Issuu on Google+

international hou s e phila d elphia

ANNUAL REPORT 2011

I n t e r n a t i o n a l H o u s e P h i l a d e l p h i a i s a m u l t i c u l t u r a l residential center, a source of distinctive programming, and the embodiment of an ideal. it has a critical three-fold mission: to maintain a diverse and welcoming community for scholars from around the world, while introducing them to the american experience; to broaden the horizons of its residents and the larger community through high quality international arts and humanities programs; and to encourage cooperation and respect among the people of all nations.


M E SS A G E FROM THE BOARD CHAIR D e a r Fr i e n d s, The year 2011 was indeed an exciting one in the long and illustrious history of International House Philadelphia. Let’s take a few minutes to look back and reflect on the year. The past twelve months have witnessed some of the most exciting international events in the last century as an outpouring of freedom and independence captivated the Middle East, some accepted, some rejected. It is too soon to predict the outcome of these happenings. It has never been more important for the United States to act as a magnet for young people who wish to come here to study and, hopefully, remain here after graduation. Our mission of acting as a beacon for them and nurturing them while they are here has also never been as important. So, in 2011, IHP’s multicultural residential center continued to welcome a diverse community of over 800 scholars from 79 countries. These future leaders from many different backgrounds live in harmony in our awardwinning building. IHP also presented more than 200 programs both to the residents and the general public in arts, culture, science, literature, and current events. Some of these programs introduced the American way of life to our scholars; while others offered a large and varied community audience an opportunity to participate in these celebrations of international understanding. As Board Chair I am proud of the many individuals whose efforts made our 2011 successes possible. As usual, our Board of Trustees provided valuable insight and generous financial support. Our Board of Delegates added welcome and infectious youthful enthusiasm to our resources. Our terrific staff continued to meet increasing objectives. Foundations, corporations, governmental entities, and individual donors recognized the merit of our work and supported our efforts with financial contributions which were especially appreciated in these economically challenging times. With pride in IHP’s year of accomplishments, I look forward to the challenges which lie ahead in 2012. With warm regards,

James M. Papada, III Board Chair

2


M E SS A G E FROM THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR


D e a r Fr i e n d s a n d C o l l e ag u e s, Our Centennial Year has passed and we have started a new century of service to the international scholars who have come to further their studies and learn about the US. We thank all our collaborators and partners who made the IHP Centennial Celebration such a wonderful year filled with events and recognition of the International House World Wide Movement, which started in Philadelphia and continues to be a flagship of international understanding and partnership. These activities brought back many of our friends and gave us the opportunity to make new friends as we introduced International House Philadelphia to those who visited us for the first time. Our many accomplishments during the centennial year speak to the staff’s dedication and to the support of our Boards and the community. The 536 films screened during the year and the 44 events that we hosted provided a view of the many cultures represented not only at IHP, but throughout the greater Philadelphia region. We saw new friends join us to celebrate our Centennial Gala, “It Happened First in Philadelphia!”. Eight major art exhibits continued to further our mission of presenting high-quality arts by showcasing the work of world renowned and local artists.

IHP’s Spoken Language Program continues to thrive, educating students on the conversational elements of many languages offered. In 2011 we had over 400 people working together in intimate class settings to learn from each other through inspired conversation groups. 2011 was indeed a wonderful year for IHP as we honored the previous 100 years of service and began to look forward to our next century here in Philadelphia, and across the globe. Once again, from the bottom of my heart and for all those associated with International House who have come before me, I thank you—residents, contributors, board members, volunteers and staff—for a successful Centennial year. Without your hard work, time, resources, expertise and dedication it would not have been possible for us to reach this milestone. Sincerely,

Tanya Steinberg Exective Director

We welcomed 814 residents from 79 countries, who attended 53 colleges, universities, educational and training programs in the greater Philadelphia region. Our multi-cultural home away from home gave them all the opportunity to experience and share the unique elements of each culture found under IHP’s roof. Through this cultural exchange new relationships have developed between people from numerous countries who will now network and call each other life-long friends. As part of our Leadership Lectures series, we continued to arrange visits from our many international partners and collaborators so that they would share with our residents their professional experiences as executives, in the US and abroad. These lectures provided our residents insight into the business world and offered support in professional and personal development. IHP residents were also recognized for the third consecutive year, receiving Davis Projects for Peace grants to implement their own grassroots peace-building programs. The recipients for 2011 returned from their fieldwork in Ghana and Egypt to present the results of their work to an audience of residents, staff and invited guests at IHP.

4


I N T E R N AT I O N A L HOUSE THEN & NOW


A CENTURY OF SERVICE International House Philadelphia celebrated its Centennial in 2011. Founded in 1910, IHP was the progenitor of the International House Movement which has since evolved into 22 worldwide.

Throughout our 100 year history, IHP has enjoyed active participation from the Philadelphia community. Our story began in 1908 when Waldo Stevenson, a missionary, and Edward Cope Wood, Director of the University of Pennsylvania’s Christian Association, chanced upon a group of Chinese students on campus. Touched by their evident loneliness and the prejudice and discrimination they and their friends experienced, Wood asked the Reverend and Mrs. Stevenson to open their Larchwood Ave, West Philadelphia apartment to foreign students studying in the area. Two years later in 1910, Wood persuaded the Christian Association to sponsor the Stevensons’ work. Thus began International House and the International House Movement. When it was founded 100 years ago, IHP provided a nurturing and supportive place for a small community of international students to meet and develop friendships with one another

and with Americans. Today, with over 35,000 alumni scattered around the US and across the globe, we provide more than 150 cultural, educational and social programs annually that assist our residents and other international students and scholars with their adjustment to American society and life in Philadelphia, while encouraging the crosscultural understanding and development of leadership skills necessary to succeed in today’s global economy. Resident programs include extensive orientations, trips to regional attractions, opportunities to meet business executives, language assistance, dance and music performances, host family programs as well as seminars on current topics. Many IHP residents major in fields that are vital to the “new economy.” A number of these students successfully secure professional positions in this region after graduation. IHP also presents hundreds of public programs to over 20,000 Philadelphia area residents throughout the year, fostering a global community by celebrating the world’s cultural diversity and probing issues from an international perspective. The acclaimed Film @ International House showcases the best in international repertory, avant garde and pop films, and often features directors and panelists that enhance the cinematic experience by encouraging dialogue on complex themes. Live @ International House seeks to showcase seldom-seen and unique artists. We also present scholars, authors and experts in fields ranging from global conflict, economic development and ethnic and social studies. Art @ International House is our most recent programming addition emerging from requests by local artists and organizations for space to showcase their work. For non-native English speakers of all ages and abilities, the Spoken English Program advances conversational skills. International House Philadelphia continues, as it has since its founding, to serve as a cultural intersection where individuals and ideas connect in a vibrant setting. We look forward to seeing you at International House.

6


F eature d b oar d mem b er s M ovi n g ih p f or ward

J u l i e M o s tov, Ph D is the Associate Vice Provost for International

Programs, and a professor of Political Science at Drexel University. Julie specializes in studies on the politics of national identity, sovereignty, citizenship, and gender with a particular interest in Southeastern Europe. Her recent publications promote the notion of soft-borders, transnational citizenship, and relational sovereignty, and explore gender and sexuality in the politics of national identity. Publications related to this work include, Soft Borders: Rethinking Sovereignty and Democracy (Palgrave Macmillan, May, 2008) as well as her book with Rada Ivekovic, From Gender to Nation, (University of Bologna/Longo Editore, 2002 and Zubaan Press 2004); [“Soft Borders and Transnational Citizens;” “‘Our Women”/’Their Women’: Symbolic Boundaries, Territorial Markers, and Violence in the Balkans;” “Sexing/Desexing the Nation/ Body;” and “Women and the Radical Right: Ethnocracy and Body Politics.”] In addition to this academic research, Julie has been actively involved in development projects in Serbia, Montenegro, Albania, and Moldova and programs and grants to stop violence against women in the US and abroad.

S a l l y B a r a k a , E s q . is currently Corporate Attorney for QlikTech, a user-driven business intelligence software company headquartered in Radnor, Pennsylvania. QlikTech originated in Lund, Sweden. In 2004, she clerked for the Honorable Joyce S. Kean of the First Judicial District of Pennsylvania in the Criminal Trial Division and in 2005 became a law clerk in the Senior Judges Chambers assigned to the Mass Tort Program. Sally graduated from Temple University’s Beasley School of Law and began her career practicing in the area of employment law. Sally is the daughter of Nabil Baraka, International House Resident Alumnus from the early 1970’s. Mr. Baraka is originally from Egypt.


DAVIS PROJECT FOR PEACE T H E V I S I O N O F K AT H R Y N W. D AV I S Upon

the

occasion

of

her

100th

birthday, International philanthropist and former international house New York resident Kathryn W. Davis chose to celebrate by committing $1 million to 100 projects for peace. Now in its fourth year, The Davis Projects for Peace continues to support and encourage today’s motivated youth to create and try out their own ideas for building peace. This program is an invitation to undergraduates at American colleges and universities in the Davis United World College Scholars Program to design grass roots projects implemented during the summer. The projects judged to be the most promising are funded at $10,000 each. International House Philadelphia has been fortunate to have five residents in the past three years receive this award. Cho Kim, our first recipient, created a peace project called “Engaging 4 Peace,” a cultural immersion program that prepares high school students in Philadelphia to live and work in a globalizing world. His program provided training to help students to not only become more receptive to cultural differences, but also to actively disabuse stereotypes held by other students through skills learned from programs workshops. Kyle Billings and Stephanie Davis’ 2010 project, “Painting for Peace,” helped make International House Philadelphia more beautiful by bringing together IHP residents and Philadelphia inner-city high school students to paint a mural on the ground floor of the building, a common area shared by residents and appreciated by all.

region, who have seen years of conflict and disorder. She, along with a team from The Hunger Project interviewed women to find out how the years of conflict has affected them. The women attended several workshops to become leaders in their household, in their community, and to increase their knowledge of reproductive health and Ghanaian laws. Her research will not only benefit the Ghana government, but will help bring peace through empowerment. Katie J. Hickerson (above, left) was another 2011 recipient of the Davis Project for Peace. Her project provided an intensive summer English writing and communication program for African refugees to discuss their everyday lives and bring light to their unique and often overlooked position in Egyptian society.

Nana Sarpong Agyemang-Mensah (above, right) was one of the 2011 winners. Her project took her back to her native country Ghana, to help empower women in the Northern

8


RESIDENT LIFE @ IHP O vervie w o f L i f e at I n ter n atio n al H ouse i n 2 0 1 1

The Resident Activities and Advisory Center (RAAC) provides programs and opportunities for residents that are

educational, intercultural, and fun. Since the founding of International House Philadelphia in 1910, the goal has been to embrace and welcome residents through vibrant and engaging programming. This year residents participated in events that welcomed new and returning people to the House.  The year was filled with our traditional resident House Socials, Education seminars, Coffee Hours, and House-wide events produced by the Residential Advisory Staff. Highlights from 2011 include:

Le a d e r s h i p Le ctu r e S e r i e s RAAC presents a Leadership Lecture Series for Residents where an accomplished professional presents on various topics related to professional and personal development.

This year we hosted Roomana M. Sheikh, M.D., a founder of Mindcare Consulting; Anette Hoegh Goelet, Chair of International Center for Clubhouse Development, Emiliano Martin, a Spanish poet, author, and an accomplished engineer; and Ajay Raju, Managing Partner of Reed Smith, LLP.


I n d e p e n d e n c e D ay B B Q

D i w a li C e le b r ati o n

Over 125 residents and members of IHP came together

Residents came together to celebrate this important

to enjoy the festivities of this traditional American holiday.

holiday event in Hindu culture, filled with various colors,

Food, music and dance were a big part of the event and

candles, lights, good food and traditional dance. Over

added to the revelry.

100 residents and members of IHP participated in this traditional experience that takes place in India every year.

S u m m e r S o i r e e “ W h ite P a rt y ” Our courtyard was transformed into a Mediterranean Café

H a llo w e e n P a rt y 

with white lights and white linen, and over 100 residents and

This popular IHP event was well attended, with 200

members enjoyed great food and danced under the stars on

costumed residents and guests dancing the night away

a beautiful summer night.

and celebrating until the wee hours of the morning!

W e lc o m e W e e k

Th a n k s g i v i n g D i n n e r

Residents started the week with an on-the-go continental

This traditional American holiday brought over 75 residents

breakfast, participated in our Town Hall Meeting, attended

together at International House where they learned about

a leadership development program, and later in the week

the origins of the Thanksgiving Holiday. For many of our

grooved to great dance music and enjoyed food while

residents, this was their first American holiday.

making new friends and celebrating the return of current residents. The majority of IHP residents, International House Staff and Board members attended these traditional events over the course of the week!

10


H o li d ay P a rt y

IHP R e s i d e nt Aw a r d s a n d Fa r e w e ll E v e nt

Residents shared their cultural traditions at the annual holiday

A very moving night for our residents, trustees and staff,

party.  We welcomed the holiday season with customs shared

this event traditionally brings each academic and residential

around the world. Over 100 residents, staff, board, and

year to a close.

members started their holidays with tree trimming, music and

through awards, comments, and messages of gratitude to one

good cheer!

another. We said goodbye to many of our long term residents

Residents and staff summarized the year

and recognized our resident leaders. We then proceeded to

W e lc o m e B a c k “ H at P a rt y ”

our Galleria, which was transformed into a dance floor for

Our residents celebrated their return to IHP in 2011 by dancing

celebration and dancing. Over 150 residents attended this

and enjoying a festive themed “hat party.” This popular winter

event to say farewell.

dance party had over 100 in attendance.  

C e nte n n i a l G a l a - R e s i d e nt Af te r P a rt y Lu n a r N e w Y e a r

With the Centennial Gala, IHP brought back the traditional

IHP residents and guests celebrated the Lunar New Year at our

After Party for our Residents! Over 75 residents joined in

9th annual festival by welcoming the Year of the Rabbit with the

the Centennial Celebration while dancing and enjoying the

traditional Lion dance. Wonderful performances and traditional

festivities of the IHP Gala.

foods highlighted this event, with over 100 residents and guests alike celebrating this special night together. 


12


Our residents represent the following academic, Educational, and training programs affiliations Over 800 students, from 79 countries, including the US, and representing 53 different instituitions in Philadelphia, have come together to be members of a friendly and supportive residential community where cultural differences are shared and celebrated.

Al Dia • Annenberg School • Art Institute of Philadelphia • Barbri • Bresler Group • Camden County Community College • Chestnut Hill College • Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia • City Ride • City Year Greater Philadelphia • Community College of Philadelphia • CVS Pharmacy/ NABP • Defense Logistics Agency - DLA Troop Support • Drexel University • Foreign Policy Research Institute • Four Seasons Hotel • GES (Global Energy Services) USA, Inc. • GPX Enterprises • Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities • Hahnemann University Hospital • Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania • Hussian School of Art • International SOS • Jean Madeline Institute • Kaplan • Kennedy Hospital (NJ) • LaSalle University • MERCK Group • Mid Market Capital Advisors • Monell Chemical Senses Center • Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts • Pennsylvania Hospital • Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas • Philadelphia University The Philadelphia Zoo • Presbyterian Medical Hospital • Pricewaterhouse Coopers LLP • Reed Smith LLP Right Management • Rutgers University • St. Christopher’s Hospital • Saint Joseph’s University • Swarthmore College • Veridex • Wistar Institute • Temple University • University of Pennsylvania University of the Sciences • Universal Technical Institute • US 3rd Circuit Court of Appeals • USDA • US Department of Sate • U.S. Naval Sea Systems

PROGRAMS

Undergraduate, graduate and postgraduate students, interns, trainees, researchers, intensive english, special programs

A C C379 Ounits: Mone Mbedroom O Dapartments, AT I O N S large efficiencies, small efficiencies, private rooms

A G18Eto 73RyearsAofN G E pop u l ation G ENDER age 77% International / 23% US 48% female / 52% male


COUNTRIES REPRESENTED Argentina Armenia Australia Austria Bolivia* Brazil* Canada* Chad Chile China Colombia* Costa Rica Denmark Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea

Eritrea Estonia Finland France Georgia Germany Ghana Greece Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India* Iran Iraq Ireland Israel* Italy

Ivory Coast* Japan Kazakhstan Kenya Kosovo* Kuwait Latvia Liberia* Libya Luxemburg Macau Malaysia Mauritius Moldova* Mongolia Morocco* Nepal

Netherlands New Zealand Nigeria Norway Pakistan Peru Philippines Qatar Russia* Rwanda Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Lebanon Singapore South Africa South Korea

Spain Sweden* Switzerland Taiwan Tanzania Togo* Thailand Trinidad/Tobago* Turkey Ukraine* United Arab Emirates United Kingdom* United States* Venezuela Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe

* Home countries of IHP staff 14


I N T E R N AT I O N A L H O U S E P H I L A D E L P H I A P R E S E N T S H U N D R E DS O F P U B L I C P R O G R A M S T O O V E R 2 0 , 0 0 0 PHILADELPHIA-AREA RESIDENTS THROUGHOUT THE YEAR, F O S T E R I N G A G L O B A L C O M M U N I T Y B Y C E L E B R AT I N G T H E W O R L D ’ S C U LT U R A L D I V E R S I T Y A N D E X P L O R I N G I SS U E S F R O M A N I N T E R N AT I O N A L P E R S P E C T I V E .


ARTS AND C U LT U R E @ I H P u n i q ue , i n n ovative , i n f lue n tial Throughout our history, International House Philadelphia has served as a cultural intersection where individuals and ideas connect in a vibrant setting. In recognition of the Centennial year of IHP’s founding, we presented a major exhibition of film, video, music and mixed media work, all of which were related to the central theme of Movement, which we interpreted both literally — work that embraces physical motion, changes through time and geographical shifts — and figuratively – work that moves between media or crosses the borders of convention. We built on an already-dynamic annual roster of film screenings and music events by opening up our theater and exhibition spaces to new forms of media that expanded the scope of our current programming. Much of this work extended beyond simple performance and presentation categories, including pieces that literally moved beyond the venue of IHP’s Ibrahim Theater. As a forum for shape-shifting, boundary-crossing art, the Movement series invited and engaged creative cultural dialogue. Two new series were inaugurated during our Centennial year: Wave Currents and Motion Pictures. Wave Currents explores the interaction between live music and live cinema and presents a variety of artists whose work is creating an entirely new category of sound/ moving image performance. Wave Currents showcases the unique experience which occurs when combining these two mediums. Participating artists were Sam Green (performing as part of Philadelphia Live Arts Festival & Philly Fringe); LoVid; Matt Suib and Nadia Hironaka with C Spencer Yeh; Andrew Lampert and Chris Corsano; Sandra Gibson and Luis Recoder with Olivia Block; and Richard Garet, Kamran Sadeghi and David Linton. Directors such as the Lumiere Brothers, John Ford and perennial favorite Chris Marker were featured in Motion Pictures, an on-going monthly series which focuses on significant movements and genres in film culture, including Italian Neo-Realism, Westerns and French New Wave. The history of the moving image exists at the center of modern

and postmodern culture, as the invention of film and the projector in the late nineteenth century brought movement as a new dimension to the visual arts. Once the creative use of movement was no longer reserved for solely the live arts, the photographic medium took on new expressive and formal capabilities. Cinema became both entertainment and developed into an acknowledged art form. Michael Snow and John Oswald are enormously influential Canadian artists working in film, sound, video, and visual art. Snow is one of the most important experimental artists living today. He has worked as a painter, photographer, sculptor, filmmaker, musician and writer since the 1950’s. His film works such as Wavelength (1967) and Back and Forth (1969) are often cited as the most important examples of structuralist filmmaking. As an elder statesman of the avant-garde, his enduring influence is still present in today’s emerging artists. Primarily known as a composer, dancer, musician and sound artist, John Oswald has recently exhibited numerous photographic and chronophotic works that employ various methods of movement and illumination. Oswald’s most famous work, Plunderphonics, remains an innovative and controversial example of using re-appropriated, copyrighted audio material to create new works. For IHP’s Centennial, Snow screened his video * Snow and Oswald performed in musical duo, Corpus Callosum, and Slought Foundation featured Many Moving and Still Works by Two Torontonians, an exhibit of visual and video work from both Snow and Oswald, curated with IHP. Surveying the influence of moving images on Pop Art, Pop Cinema was a three-night exhibition of Pop Art film screenings, including a panel discussion. While many American and British artists associated with Pop Art created original films, only those of Andy Warhol are widely known. Pop Cinema raised awareness of the contributions other artists and film makers made to the Pop Art film genre. This was the first time in the US that a collection of films presented early appearance of Pop Art in motion pictures. This project was supported by The

16


Pew Center for Arts & Heritage through the Philadelphia Exhibitions Initiative. A Page of Madness was a collaborative work of Philadelphia composer Gene Coleman and Japanese artist Akikazu Nakamura, commissioned by IHP for the Movement program. The two composed a new musical score for the 1926 Japanese silent film A Page of Madness. This performance was a re-imagining of the role of contemporary music in the interpretation and presentation of historic films. A Page of Madness also screened at the Museum of Modern Art in NYC as part of their eighth MoMA International Festival of Film Preservation. A Page of Madness was supported by The Japan Foundation, New York.

another. Since the action and characters of the story are spread between the two rooms, each film showed only half the story. The Centennial Photography Project was a collaboration between IHP and InLiquid Art + Design featuring diverse images of the wide-ranging activities, programs and people that make International House so unique. We thank the Centennial Arts Committee–Jill Katz, Joseph Newland, Mimi Sheller and Sean Stoops–for their invaluable dedication and commitment to Arts Programming at International House Philadelphia.

During the Philadelphia International Festival of the Arts (PIFA), we presented a weekend of three programs that reinterpreted the collision of art and artists at the beginning of the last century. The Independent Artist Movement in Cinematography program was dedicated to silent film directors who utilized techniques from avant-garde artists of the time. As early 20th century composers from the East and West began to discover each other’s work, it led to a blending of different forms of composition, creativity and collaboration. This merger was experienced at Wave Upon Wave, produced by Soundfield, and Trade Winds from Japan, produced by Network for New Music, presenting new works of music, video and dance commissioned by PIFA. Migration: Artistic Formations was a film program which examined the changing movements that transplant artists from one culture to another, intensifying migratory distinctions, and sharpening the conception of the creative role of displacement and estrangement within modern art. Filmmakers included Alison Kobayashi, Lonnie van Brummelen & Siebren de Haan and Oliver Husain.

Chris Marker’s Sans Soleil, featured in Motion Pictures

Cosmic Terrarium: Motion Painting Project featuring Muralmorphosis was part of the Philadelphia Live Arts Festival & Philly Fringe. Curated by Sean Stoops, Cosmic Terrarium: Motion Painting Project was a live outdoor mural painting/street art project set in Northern Liberties throughout the Festival. The Motion Painting Project culminated with an afternoon of street-art films and “animated painting” plus a panel discussion. Filmmaker Ted Knighton’s Six Plus Six was a video installation based on the myth of Persephone and consisted of two films, one shown in one room and one shown in

* A Page of Madness


I H P AT T E N D A N C E & PROGRAM DIVERSITY P R O G R A M S AT T E N D A N C E 1 3 3 6 2*

PROGRAM DIVERSITY 56

Language classes

p r ivat e event a d mi s s io n

11

FILM+LIVE

5775

1

general a d mi s s io n

GA L A

5585

44

Free A d mi s s io n

p r ivat e events

1179

19

STUDENT / SEN I O R

LIVE

808

L EARN

26704

ART

3

M E M B ER

12

T O TA L

*133 FILM

87% FILM / 13% LIVE

219

*41% THEATER / 59% CONFERENCE CENTER

T O TA L

* 5films 36

IHP PROGRAMS BY THE NUMBERS

13 8 live

performers

4 9 artists

3ARTS8

volunteers

8 Learn program presenters

*536 Films were screened at our 133 film programs.

18


LANGUAGE PROGRAMS @ IHP E D U C AT I O N A L , I N T E R C U LT U R A L , F U N The Language Programs have continued to grow with the addition of Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) prep classes, writing classes, and more tutoring hours. The TOEFL prep classes and the additional tutoring have been especially welcomed by our English students. We began to offer more TOEFL prep hours by dividing skill areas out into different classes. Some focused on speaking and listening and others on reading and writing. Our foreign language classes also began to have broader appeal, and we saw an increase in inquiries and enrollments particularly from high school students and teachers. Many of the inquiries came from different parts of the city and a higher proportion of our student body travel 45 minutes or more to attend classes. Our volunteer teachers are interested in different cultures, and students come from all over the world. This makes our classes a great place to meet people from other countries and learn about American culture. Students can participate in field trips, extra-curricular activities and have opportunities to meet with conversation partners.

“I highly recommend International House Philadelphia’s language program for anyone seeking a pressure free environment in which to learn a new language. After taking 40 hours of Korean at IHP…I was able to test into a n u n d e r g r a d u a t e I n t e r m e d i a t e K o r e a n c l a s s a t Te m p l e U n i v e r s i t y. T h i s c o n f i r m e d m y s u s p i c i o n t h a t I n t e r n a t i o n a l H o u s e c l a s s e s a r e o n p a r w i t h u n i v e r s i t y f o r- c r e d i t language instruction—at a fraction of the cost!” – Peter C. Burke

32

ENGLISH CLASSes

2 5 1 ENGLISH CLASS STUDENTS

9

korean classes

1 1 0 FOREIGN LANGUAGE CLASS STUDENTS

15

mandarin classes

4 6 Volunteer

TEACHERS AND TUTORS 20


Facilities and conference center @ IHP distinctive, welcoming, comfortable Building Pr o ject s Co mple ted in F Y 20 11

• $583,903: Completion of the final phase of new Fire Alarm and Central Annunciator System, which includes speakers in each resident’s room and apartment for clear evacuation instructions, and a central panel providing immediate identification of potential fire safety issues. It was also upgraded to meet ADA standards. • $33,800: Exterior caulking of 33 residential suite windows and interior caulking of expansion joints. This work eliminated leaking problems on 14 floors. • $3,475: Replacement of 40-year-old Front Doors. • $17,810: Renovations of Residential Suites and Apartments. • $3,816: New Rose Garden, Seasonal Plantings, and Tree Pruning.

C omm u nity organi z ations presenting events : 10

9

PERS O NA L DE V E L O P M ENT Groups a n d Cl u b s

O r g a n i z at io n s S e r vi n g hi g h s c hool S t u d e n t s

18

Coll e g e s & u n iv e r s i t i e s

11

H e a lt h a n d So c i a l S e r vi c e s o r g a n i z at io n s

17

E d u c at io n a l O r g a n i z at io n s

4

6

Arts & C u lt u r e

I n t e r n at io n a l O r g a n i z at io n s

8

Comm u n i t y Groups

83

T O TA L


P

ortable

in september of 1970, the building we call home received recognition from the american institute of architects, and we work continuously to maintain its award-winning standards. every project we undertake is designed to ensure ihp continues to be a distinctive, welcoming, and comfortable place for residents, audiences, and guests.

22


in may, international hou s e phila d elphia ho s te d our C entennial gala . cele b rating fir s t s in the city of phila d elphia . inclu d ing the worl d ’ s fir s t international hou s e .


SPECIAL EVENTS @ IHP V I bra n t, e n tertai n i n g , dy n amic I t H a ppen ed Fir s t in Ph il a de l ph i a!

Each year, International House Philadelphia holds a fundraising Gala to support operations. On May 20th, in IHP’s Ibrahim Theater we celebrated our Centennial Gala: It Happened First in Philadelphia! featuring our beloved city of Philadelphia, a city of firsts, home of the world’s first International House and the birthplace of our nation’s constitution. Guests included our Board of Trustees, Board of Delegates, Corporate friends, Alumni and community leaders who support IHP’s mission to promote cross-cultural understanding and international awareness. Mika Brzezinski, co-host of MSNBC’s Morning Joe was featured speaker.

ALU M NI S U M M E R B BQ R EU NION!

On June 4th, IHP welcomed alumni and friends to our Alumni Summer BBQ Reunion, which was held in our courtyard. This gathering was attended by alumni and friends spanning many generations, and included many who traveled from around the US to visit with old friends and new. IHP prides itself on touching over 35,000 alumni and friends worldwide since we began in 1910. Our Alumni Relations department maintains communications with alumni and friends, coordinates gatherings and reunions, and secures contributions and grants to support IHP’s mission. The office also publishes iWorld, our electronic newsletter, maintains the official Alumni page on facebook, coordinates Annual Fund mailings, and welcomes alumni year-round for tours and visits to their home away from home, IHP. Whether you lived here for a week, a month or many years, you are part of the IHP family and we welcome you to visit the House whenever your travels bring you back to Philadelphia.

24


MEMBERSHIP @ IHP adve n turous , e n abli n g , re wardi n g In 2011, International House continued growing its membership program by appointing a full time Manager. The end of the year was spent revamping Corporate and Individual Membership Levels and Benefits for roll-out in 2012. In addition to Membership Benefits, IHP is working on expanding its relationships with other Greater Philadelphia Area Organizations through co-sponsorship of events, and reciprocal membership benefits in order to provide the best experience and value for IHP Members. In 2011, International House also introduced Volunteer Night—a monthly night to engage volunteers in short projects that benefit IHP. The volunteers get to meet staff, learn about various volunteer opportunities at the House, and can see first-hand the positive impact of their involvement with IHP. Volunteer opportunities at International House Philadelphia include teaching in our Language Programs Department, working at IHP film and live events, acting as Membership Ambassadors at events around the city, and providing general office support. IHP has engaged dozens of new volunteers since implementing Volunteer Night. Call 215.895.6528 or visit www.ihousephilly.org/give for more information.

s upport from in d ivi d ual s , corporation s , community, an d e d ucational organi z ation s ha s b een integral to the s ucce s s of I H P ’ s mi s s ion . the s e gift s are an inve s tment in the live s of our re s i d ent s , the greater s tu d ent community, our alumni , an d every per s on who wal k s through our d oor s . T han k you .


C O R P O R AT E MEMBERS 2011 $ 10,0 0 0+ Wells Fargo Bank N.A. • University Of Pennsylvania • PNC Bank

$ 7, 5 0 0 – $ 9 , 0 0 0 Pennsylvania Academy Of The Fine Arts • Coinmach

$ 5 , 0 0 0 – $ 7, 4 9 9 Citizens Bank • Elliott Lewis Corporation • Asher & Co. Ltd Progressive Business Publications

$2,50 0 – $ 4,999 University Of The Sciences • Drexel University • Mintz Levin

$750 – $2,49 9 Shelly Electric Company • Complete Claim Solutions LLC • Bartlett & Company Inc Certainteed • Philadelphia Zoo

U p To $ 74 9 Brown Brothers Harriman And Company • Greater Philadelphia Tourism Marketing Corporation • Community College Of Philadelphia • Geiger • Iperdesign Inc Rhino World Inc • Science Center • Starrez • Cohen, Fluhr & Gonzalez Pc A’lecole Francaise • Husky Associates • Philip Rosenau Co. Inc • University City District • Beech Company • Philadelphia Asian American Film & Filmmakers

G overnment & F oun d ation Support Government Suppor t Pennsylvania Council on The Arts

Foundation Support Davis United World College Scholars Program • The Pew center for arts & heritage through the philadelphia exhibitions initiative • Sam And Charles Foundation • Ounsworth-Fitzgerald Foundation • Japan Foundation, New York • Alpin W Cameron Foundation • Cozen O’connor Foundation • Callaghan Family Foundation • Leo Model Foundation, Inc • Rittenhouse Foundation • Samuel P. Mandell Foundation 26


in d ivi d ual contri b utor s 2011 T h e c o n t r i b u t i o n s l i s te d b e l ow r e p r e s e n t c u m u l a t i ve to t a l s o f a l l c o n t r i b u t i o n s to I n te r n a t i o n a l H o u s e Ph i l ad e l p h i a f o r M e m b e r s h i p, S p e c i a l Eve n t s, a n d Pr o g r a m s b e t we e n J u l y 1, 20 10 a n d J u n e 30, 20 11 $25,000 + A. Bruce & Margaret Mainwaring *

$10 , 0 0 0 – $ 24 , 9 9 9 Constance Benoliel-Rock & Dr. Milton Rock + Frank + & Susan Mechura Edward Satell + Richard + & Carolyn Veith

Laurada Byers + Rebecca Weidensaul Gigli Joan Heller ++ John Hopkinson Osagie Imasogie Kenneth Kring + & Pamela Laucks Siobhan Lyons + John Walker **

$500 – $999 $5,000 – $9,999 Robert & Susie Harries + Jim Papada + Emily Riley + John F. + & Susan Smith David + & Lisa U’Prichard

$250 0 – $4,9 9 9 Peter Dachowski + & Victoria Kaplan Josephine Klein Thomas & Ann Morris * Julie Mostov + Louis + & Katherine Padulo Herbert Rappaport + Tanya Steinberg x

$1, 0 0 0 – $ 2,4 9 9 Christer Andresen Donna Lee Jones Yelena Barychev + Peter Benoliel

+

&

Kodjo Adovor ** Busola Awoniyi ** James & Kim Balaschak Steven Balin Sally Baraka ** Richard Bartlett ** Toni Benedetti ** Peter Brennan ** Christopher Bryan ** Martha Buccino x Ellen & Peter Davis Edward Driscoll Marc Duey + Walter Garrison Nancy Gilboy Hernan Guaracao + Chandrakant Gupta ++ Robin Pinder Herndon + & Bruce Herndon John Jones Audrey Julienne ** Frode Kjersem **

Shermeela Kumar ** Kimberly Langton ** William Larkin + Patricia Le Foll ++ Michael Lettiere Edward Liu Heather Ritch + John Ryan Matthew Satell ** Ivy Silver Anna Steinberg David Suisman John & Geraldine Tom ++

$10 0 – $ 24 9 Frank Anbari ++ Steve Averbuch Sandra Battaglia Stephen Beuret & Barbara Hirshkowitz Howard Bilofsky Martin Brennan Eric Bresler ++ Chris Cagle Chip Cale Mary Carroll Moshe Caspi x Ellyn Charlestein-Phillips Cheng Che Chen # Christos Christou Jay Cornell Bernadette Daniel Jeanne Delcasino ++


Dawna Desrosiers Renae Dinerman x Jonathan Fiene Michele Haines Kenneth Hill Frank Hoffman Scott Homan Simone Jeffers x Paul Lewis Joseph Newland Atsushi Numaguchi ++ Anna Olshanskaya Todd Parsons Curtis Reitz * Alexander Rivkin x Bharati Sharma Monika Sienkowska Linda Smith Charles Snell Glenn Stephanowicz Katherin Swift Philip Webster Dh Wheeler Horace Wu & Kate King Wu Xinyi Zhou

U p to $ 9 9 Nana Agyeman-Mensah # Philip Ahr Layli Alexander Beatrice Bellini Candace Cavalier Elaine Chang

++

Tuhin Chatterjee ++ Francis Conroy Priscila Contreos Ian Cross & Josette Bonofino Gwendolyn Darony Danielly De Oliveira Deangela Duff Magdalena Echenique Satoko Elstein Olga & Steve Fedorov Jeronimo Fernandez Nikolai Fomich Peter & Clara Fomich x Jeffrey Ford Ronald Francis Jonathan Gaev ++ Tomaz Gazmuri Luwam Ghermay Rajesh Gopalan Laurel Grady Xiaoyan He # Christopher Hearsey ++ Bill Hooper Yi Huang Mitsumoto Kawai Hakmin Kim David Koch Kathryn Kraczon Sami Krait # Asher Lewis Joshua Martin Julius Masri Edward Miller

Matthew Moxey V. S. Naiken ++ † Alessandra Oliveira Robert Padulo Carole Parker x Ted Passon Salvatore Patti Jim Perretta Caroline Garcia Pinto Sally Redlener Martina Roes Lynn Sawlivich Monica Souza Christopher Smith Emily Steinberg Bertram Strieb Barrie Trimingham Timothy Unruh ++ Alejandra Wolff ++ Diane-Louise Wormley Lina Yankelevich x Lihe Yeo Tarchini Yi Yu

* +

IHP Center Board Managers

Board of Trustees

** Board of Delegates IHP Employee

X

++ #

†

IHP Alumnus Current IHP Resident Deceased

28


International House Philadelphia + International House Center, Inc. Combined Statements of Activities Year Ended June 30, 2011 U n r es t r i c t ed Temp o r a r i ly Tota l Res t r i c t ed Support and Revenue Program Revenue Residential and facility Arts, cultural and educational programs Contributions Investment Income

$3,936,762 $144,015 $815,951

_

$3,936,762

_

$144,015

$50,000

$36,875

$865,951 $36,875

Realized and unrealized gain on investment

$223,015

_

$223,015

Net assets released from time and purpose restrictions

$447,437

($447,437)

$5,604,055

($397,437)

$5,206,618

$3,080,189

$3,080,189

$465,829

_

Total Support and Revenue Expenses Program Services Residential and facility Arts, cultural and educational programs Total Program Services

$3,546,018

$465,829 $3,546,018

Supporting Services General and administrative

$344,509

Development, marketing and public relations

$607,490

$16,000

$623,490

$951,999

$16,000

$967,999

Total Expenses

$4,498,017

$16,000

$4,514,017

Changes in net assets before depreciation and amortization

$1,106,038

($413,437)

$692,601

Depreciation and amortization

$604,623

$604,623

Changes In Net Assets after depreciation and amortization

$501,415

($413,437)

$87,978

Total Supporting Services

_

$344,509

NET ASSETS, BEGINNING OF YEAR

$2,338,392

$3,771,002

$6,109,394

NET ASSETS, END OF YEAR

$2,839,807

$3,357,565

$6,197,372

30


international hou s e b oar d s FY 2011 Of ficers

James M. Papada, III, Esq., Chair Laurada B. Byers, Vice-Chair Frank J. Mechura, Treasurer William Larkin, EdD, Secretary

B o a r d o f Tr u s te e s

Christer Andresen Yelena Barychev, Esq. Constance W. Benoliel-Rock Laurada B. Byers Peter R. Dachowski George Doolittle Marc Duey Jill R. Felix-Colton Adelaide Ferguson Hernan Guarcaro Robert Harries Nicole Kraus Kenneth L. Kring Siobhan Lyons Julie Mostov, Ph.D Louis Padulo, Ph.D Robin Pinder Herndon, Esq Herbert Rappaport, PhD Emily C. Riley Heather Ritch, Esq Rep. James R.Roebuck, Jr.* Edward Ryan Edward Satell John F. Smith, III, Esq. David C. U’Prichard, Ph.D Richard L. Veith Senator Anthony H. Williams*

E m e r i t i, H o n o r a r y + I n te r n a t i o n a l Tr u s te e s Hussein El-Sharkawy Anne Elder Josephine Klein A. Bruce Mainwaring William T. McClintock Thomas B. Morris, Jr, Esq. Lewis S. Somers, 3rd † Mark Willcox, Jr., Esq.

C e n te r B o a r d

Richard Brown Graham Finney Frederick Heldring A. Bruce Mainwaring Paul Miller Thomas B. Morris, Jr., Esq. Curtis Reitz

B o a r d O f D e l e g a te s

Frode Kjersem Chair Audrey Allen, Esq. Vice-Chair Christian Mattioli, Esq. Secretary Kodjo Adovor Audrey Allen, Esq. Busola Awoniyi Sally Baraka, Esq Richard Bartlett Toni Nicole Benedetti, Esq. Peter Brennan Christopher Bryan Audrey Julienne Frode Kjersem Sherry Kumar Christian Mattioli, Esq. Ken Oh Matthew Satell Brendan Walsh John Walker, Esq.

* ex-officio † Deceased


I nternational hou s e s taff Tanya Steinberg, Executive Director International Houses Worldwide Association Clara Fomich, Executive Assistant

Ad m i s s i o n s + R e s i d e n t S e r v i c e s

Glenn Martin, Director of Admissions + Resident Services Jeff Bourgeois, Associate Director of Resident Services Marlon Patton, Front Desk Manager + Cashier Deborah Houda, Resident Activities + Advisory Center Manager Edwin Garcia, Admissions Coordinator Emily Martin, Admissions Coordinator Eugene Park, Front Desk Coordinator

A r t s + L a n g u ag e Pr o g r a m s

Renae Dinerman, Director of Arts Robert Cargni, Curator Jesse Pires, Curator Barbara Warnock, Language Programs Manager Jesse Kudler, Production Manager Herb Shellenberger, Box Office + Programs Manager

Building Operations

Carole Parker, Director of Building Services Moshe Caspi, Security Services + Systems Manager Raj Persad, Building Operations Manager + Maintenance Alex Rivkin, Information Systems + Technology Manager Wendy Hyatt, Conference Center + Building Services Coordinator Larry Moore, Lead Security Officer Althelson Towns, Lead Housekeeper

Business Of fice

H o u s e ke e p i n g, M a i n te n a n c e + S e c u r i t y Noah Anthony Reginald Brown Melvin Caranda Phillip Carter Moifee Dorley Robert Engle Kodzo “David� Gasonu Sherman Griggs Sylvie Hoeto Russell Jenkins Marie Berhe Johnson Henry Koffi Yefim Klurfeld Vipin Maxwell Lulzim Myrtaj Amar Persad Christina Rivera Ronald Smith Linda Stanton Robert Wooten

I n s t i t u t i o n a l Ad va n c e m e n t

William Parker, Senior Marketing Manager Christina Rockwell, Membership Programs + Development Services Manager Justin Miller, Graphic Designer Angel Raffanello, Manager of Corporate Relations + Special Events Jessamyn Falcone, Development Services Coordinator Lauren H. Fenimore, Development Assistant

Lina Yankelevich, Finance + Human Resources Manager Angela Bachman, AR/AP Coordinator

32


HOW YOUR SUPPORT HELPS US i n s p iri n g , e n richi n g , u n i f yi n g Pro g r a m s fo r c ro s s c u l tu r a l u n d e r s t a n d i n g, L e a d e r s h i p d eve l o p m e nt, a n d a c a d e m i c exc e l l e n c e

A n n u a l C o st: $ 240,0 0 0

R ef u r b i s h i n g re s i d e nti a l s u i te s

O n e T i m e C o st: $ 40,0 0 0

I nte r n ati o n a l f i l m s, m u s i c a n d v i s u a l a r t p ro g r a m s of a r ti s ti c exc e l l e n c e

A n n u a l C o st: $ 220,0 0 0

S p o ke n L a n g u a g e p ro g r a m s

A n n u a l C o st: $70,0 0 0

HERE’S HOW YOU CAN HELP FURTHER: • U n i t ed Way Please remember International House as you consider your designation for United Way. Our donor option number is 1517. • Matching Gifts are a wonderful way to increase your support of IHP. • A planned gift to International House is an expression of your commitment to this great institution. Your gift will ensure our continuing ability to enrich and transform lives. Please call Tanya Steinberg, Executive Director at 215.895.6527 or e-mail tanya@ihphilly.org to make your gift or for further information. Thank you for your support.

8 0 0 + INTERNATIONAL AND AMERICAN RESIDENTS ANNUALLY

2ARTS 00 + AND CULTURAL EVENTS PER YEAR

3 3 + YEARS OF PREMIER

ARTS PROGRAMMING

1ARTS 0 0AND+

CULTURAL PARTNERS AND COLLABORATORS YEARLY

2 0 + DIFFERENT

LANGUAGES SPOKEN

5 5 + COLLEGES,

UNIVERSITIES, and institutions REPRESENTED

250 , 0 0 0 SQ. FEET 34


370 1 C h es t n u t S t r ee t, Ph i l a de l ph i a , PA 19 10 4 w w w.i h o useph i l ly.o r g • 2 15.387.5125


IHP's Annual Report, 2011