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English edition

II. 2010


Dear readers, EXPOs are increasingly becoming a training ground where the best architects can propose new ideas for architectural spaces and new technologies to put them into practice. In recent years, light has become nothing less than a “material” able to create spaces and architectures, overcoming the simple functional role assigned to it in the past. The Shanghai EXPO is an obvious example. Today light should be considered a material able to create architecture, such as bricks, concrete, glass and steel. In the past this role was limited to the use of natural light, from the Crystal Palace, made of glass and steel, by Paxton in 1851, to the chapel at Ronchamp by Le Courbusier, which are examples that everyone is familiar with. Today artificial light technologies, such as new discharge lamps, LEDs, OLEDs, LASERs are controlled by increasingly sophisticated computerised systems producing effects and situations which until a few years ago were limited to the cinema. But all of this should be supported by a precise strategy which we have clearly expressed for several years now in our advertising campaign “Better light for a better life”. A phrase that calls to mind the motto of EXPO 2010: “Better City, Better Life”.

Adolfo Guzzini


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II. 2010

Summary

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Editorial

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Design Interview with Georges Berne/Lao Bei

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Projects An opus of music and light. Nessun dorma by Chen Yifei

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Expo 2010 Shanghai “Better City, Better Life” Italy palace

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Expo 2010 Shanghai “Better City, Better Life” French pavilion

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Expo 2010 Shanghai “Better City, Better Life” UBPA - Pavilions B2 and C1

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Expo 2010 Shanghai “Better City, Better Life” UBPA - Pavilion B3-2

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New Acropolis Museum

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Restructuring of the Cour des Comptes (Court of Auditors)

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Caravaggio

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Darwin Exhibition

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Carrasco International Airport. New passenger terminal

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The new Condominio Theatre

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Herren Globus shop, Zurich airport

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Lyon Housemuseum

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New lighting for the Manufactum store

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Kurilpa Park and bridge

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Wesley Church

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Tibidabo park

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Cervantes square

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1001 trees for Copenhagen

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Company culture iGuzzini illuminazione in New York

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The iGuzzini Shanghai office, destination of the Marche delegation

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New online catalogue

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Young Creative Poland

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iGuzzini contributes to the LOW3 project

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The family as entrepreneurial value Luigi Moretti, architect. From rationalism to the informal

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Georges Berne guest of iGuzzini illuminazione IV Forum for Italo - Russian dialogue Guildford Design Awards

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The Treasure of the Shroud Abu Dhabi Award


Design

Interview with Georges Berne/Lao Bei

How did the collaboration with the client Adam Yu come about? Did Yu put the work out to tender or did you already know about it? The story of how we came to work together is interesting. Obviously, Adam Yu or his team had approached various people before meeting me: some lighting designers, perhaps, although it's more likely that they were lighting material manufacturers. None of the solutions they suggested for lighting the “Lacquer work” (lacquer is the technique used for the “Nessun dorma” work) satisfied him apparently. A young French woman Hélène Lemerle, chinese name Lina, who is in charge of cultural projects near Adam Yu for Winland tracked me down through Jim Tordjeman, producteur (O+ PRODUCTIONS) who gave her my name. With an “online” search they discovered the article from a few years ago by journalist Carine Lenfant, which outlined my professional development, together with illustrations. My references won him over, particularly the lighting for the Mona Lisa in 1993 and work with monumental pieces such as Fée Electricité at the Paris Museum of Modern Art. To conclude my answer to this question, I could say that in this case a number of factors went in my favour: for example, but always prudently, maybe the fact that I am French, I work in Paris and am linked to many cultural initiatives. Really, nobody knows except Adam Yu. 1

How did you create the lighting design? Did the client have ideas of his own? Did he explain what type of light he wanted? Did he set limits on what you could spend or other limits? Or did he ask you to put forward several ideas and solutions so that he could choose something from them? I asked to meet him before starting the work, to see “Nessun dorma”, to see where it would be, and to make sure I understood what he was looking for. I think my unconventional profile surprised him....not sure... I showed him my idea right away, a technical solution that no one else had proposed: to light the “Lacquer work” in such a way as to avoid any reflection. I provided an impromptu demonstration with some stage lighting material that I had to hand, a latest generation Vari Lite luminaire, a product hugely admired in Europe, so you can imagine the reaction in China: the “top” in motor-driven stage lighting. Once the demo was successfully completed, I suggested to him that it wasn't necessary to overload the environment with light, but that in actual fact a little light was sufficient to show off the “Lacquer work”, to stimulate observers' perception of it: just 200-300 lux were needed rather than the thousands that one might have expected. That was it: just a few minutes, a Chinese meal shared, spicy, the way I like it… Nothing more... Despite that, I think it took me around two years to truly understand what Adam Yu wanted for this work: if he definitely wanted to avoid any reflection, but he wanted also and almost, through artificial lighting, as an emotion previously experienced…. We talked of nothing else, neither technology nor money. I saw who Adam Yu was, and I saw “Nessun dorma”. He accepted me. I agreed to work for him. The only condition was to take up a challenge: designing and implementing the work in 6 months so as to be ready for the inauguration of the lacquer work on 28 April 2008.

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Photographs: Lv Hengzhong 1. The lit “Nessun dorma” work 2.3.4. Different stages for lighting the special product

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What is the general idea behind the lighting management you created? Before talking about lighting management, we need to discuss the design. The Nessun dorma work, due to its position in the building's Atrium and because of the structures around it, in order to be properly appreciated and avoid any reflection needs very localised lighting, I'd say intense and so divided according to its considerable dimensions (40 m long and14 m wide). Words weren't enough to explain the situation and illustrate our idea: our drawings where what showed with some degree of method the spirit, requirements, the solution… or rather solutions, because there wasn't just one solution. The spirit was to manage to create a system that would always and only allow the work to speak for itself. The only way of doing that was integration. For the requirements we suggested the installation of between 300 and 500 spotlights depending on the power wanted… and the exact number of spotlights selected was 300 + 5. The solutions involved spatial organisation of the lighting material in various installations. We advanced by degrees… Adam Yu told me over and over the legend of Princess Turandot. He told me it as he very often, almost daily, tells it to friends and acquaintances… He sang Puccini's opera… He loves to sing. He talked me through the «clouds» which symbolise the sequence of scenes that are the plot of the legend. He drew with his finger from 30 m away. It was his drawing like this which quite simply prompted the idea that, if staged correctly, the light could accompany his words.

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Design

Interview with Georges Berne/Lao Bei

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5. Drawing derived from the lighting concept 6. Detail of the product coupling brackets

In the meantime two years went by. The luminaire, the lighting object, has in a certain sense «as inadvertently» become well-established. And I realised that Yu wanted something unique. He saw my passion grow day by day, imperceptibly… and he finally asked me for an interpretation of the Puccini opera using light. The lacquer work, the object lit, appeared in relative splendour under the artificial light. There has always been a torment, a fear that reflection was not completely controlled, one hundred percent. I read a lot about lacquer, its use, its fragility, it brilliance… I realised almost really at the end that I didn't have only to oppose the reflection, but instead support it. The extreme brilliance of lacquer has its purposes, such as forcing one's gaze to go beyond it. “Nessun dorma” controls reflection in two ways: its abstraction to allow a glimpse of Turandot and its materialisation so that Turandot can see us, since the eyes only light up if reanimated by the flame of reflection. All of this remained, very simply. How was the idea converted into actual lighting effects, with real life lighting management? There could be a number of answers and I would choose perhaps the one you don't expect. Adam Yu had a direct requirement: to provide good lighting for “Nessun dorma”… respecting, that is to say, in keeping with a place. The lighting set-up was proposed practically from the start, from our second meeting. For us it was the logical solution. But it wasn't for Adam Yu who, however, believing in and respecting our art, never ruled it up. I hope, I think he apreciated, as a recompense of his true and constant trust, the result when the finishing touch was made to the lighting design, programming the light to natural scale. Then he saw the artificial light transform into a kind of fluid which flows over “Nessun dorma” symbol after symbol: 300 spotlights that light up simultaneously or one after another with different intensities to tell a story. When Vincent Valère, the lighting man from the French Institute «La Caisse des Monuments et des Sites», saw our studies and drawings, while the project was a work in progress yet, and he coined the phrase «dragon of light» because he imagined the spotlights as a dragon with 300 heads, each spitting its own flame....

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Design

Interview with Georges Berne/Lao Bei

8’18’’ * 8’18’’ is a new firm, founded in 2007 by the presidents of “Grandeur Nature” (François MIGEON) and “L’Observatoire 1” (Georges BERNE). The association of the two entities, of their shared competences of lighting engineer and lighting designer, promoves, with different signatures, the alliance between the technical rigor and the artistic emotion. It allows each one, from now on joint through 8’18’’, an amazing approach on subtantial projects, bringing them a both living, compared and experimented answer, 8’18’’ has a French touch in a World perspective. *Eight minutes 18 seconds is the time taken by a photon to travel the distance between the Sun and the Earth Georges Berne Born in Marseille in 1956, he combines technical scientific education with an artistic style. From 1980 to 1985 he worked for Philips. From 1986 to 1991 he worked as a professional Lighting Designer. In 1992 he established “L’Observatoire 1” followed in 1993 by “L'observatoire International”. During the two-year period 1994/95 he was vice-president of ELDA (European Lighting Designer Association). In 2007 he co-founded 8’18’’. In 2009 he was appointed “Chevalier in the Arts and Humanities Order”. Recent cultural works on which he was recently collaborating through “L’Observatoire 1” or 8’18’’ are: the Pompidou Art Center in Metz with Shigeru Ban and Jean de Gastines, 2010; the Cité Internationale de la dentelle et de la mode in Calais with Alain Moatti and Henry Riviere, 2009; the Cham Museum in Da Nang with Renaud Piérard, 2008; the Modern Art Museum In Alger with Halim Faïdi, 2007; In progress: the European and Mediterranean Civilizations Museum in Marseille with Rudy Ricciotti; the Louvre-Islamic Arts Department in Paris with Rudy Ricciotti and Mario Bellini; the Louvre Abu Dabi with Jean Nouvel.

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What technical difficulties did you encounter? At this point we can talk about the lighting material. The first difficulty was convincing the supplier of the luminaires, in this case iGuzzini, that we needed more than a simple lighting system picked from the catalogue. We were looking for highly «professional» material, in the sense that access to the lamps for “relamping” had to be allowed without changing the way the spotlights were aimed, which meant locking the luminaires extremely «precisely»: each of the 60 structures supporting a total of 300 spotlights had to allow adjustments of around 1°... that is to say, adjusted one next to another like the pleats of a Fortuny pleated fabric. All of the spotlights are controlled using the DALI protocol, which wasn't designed for theatrical use. So the first and last difficulties were basically: adjustments, programming, management and long life.

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Contacts

7. The complete luminaire system

Rue Smétana 2 92000 Nanterre - France Tel. + 33 6 08 92 68 10 Mail georges.berne@wanadoo.fr 8.18@orange.fr

Considerations and acknowledgements I would like to thank Adam Yu, 8’18’’, Claire-Lise Bague the lighting designer and her assistant Anthony Perrot, whose help was invaluable. Thanks also to the considerable Winland team which worked alongside Adam Yu on this project. Particularly, thank you Hélène Lemerle/Lina for finding me… more than an intermediary. Particularly, thank you Sam Qi, in charge of cultural projects too, who relayed Lina for a time. Particularly too, thank you Hou Dong, engineer in charge in Winland to all the aspects of our electrical project. Thanks to the 3 units iGuzzini France, Italy and Beijing which each had its own role: iGuzzini France for their technical and relational support, iGuzzini Italy for developing and setting up the lighting and control equipment; iGuzzini Beijing for putting the project into effect... And their astonishment when faced with the completed project. You will by now have understood that I couldn't have done it without them! It was never a work by one person. They called me Lao Bei from the moment we started to work together. For them, far away, I will always be Lao Bei: Bei like Berne, Lao for “old, wise”.

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An opus of music and light. ‘Nessun dorma’ by Chen Yifei.

Projects

Client Adam Yu Lighting designer 8’18” - Georges Berne

Beijing, China

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The romantic Chinese Adam Yu is a keen operalover, and particularly fond of Giacomo Puccini. A few years ago, Yu decided to commission the artist Chen Yifei to create the largest Chinese lacquer inspired by Turandot, Giacomo Puccini’s last and unfinished opera, famous especially for its great tenor aria ‘Nessun dorma’. The painting employs the traditional technique of Chinese lacquer. Constituted of 288 pieces like mosaic, the work stands 40 metres high and 15 metres wide, completely occupying one side of the wall

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of the atrium in the Winland International Finance Center, a multipurpose building. The lacquer was unveiled on April 25th 2008, to celebrate the 150th anniversary of the Tuscan composer’s birth and exact date of the 82nd birthday of the premiere of Turandot in La Scala de Milan. The painting captures 12 key moments in Turandot. The lighting was conceived with the intention both of focusing on certain scenes, and of portraying the opera in its totality, or revealing it piece by piece.

Given its complexity, the operation called for the creation of a special product, developed by iGuzzini, that would allow the combination of bright light sources and optical assemblies capable of being integrated and aggregated with the end view of illuminating the work in its entirety. The fixture that emerged uses 50W low voltage dichroic light sources with cone widths of 4° and 8° and a colour temperature of 3000 K, all of which is dimmable. The specially made fixture consists of an assembly of long and

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Photographs: Lv Hengzhong 1.2.3.4. Different lighting situations created using the luminaires and the control system

narrow rectangular structures, designed to house the light sources. Each single rectangular element is mounted to an arm that can be inclined vertically up to an angle of 30° by steps of one degree. The output is essentially a wave of light, but with different final effects obtainable by means of directional adjustments. The structures are angled individually and locked in position mechanically. The entire installation is managed by a single control system. Lighting design, scenographies and the lighting fitting design were thought and developed by 8’18’’ engaged by the client. The design of the fixture was finalised in close cooperation by the client, 8’18’’ and iGuzzini. In recognition of Mr. Yu’s contribution in promoting opera art, Puccini Festival Foundation bestowed, in collaboration with the Italian Government, the ‘Gran Pucciniano’ award upon him, which is set up by the Foundation to honour music lovers the world over with a special devotion to Puccini.

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Projects

Expo 2010 Shanghai “Better City, Better Life” Italy Palace

Design Studio Iodice & Associati Chief architect Giampaolo Imbrighi

Shanghai, China

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Architect Giampaolo Imbrighi designed a building able to accommodate the most innovative aspects of the immense cultural heritage of Italy. The building is a parallelepiped which has been broken up and put back together again, covering more than 3600 square metres. It is 18 metres high and located in area C of the Expo, with water on three sides. Perfectly in line with the theme of the Expo, the pavilion was designed to behave like a “bioclimatic creature”, in which exposure to, screening from and build-up of heat or cold are based on the observation of nature rather than on

heating, cooling and lighting technologies. The artificial lighting is controlled by Lighting Management systems which optimise energy consumption. It is because the lighting is so important, that its design and control were entrusted to set designer Giancarlo Basili who went to iGuzzini for the artificial lighting. The heart of the pavilion is the large piazza or square, representing all Italian squares, since the design of the inside of the pavilion is inspired by the town planning structure of Italian cities.

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Contracting LVS Exhibition Service Co., Ltd. Shanghai Greenland Construction Group Project Management Bureau Veritas Greater China

Lighting set designer Giancarlo Basili Partners Assistance iGuzzini illuminazione iGuzzini China

Photographs: Lv Hengzhong 1.2. Outside. The night picture shows the effect created by the transparent concrete

In the foyer the lighting effects are created by wall-mounted Cestello luminaires around the outside at the top of the steel profiles supporting the windows, and which use PAR 30 halogen lamps. For the courtyard, the heart of the design, a ceiling like a starry sky was created with PAR 30 lamps, whilst Cestello luminaires with QR 111 halogen lamps provide spot lighting on the walls adorned with a symbolic orchestra and a representation of fashion, with clothes and mannequins set up for “Joy of living”, using different cones of light. At the centre of the courtyard there is a faithful reproduction of Brunelleschi's dome, housing the escalator to the upper level. On the ground floor is the permanent exhibition dedicated to Italy, by Triennale di Milano (design museum) which occupies 5 display spaces, each having its own theme. These include “The making of”, the room charting the industrial revolution from craftsmen to mass production. In the design room there are display cases containing tools for making objects which made the history of design, the relative objects appearing on the outside.

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Projects

Expo 2010 Shanghai “Better City, Better Life” Italy Palace

3. Hall with reproduction of the Vicenza Theatre 4. Music wall

Light falls evenly on the display cases, whilst the objects on show outside them, on poles or on the ground, are lit from above, creating localised islands of light and so producing a sequence of light and shade. This is all achieved thanks to track-mounted Tecnica spotlights controlled by a DALI system. In the “I-Tech” room visitors can see objects representing Italian technology: the Vespa, the Fiat 500 and Tecnogym equipment. Light is provided by reglette strip luminaires with T16 fluorescent lamps, dimmable and controllable using a DALI system. The “A bite of Italy” room is dedicated to what identifies Italy in the collective imagination, that is to say, good food. Trailing from the ceiling there are myriads of ears of wheat and red poppies indirectly lit by Reglette T16 luminaires positioned on top of the display cases, and by i24 spotlights, whilst several Le Perroquet luminaires with accent light emphasise the movement of the ears of wheat caused by fans. Rising from the wooden floor there is a magnificent olive tree, whose knots are underlined by Le Perroquet luminaires. The whole room is lit by 2700 K warm fluorescent light from the backlighting of the display cases filled with pasta and wine.

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Projects

Expo Shanghai 2010 “Better City, Better Life� Italy Palace

The service areas of the first floor were lit according to their purposes: the events zone uses track-mounted Tecnica spotlights with DALI technology to achieve the necessary flexibility. The Coffee Shop and the Restaurant are lit with Le Perroquet pendant luminaires. Lighting for all transit zones was created using the iN100 product (with adjustable emission thanks to natural light sensors) giving the interiors the same look as the outside of the pavilion. The second floor consists mainly of offices lit with i88 luminaires, whilst transit zones were lit using recessed Reflex and iN100 products. For the Auditorium recessed Reflex luminaires were selected, with a QR 111 lamp to guarantee maximum visual comfort and Ledplus as marker lights on the steps. The lighting is controlled by the Master Pro Lighting Management System.

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5. Fashion wall 6. I-Tech area

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Projects

Expo Shanghai 2010 “Better City, Better Life” French pavilion

Client Cofres SAS General firm CCEED Works and set direction Jacques Ferrier Architectures

Shanghai, China

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Jacques Ferrier decided to evoke the “city of senses/sensuality”, understood as “getting back in touch with pleasure and the will to live in the city”, for the theme of the Expo in Shanghai, “Better City, Better Life”. According to the architect, technology has dominated human existence in the last century, but today the challenge is to put man back at the centre of the urban hub using the five senses, to which the Chinese add balance and movement. The pavilion is a large cube above a mirror of water and is inside a steel mesh in turn covered with concrete reinforced by fibreglass in a stone colour like Chambord castle, but also like the works of engineer Eugène Freyssinet, the inventor of pre-stressed concrete.

The inside has no partitions and the outer steel mesh helps discharge horizontal forces thanks to metal connecting rods. The core of the display is a 250 metre long down ramp extending around the French garden. A long “video fresco” formed by three dozen screens, as well as several impressionist masterpieces on loan from the d'Orsay museum, illustrate the balance between technology and sensuality, creation and permanence, city and territory. For this project iGuzzini developed a special product to light the facade. Studio Sexton and architect Ferrier together came up with a very simple concept consisting of placing “candles” in each space in the rectangular mesh covering the pavilion.

The product had to be simple, economical and had to perform two main functions: if seen from the outside the product had to shine like a candle, whilst on the inside it had to light the main structure of the building in such a way as to make the rectangular structure visible in contrast. To do this, the team made up of the architect and lighting designer proposed a simple fluorescent lamp with screw fitting, easy to change, economical, and inserted in a diffusing screen (180° outwards) made of pierced sheet metal. In some cases the pierced metal even covers the product 360° to avoid glare in the zones where the main building has windows or openings.

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Lighting design Georges Sexton Associates

Photographs: Lv Hengzhong 1.2. Night view

Project manager Pauline Marchetti Partner Assistance iGuzzini China

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Projects

Expo 2010 Shanghai “Better City, Better Life� UBPA -Pavilions B2 and C1

Client Shanghai World Expo Land Holding Architectural Design mOa - marioOcchiuto architetture

Shanghai, China

For the Shanghai Expo a competition was held to find the best project for recovery of former industrial pavilions in the Expo area. This was dubbed the UBPA - Urban Best Practise Area and the new pavilions built, B2 and B3-2, house an exhibition of the projects of the best urban practices of various cities around the world. The competition was won by mOa - marioOcchiuto architecture. For the competition, Mario Occhiuto, who has spent years working on architectural sustainability and has already completed major projects in China, developed a technological and eco-friendly solution by exporting Italian know-how.

The key principle of the project is the ventilated wall made up of huge cut-out sheets of fired brick covering the old industrial sheds like a second skin. This coating serves two purposes: it screens the pavilions and improves their thermal performance, as well as acting as a decorative element that gives the building a distinctive look. The sheets are made of a specially fired brick which in reality is the result of fired brick that has been broken up and mixed and bound with resins and natural quartzes. The motifs are inspired by Vietri ceramics. The lighting design for building B2 was entrusted to Francesca Storaro and iGuzzini who supplied advice and products. The basic idea of the design focuses on energy saving and the use of the high performance LED lighting technologies of the recessed Linealuce RGB luminaire and the Colour Equalizer control system. The colour change is inspired by the symbolic value of colours in Italian works of art, above all those of the sixteenth century. Alongside the buildings to be recovered there is a building designed from scratch (C1 Building) which is used to welcome visitors to the whole UBPA.

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Project manager Massimo Baragli Alessandro Izzo Structural and system design Favero & Milan Ingegneria

Product engineering Tonji University

Photographs: Lv Hengzhong 1. Pavilion B2 facade

Lighting design for building B2 Francesca Storaro

2. Effects created by the light through the fired brick

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Projects

Expo Shanghai 2010 “Better City, Better Life” UBPA - Pavilions B2 and C1

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3. Side of building B2 with connection to C1 4. Square in pavilion C1

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Projects

Expo Shanghai 2010 “Better City, Better Life� UBPA - Pavilion B3-2

Client World Expo Shanghai 2010 Holding Company Architectural Design Archea Associati

Shanghai, China

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At the client's request Archea Associati designed a simple rectangular container measuring 78 by 28 metres, completely clear inside, forming a neutral space able to house the displays of the cities taking part in the Urban Best Practise Area event. Since the work is part of the programme for cooperation between the Expo and the Italian Ministry of the Environment, the design transformed the idea of the industrially derived casing into a mechanism for the diffusion of natural light. The space is lit and heated, during the day, without any need for energy consumption. The covering is a shed structure, with steel girders running across it, coated to form a sequence of reflective surfaces

which spread the light downwards. During the night artificial light aims to recreate the daytime effect. Platea spotlights with discharge lamps and a very long street optic were fitted in the sheds to achieve this. The visible surfaces of the sheds are fitted with Frame recessed luminaires using two discharge lamps and one halogen lamp to guarantee emergency lighting. The outer walls are metal structures, covered with silicone fabric panels which transform the boxy building into a soft, surface. The variable and coloured lighting emphasises the irregularity of the surface, creating patches of colour thanks to Light Up RGB recessed luminaires.

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Structures and systems Favero & Milan ingegneria Construction company Shanghai Construction Company

Partner Assistance iGuzzini illuminazione iGuzzini China

Photographs: Lv Hengzhong 1. Exterior with variable, coloured lighting 2. The ceiling grooves full of light

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Projects

New Acropolis Museum

Client Organisation for the Construction of the New Acropolis Museum (OANMA) Architectural design Bernard Tschumi Architects

Athens, Greece

The Acropolis Museum was built to display the most important and significant finds from the Acropolis and its slopes. Designed by architect Bernard Tschumi with Michael Photiadis, it was inaugurated in summer 2009. The Acropolis Museum covers a total surface area of 25,000 square metres, its exhibition space exceeding 14,000 square metres. The Museum's architectural shape was dictated by three main requirements: visual contact with the Acropolis monuments had to be maintained, Parthenon sculptures had to be displayed in their entirety and the building had to be adapted to the archaeological digs extending amongst the foundations. The visual link between the Parthenon sculptures displayed in the Museum and the monument from which they came was achieved through the glass outer walls of the Parthenon Gallery. From this Gallery, visitors can enjoy a breathtaking view of the Acropolis, of its historic surrounding hills and the modern city of Athens. At the heart of the Parthenon Gallery is a concrete rectangular area with the same dimensions and orientation as the Parthenon, specially designed to receive and display the temple's entire frieze. At its base, the Museum seems to “float” on more than 100 concrete pillars which are an extraordinary setting for the site's archaeological digs. The Museum holds collections on three levels, as well as in the archaeological digs in its foundations. On the ground floor is the ‘Gallery of the slopes of the Acropolis’ with finds from the sanctuaries

discovered on the slopes of the Acropolis, plus objects used in daily life by Athenians throughout different periods in history. On the first floor of the Museum visitors can follow the steps of the evolution of the Acropolis. The eastern and southern sections of the first floor house the ‘Archaic Gallery’, nine metres high and naturally lit, containing the magnificent sculptures which decorated the first temples on the Acropolis. The gallery is also used to display votive offerings from the faithful, including splendid ancient Korai (representations of young women), Hippeis (cavalry men), statues of the Goddess Athena, sculptures of male figures, relief work on marble and smaller votive offerings made of bronze and clay. The Museum exhibition culminates on the third floor in the glazed area housing the ‘Parthenon Gallery’. The relief sculptures of the Parthenon frieze depicting the Panathenaic procession are displayed in a continuous sequence along the outside of the rectangular area housing the Gallery. Metopes, marble sheets with relief images of Greek mythology, are displayed between the steel columns of the Parthenon. The colossal figures of the two pediments (triangular elements at the top of facades) are placed on pedestals on the eastern and western sides of the Gallery, in the same positions that they would have occupied in the Parthenon. The eastern pediment shows the birth of the Goddess Athena from the head of her father Zeus, whilst the western pediment depicts the contest over Attica between Athena and Poseidon.

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Key people Joel Rutten, Adam Dayem, Jane Kim, Aristotelis Dimitrakopoulos, Eva Sopeoglou, Kim Starr, Anne Save de Beaurecueil, Joel Aviles, Valentin Bontjes van Beek, Jonathan Chace, Allis Chee, Thomas Goodwill, Robert Holton, Liz Kim, Daniel Holguin, Michaela Metcalfe, Justin Moore, Georgia Papadavid, Kriti

Siderakis, VÊronique Descharrères, Cristina DeVizzi, Kate Linker.

Lighting design Arup Lighting - Florence Lam

Photographs: Nikos Daniilidis with kind permission from the Acropolis Museum and Nikos Pilos

Associate architect Michael Photiadis, ARSY

Partner Assistance Diathlasis S.A.

1. Night-time view of the building

Structural and mechanical engineering Arup

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Projects

New Acropolis Museum

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The Museum's exhibition programme is also enhanced by a large number of finds from the ancient Athenian city which were discovered during archaeological digs that took place before the Museum was built. The digs can be seen from various points on the ground floor and the upper levels of the Museum through a series of expertly positioned large glasscovered openings. The lighting design by Arup Lighting was awarded a prize (Excellence and

Sustainability) at the 27 th International Association of Lighting Designers (IALD) Awards. The reason is indicated as: “The holistic approach to the design of the New Acropolis Museum creates a choreography of light and shade effects both for natural light and for architectural lighting�. The design brief for the Museum was to use natural light as a theme for adding a fourth dimension both to the collection and to the architecture.

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2. Parthenon frieze 3. Metopes and huge figures in the Parthenon Gallery

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The accent light, provided by Tecnica spotlights, emphasises the character of the marble reliefs and helps to distinguish between original pieces and those recreated and integrated, and it is balanced with diffused natural light arriving both from above and from the side windows. The design recreates the sense of external conditions in which the sculptures could originally have been seen.

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Projects

Restructuring of the Cour des Comptes (Court of Auditors) Paris, France

In 1898 architect Constant Moyaux was asked to design and build premises for the archive of the Court of Auditors in a project that would last a decade. The archive building is a tribute to the Chicago School with its moulded brick facades looking onto the courtyard and its structural functional pragmatism: designed to hold files of financial documents, the building was to be filed with colossal masonry shelving. Perpendicular to the outer circulation areas, the corridors to the shelves were lit with natural light, thanks to the windows on the facade facing the courtyard which separates the archive from the Palais Cambon housing the courtrooms, the library and other important areas for the magistrates. Around the stone plinth, topped with glass, there extends eight floors in an elegant inlaid work of terracotta interspersed with the steel of cabochons and crosses with connecting rod ends, plus limestone keystones and cornices, flat or crenellated. Between 1976 and 1978, a central silo, consisting of an independent structure, hid the atrium on five floors, offering an essential addition to the storehouse. In 2000, to increase its personnel so that it could also handle certification of the State Budget, the institution decided to outsource its archive, leaving the building that housed it free for the new arrivals and to house the various branch offices which until then were spread around the district. The restructuring was very complex, due to many constraints, including registration of the facades and the courtyard roof in the Additional Inventory of Historic Monuments. After a technical audit the central silo was completely dismantled and the rest of the building was restructured to transform each floor into office space. This change in purpose was a real challenge, since the indispensable structural renewal had to avoid reducing the ceiling height which was already very low.

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Works manager Ministry of the Economy Finance and Industry Architectural design Goudchaux Architecte et Associés Daufresnes, Le Carrée & Associés

Economist J.P.Tohier & Associés

BET Fluid engineering certification BETHAC

Acoustic impact study AVEL Acoustique

Partner Assistance iGuzzini illuminazione France S.A.

Photographs: Didier Boy de la Tour 1. Central area above the courtyard 2. Courtyard with bench covering technical equipment 3. View of offices from a corridor

BET Structural engineering certification SCYNA 4

In the courtyard, a strategic space for the offices on the ground floor, on a central parquet floor partly covering the original rocky plinth, a large wooden podium extends as a gigantic seat that also elegantly hides the central heating system and the ventilation and air conditioning systems. In this large hall wall-mounted iRoll 65 luminaires with Up-down lighting were used to create lighting effects that would emphasise the form of the masonry walls with large windows. The three facades rising from the courtyard roof were carefully recreated in masonry just as they originally were, and the original metal window frames were restored. The texture created by the small brick is highlighted by the grazing light of Linealuce LED luminaires arranged around the

atrium's glass ceiling. Inside, walls in four shades and doors in eight colours distinguish the floors, the circulation areas and offices, where workstations are protected and isolated by panels of different heights or by partitions with double acoustic glass hidden by white Venetian blinds. The offices were lit using the Action system with modules having the Dark light screen in zones assigned to work at video terminals, whilst in transit zones modules with accent light were preferred. Along the inner corridors ceiling-mounted Plafoni 44 luminaires were used, whilst recessed Sistema 44 luminaires were used for external corridors.

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Caravaggio

Projects

Rome, Quirinale Stables, 20 February - 13 June 2010

The exhibition devised by Claudio Strinati and run by Rossella Vodret and Francesco Buranelli, focuses on a very precise philological choice: only works historically and without question acknowledged as works by Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio are displayed. Therefore, the exhibition consists of only 24 paintings plus another 15 masterpieces spread through the capital's churches and magnificent palaces. For the first time, it will be possible to visit the Gabinetto scientifico del Cardinale Del Monte (science study), to see the only fresco by Merisi, in the current residence of the Boncompagni Ludovisi princes. The Stables area houses the canvases with a display designed by the Michele De Lucchi firm and lit with luminaires from iGuzzini, the exhibition's technical sponsor. Michele De Lucchi chose red as the main colour for the display, and in some cases a very dark blue - grey.

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Under the Patronage of the President of the Republic

Display aMDL - Michele De Lucchi

Promoters Rome Municipal Authority - Office of the Councillor for Cultural and Communication policies Azienda Speciale PalaExpo Fondazione Roma

Technical sponsor iGuzzini illuminazione

Photographs: Alfredo Cacciani 1.2. Two of the display's rooms

The lighting for the whole exhibition is spot, accent and created with 35 and 50 W dichroic lamps, with 24째 to 38째 beams. Dimmable Tecnica spotlights are track-mounted. In some cases they are black and hidden in grooves made in the ceiling, lighting the works and information panels. In other cases they are white and applied on special visible structures.

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Projects

Darwin Exhibition

Client Natural History Museum Display design and lighting design Sutton Vane Associates Partner Assistance iGuzzini illuminazione UK

London, England

In spring 2009, the Natural History Museum in London dedicated an exhibition to Charles Darwin and his voyage to the Galapagos Islands on the Beagle. The voyage resulted in the theories of evolution which formed the basis of his work “On the origin of species�. The Museum is one of the world's leading centres for the study of the natural world and contains a large number of exhibitions with exhibits ranging from dinosaur fossils to a life

size model of a blue whale, the extraordinary mammal which all British students come across sooner or later when studying sciences or biology. The London-based firm Sutton Vane Associates designed the display and lighting for the new and prestigious Darwin Exhibition at the Natural History Museum. The lighting needed for the exhibition had to show off and enhance the items exhibited, at the same time being both functional and unobtrusive.

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Photographs: Sutton Vane Associates 1.2. Different areas of the display

The choice of the black Tecnica luminaire with QR CBC 51 lamp allowed extremely flexible lighting. More than 120 Tecnica spotlights were used, mounted on special black tracks. In addition, more than 50 Pixel Plus luminaires were supplied, with low voltage lamps and metal halide lamps. The lighting design for the exhibition was included in the Public Building Lighting category in the Lighting Design Awards competition, London.

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Projects

Client Puerta del Sur SA

Carrasco International Airport. New passenger terminal

Architectural Design Rafael Vi単oly Architects Lighting design Studio Ricardo Hofstadter Ricardo Hofstadter Joel Fregosi

Montevideo, Uruguay

The main lighting design guidelines were: show off the main architectural elements, satisfy the requirements of the Specifications and guarantee a high degree of energy efficiency (although there are no local standards relating to this). The main architectural element to be shown off was the roof, 350 metres long (150 metres interior) and almost 80 metres wide at the centre. Under the roof are the Departures Hall and the airport Terrace, from which people accompanying travellers can watch the aeroplanes take off.

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In terms of requirements, the specifications indicated lighting levels much higher than international standards, a feature which necessitated a search for high efficiency lamps, mainly fluorescent and discharge lamps with a very good chromatic yield as well as electronic ballasts, which would not increase energy consumption. The types of lighting were identified based on the functions performed in the various areas of the airport: departures hall, check in desks and terrace, as well as lighting for the roof; all boarding and pre-boarding areas: immigration control, boarding hall, baggage hall, customs, arrivals level; shopping areas. The lighting for the Departures Hall and the Terrace, both located under the building's huge roof, was created indirectly by reflection off the roof. For these areas the specifications required a light level of 300 lux, therefore, around 280 asymmetrical spotlights were used, not supplied by iGuzzini, with 400 W metal halide lamps, mounted on the structure supporting the roof. Considering that the internal area of the building

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Partner Assistance Proyecto Illuminacion

Photographs: Francisco Nocito and iGuzzini Archive 1. The curved line making the Vi単oly design so distinctive 2.3. The airport and its natural setting 4. Night-time view

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lit with these spotlights measures around 10,000 square metres and the power used for them is 136 kW (including leakage in the ballasts), the resulting density is 14 W per square metre which, although the lighting is all indirect, lies within acceptable energy efficiency values. The rest of the roof (areas outside the building)

were lit with the same type of spotlights, although fewer of them, totalling 370 lamps for lighting the whole roof. Parts of these outer areas consists of access routes to the Departures level which are lit only by reflection from the roof and for which the average light level of 80 lux was planned and achieved.

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Projects

Carrasco International Airport. New passenger terminal

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The zones for immigration control, boarding areas, baggage collection, customs and access levels were lit with continuous lines of Lineup and Sistema Hub fluorescent tubes. T8 tubes between 36 and 58 W were used, and electronic ballasts. In the check in area Lineup luminaires were used to light the wall and the area surrounding the baggage conveyor. The average light levels required in the specifications for these zones were very high (600 and 300 lux) and were achieved very efficiently with just 15 W per square metre and 7.5 W per square metre. Shopping areas were set up with a combination

of down lights and two spotlights recessed in the ceiling with 35, 70 and 150 W (depending on the height) metal halide lamps. The Reflex and Frame luminaires were fitted in these areas. Green areas are picked out by Woody luminaires with halogen lamps. Outside areas for access to the departures level and the terrace on the upper level are indirectly lit with 150 W MaxiWoody luminaires with superspot optic and lenses for elliptical light distribution. The VIP lounge access area has Balisage LED luminaires. The Presidential zone is lit with Lingotto spotlights, for direct and indirect lighting, and 250 W Platea luminaires.

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5. Hall with strips of lights on the ceiling 6. One of the waiting areas in the boarding zone

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Projects

The new Condominio Theatre

Architectural design Studio Amati - Alfredo Amati Federica Finanzieri (design) Romina Sambucci (works manager) Maria Luisa Gioffredi Rendering Christopher Stack

Gallarate, Italy

In the more general context of the city's cultural renovation, the Gallarate Municipal Administration acquired the historic “Teatro Condominio�, a building of architectural significance, designed in 1862 and radically modified inside after World War II. The project for recovery of the 19th-century body and adaptation for modern use was assigned to the Rome-based Amati firm. Partly preserving the original relationship between the internal spaces, the main distinctive feature of the project is the recovery of the close correlation between the theatre hall and the foyer, that is to say, the relationship between the performance and socialising. The aim of restoring the foyer to its original function was achieved by shaping the stalls on an inclined plane and shifting the Gallery higher up. The design also had two halls: the main one with 647 seats and a smaller one seating 132. The technical features of the spaces allow both to be used simultaneously. The smaller hall is also set up for the recorded

transmission of an event held in the main hall, further increasing the latter's capacity. Another distinctive feature of the project is the choice of materials for the exteriors. The main entrance is emphasised with the insertion of a cantilever roof having a light steel and glass structure. The element joining the old body and the renovated one is a vertical band of glass in which the vertical routes to the halls extend. Along Via Verdi a slightly projecting portion, with a characteristic curved shape, announces with its geometry that the interior space is the theatre hall. The scenic tower has a new iridescent metal skin so that, emerging from the building, it becomes a signal tower. Particular care was taken getting the hall acoustics right, by MateriAcustica s.r.l., a spinoff company of the Ferrara Faculty of Engineering, part of the Engineering Department. The main material used is wood both for the floor and for the panelling. A good finish was obtained by alternating smooth laminate panels with drilled panels and with the choice of

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General coordination: Studio Amati s.r.l.

Systems Paolo Torelli

Structures Sergio Tremi Proietti Alfredo Morgante Domenico di Berardino

Acoustics MateriAcustica s.r.l. Roberto Pompoli Nicola Prodi Giampietro Ricci

Collaborators Giulio Baiocco Alessandro Balasso Annabella Bucci Alessandra Zenga Gianluca Abbati

Photographs: Luigi Filetici 1.2. Exterior. By day and by night 3. The stalls

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diverse wall panel geometry (curved, smooth and box shapes). The theatre's interior lighting system was designed according to the activities carried out, selecting luminaires which fit in, yet at the same time bring out the architectural features of the rooms. In the conference hall recessed Reflex luminaires were used, with a dichroic halogen lamp, in the stalls, they were equipped with a low luminance professional optic, for diffuse lighting. Fixed Quasar recessed luminaires were installed at the speakers' positions to light the work area. In the theatre hall The Reflex luminaires

were again used to create diffuse lighting. In the ground floor atrium Kriss spotlights were fitted on several pilasters, producing vertical blades of light which highlight the vaults. Another light source is fluorescent tubes on the capitals of the columns and behind the covering of the outer wall of the hall which, due to its translucent finish, acts as a diffuser. In the public areas, to allow a good level of lighting the false ceiling was fitted with Easy recessed fluorescent lights having a decorative screen. Recessed Light Up Walk Professional luminaires were placed outside.

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Projects

Herren Globus shop Zurich airport

Client Herren Globus Architectural design Bauabteilung Magazine zum Globus AG Michele D'Ambrosio Rico Schmid

Zurich, Switzerland

The famous Swiss Herren Globus brand, with a long tradition in the men's clothing sector, has 23 points of sale in all regions of the Swiss Confederation. Its range is aimed at men of all ages, who keep a watchful eye on fashion and style, from business to casual. iGuzzini acted as lighting consultant for the point of sale at Zurich airport. The use of vivid light - dark contrasts creates a theatrical atmosphere to put the correct emphasis on the articles displayed. The interior design and lighting design highlight the division of the range into “business” and “young fashion”, thanks to the use of different colours and materials. The “business” department is simple and light, reflected by the white coloured walls and ceiling coverings, whilst the young fashion department is black and anthracite. For Herren Globus iGuzzini used the Express series trackmounted spotlight and recessed down light. The same lighting had already been applied in other points of sale. At the moment, another premises is being built, whilst another two are at the design stage, and all will be created based on the new lighting design.

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Electrical system design Hefti. Hess. Martignoni. Zürich AG Christoph Köchli

Partner Assistance iGuzzini illuminazione Schweiz AG

Photographs: Günther Laznia 1.2. Different areas of the shop

Building works manager Sulzer + Buzzi Baumanagement AG Urs Bleuer

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Projects

Lyon Housemuseum

Client and architectural designer Corbett Lyon Partner Assistance E.C.C. Lighting

Melbourne, Australia

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Lyon Housemuseum is a privately funded cultural project promoted by the Lyon family to support and spread contemporary art, architecture and music. In 2002 the Lyons had the idea of designing a new building which would act as both a home and a museum, to house a hugely important collection of Australian contemporary art. The intention was to allow the collection to be on show to the public, with the support of a series of educational programmes and public cultural events.

The aim was not to create a large home nor a public museum, but a new hybrid which would bring together art and living, that is to say, ‘home’ and ‘museum’, mixing public and private ideas in a single new building which would take the name ‘housemuseum’. Located in the Kew suburb of Melbourne, the design of the Housemuseum takes into account the interweaving of domestic family requirements and functional and operational public museum requirements. In particular, the building is inspired by private museums and art collections

which are shown in domestic environments, dating back to the Renaissance, including the XVIII-century ‘wunderkammer’ and the domestic museums of the XIX and XX century by Frick, Guggenheim, Soane and many others. The building is structured around two large ‘museum’ spaces: a two-storey white cube at the front of the building and a two-storey ‘black box’ at the back. These elements anchor the two ends of the building and are used to show video art and important sculptures, paintings and installations. The family's private areas are a

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Photographs: Dianna Snape with kind permission from Lyon Housemuseum and the Lyon family 1.2. Structure of various areas of the Lyon Housemuseum

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series of wood-covered box shapes distributed on both levels of the building: bedrooms, bathrooms, wardrobes, studies and lounges. When these ‘boxes’ are closed, the private areas of the building are invisible to the visiting public. The areas are deliberately ambiguous when it comes to the typical interpretation of them: the kitchen is also the museum coffee shop, the black box showing video art on the rear of the building also acts as a home cinema and a space where members of the family can sleep, whilst the study is also a research library

and archive for visiting students and academics. At the centre of the building there is a twostorey music room, featuring a large mural by artist Brook Andrew. This room is used for concerts and debates about art and architecture and also includes a pipe organ with customised design which is played by members of the family and for public concerts. On the ground floor, the Housemuseum areas flow out into the gardens which are used by the family and as outdoor areas for displaying the museum's sculptures. White concrete, blue stone and lawn

areas in the outside landscape spell out the museum's initials, LHM, making their mark in the new view of the world offered by Google Earth - the Housemuseum seen from space and attempting to link this new small Australian museum to the world network of art museums and cultural institutions. To fulfil the many functions required of lighting in such a complex and structured environment, track-mounted low voltage spotlights were mainly selected: therefore Trimmer Parallel, Laser and recessed luminaires such as Pixel Plus and Quasar were used.

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Projects

New lighting for the Manufactum store

Client Manufactum GmbH Display - Frankfurt Landau + Kindelbacher Lighting design Tropp Lighting Design

Frankfurt, Germany

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In November 2009 at the Podium building of the new Opernturm in Frankfurt, opposite the Alte Oper (Old Opera), the inauguration was held for the eighth Manufactum department store and a grocery store belonging to the subsidiary brot&butter. The uniqueness of the company, which has been in business for more than twenty years, has always been its range: with the motto “The good things in life still exist” (in German “Es gibt sie noch, die guten Dinge”), Manufactum offers top quality items, including second-hand objects, clothing and groceries. The incredibly vast range is displayed in Frankfurt over a surface area of more than 1100 m 2 with a system of modular display units specially developed for Manufactum. Arranged in a linear fashion and full-height,

the flexible system produces a homogeneous effect and precise order, intended to give the range of products a suitable backdrop and orientation. Particularly captivating is the choice of materials for the presentation system: with oak furniture, the store looks more like a contemporary variation on the traditional sales department than a department store. The display and interior design proposal for the Frankfurt premises was created by the Munich-based architectural firm Landau + Kindelbacher, with which Manufactum has already successfully set up the stores in Munich and Cologne. The lighting design for the Frankfurt store was by Tropp Lighting Design.

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Partner Assistance iGuzzini illuminazione Deutschland GmbH

Photographs: With kind permission from Manufactum 1.2. Glimpses of the display at the Frankfurt store.

Since the central theme of the lighting concept is presentation of the goods, two features took on fundamental importance during implementation of the lighting design: discretion and maximum functionality. Therefore, the lighting must be unobtrusive, but at the same time must place the correct emphasis on the goods displayed. These requirements resulted in the choice of High Performance Pixel Plus recessed luminaires. Arranged in pairs and with the possibility of disappearing into the ceiling, these luminaires create a discrete and harmonious image, blending in with the circular lights specially designed for Manufactum by pfarrĂŠ lighting design, now clearly recognisable to customers. Thanks to their high performance, Pixel Plus spotlights light the goods on display while limiting heat emission and energy consumption. The good colour yield and brightness mean that these luminaires really flatter the products displayed, and spill-rings eliminate glare. Interior architects Landau and Kindelbacher placed considerable importance on the flexibility of the lighting, which could be achieved because the spotlights are adjustable. Obviously, the lighting design also had to take into account the central position of the Manufactum department store in the Opernturm context: to underline the effect towards the outside, a high level of brightness was created using very tall vertical lighting.

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Projects

Kurilpa Park and bridge

Client Queensland Department of Public Works Architectural design Cox Rayner Structural design Arup

Brisbane, Australia

Brisbane's urban landscape was enhanced with a new icon with the construction of the Kurilpa bridge, a 470 metre long cycle and pedestrian link between Tank Street and Kurilpa Park. The design is the result of a creative collaboration between Arup, Cox Rayner and Baulderstone Hornibrook, inspired by the idea of “tensegrity�, in which architecture and

engineering create a system in which structural strength is a synergy between balanced tension and compression components. The result is extremely light and incredibly sturdy. The (futuristic lighting) lighting of the Kurilpa bridge was designed by a team of specialists from Arup and in particular by Paul Guger,

who during the design stage played on the tangible connection between the footbridge and the Gallery of Modern Art, lighting the bridge as if it were a permanent work of art and portraying each structural element with heightened splendour. From the lighting design viewpoint, two aims had to be achieved regarding the night-time landscape: the first

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Lighting Design Arup

Photographs: Michael Pickerill 1.2. The bridge seen from different angles

Construction Baulderstone Hornibrook Partner Assistance E.C.C. Lighting

was to reveal the structure in such a way as to highlight the absolute uniqueness and sturdiness of the vertical supports rising skywards, together with curious suspended elements inspired by ‘tensegrity’. The second and equally important aim was to transform the act of crossing the bridge into an entertaining experience which would make one

want to explore the distinctive aspects of its design. Kurilpa is also one of the first large-scale footbridges in the world to be solar powered, with 84 photovoltaic panels producing 75 100% of the power needed for the lighting, consisting of 28 W Linealuce recessed luminaires, with 26 W Bollard, Bliz and Light Up Walk Professional with anti-slip glass.

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Projects

Wesley Church

Client Australian Unitarian Church Sponsors Heritage Perth Città di Perth Lighting design Wood & Grieve Engineers

Perth, Western Australia

Heritage Perth is managing the project called ‘Light Up the City’ to create sustainable lighting for the facades of several important buildings in the city of Perth. Using luminaires with low energy consumption, it will create spectacular night lighting for the most important buildings, further confirming the name Perth ‘City of Light’. The project is based on the invitation extended to the buildings' owners to turn off internal lighting, to allow a reduction in energy consumption from megawatts to kilowatts, at the same time creating a Perth

that is lit at night, breathing new life into the city centre and encouraging more people to come into the city even in the evenings. Wesley Church is probably one of the central Perth's most important church buildings. Built in 1870 for the ever increasing Methodist congregation in the city, the church was designed by Richard Roach Jewell, Superintendant of Public Works for Western Australia, in the Victorian academic gothic style. Its fine gothic architecture and its position at a major crossroad meant that Wesley Church was

the first building in the city to be lit during the ‘Light up the City’ campaign by Heritage Perth and the suggestion was enthusiastically received by the church authorities who worked with the association. The requirements supplied by Heritage Perth made sustainability the decisive factor for the project and dictated that consumption linked to lighting should be no more than 0.05 kWh per square metre of facade lit. So, embracing the idea of energy efficiency, the lighting design for Wesley Church was created using a variety of iGuzzini LED, fluorescent and metal halide luminaires from the Woody, Linealuce and Light Up ranges in harmony with the iGuzzini luminaires used in all of Perth's pedestrian areas. Care was taken with the design so that there would not be too much light on the facade. All light levels were chosen based on ambient lighting from the surrounding streets and buildings. Complex 3D models were made, with sample accessories and application tests performed in situ by Wood & Grieve Engineers, with lighting consultancy services from Mondoluce. To reach the required consumption levels, the entire lighting is controlled “in levels” all night. During the early evening all lamps are on for maximum effect, taking into account ambient lighting levels from surrounding buildings. During the second part of the evening, the level of light from the luminaires is reduced to save energy, guaranteeing the longevity of the metal halide lamps. The low energy consumption LED and fluorescent luminaires remain on all night, with a slight reduction linked to the lower levels of light in

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Heritage Consultant Ronald Bodycoat Architects

Photographs: Ron Tan

Partner Assistance Mondoluce

1.2. Wesley Church and its urban context Contractors Mirvac (construction) Elder Electric (electrics)

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the surrounding environment. The range of optical accessories available, including elliptical and shaped beam filters, was deftly used to prevent the light from going into the surrounding buildings and bothering passers-by near the Church. The proven long life and resistance to vandalism of iGuzzini products were the second selection criterion. Although the project was financed by

sponsorship from the Perth City Authority and Heritage Perth, system maintenance remains the responsibility of the Unitarian Church. For this reason, taking into account the maintenance budget, the frequency with which the lamps need changing and resistance to vandalism were important criteria in selecting iGuzzini products.

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Projects

Tibidabo Park

Client Parc d’Atraccions del Tibidabo SA BSM - Barcelona Serveis Municipals Administration Rosa Ortiz Engineering and maintenance Josep Mª Gaudés

Barcelona, Spain

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Tibidabo Park is located on a hill around 500 metres high, providing a view of the whole city as far as the sea. At the end of the 19th century, doctor and pharmacist Salvador Andreu i Grau, inventor of Doctor Andreu cough pastilles, purchased the park on this hill from the Parés Cayrol family and began building. The Church of the Sacred Heart, the Collserola telecommunications tower, the Fabra Observatory, the Florida Hotel and today's amusement park were all built. The park is linked to the city by a tramway extending up from the Sant Gervasi district with a blue tram (the Tramvia Blau).

Ownership of the park was passed to various families and management companies and it was only at the end of 1999 that the Barcelona Municipal Authority became the owner. This saw the start of a series of upgrading work projects: renovation of the building housing the “Marionetarium” (puppet theatre) by architect Josep Miàs, creation of the new “Plaça dels somnis”, the Square/belvedere of dreams, recovery and extension of the footpaths through the park for which the Varis Arquitectes firm has prepared a new lighting design consisting entirely of LED luminaires: Woody, MaxiWoody, Light Up Light.

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For Camì del Cel and surrounding areas, the New Square - Belvedere and general Park lighting Architecture Varis Arquitectes SLP Engineering Tecnivallés

For renovation of the “Marionetarium”

Lighting Designer Pablo Martínez

Architectural design Miàs arquitectes

Partner Assistance iGuzzini illuminazione España

Photographs: Josè Hevia 1. Some of the park footpaths with spotlights 2. Some of the attractions

Engineering Proisotec (Projectes i Solucions Tècniques)

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MaxiWoody luminaires with monochrome LED having 3100 K colour temperature and spot optic pick out the paths, linking the various zones without interfering with the lighting for the individual attractions, nor with the natural environment. The 12x1W Woody luminaires, again with 3100 K colour temperature, but with a flood optic, are placed in the wooded zones next to the paths. The most impressive trees in the pedestrian areas are shown off by ground-recessed Light Up LED luminaires, 12x1W, with adjustable optic. The end result is a lighting design which is extremely energy efficient: passing from the 172 existing lights to around 600 without any increase in absorbed power. There is no light pollution and maintenance costs are slashed. 3

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Projects

Cervantes square

Client Ajuntament de Lleida - Tomàs Ferré Architect Francesc Oró Engineer Ramón Cortés

Lleida, Spain

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In the city of Lleida, beyond the shopping district (Eix Comercial), is the group of streets Avinguda de Catalunya, Ramla d’Aragò, Avinguda de Balmes and Alcade Rovira Roure which play host to the main trade, cultural and political activities. Institutions such as The Lleida Museum, Library, Bishop's palace, the University and services such as the bus station, tax office, various health and professional organisations

make up a social fabric which together with the commercial one bring to life this, the leading district representative of the city. In 2009 these streets were the subject of major work to overhaul the lighting systems. In their original form they mainly lit the road surface and used obsolete lampposts with HST 400 W sodium vapour lamps which illuminated the street and did not shed any light on the pedestrian areas.

The overhaul saw the installation of the Lavinia lighting system, with HST 250 W sodium vapour lamps which, thanks to high performance in street lighting, improved on the previous lighting conditions, supplemented with Lavinia and Delo lampposts, with a light distribution optic that uses LED technology (from 39 W to 59 W as required). In this way, not only was the lighting in the entire zone improved, giving pavements and

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Photographs: Josè Hevia

Partner Assistance iGuzzini illuminazione EspaĂąa

1.2. Cervantes square seen from different angles

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pedestrian areas the lighting they deserve, but the power used was also reduced by 25 - 30%, with the consequent energy saving. At the heart of this new zone is Plaza Cervantes, a small square which, having started out as a simple pedestal for a monument and a means for distributing the traffic, has now been turned into a town meeting point. For this reason it was incorporated in the adjacent urban fabric, fitted out with parks and gardens and with a lighting

system suited to its character and overall function. The definitive factor of the upgrade was therefore the use of LED technology: whilst the perimeter of the square sees the uninterrupted use of both Lavinia LED and Argo, at the centre the designer opted for a customised and distinctive solution combining MaxiWoody LED floodlights with the comfort and atmosphere offered by indirect light from Nuvola luminaires.

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Projects

1001 trees for Copenhagen

Client Copenhagen Municipal Authority

Copenhagen, Denmark

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In 2006 Copenhagen Municipal Authority put out to tender work to upgrade the NorthWestern area of the city, which was won by the firm SLA. The “1001 trees” project allows the upgrading of this area which has great cultural diversity, being a multiethnic zone, and which has residents of all ages. The district is under development and the park is considered a symbol, but also a tool for change in a positive direction. The idea behind the project came from a series of meetings to get to residents' opinions and ideas about the use of this space. The resulting park is so vast and offers so many opportunities that everyone can find room for their favourite activities. There is sports equipment which can be used by Frederikssundsvej School pupils and by local residents, plus the possibility of outdoor activities not available in the rest of the area: barbecues, chess and open-air theatre. The possibilities are endless and reflect the vastness and cultural diversity typical of the north-west.

The SLA design has four simple elements: trees, footpaths, lights and small conical hills. 63 different types of trees give the park different shades of colour throughout the year. The exotic species include Japanese cherry, Korean fir and American Eastern red cedar, whilst species more traditional to Denmark include Swedish service, hawthorn and Scots pine. The presence of lampposts soaring between the trees makes time spent in the park safe even when it's dark. A maze of tarmac footpaths crisscross the park, linking the various sub-sections from Hulegårds Square at the northern end to Ørnevej in the south. The three hills around 15 metres high mark the three sections of the park and boost its overall harmony, offering visitors a sense of depth. They have also become local reference points. The spectacular colourful lighting was created using 246 Multiwoody luminaires with different coloured filters mounted on poles which are also multi-coloured.

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Architectural design SLA - Stig L. Andersson, Rasmus Astrup, Friedemann Rüter, Thomas Kock, Salka Kudsk, Signe Høyer Frederiksen, Michelle Nielsen-Dharmaratne, Cecilie Milsted Lind, Simone Maxl and Martin Søberg

Collaborators Jan Sonnergaard Lemming & Eriksson 2+1

Photographs: With kind permission from SLA 1. Plan from the design presented 2. Coloured light at various points in the park

Partner Assistance iGuzzini illuminazione Danmark

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iGuzzini illuminazione in New York

With the 25 May 2010 inauguration, there is now iGuzzini partner assistance in New York. In Manhattan, an area of around 500 square metres on the second floor of an elegant Midtown building is the place where those interested in lighting design can go, whether they are architects, designers or lighting designers. Like all of the latest generation iGuzzini showrooms, the one in NY features a “lighting laboratory”: an area in which various typical environments are reproduced: a museum, a store, a brick facade, which can be used to experiment with and assess the effects of different lamps and luminaires and to understand just how important a role light plays in the perception of shapes and colours. The area will also host events and initiatives aiming to sensitise people so that they are aware of the way they use light. Good light, which is a truly active part of the entire quality design process.

iGuzzini lighting USA, Ltd 60 Madison Avenue, 2nd floor New York, NY 10010 USA tel. +1 212 481 8188 www.iguzzini-na.com Left to right: George M. Beylerian (chairman of Material ConneXion), Adolfo Guzzini, Massimo Vignelli (architect), Francesco Maria Talò (consul general). Photographs: Peter Dressel

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The iGuzzini Shanghai office destination of the Marche delegation

4 June 2010. Official inauguration of the iGuzzini illuminazione office. The occasion was the official and business visit which, organised by the Marche Regional Authority for the first week of June, brought together Marche-based political and business figures in Palazzo Italia for the inauguration of “Casa Marche�. In this context, the Chairman of the Regional Authority, Gian Mario Spacca, was invited to officially inaugurate the office which has seen iGuzzini illuminazione operate in China since 2006. The ceremony involved cutting the ribbon and the traditional lion dance and took place in the presence of the Marche delegation and a number of leading Chinese figures: Dr Tang Hailong, Vice-Mayor of the Fengxian district, Dr Li Zhen, General Manager of Fengpu Industrial Park, Dr Peter Jin, Deputy General Manager of Fengpu Industrial Park, Dr Sophie Ji Fenghua,Director of Fengpu Industrial park Customer Services and Dr Wang Jian, Head of Bank of Communication Fengxian Branch.

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New online catalogue

From October 2010 the www.iguzzini.com website will include the new iGuzzini online catalogue. The catalogue has been improved in terms of the quantity and quality of the data provided and by making navigation very intuitive. Data management and searches have also been made easy. For example, it is easy to download photometric data in the most widespread and widely used formats; searches for luminaires are facilitated using various methods: by searching according to performance and type, or via areas of application. The new catalogue will be available in the 5 languages featured on the iGuzzini website.

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Young Creative Poland Triennale (Triennial Exhibition), Milan 14 - 19 April 2010

A group of young emerging designers, called Young Creative Poland exhibited their designs at the Milan Triennale, at the Furniture Show, highly innovative designs in various sectors: furniture design, industrial design, graphic design, fashion animation, architecture and engineering. Following the broad consensus obtained in London during the London Design Festival, Young Creative Poland braved the Milanese stage by presenting, amongst others, the designs of Oskar Zieta, Tomek Rygalik, Beton, Kompott, Puff-Buff, Jaroslaw Kozakiewicz, Moomoo Architects and Maria Jeglinska. There were also graphic designs and animations by Monika Zawadzki, Tomasz Baginski, Fontarte, KIS, Truth, m-city. Poland is currently one of Europe's most vibrant emerging design scenes, the natural legacy of the movement which took hold between the ‘30s and ‘60s, to which the exhibition put on alongside Young Creative Poland at the Triennale was dedicated.

Curator and exhibition design Miska Miller-Lovegrove Co-curator and producer Anna Pietrzyk-Simone and Monika Unger

www.youngcreativepoland.com

Graphic design Studio Fernando Gutierrez Technical sponsor for lighting iGuzzini illuminazione

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iGuzzini contributes to the LOW3 project by the Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, a winner in the Solar Decathlon Europe Competition

With the solar house LOW3 the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC - Polytechnic University of Catalonia) won top marks in the architecture test in the international Solar Decathlon Europe Competition and took first prize, together with another two universities: Aalto University Finland (Finland) and Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University (USA). The Architecture prize is the first of the two tests of Solar Decathlon Europe, an international competition organised by the Spanish Town Planning Ministry in cooperation with the Polytechnic University of Madrid and the US Energy Department. In awarding this prize, the jury assessed the quality of the architectural design of the houses, their coherence, the flexibility of the spaces, the application of bioclimatic strategies and integration of technological systems. The solar house LOW3 (Low energy+Low impact+Low cost) by UPC, one of the five Spanish designs entered in the competition and the only one to have won this first test, was specially designed to be much more than a home that is self-sufficient in terms of energy. It was designed starting with a thorough analysis of the lifecycle of its materials and components, optimisation of the construction process and a versatile design, which adapts to changes in use (extension, technological upgrades, re-use and recycling). The house has built-in photovoltaic technology and solar thermal systems, which guarantee that the building is capable of generating the

energy it needs. The prototype is also made of low-cost, locally-sourced sustainable materials which are renewable, simple and efficient. In this way, as well as making the house highly energy efficient, the aim of closing the cycle of materials and water as far as possible is achieved. The LOW3 team is made up of 40 students from the Escola Tècnica Superior d’Arquitectura del Vallès (ETSAV - Technical School) at UPC, supervised by professors from the university and directed by professor Torsten Masseck. The project is supported by the Department of Cars and Internal Combustion Engines and the Architecture and Sustainability Group (iPAUS) at UPC, by the Catalan Energy Institute (ICAEN), by the Department for the Environment of the Generalitat of Catalonia and by Adigsa. The design is also sponsored by many companies: Schneider Electric, Schott Solar, Rehau, iGuzzini, Aislux, Ininsa, Black&Decker, Finnforest, Fupicsa, Solarlux, Gutex, Homatherm, Stanley, Grundfos, Biohouse, ProClima and Junkers Bosch Group. Other companies which helped with the design are Biolan, Grupo JG, Zicla, Bioclim, Klein Iberica, Polysun, Unex, ABC, Armacell, Humiambiente, SI Capital, TFM, Espacio Solar, Viru, Bec, Siemens, Espais Domòtics, Espacio Solar, Fustilan, BEC, ElectroDH, Novallini, Giró, Schutz, Galindo and La Salle of Universitat Ramon Llull. On 26 June, Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University was announced as the winner.

Solar Decathlon Europe Competition http://www.sdeurope.org

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The family as entrepreneurial value

Luigi Moretti, architect. From rationalism to the informal

In 2009 Fimag, the holding company which controls iGuzzini illuminazione, to mark the company's 50th anniversary, promoted the publication of a book entitled “The family as entrepreneurial value”. The book is mainly a photographic publication using pictures to tell the story of iGuzzini and all of the people who contributed to building the success of the companies in the Guzzini family. The book contains some precious and surprising information, such as the contribution from Carlo Azeglio Ciampi, former President of Italy, who remembers how as a young employee at Banca d’Italia's Macerata branch, he was able to witness the entrepreneurial spirit of the companies which were just getting started.

The exhibition proposes an exhaustive examination of the work of Luigi Moretti, one of the leading figures in twentieth-century architecture. The exhibition investigates both Moretti's design and theory work through drawings, models, vintage photographs. iGuzzini illuminazione is the technical sponsor for the exhibition, which was set up for the inauguration of MAXXI (National Museum of 21st century Art). The lighting for the photographs, both vintage and taken recently by Gabriele Basilico, for Moretti's models and paintings, consists of Tecnica spotlights, programmed and controlled using the Master Pro control system.

Rome, MAXXI, 30 May - 28 November 2010

Exhibition curators Bruno Reichlin Maristella Casciato Promoted by MAXXI - National Museum of 21st century Art Modern Archive University of Lugano (USI) State Central Archive Photographs Simone Cecchetti

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Georges Berne guest of iGuzzini illuminazione

IV Forum for Italo-Russian dialogue

Guildford Design Awards

Rome, 2 December 2009

Guildford, United Kingdom

On 23 July 2010 Georges Berne held a lesson about his experience as a Lighting Designer at our company. The event was a result of the cooperation established for the “Nessun dorma” project and fits perfectly with the iGuzzini Partners for Better light philosophy: only cooperation by all of the professionals involved in the project can give a quality result in the relationship between light and architecture.

On 2 December at the Ministry of Economic Development in Rome, the IV Forum for Italo Russian Dialogue took place, promoted by the governments of the two countries to mark the summit between the Premier Silvio Berlusconi and Russian President Dmitri Medvedev. The work - started by the Foreign Minister Franco Frattini and closed by the then Minister for Economic Development Claudio Scajola and by the Russian Minister for Trade and Industry, Victor Khristenko - focused on political, cultural and economic bilateral relationships. Participants included Education, Universities and Research Minister Mariastella Gelmini and the Heritage and Culture Minister Sandro Bondi. Leading figures in politics, economics and from Italian and Russian institutions took part in the debate, including Emma Marcegaglia, President of Confindustria (Confederation of Italian Industry) and Anatoly V. Torkunov, Rector of the University of Moscow.

The Guildford Design Awards ceremony was held on 21 October 2009. The awards, coordinated and organised by Guildford Council since 1987, aim to help to raise quality standards and attention to protection of the environment within the municipal area. iGuzzini won an award in the “new construction” category, in the commercial sector for the new office in Peasmarsh. The evening was hosted by Wayne Hemingway, founder of the “Red or Dead” clothing line and now president of Building for Life, a Commission for Architecture and the Built Environment (CABE), an association which promotes excellence in the design of new buildings.

Left to right: Luisa Todini, Co-president of the Forum for Italo - Russian Dialogue, Adolfo Guzzini, former Minister Claudio Scajola, Victor Khristenko, Russian Minister for Trade and Industry.

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The Treasure of the Shroud

Abu Dhabi Award

Turin, Palazzo Reale, 17 April - 23 May 2010

To coincide with the Ostension of the Most Holy Shroud, the Architectural and Landscape Heritage Office for the provinces of Turin, Asti, Cuneo, Biella and Vercelli has presented a new visitor route for Palazzo Reale in Turin, with the Treasure of the Shroud displayed for the first time and has unveiled the precious Shroud Collection of the Umberto II and Maria Josè di Savoia Foundation, with more than thirty engravings depicting the main ostensions between 1563 and 1931. Maria Gabriella di Savoia took part in the press conference. iGuzzini is the technical sponsor for the exhibition “From the Treasure of the Shroud to the Shroud Collection of Umberto II di Savoia”, supplying Linealuce LED luminaires for the lighting.

The Archilede LED street lighting system was recognised at the CityBuild Abu Dhabi Excellence in Construction Awards 2010. The prize is a prestigious award for companies which have made a significant contribution to progress in key areas of the Middle East construction sector. Archilede won in the “Best Product - Building and Construction” category, and the reason given was: “Archilede demonstrates innovation in the design and allows energy saving of up to 40%”.

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Incontroluce

II. 2010

Incontroluce Six-monthly international journal of lighting culture year XII, 22 Editorial office Centro Studi e Ricerca iGuzzini Fr.ne Sambucheto, 44/a 62019 Recanati MC +39.071.7588250 tel. +39.071.7588295 fax rc@iguzzini.it iGuzzini illuminazione spa 62019 Recanati, Italy via Mariano Guzzini, 37 +39.071.75881 tel. +39.071.7588295 fax iguzzini@iguzzini.it www.iguzzini.com 071-7588453 video Graphic design Studio Cerri & Associati Editor iGuzzini illuminazione spa The following companies collaborated in this issue iGuzzini illuminazione China Ltd. iGuzzini illuminazione Danmark iGuzzini illuminazione Deutschland GmbH iGuzzini illuminazione Espaùa S.A. iGuzzini illuminazione France S.A. iGuzzini illuminazione Schweiz AG iGuzzini illuminazione UK Diathlasis S.A., Greece E.C.C. Lighting LTD, Australia (except W.A.) Mondoluce, West Australia (W.A.) Proyecto Illuminaciòn, Argentina Cover photograph Lv Hengzhong Printed: October 2010 Tecnostampa, Recanati

Corrections to Incontroluce issue 21 Pag. 21 The lighting design is attributed to Studio Methis - Marinella Patetta. The correct name of the Firm is: Methis Lighting. Page 31 Photograph with kind permission from Fondazione Barbara Capocchin Pages 34, 35, 47 the photographs are by Paolo Carlini

The Editorial Team is not responsible for errors and omissions in the list of credits relating to projects and supplied by collaborators. Any additions or corrections will appear in the next issue.


9.2624.000.0

Georges Berne / 8’18” / Studio Iodice e Associati / Giampaolo Imbrighi Jacques Ferrier Architectures / mOa - marioOcchiuto architetture Archea Associati / Bernard Tschumi Architects / Goudchaux Architecte et Associes / Daufresnes, Le Carrée & Associés / aMDL - Michele De Lucchi Sutton Vane Associates / Rafael Viñoly Architects / Studio Amati Bauabteilung Magazine zum Globus / Corbett Lyon / Landau + Kindelbacher / Cox Rayner / Varis Arquitectes SLP / Francesc Oró / SLA


Incontroluce 22 EN - iGuzzini magazine