Government’s website says, “Patience is golden”). Most of the European settlement surrounded the King’s Army barracks that would be known later as Dodan Barracks. The Police Barracks at Ijeh would later be built to serve the Southern Nigerian Police which would not be merged with its Northern Nigerian counterpart until the late 1930s. In 1928, St. Gregory’s College was the creek from obalende

bridge in 1951

harmony

43


law

Speaking from the

dead

“M By Abiodun Olufowobi

aking a will is expensive.” “What assets do I have to require a will?” “Since I have just one wife, everything I own will go automatically to my spouse and my children.” You probably have said or heard any or all of the above before. Then you need to read this – attentively – because those statements are misconceptions with dire, unpalatable consequences. A will gives you control, albeit, ambulatory (takes effect after death), and it gives you the right to devolve your estate according to your preference, even when you are no longer around. A will gives you options. A will means that you can give other people opportunities. It is important for you to make a will, whether or not you consider you have many possessions or much money. It is important to make a will because: yy When you die intestate, particularly, with children who are still minors, family members can take out the Letter of Administration of your estate and the consequence of that situation is better imagined. yy Unmarried partners - Live-in-lovers, etc. cannot inherit from each other unless there is a will; so, the death of one partner may create serious financial problems for the remaining partner. yy If you have children, you will need to make a will so that arrangements for the children can be made even after your death. yy It may be possible to reduce the amount of tax payable on the inheritance If your circumstances have changed, it is important that you make a will to ensure that your money and possessions are distributed according to your wishes. For example, if you are separated and your ex-partner now lives with someone else, you may want to change your will.

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The death of a man (both genders intended) changes many things. The seemingly subservient, unemployable brother of yours becomes a significant factor in your family. Your driver (who knows all your clandestine relationships) may suddenly become the pathfinder for your wife because of his acclaimed knowledge of what assets and liabilities your wife is ignorant of. Extended family members may stake out in your living room and subject your immediate family to sordid demands in the name of sharing your estate according to native law and customs. The adverse possibilities are endless, depending on your status (bottom-line or bottom-pot) and where you come from. But the good news is that all of these can be avoided. The only certain way to ensure that your spouse, children, friend, relative, or concubine, inherits what you intend is, by making a will. If you die without one, the intestacy rules apply arbitrarily, especially if there are no children. This may lead to your spouse having to share your estate with relatives (e.g. brothers and sisters, aunts and uncles) whom you may never have intended to benefit. Even in monogamy (one wife) you still need to spell out what goes to your wife and each of the children/dependents in specific terms. Have we not witnessed children of the same mother engaged in protracted litigation over the family estate? For those who feel they have so-called insignificant assets – you still would not be happy (in the world beyond) - for these to end up in the hands of your nasty and unemployable sibling. You can safeguard the interests of your minor children (i.e. children under 18 years of age) by appointing legal guardians to care for them in case you died prematurely, e.g. in an accident. A will can be used to provide for complex family arrangements, for example to include children from previous marriages. It can give a second spouse the right to occupy the family home, while protecting the capital for children of an earlier marriage. This will ensure that the assets will not pass outside the immediate family and may pre-empt potential challenges to the distri-


l a w s p ea k i n g from the d ea d

bution of the estate. The consequence of dying intestate (without making a will) can prove both complicated and expensive. At a stressful time for your family and friends, much worry, complications and expense can be avoided through making a correct and valid will. Even if you have already made a will, it is important to review it at regular intervals (at least every five years). The world does not stand still and, in particular, your family circumstances also change. Your solicitor could draw up Codicils to effect minor changes, while it is advisable that any major changes should attract the making of a fresh will. Though I may be inclined to agree that the cost of making a will may be significant, would you not rather live with the knowledge that you have settled your estate with the services and advice of a competent professional than subject your family to the whims and caprices of family members you would not have given the time of day when you were alive? The will is the instrument with which you can speak from the dead and direct how your assets will be managed (for the first time, your words will be law and cannot be changed by anybody regardless of family affinity). In particular, it shall state: yy How much money and what property and possessions you have, for example, property, savings, occupational and personal pensions, insurance policies, bank and building society accounts, shares. yy Who you want to benefit from your will. You should make a list of all the people (and, perhaps, your pet, charity) to whom you wish to leave money or possessions. These people are known as Beneficiaries. yy Who should look after any children under 18? yy Who is going to sort out the estate and carry out your wishes as set out in the will.? These people are known as the Executors. yy Your provisions for specific funeral arrangements. This is particularly important for some individuals. Some people ask for their body to be donated to medical research: offten people who have suffered from prolonged illness want to help reduce other people’s suffering by helping scientists to find new treatments. Some persons direct that they be buried at estate cost, in specified burial grounds and, these days, some even nominate the preferred burial services providers. For a Will to be valid, it must be: yy made by a person who is 18 years old or over; yy made voluntarily and without pressure from any other person; yy made by a person who is of sound mind. This means the person must be fully aware of the nature of the document being written or signed and of the property and the identity of the people who may inherit; yy in writing; yy signed by the person making the Will in the presence of two witnesses; and yy signed by the two witnesses, in the presence of the person making the Will, (Note - A witness or the wife of a witness cannot benefit from a Will. If a witness is a beneficiary (or the wife of a beneficiary), the Will is still valid but the beneficiary will not be able to inherit under the Will).

As soon as the Will is signed and witnessed, it is complete. Now then, it is equally important that you nominate credible persons as your Executors – the people who will be responsible for carrying out your wishes and for sorting out the estate. They will have to collect together all the assets of the estate, deal with all the paperwork and pay all the debts, taxes, funeral and administration costs out of money in the estate. They will need to pay out the gifts and transfer any property to beneficiaries. It is not necessary to appoint more than one executor although it is advisable to do so, for example, in case one of them dies. It is common to appoint two, but up to four executors can take on responsibility for administering the will after a death. The people most commonly appointed as executors are: relatives, friends, solicitors, accountants or your banks. It is important to choose executors with considerable care since their job involves a great deal of work and responsibility. You should always approach anyone you are thinking of appointing as an executor to see if s/he will agree to take on the responsibility. If someone is appointed who is not willing to be an executor, the person has a right to refuse. These executors have a very important role to play and should be credible, responsible business-minded family or friends and/or professional advisers. A very close friend who had been living off you may turn a hostile loser and carry on the duty in a manner that will frustrate and, in some cases, deny your intended beneficiaries of the fruits of the estate. Remember, the beneficiaries will require a lengthy court action to remove him. Even if sufficient evidence is attained against his office, this may be an expensive and nasty experience. Otunba Olufowobi (Pabiekun) is a legal practitioner Questions and comments should be sent to harmony@harpostrophe. com

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harmony

45


law

Mortgagee’s

‘power ofas mirage sale’

I

By Akeem Babatunde n credit transactions, the legal mortgage has always been considered formidable as collateral for facility availment by a lender, usually a financial institution, to the borrower. The reason is not far-fetched, a legal mortgagee has the power of sale which is implied in every legal mortgage where there is no express stipulation in the mortgage instrument. However, recent developments, particularly the relative ease with which borrowers are able to frustrate the realisation of the collateral through the inadvertent participation of the Nigerian courts, have become a cause of concern for many financial institutions as the mortgagee’s power of sale is fast becoming a mirage, an illusion. The ‘power of sale’ can be viewed as the right of the mortgagee to force the sale of a property without judicial proceeding, should default occur. It is the most frequently used method by which a mortgagee (usually a financial institution/lender) will remedy a default by a mortgagor (the borrower/ owner). The term ‘power of sale’ indicates a sale under the power contained in the mortgage document or, as stated earlier, implied by operation of law where the mortgage is a legal mortgage. It should be noted that an equitable mortgagee may have recourse to the power of sale in closed circumstances. The power of sale is the fairest, most inexpensive method to deal with an unpleasant financial circumstance.  It allows the mortgagee/lending institution to retrieve only what it is entitled to and no more.  If there is a surplus, then the owner/mortgagor will benefit.  The ‘power of sale’ in some other jurisdictions is known as non-judicial foreclosure. Judicial sale, on the other hand, involves the sale of the mortgaged property under the supervision of a court, with the proceeds going first to satisfy the mortgage, and then to satisfy other lien holders, and, finally, to other lenders, so the purchaser of the foreclosed property receives valid title to the property. Expectedly, it is more beneficial for the borrower and is used when the mortgage is an equitable mortgage in which case the power of sale is not secured.  The reason a judicial sale is favourable to a borrower is because a court case can be ongoing for months and become very expensive for a lender.  When the lender goes to court s/he/it is attempting to obtain an approval for an order of sale. Little wonder a lender’s first choice of security is a legal mortgage where the power of sale is secured. It is germane at this juncture to have an understanding of what a mortgage is. A mortgage is a conveyance or transfer by a borrower of his legal or

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equitable interest in a property to a lender as a covenant by the lender that upon payment of the loan, the conveyance shall become void or that he would re-convey the interest to the borrower. In other words, a mortgage is a method of using property (real or personal) as security for the payment of a debt. The mode of creation determines whether the mortgage is legal or equitable. As noted earlier, though the legal mortgagee (the lender/financial institution) possesses statutory power to sell the mortgaged property, such a power arises only when the mortgage debt is due, that is, the legal or contractual date of redemption has passed and, where the mortgage debt is payable by installment, the power of sale arises as soon as any installment is in arrears. Nevertheless, the power only arises where: the mortgage was created by way of a Deed, there is no contrary intention in the Deed against same, and, the legal due date has accrued. Furthermore, the power is exercisable where: yy Notice requiring payment of the mortgage debt has been served on the mortgagor and default had been made in payment of part or all of it for three months after such service yy Some interest under the mortgage is two months or more in arrears yy There has been a breach of some provision contained in the Act or in the mortgage Deed, other than the covenant for payment of the mortgage debt or interest which impose an obligation upon the mortgagor. To check abuse of the power of sale by unscrupulous mortgagees, Common Law and Equity have developed a range of inherent safeguards to advance the interest of the mortgagor in the exercise of power of sale by the mortgagee. For instance, it is settled law that the mortgagee cannot sell the mortgaged property to itself, its privies or cronies while however the mortgagor is allowed to purchase the mortgaged property. In exercising the power of sale, the law requires the mortgagee to act in good faith; where fraud, unfair dealing with the mortgaged property or collusion with the purchaser resulting in gross undervalue is established, the sale could be impeached. This was recently confirmed in the case of OKONKWO Vs CO-OPERATIVE AND COMMERCE BANK PLC [1997]6 NWLR [507] at 50, it was held that ‘if a mortgagee exercises his power of sale bona fide for the purpose of realising his debt without collusion with the purchaser, the court will not interfere, even though the sale is disadvantageous, unless the price is so low as, in itself, to be evidence of fraud.’ Conversely, the court will interfere where any of the vitiating factors identified in the case is established. This position was corroborated by Musdapher J.C.A in the case of Moses Ola and Sons Ltd Vs B.O.N [1992] 3 NWLR [229] 337 at 391, when he said “...A bank possesses the potent weapon of a mortgagee to exercise its power of sale on the only condition that it acts in good faith (Union Bank v. Ozigi (1991) 2 NWLR (Pt.176).” Similarly, the Court of Appeal in TEMCO ENG & CO. LTD vs. S.B.N LTD [1995] 5 NWLR [397] 607 at 628 added that the law is clear that the Mortgagee, in exercising his power of sale under a mortgage has a duty to take reasonable care to obtain the true market value of the property. In other common law jurisdictions, the Mortgagee is under a duty of care in negligence. It has been argued that this is crucial in view of the obvious implications which the Mortgagee’s negligence may have on the outcome of sale. The Mortgagee might have conducted a sale in good faith, yet loss may be occasioned by an inadvertent insertion in auction particulars of a misstatement. With the enactment of the Land Use Act came a number of pitfalls which threatened the Mortgagee’s power of sale, prominent among which was the effect of failure by the Mortgagor to obtain consent as contemplated under Section 39 in view of the provision in Sections 21, 22 and 34 [1] & [4].


l a w mort g a g ee ’ s ‘ p o w er of sa l e ’ as m i ra g e

The case of Savannah Bank Ltd. Vs Ajilo [1989] I NWLR [77] p. 305 exem- court declining jurisdiction. The trial court granted a conditional stay of plified this pitfall. However, that is no longer the position as the Supreme execution. Dissatisfied, the Applicants/Appellants filed a similar application Court, in subsequent cases, has held. In Adedeji Vs National Bank of before the Court of Appeal. Relying on Order 3 Rule 3 [3] of the Court of Nigeria Ltd. [1989] 1 [96] p. 212 and the more recent case of Ugochukwu Appeal Rules and Section 18 of the Court of Appeal Act, the Court granted V. Co-operative and Commerce Bank (Nig) Ltd [1996] 6 NWLR [456] p. the injunction. The reasoning of the Court of Appeal was that the mortga524, it was held that t it would be unconscionable for the mortgagor to turn gee was yet to exercise its power of sale but had merely seized the mortgaged around and maintain that no consent was obtained or that such consent property when the action commenced at the lower court. The Court further obtained was flawed, having received valuable consideration in the form of a stated that if the sale had been effected, definitely the Court’s hand would loan from the mortgagee. have been tied. The connotation is that the Courts will always, more often The contemporary challenge now faced by mortgagees in the exercise of than not, grant an order of interim injunction, ostensibly to protect the ‘res’ their power of sale and which is proving to be a formidable weapon in the at the expense of the mortgagee. hands of fraudulent Mortgagors, relates to the grant of injunctive remedies by the courts to frustrate the sale of mortgaged properties when the need Also in Matthew Okechukwu Enekwe Vs International Merchant arises. The mortgagors take advantage of the porous judicial system. MortBank of Nigeria Limited & 2 Ors [2007] All FWLR [pt.349] p.1053, the gagors file all sorts of preliminary objections and interlocuAppellant filed an application for interim order of injuncNigerian tory applications to prevent the mortgagee from enforcing its tion ex parte restraining the mortgagee bank from selling the power of sale. This could delay the realisation of the Security courts are be- property and a Motion on Notice for the same relief. The trial by the mortgagee until the matter is finally disposed off at the coming sympa- court granted the order of interim injunction ex parte while no court; a situation that could be exasperating for the mortgagee. date was given for the hearing of the Motion on Notice and an thetic to the The judiciary then becomes an unwitting partner, a clog in the Order. It is interesting to note that the ex parte application was cause of the realisation of the security by a genuine mortgagee. This asserheard and granted the same day it was filed. The matter would mortgagors tion is better exemplified by case law. have ended there but for the sale of the mortgaged property by the mortgagee bank to the 3rd Respondent who then sold to by the grant In Universal Trust Bank Limited Vs Dolmetsch Pharm, of injuncthe 2nd Respondent. Aggrieved by the sale, the Appellant filed [Nig] Limited & 2 Ors [2007] All FWLR [pt. 385] p. 434 at an action seeking declaratory orders. The Appellant’s suit was tive relieves 454, the trial had granted the Respondent an interim order of dismissed. At the Court of Appeal, the appeal was dismissed. to frustrate injunction ex parte pending the determination of the Motion Consequently, the Appellant approached the Supreme Court mortgagees on Notice but refused the Appellant’s application to discharge for relief. The Appeal was further dismissed. It should be same. Being dissatisfied with the ruling, the Appellant propointed out, however, that the Supreme Court dismissed the from exerceeded to the Court of Appeal which upheld the verdict of the appeal because it reasoned that the doctrine of lis pendes does cising their trial court prompting a further appeals to the Supreme Court. not apply to declaratory reliefs. power of sale In dismissing the Appeal, the Supreme Court reasoned that under the the object of an order of interim injunction was to make sure The lessons from these cases and the pronouncements of mortgage inthat the subject matter of the litigation was kept in status quo the Courts lend credence to the suspicion that Nigerian Courts pending or until the litigation. The Supreme Court reached are becoming sympathetic to the cause of the mortgagors by strument this conclusion in spite of the finding by the Supreme Court the grant of injunctive reliefs to frustrate mortgagees from exercising their power of sale under the mortgage instrument. that the Respondent was a customer of the Appellant who had If this trend persists, land as the preferred collateral for lendobtained several facilities and was indebted to the Appellant. ing, may lose its pride of place. When this happens, the economy will suffer Interestingly, the Supreme Court agreed with the appellate court that havgreatly as borrowers will be required to provide alternative securities. In ing regards to the facts of the case it would have been impracticable to have Nigeria where viable collaterals are in short supply especially in view of the put the Appellants on notice without the risk that the Respondent’s business might be destroyed while the Appellants remained in occupation of the experiences with the stock market, project and business financing will be stunted resulting in economic strangulation. premises and in control of its operations and assets. The Court was more The way forward is that the Land Use Act should be amended, particudisposed to granting relief to the Respondent [who had obtained value but larly the provisions relating to Consent, Revocation and Compensation and failed to liquidate the facility] at the expense of the mortgagee bank. the rights conveyed by the Certificate of Occupancy. Similarly, in Ndaba [Nig] Limited Vs Union Bank of Nigeria Plc & 5 The courts should also be cautious in their intervention in the mortOrs [2008] All FWLR [pt.436] p.1945 at 1973, Agube, JCA reading the lead gagee’s exercise of its power of sale. This is to guard against the Mortgagor judgment of the Court of Appeal held that “... the law is settled that applicants as mortgagors who defaulted in the settlement of their mortgage debt bringing frivolous applications against the mortgagee or the purchaser so as to impeach the sale. They must be circumspect in granting applications, may not be entitled in law to restrain the mortgagees from exercising their whether ex-parte or interlocutory, whose aim is to prevent the mortgagee right of sale”. “However, this is an interlocutory application pending the hearing and determination of the substantive appeal ...” the Court of Appeal from realising the mortgaged property to cover its exposure. Otherwise, the court would have, unwittingly, lent itself as an instrument of destroying the thereafter granted the application for an injunction. The 1st Respondent had attempted to exercise its power of sale under the mortgage deed foluse of land as security which will ultimately impact the economic well-being lowing the Appellants’/Applicants’ inability to repay the loan. However, the of the country and expose the court to odium. Appellants/Applicants filed an application at the trial court to restrain the Mr. Babatunde is the Company Secretary & Legal Adviser of IntercontinenRespondents from carrying out the sale of the pledged assets pending the tal Bank plc. Comments and questions should be sent to harmony@hardetermination of the appeal which they filed against the decision of the trial postrophe.com harmony

47


tra v e l

My journey to

Paradise

T

By Omotola Obagbemi

he Christmas of 2007 was set to be a special one. After a lot of persuasion, I managed to convince my hubby that Egypt was safe to go to and Christmas at the Red Sea resort of Sharm el Sheik woul be the most perfect that we’d in a long time. I made all the arrangements, hotels, tickets, excursions etc., and soon we were ready to embark on a Christmas of a lifetime. We arrived in Egypt on 22 December. From the moment we were picked up by our chauffeur, we knew we made no mistake in choosing a holiday at the Sharm el Sheik, one of the greatest tourist successes in recent years. Squeezed between the rocky mass of Sinai and the incredible blue waters of the Red Sea, it’s a paradise that arose practically out of nothing. At Sham el Sheik, everyone is catered for, from the luxury hotels that line shores of the Red Sea, to the good budget hotels all around the peninsular. One thing is constant: the genuine hospitality of the Egyptian people. Our hotel did not disappoint in any way; beautiful and welcoming. I specifically requested for a room with a sea view. I wanted to see the splendour of daybreak and sunset on the Red Sea. It’s truly one of the most beautiful sights that I’ve ever seen. There was never a dull moment at the Sharm. One evening at a Bedouin camp was particularly fascinating. After a camel ride into the Sinai desert, we were treated to hot sweet tea and some traditional Bedouin snacks. Our host was very warm and educated us about the simple but interesting lives of the Bedouins. The small Christian community in Egypt are the Coptic Christians

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who make up about 10% of the Egyptian population. According to ancient tradition, Christianity was introduced to the Egyptians by Saint Mark in Alexandria, shortly after the Ascension of Christ and during the reign of the Roman Emperor Claudius around 42 AD. The fascinating difference between the Copts and other Christian sects is that they celebrate Christmas on 7th January, as against 25th December. This, however, did not stop us from going to church on our traditional Christmas Day. After the lavish Christmas party at the hotel the night before, we went to the majestic El Sama-eyeen (The Heavenly) Cathedral. Although there was no service, the church was opened to tourists like us who just wanted to come in and say Christmas prayers. I looked forward to Boxing Day with all eagerness. It was the day that I was destined to follow the path of Moses to the top of Mount Sinai. Having been told that our journey would be overnight, our hotel was kind enough to prepare breakfast packs for us so that we wouldn’t go hungry after the tedious climb. We were picked up at the hotel at about 9pm, along with a couple of other tourists scheduled to make this incredible journey. We drove for over an hour deep into the hilly countryside of Sinai, a distance of 84 km. We encountered a few checkpoints and we had to show our passports. (This was a bit frightening at times when the hooded security operatives searched the bus to confirm that there were no Israeli citizens on board!) We finally arrived at the foot of the site, the Moses’ Mountain (Gebel Musa). It is located north of one of the most important religious and historical sites, the Monastery of St.Catherine. It is the smallest diocese and the oldest Christian monastery still in existence in the world and houses one of the richest collections of Christian iconography and precious manuscripts. We were told that our tour would end at the monastery, for now all our attention was turned to making the threeand-half-hour trip to the top of the mountain in the dead of the night. We, along with tens if not hundreds of other tourists (from different excursion parties), were given a short brief by one of the accredited tourist guides. Warm clothing was a prerequisite for climbing as it got colder with higher altitude. We were reassured that, for a fee, any tired climber could make use of one of the many camels that were part of the travelling party. We eventually began the climb at about 1a.m, armed with water, some food, torch lights and prayers.  As the time to commence the climb drew nearer, a few jitters started creeping to my mind; I thought we were crazy, no one back at home knew we were going to do this and it seemed sufficiently dangerous. My hubby stared at me and exclaimed, “You didn’t tell me we were going mountain climbing in the middle of no-


where at night! Do you see any other black man or woman here?” The adventurer in me kicked in and reassured him that everything would be all right. We continued to make our way, along with others, deep into the mountains. There were several stops for people to rest; some opted to use the camels. We quickly made friends with an English couple, who were also on the same adventure. Of the two, Peter was climbing Mount Sinai for the fourth time! I also noticed an older woman (in her late 50s) with, presumably, her son (about 13 years). I wondered if they would make it to the mountain top because she appeared to be struggling for breath. After over three hours, we finally made it to the top. It was freezing cold! We had climbed 7,500 feet up to the peak. We were exhausted but excited. At the top, we were greeted by the sight of the small chapel and mosque. It is said that this was the site where Moses received the Ten Commandments on stone tablets. As the temperature dropped, we rented a sleeping bag and blankets to catch some sleep.  We were woken, shortly, by some noise at daybreak. It was what everyone was waiting for: the most beautiful daybreak I had ever seen.  Everyone’s face shone as it reflected the glory of the sun. It was almost magical. “We have seen God,” I exclaimed. Now I understood that the highlight of the journey was to see the day break on the mountain and, perhaps, experience a little of what Moses must have seen. We started making our way down by 6 a.m. I soon realised that coming down the mountain was even more tedious and, perhaps, more dangerous. We headed down through the ‘Steps of Repentance’ carved by some ancient monks. There were 3,750 of them, unequally hewed from stone, lining the ravine that had been carved into the rock by some ancient flood. As we made our way down with tentative steps, I saw the same older woman and the boy. They’d made it to the top. It was a relief for me. I was totally fagged out by the time we reached the base of the mountain. I think I was even happier to be alive. There were times my knees were weak and I thought I would fall over the cliff. Our tour guide led us to the Monastery of St. Catherine. As we made our way, he pointed to a group of monks who were making their way up the mountain for an early morning Mass. This must be real service to God. St. Catherine’s monastery was a beauty to behold. No fancy architecture or façade, its beauty lies in the harmony of the two major religions sharing the historic relevance of the site. We were showed an old minaret and mosque, which were no longer in use, as we were ushered through the small courtyards, staircases and narrow corridors of the Monastery. In all, there are about 20 chapels in the monastery, the most important located on the ‘Moses’s Well’ or ‘Bir Musa.’ Tradition has it that it was here that Moses met Jethro’s daughter. We also visited the Chapel of The Burning Bush; the place indicated by tradition as one in which Moses saw the burning bush. Even today, visitors must enter without shoes.  The reverred library of St. Catherine’s Monastery boasts of preserved precious codices and manuscripts. For the number and value of the volumes, the collection is second in importance only to the Vatican library. We had breakfast at a local Egyptian restaurant and headed back to Sharm el Sheik. For me, it was one of the most adventurous and enriching part of our holidays. We slept for the whole day on arriving back at the hotel. It took two hours of expertly done massage and spa treatment to get our bodies back into shape. But in all of it, I wouldn’t trade my experience of Sinai for anything in the world.

So, relax and allow us to show you the world. Make that call right now.

Omotola Obagbemi is the CEO of The Red Kite, a travel company specialising in Package holidays, Adventure tours, Cruises, Destination weddings and other bespoke leisure offerings. harmony

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PRE F ACE

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By Tolu Ogunlesi

hat have they done to rice? Up until last year, it was the world’s most popular staple. But, according to the latest survey by Oxfam, it’s now No. 3, after pasta and meat. In Nigeria, however, it must still be No. 1. But it had not always been so. Nigerians who grew up before the 1980s delight in telling stories of rice-deprived childhoods, marked by the consumption of the grain only at festive seasons – Christmas, actually, not just any festive season. Those stories are regularly flaunted as badges of honour (the ‘good ol’ days’ before younger generations came along with their indiscipline and reckless sense of entitlement) and testaments of personal and national progress (“See how far we’ve come in life”).

President Goodluck Jonathan famously declared that he was born without shoes; which means he was born without a silver spoon - and if any spoon at all, definitely not a rice-spoon. Like many of our parents and grandparents. It is hard for any child of the 1980s and 1990s to imagine the rice-less Nigeria of a few decades ago. For, long ago, Christmas lost its monopoly on rice. From a certain generation onwards Nigerians grew up eating rice anytime they wanted; attending parties where various ‘flavours’ of rice were abundantly on offer; and, most crucially, enjoying the privilege of being able to turn down rice when they grew tired of it or felt there were more appealing alternatives (like noodles and spaghetti – more on those later.) In their youth, our parents wouldn’t have dreamed, or imagined, of turning rice down. But, now, yes, we can, and do.

One of the episodes of Ken Saro Wiwa’s famous 1980s television series, Basi & Company, was entitled A SHIPLOAD OF RICE. Apparently, long before Yahoo-Yahoo and Nigerian Letters, there were rice importation scams. Mr. B, the hero of the series, is seduced by the promise of a consignment of rice waiting at the ports. In those bags of rice Mr. B sees the millions of naira that have, thus far, eluded him in Lagos. He proceeds to market the rice, even before laying his eyes on a grain, much less a bag, and sets of a chain of sub-marketers and eager buyers all across the city of Lagos. Needless to say, like all other schemes involving Mr. B, nothing comes out of it. Poor Mr. B. He should come out of retirement to speak to all those merchants churning huge fortunes from Nigeria’s rice appetite. Every year, we spend nothing less than two billion dollars importing rice – a fifth of Sub-Saharan Africa’s rice imports comes to Nigeria. Out there in the world are merchants growing fat on our hard-earned dollars, satiating our national appetite for rice. And out there at our ports are prob-

ably more shiploads of rice than the grains of rice in a 50-kg bag.

White rice, jollof rice, fried rice – the holy trinity of rice in Nigeria (I agree this is controversial, but at this time let’s count ofada as ‘white’ rice). There are several other variants, as this magazine has gone to cook up, trust Nigerians to apply their never-ending inventiveness to the closest thing they have to a national staple. There’s an unacknowledged one, though. Burnt rice. It’s a wonder that you cannot find it on any menu anywhere in the country, as we speak. It takes a special genius to cook burnt rice – i.e. to burn rice for human consumption. Many are charred but few are chosen. Some of the finest forms of burnt rice are to be found in University hostels across the country. Especially in the male halls of residence, where there seem to be elaborately constructed rosters that dictate the frequency with which food is burnt. Beans is more commonly burnt, followed closely (on the basis of anecdotal, as opposed to statistical, evidence) by rice. Many are the battles fought over the burnt bottom of a rice pot. There are people who will temporarily abandon their plate of steaming rice to do justice to the scrapings from the bottom of the pot. Only when that has been done will they turn their attention to what was supposed to be the main deal. It may be harder to find burnt rice in the homes of the rich, for the simple reason that they are rather more likely to depend on cooks, and on pressure cookers, which, one assumes, were designed to ensure that uncivilised things, like the smell of burning, are banished to the darkest outskirts of civilisation.

Because of instant noodles, and spaghetti, Nigerians have since grown used to saying ‘No’ to rice. Look at how popular Indomie has become, in recent years. Counting on the ease, and speed, of preparation, Indomie has successfully seduced an entire generation of Nigerians. Who wants to spend five minutes washing rice, and forty-five minutes watching it swell (while simultaneously having to ensure that there is stew to go with it), when they could spend five minutes (or less) boiling noodles and egg. With a ‘boiling ring.’ But despite all the lost ground, rice continues to exert a dominant influence. No one dares to serve instant noodles or spaghetti at a party. At least, not yet. And, perhaps someday soon someone will introduce a ‘2-minute’ brand of rice. Until then, all Nigerians looking for instant- or near-instant rice will have to make do with kind ol’ Uncle Ben’s offering. Knowing Nigerians though, rice that comes in such fancy packaging is to be treated with suspicion and contempt. Just like ‘poundo yam.’ This season, you are invited to try other kinds of rice apart from W, J & F. Bon appétit. harmony

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Other than

white, jollof and fried orary Secretary, Institute of e have Wasiu A. Babalola, PhD, MIH, Hon, to thank for the rice menu we Hospitality – Nigeria International Chapter request of this magazine, also are being served here. He, it was who, at the recipes other than white, jollof e up with rice requested members of the Institute to com (in picture, right), principal lecturer in the and fried rice. Mrs Julliete F Fashakin, MIHement, Lagos State Polytechnic, responded Department of Catering and Hotel Manag presented the following. For accompanying with ‘loads’ of them, out of which we have EATCETERA, a catering outfit, to thank for photographs of a couple of them, we have ard Enesi, for the shots the cooking, and, our ace photographer, Rich right, bottom), the TV chef famous for, Thanks, too, to Ainsley Harriot (in picture, , for sending us two of his favourite among others, CAN’T COOK, WON’T COOKtry them…and send us some – by, er, rice recipes, for you to savour. Go ahead and bluetooth.

W

DIRTY RICE Ingredients yy 2 tablespoons olive oil yy 3 cloves garlic, minced yy 1 cup chopped onion yy 1 green bell pepper, chopped yy 1 tablespoon chili powder powder yy 2 teaspoons annatto or achiote (optional) per yy 1/4 teaspoon crushed red pep in cum nd grou n yy 1 teaspoo n yy 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamo rice e whit ed ook unc s yy 1 1/3 cup yy 2 3/4 cups water yy 1 teaspoon salt d yy 3 roma (plum) tomatoes, choppe ched blan els, kern corn le who s yy 1 1/3 cup drained yy 1 cup black beans, cooked and yy 1/4 cup toasted pine nuts yy Freshly-ground black pepper yy 1 red onion, thinly sliced yy 1 tablespoon fresh lime juice tro yy 2 tablespoons chopped fresh cilan yy 1 lime, cut into wedges yy 2 teaspoons annatto powder

er and stir to coat. Add the wat g the and 1 teaspoon salt, and brin er Cov t. hea h hig r ove l boi a rice to . low to t hea the pan and turn the s. ute min 25 for rice the r Simme When the rice is cooked, mix ns, in tomatoes, corn, black bea per and pine nuts. Stir in salt, pep ture mix the en Wh e. juic e and lim onto is heated through, spoon it red ed slic the h wit top and plates ge wed a ve Ser . onion and cilantro to te pla h eac h wit e lim of or two squeeze over the rice.

Directions In a heavy saucepan, heat 1 r tablespoon of the olive oil ove and medium heat. Add the garlic for 5 the chopped onions; saute Mix minutes, stirring frequently. , der pow i chil , per pep in the bell cumin, ground annatto, chili flakes, minutes. and cinnamon. Saute for 2 cepan sau the Pour the rice into

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Nutritional Information Dirty Rice Servings Per Recipe: 6 Amount Per Serving: yy Calories: 409 yy Total Fat: 9g yy Cholesterol: 0mg yy Sodium: 424mg yy Total Carbs: 71.4g yy Dietary Fiber: 9.1g yy Protein: 13.7g

of

YOGURT RICE Ingredients yy 1 cup jasmine rice yy 2 cups water (clarified yy 1 tablespoon ghee r) tte bu er, broken yy 1 dried red chili pepp in half (optional) stard seeds yy 1 teaspoon black mu meric tur d yy 1/2 teaspoon groun ves lea ry yy 4 fresh cur powder (optional) yy 1 pinch asafoetida lk mi yy 1/4 cup yy 1 cup plain yogurt yy Salt to taste

spice ghee bowl until together in a large e rice until th in ld smooth. Fo to taste with well mixed. Season ol to room co to ow salt, then all rving. se temperature before of Nutritional Information e s Direction Yogurt Ric to a boil in a e: 4 Bring rice and water at. Reduce Servings Per Recip he h ng hig rvi er Se r ov saucepan Amount Pe w, cover, and heat to medium-lo yy Calories: 271 20 r, de e is ten simmer until the ric yy Total Fat: 5.2g . tes inu m 25 to yy Cholesterol: 13mg small Heat the ghee in a yy Sodium: 173mg e heat. Add th skillet over medium d cook until yy Total Carbs: 48g an broken chili pepper, nds. Stir in yy Dietary Fibre: 0.8g seco fragrant, about 30 yy Protein: 8.1g seeds, and cook the black mustard pop, about 30 until they begin to e from the ov m Re e. or m seconds e turmeric, curry heat, and stir in th da powder. leaves, and asafoeti gurt, and , ilk Whisk the m yo


RICE BREAD Ingredients yy 2 1/4 cups white rice flour yy 1 cup brown rice flour yy 2 1/2 teaspoons xanthan gum yy 1 teaspoon unflavoured gelatin yy 3 tablespoons superfine sugar yy 1 1/2 teaspoons salt yy 1 tablespoon egg substitute yy 1/2 cup dry milk powder yy 2 1/4 teaspoons active dry yeast yy 3 eggs yy 1 teaspoon cider vinegar yy 3 tablespoons walnut oil yy 1/2 cup warm water (110 degrees F/45 degrees C) Directions To help ensure success have all ingredients at room temperature before proceeding. Combine the white rice flour, brown rice flour, xanthan gum, and salt. Mix very well. The flours need to be completely combined. Combine the gelatin, sugar, egg replacer, milk powder, beaten eggs, vinegar and oil. Beat until well combined. Combine the flour mixture, egg mixture and yeast together and beat well. A standup mixture works best for this. Add tepid water to dough if mixture is to dry. The dough should be

somewhere between a normal bread dough consistency and a batter. Pour into greased 9x5 inch bread pan and allow to rise in a warm, still place until doubled in bulk. Bake in a preheated oven at 325 degrees F (165 degrees C) until crust is a light to medium brown. Cool for ten minutes in the pan, then to room temperature outside the pan before slicing. Nutritional Information of Rice Bread Servings Per Recipe: 12 Amount Per Serving yy Calories: 237 yy Total Fat: 5.5g yy Cholesterol: 54mg yy Sodium: 363mg yy Total Carbs: 39.8g yy Dietary Fibre: 2.6g yy Protein: 6.6g

Ainsley Harriott’s Seafood Rice Ingredients - Serves 6 yy 2-3 tbsp olive oil yy 1 large onion, finely chopped yy 2 garlic cloves yy 450g/1lb risotto rice yy 450ml/ 3/4 pint white wine yy 750ml/1 1/4 pints hot chicken stock yy 2 large pinches saffron yy 1 large pepper, roasted, skinned, seeded and diced yy 500g/1lb2oz live mussels yy 24 raw shell-on prawns yy 250g/9oz fresh squid, cut into rings yy small bunch of fresh parsley and 2 limes to garnish yy salt and pepper Directions Heat two tablespoons of the oil in a casserole dish. Add the onion and garlic and cook for 1-2 minutes until beginning to soften. Stir in the rice and cook for one minute then add the wine and cook for 4-5 minutes stirring occasionally until all the liquid has been absorbed. Stir the hot stock, saffron, pepper and plenty of seasoning

into the pan, cover and cook for a further 10 minutes. Meanwhile, preheat a griddle pan. Pour in a little oil and cook the prawns for a couple of minutes on either side. Transfer to a plate. Scatter the mussels over the rice, replace the lid and continue to cook for 5 minutes until the mussels have opened and the rice grains are tender. Cook the squid rings in the hot griddle pan for a minute or two until opaque. Arrange the prawns and squid rings on top of the rice. Garnish with chopped parsley and lime wedges.

CHILLED RICE SALAD Ingredients yy 1 (6.9 ounce) package chicken-flavored rice and vermicelli mix yy 1 teaspoon vegetable oil yy 12 stuffed green olives, sliced yy 4 green onions, thinly sliced yy 1/2 green pepper, chopped yy 2 (6.5 ounce) jars marinated artichoke hearts, drained, liquid reserved yy 1/3 cup mayonnaise yy 1/2 teaspoon curry powder

PICARDY RICE

Ingredients - Serv es 4-6 yy 4 streaky bacon slic es, diced yy I oz. [2 tablespoons] butter yy 2 shallots, finely cho pped yy 2 small green peppers , white pith removed, seeded and cut into julienne strips yy 2 medium-sized tom atoes, blanched, peeled and chopped yy 1 teaspoon salt yy 1/2 teaspoon black pepper yy 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme yy 12 oz. [2 cups] long-g rain soaked in cold water for rice, washed, 30 minutes and drained yy I pint [2 1/2 cups] ho t chicken stock yy 1 lb. lean cooked chi cken, cut into strips Directions In a flameproof ca ssero bacon over modera le, fry the te heat for 5 minutes or until it is cri rendered most of its sp and has fat bottom of the casse . Scrape the ro with a wooden spoo le frequently n bacon from sticking to prevent the . With a slotted spoo n, remove

Directions Prepare rice mix according to package directions, except substitute 1 teaspoon oil for butter called for. Cool. Add olives, green onions and green pepper; toss to mix. Cut the artichokes into quarters and add to rice mixture; set aside. In a small bowl, combine mayonnaise, curry powder and reserved marinade; blend well. Pour over rice mixture; toss to mix. Cover and chill for at least 2 hours.

the bacon from th e ca drain it on kitchen sserole and paper towels. Set aside. Add the butter to the casserole. When the foam su bsides, add the shallots and green peppers and fry, stirring frequen tly, minutes or until th for 3 to 4 e shallots are soft and translucen t but not brown. Stir in the tomatoe s, salt, pepper and thyme. Add th e ric well to coat the grain e and stir s. Pour in the stock and bring to the boil, stirring occasionally. Reduce the heat to low and simmer, stirring oc casionally, for 15 to 20 minutes . Stir in the chicken and simm er for a further 5 minutes, or until th e rice is cooked and tender and ha s absorbed the cooking liquid. Remove the cassero le from the heat and spoon th e ric into a large warmed e mixture se Sprinkle over the fri rving dish. ed serve immediately. bacon and

Ainsley Harriott’s Wicked Kicking Kedgeree SAUCE yy little olive oil yy 1oz butter to meyy 1 teaspoon curry powder (mild dium strength) yy 1 teaspoon garam masala der (or yy 2 teaspoon vegetable or fish pow e) cub illon bou e tabl vege 2 yy 2 cup white wine yy 1 cup heavy cream yy 2 teaspoon tomato puree Directions Melt butter in saucepan. Add e, the spices, then add the win w Allo ee. pur ato tom and m crea ck Che f. hal by uce to boil and red the h wit e serv n the , ing son sea kedgeree. RICE yy Little olive oil yy 1oz butter yy 1 small onion, sliced yy 2-3 0yster mushrooms yy 8oz long grain rice, cooked

yy 4oz salmon fillet, poached , yy 4oz smoked haddock or cod fillet poached yy 2 eggs, hard boiled d yy 1 small bunch of parsley, choppe Directions olive Melt the butter with a little (but oil. Add the onions and fry the Add ). wn bro go m don’t let the s mushrooms and thirty second l, then later throw in the rice. Stir wel k. doc had flake in the salmon and a in ce pla n the er, Toss togeth serving dish or on a plate. Chop the egg and sprinkle on the top of the rice together with ce sau the r Pou . sley chopped par a little around the side and drizzle d! on top. Serve. It’s wiiiiiiiiicke harmony

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Let’s do

RWG By Wole Soyinka

Our own WS: yes, the Nobel Laureate, Prof Wole Soyinka, is reputed to be a hunter of game. And, a connoisseur of wines. Oh well, here’s what else you don’t know – he’s good at roasting things. In 1978, a correspondent of EMOTAN, A Woman’s Magazine, watched him roast a whole goat.

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Tola Adenle, editor of the now-rested magazine, is delighted to have readers of Harmony magazine take a roasting trip with Prof Soyinka, hereunder. We thank her immensely. Perhaps, in the spirit of the season, you could also invite family and friends to join you as you roast your own whole goat. Just send us the pix. We shall be glad to publish them here. Have fun Implements: yy Firewood or coal yy 2 extra large cooking pots yy 1 roll of aluminum foil yy skewers yy 1 long, sharp pointed knife or 1 meat syringe (ordinary syringes may be used) yy 1 large board or other clean surface on which to work yy Chicken wire


of the ingredients he used. These, however, will vary depending on the size of the goat being prepared. The cooking time for this recipe is 4-6 hours, depending on the size of the goat and the intensity of the heat which can be maintained. The preparation time is about 3-6 hours if the time for the killing, cleaning of the goat is included, but the end product is well worth the effort. During the preparation of the goat, the cook can refresh himself with glasses of well-chilled palm wine.” Postscript

Ingredients: yy 1 goat butchered without removing the head, cleaned, scraped and kept whole yy Limes or Lemons yy 3-4 bottles of soy sauce yy 1 bottle of white wine. (The wine and soy sauce may be mixed together or used separately.) yy 2 containers of dried thyme yy 3 containers of Italian seasoning yy 2 small bottles of mustard yy A quantity of ‘pasmanger’ (a local highly aromatic herb) yy Ghanaian pepper yy 4 cups of sliced onions. Salt and pepper. Vegetables for stuffing: yy Green peppers, cabbage, garden eggs or aubergines, whole tomatoes, carrots Method Remove entrails and offals. Scrape and clean goat thoroughly. Reserve any fat. Make deep incisions or gashes in the skin of the goat. Clean the head of the goat thoroughly and rub with lemon or lime juice. Inject tongue and other orifices with large amounts of white wine and soy sauce. Rub with salt and pepper. Inject large quantities of soy sauce and wine into the meat of the goat through the incisions which already made in the skin, and from the inside. Also into tail cavity. Saturate the goat meat with this mixture especially the bony areas. Rub generously with salt and pepper. If syringes are not available, use a thin long knife to make deep incisions and pour the mixture through these. When the goat meat is well-saturated, stuff with as many of the assorted vegetables and onions as the centre cavity will hold. Sea-

son with thyme and Italian seasoning. Wash ‘pasmanger’ thoroughly, and stuff into the neck cavity, the centre cavity, the tail cavity and the mouth of the goat, along with the Ghanaian pepper. Skewer all openings. Put a large red whole tomato into the mouth of the goat. Rub the skin of the goat with large amounts of hot mustard, and the fat from the goat. Wrap the prepared goat in chicken wire, and secure. Place the wrapped goat into one of the large pots. Use the other pot to cover and seal the joint with foil paper to prevent the heat from escaping. Place pot on a roaring open fire and cook for 4-6 hours. Bon Apetit!

When the piece was published in 1978, the price of a whole goat was N35. Following the piece, a number of the magazine’s readers wanted to know what they could do if they couldn’t afford a whole goat. Most (at Ikoyi Club 1938) could afford a whole goat, no doubt, but it isn’t a bad idea if some close families would want to have a cook-out at one family’s house or for a picnic and decide to share the cost. Or some families could come with other items like food and drinks that would make a good feast. Go ahead, enjoy... - Tola Adenle

The correspondent adds:

“What is interesting about Wole Soyinka’s cooking is his style and ingenuity. This is not a recipe to be followed ‘by the book,’ because, as we all know, men hardly cook that way; they “throw in” until satistfied. Therefore, during my morning in the kitchen with Wole Soyinka, I tried to capture the style and flavour of his cooking rather than concentrate on the exact measurements

‘SEASONS

GREETINGS’

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O

ne of life’s great pleasures is the diversity of all the world’s wonders - flowers, animals, human beings - all come in an assortment of colours and shapes, styles and personalities. These are the things which make the world we live in more interesting, more exciting, more tantalising. The world of wines is no different. With all the possible aromas, flavours and styles made and available to us from all corners of the earth, there is surely something which takes your fancy. Personally, I am easy to please. It is my experience that ‘wine experts’ are actually simply (knowledgeable) lovers of wine and it is unlikely that you will ever hear generalised comments of dislikes such as having an aversion to all sweet or all sparkling wines, or having a preference for red over white or thinking that anything pink is not quite a wine of note. We like all styles and it simply depends on the occasion, the place, the company and the price as to whether it is a truly worthy wine. The only wines we don’t like are those which are badly made; so, so long as we avoid these, we’re happy. The pleasure of drinking wine comes well before it reaches your mouth. For me, the enjoyment begins as I wander down to my cellar or browse in a wine merchant’s or internet site. It’s like opening a box of chocolates. You look over the selection before you, tempting you, making you salivate just a little. You make your choice. With wine, there is the further pleasure of opening the bottle, letting it breathe if it is red, refrigerating it if it is white, rosé, sparkling or, oh joy, Champagne, and delaying the moment of gratification that bit longer. Time to pour, to taste, to satiate. Stop. Wait. If I have transferred the wine into my beloved

wine you up Let’s

By Laura Clay

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Riedel Amadeo Decanter then the additional delight of pouring from this is immense, a pleasure in itself. Sometimes, I worry about my sanity, but there it is. Let’s enjoy the colour before lingering over the aromas. The wine palette is infinite and especially beautiful in reds and rosés, attractive subtle hues which please the eye, dark, strong tones threatening an intensity of flavours. Now for the aromas. A swirl of the glass to release the bouquet, and it is at this point that my pleasure ascends new heights. Our sense of smell is fundamental yet, sadly, we don’t use it as much as we might; wine offers so much. You may not immediately be able to work out exactly what you smell, that doesn’t matter so long as what you smell is good and enticing you to sip. Some wines may not be overpowering in their aromatic display, less showy, more subtle and, consequently, they may be more delicate on the palate too. A wine doesn’t have to shout at you for you to hear its message. Now to taste. In wine, we have so many different flavours to relish – they may be fruity (black fruits, tropical or citrus fruits) or savoury or earthy, delicate or powerful. Don’t forget to appreciate the feel of the wine too, the texture in the mouth, the sensuality. Is it smooth and silky, or zesty and tingly, is it bold and tannic? Does it punch the tongue or caress it? Even, once the wine is swallowed, often the taste lingers on, the pleasure is not gone in an instant but lasting still and, of course, the memory too remains. Whatever the wine reveals in terms of taste, whether it is the everyday bottle from the local supermarket or the most expensive bottle in your cellar, ultimately the only thing which really matters is whether or not you like the wine and are deriving pleasure from drinking it. Pleasure is the essential reason for drinking wine, but as Mr Rajai Shahin, my cardiologist friend, said, ‘don’t forget drinking wine means less heart disease, too!’ Certain red grapes, such as Malbec and Tannat, are high in polyphenols and these are very useful for healthy blood. This is well explained in Roger Corder’s book, The Wine Diet, or you can read more about it at www.vinopic. com. Recently too, The Times suggested that a glass or two of wine a day helps to stave off dementia. I’m happy to be convinced by such reports.Another good reason for opening a bottle. Wine is so much more than just an alcoholic drink. It can touch your senses and whisper to your soul! It is truly one of the world’s wonders. Go ahead...imbibe. And enjoy. Laura Clay is one of the UK’s best wine presenters. She loves talking about wine and instilling the love of wine to all those who attend her talks, tastings, lectures and courses. Her interest began at the tender age of six when she had the good fortune of living a spitting distance, appropriately enough, from the ‘Route des Grands Crus’ in Burgundy. A certified wine and spirit educator and Bordeaux tutor, she is proud to have won the UK Champagne Ambassador Award in 2010. She is excited and honoured to be a guest writer for Harmony. Comments/questions should be sent to harmony@harpostrophe.com


H ea l th

Foods

of the run

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By Debo Aderibigbe

ou’ve signed a partnership agreement with your new business partner. So, you decide to “wash” it at an upscale Chinese restaurant. In a few minutes, the table was set, with an array of tantalising sea foods – fish fillet, shrimp batter, sea cucumber, stir-fry salt and pepper shrimps, etc, screaming at you: Eat me, I’m delicious. You can’t even wait to use the hot towel; you dip a piece of shrimp batter in chilli sauce and bite on it lovingly. Another bite, then another; you are about to take the fourth when you start feeling itchy in your throat. To assuage the itching, you cough and scratch on the throat. This is futile as the itchy feeling is still there. Your business partner, thinking you are choking, offers a glass of water but this is equally fruitless. Luckily for you, a lady at an adjoining table, who, apparently, had been attracted by your cough, quickly moves over and does what appears to be unbelievable: she brings out a pen from her bag, breaks off the cap and sticks it in your leg while she looks at her wrist watch. Of course, everyone is as shocked as you. Well, not really, as your own shock is induced partly from the itching and the ‘assault’ from the Heaven-sent lady. But you find you are beginning to feel relief from the itching. Thank goodness. The lady introduces herself – she is a doctor - and advises that you should not just run from prawns, you must go for an immediate allergy test. Her diagnosis, you are allergic to prawns. Dear reader, you probably have your own food allergy that has put you in worse situations. Toki is an enterprise development consultant. Not only does she not eat any kind of sea food, she also can’t touch it, the oil used in cooking it can’t be used for her own stew or soup. She had gone into a coma once or twice; it’s that bad. She was lucky – she found out at a very young age; so she knows what to run from, even if it is a presidential banquet. While it is easy to consciously avoid meals that you are allergic to, chances are you might find yourself eating a meal that contains an item that can put you in distress. For example, someone with an allergy to prawns may eat a palatable meal of efo riro without knowing that prawn granules were incorporated into the meal. One might also assume that

one has outgrown an allergy to a particular meal and find, only too late –and painfully, that it is not so. And what are these allergic reactions? They range from relatively manageable manifestations, like rashes, vomiting and runny nose, to shortness of breath (brought about by swelling of the throat), abdominal pain, and, in extreme cases, death (when the body goes into shock). The first aid treatment of food allergy is the use of the Epipen. This, according to Dr. (Mrs) Adeola Ayorinde, who holds regular first aid training for members of Ikoyi Club 1938’s Squash Section, is a state-of-the-art treatment of food allergy worldwide. She says, “When you notice someone is suffering an allergic reaction, you break off the cap of the Epipen, stick it in the person’s thigh and count to ten.” The person should be relieved after this intervention. Shaped like a pen, the Epipen delivers a dosage of Epinephrine (adrenaline) that counters the allergic reaction. In severe cases, where the patient has gone into shock, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) should be administered to get the patient’s heart working. She also stresses that medical attention should be sought immediately after the Epipen has been used. That’s if you are armed with one – or lucky to have a doctor at an adjoining table. Hint: if you have a slight idea of your food allergies, never be tempted, no matter the celebration or the allure of the food. If in doubt about what it contains, just ask whoever knows about the food preparation.

If you have a slight idea of your food allergies, never be tempted, no matter the celebration or the allure of the food.

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QUICK CROSSWORD Across 5 Loud confused noise from many sources (6) 7 An integral part of the club on the strength of their parents (8) 9 Was prominent (5,3) 10 Flag used to show nationality (6) 11 The pleasure afforded by a thrilling performance (13) 13 Ionised gas, the fourth state of matter (6) 15 Under no circumstances (6) 18 Membership dues paid to the club (12) 21 Inexpensive and often low in quality (6) 22 A hair-forming cell on the epidermis of a plant root (4,4) 23 Between good and bad (8) 24 Made of earth (6) Down 1 The region of the body between the thorax and the pelvis (plural) (8)

WORD & DEEDS

“A man may be born to fortune, but wisdom only comes with length of days.”

- a proverb translated from Yoruba.

“Love is like five loaves and two fish; always too little, until you start giving it away.” - Anon

“The crown of a leader is his integrity, his stronghold is his impartiality, his wealth the prosperity of the people.”

- Shehu Uthman dan Fodio

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Harmony Magazine  

The delightful Anniversary and Yuletide issue of Harmony Magazine of Ikoyi Club 1938