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Beginning with an extensive, hand-picked collection of exclusively regional art, interior designer eric Brown has created a relaxed and cultured greenville home for td Bank executive tim hockey and his family when they are in town from toronto. overlooking cleveland park and filled with landscapes, aBstracts, and sculpture, the two-Bedroom condo’s colors and textures echo the art collection. original artwork, with the latest technology and comfortaBle furnishings, makes this home a truly carefree downtown getaway.

photography By gil stose

Presented by

september/october 2010 |


Dream Space: Over the master bed hangs oil painting Carolina Autumn Dusk by Mickey Williams. All paint colors throughout the home are historic and from Davis Historic Paints of America or Farrow & Ball, Co.

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Face Forward

P h o t o g r a P h s

b y

P a u l

m e h a f f e y

sched u

le & eve ers 24 t t e s d n e nts 14 ups tate Designers 18 style Profle 22 tr

For g magazine’s inaugural Fashion Greenville event, more than 100 hopeful, fresh-faced models flocked from North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, to the open casting call. Fifty-eight women and men were selected to strut their stuff on the runway. october 22-23, 2010 |

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G Magazine’s Fashion Greenville

Stylish Serenade

the pulsing paintbrush

fashion greenville moves to the sounds of Daniel D.

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aniel D.’s musical stylings are a cross between classical and pop. His instrument? The violin, which he picked up at age 12, and which has been an extension of his spirit ever since. With his faith at the center of his music, this Charleston native plays with true heart and soul. At 21, Daniel D. has grown accustomed to playing in front of large crowds, but still embraces playing on Sundays at his family’s church. He has performed for President Obama, Oprah Winfrey, and the late King of Pop, as well as performances on BET’s 106 & Park, as an opening violinist for Jamie Fox and Kanye West. Daniel D. creates a sound both soothing and inspiring. His beats form a bridge between a variety of genres. Though his precision and superb art can clearly fit in a more somber and symphonic genre, the movement that emerges from his rhythmic and lively hip-hop style reaches an audience beyond the chambermusic crowd. With techno beats weaved into Daniel D.’s meticulous strings play, he establishes an entirely fresh music concept, something only a true artist can create. Attendees of Saturday night’s show of Fashion Greenville enjoyed the sights and sounds of the mesmerizing Daniel D. as he sauntered down the runway, playing in time to the unmistakable “Billie Jean” by Michael Jackson. The spotlight followed him as he ignited the crowd—a fitting opener for the night’s shows and festivities. —Alison Geist

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Local artist Ric Standridge redefines performance art at Fashion Greenville

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n his fashion greenville series homage to the masters, local artist ric standridge tips his hat to some artistic greats. on friday and saturday nights, standridge’s canvases were curvier than usual—they were actual models. With nods to michael Jackson, barbie, andy Warhol, and even Jackie Kennedy, standridge painted directly on black and white dresses to music by John lennon, David bowie, lady gaga, and more playing in the background. ric explains that he associates musical notes to colors: “e chord, i see red. bright red. an effervescent man, standridge has given new life to greenville’s art scene with his creation of the south carolina children’s theatre in 1987 and as a former recruiting director for the south carolina governor’s school of the arts. though he has always been artistic, drawing, acting on stage, or playing the guitar, standridge did not incorporate his love of music and painting until 2006. throughout his years as an active participant in the arts, standridge says he learned that “talent knows no boundaries.” though he had never before participated in a live show, on live models, as at fashion greenville, standridge embraced this opportunity. “there’s a fine line between 2-D art and a fashion piece. this morphs them together,” he says. With all that he has done in association with the arts, standridge is still humble and applauds those around him. he donates a


september/october 2010 |


G Magazine’s Fashion Greenville

Beautiful Craft beauty is more than meets the eye. meet the hair and make-up stylists behind fashion greenville’s fashion-forward looks

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ashion is more than clothes, hair, and make-up. It is a story told, a concept revealed, and the incorporation of a variety of creative ideas. Ivy Salon and Spa and Wilson’s on Washington are two of the creative forces behind Fashion Greenville’s style-filled weekend. Wilson’s on Washington combines its experienced hair professionals, and twenty-five years in Greenville, with Ivy Salon and Spa’s bevy of make-up artists who will polish the look of each model. Both beauty businesses agree that crafting a distinct look for each model takes a team effort, practice, and, of course, good direction. Wilson Eidson, owner and stylist at Wilson’s on Washington, explains that to create the right look and style for Fashion Greenville, he and his team members have assembled storyboards, conducted training sessions, and researched current styles. The folks at Ivy Salon and Spa agree that research is key. Preparing for an event like this requires a solid knowledge of color schemes, current trends, and adeptness of application. Teams of ten to twenty stylists will be on hand from both Wilson’s on Washington and Ivy Salon and Spa, wielding a full stock of hairdryers, curling irons, flat irons, L’Oreal Professional products, and Aveda products, which are vitamin-rich and naturally produced, to enhance each model’s personalized look. —Alison Geist

Ivy Color salon 19 south main street, greenville (864) 370-1489 Ivy salon and spa 802 south batesville road, greer (864) 801-8014 Wilson’s on Washington 794 east Washington street, greenville (864) 235-3336

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the substance ubstance of style Fashion Greenville’s distinguished cadre of catwalkers

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ne thing’s for sure about greenville’s premier fashion event: it could not happen without its standout models. fifty-eight men and women from four states—georgia, the carolinas, and as far as florida—were selected to strut the catwalk, and that number was culled from a blowout turnout of more than 100 applicants. for two days in september, the bold and beautiful presented their style and sass to a three-judge panel, who took in their walk, looks, and presence (you know, that little somethin’, somethin’). photographer paul mehaffey took reference shots of each, and the committee selected the participants on the spot. their personal stories are as unique as their styles. model Whitney mahon, 15, traveled more than six hours from her home in Yulee, florida, to try out for the event. greenville firefighter chip campbell of the gantt fire Department will walk in his first-ever fashion show. but come november, chip will don a suit of a different sort when he ships out to fort Knox, Kentucky, to begin his active tour of duty in the United states army (no doubt a role model with model looks). then there is mother-daughter modeling duo, Deborah and lindsey foulkes (who is freshman at Wade hampton). it was lindsey’s interest that brought Deborah to the audition. Deborah laughs, “i did not come prepared to audition for myself.” but one thing led to another, and in a carpe-diem moment she, too, decided to take on the runway. With such diversity of looks, age, and background, the models of fashion greenville reenville will surely dazzle these october nights. —Blair Knobel

f a s h i o n ggrvei el lnevmi lal eg . c o m


Park Place: (Opposite top) The Hockeys’ Greenville home overlooks Cleveland Park and the balcony provides a place for low maintenance plants, selected by The Houseplant, to thrive while they are away. (Opposite bottom) Tim and Lana Hockey, with Jynx, in their new downtown getaway at Ridgeland at the Park. (This page) The guest room showcases a series of twelve works on paper by Kate Landishaw. The room also features a continucontinu ous headboard and—with the help of a custom mattress cover—beds that can be pushed together to form a king-sized sleeping space.

J U lY / a U g U s t 2 0 1 0 | september/october 2010 |

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G Magazine’s Fashion Greenville

stYle Done right

Lynne Curtin Designs

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here’s more than a little irony in the “housewife” label that’s been placed on orange County reality television star llynne Curtin. the truth of the matter is, the celebrity homemaker is making homes beautiful from coast to coast, not just in orange County, California, where she gained fame (and a bit of notoriety) on the hit bravo television show, The Real Housewives of Orange County. as fashion greenville’s celebrity designer, the upstate will receive a sneak peak at her new fall line of handbags and jewelry, plus an exclusive introduction to her not-yet-released line of fashion bedding coming out in time for this holiday season. Curtin, the fashionista-turned-designer, launched her edgy, elegant line of accessories last year—think fringed hobo bags, elegant evening clutches, and exquisitely ornamented cuff bracelets. the lynne l Curtin Designs accessory line is coming back with a vengeance this fall featuring several exotic new skins (crocodile, lambskin, and stingray, to name a few) and funky, fashionable new designs. “I really want people to feel like they have purchased a piece of art when they buy from my line,” Curtin explains. “We use only the fnest skins—tanned leathers that are durable yet very soft and comfortable to wear.” how Curtin became a designer has less to do with her reality stardom than it does with her globetrotting tendencies, which go back to when she was a little girl. “you you have to be fashion y forward to live in orange County,” she says, smiling. “but my design inspiration really comes from my genuine love for creating new looks and

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being a trendsetter. that hat goes back to my childhood.” a military brat, she traveled the globe with her parents, moving often and learning about a variety of cultures and customs everywhere she went. It seems unsurprisunsurpris ing that Curtin landed in affluent (and, yes, sometimes ostentatious) orange County. but ut how she got hooked up with an upstate-based pstate-based luxury bedding designer is a bit more perplexing. “I guess you could say it was meant to be, or divine intervention,” laughs spartanburg-based travis blackwood, Ceo of branded home Designs/trinity source International who will be producing the bedding collections inspired and designed by Curtin. “how else does a south Carolina boy bring an orange County diva to the upstate?” his wife, a fan of the show, plugged him into llynne’s design sensibilities. long story short, travis sent llynne an e-mail, “and the rest is history,” he says. after four months of designing pieces, the llynne Curtin bedding line is ready to roll. “We are so excited,” blackwood says. “lynne l lynne really worked to incorporate the latest in fashion into this bedding line—she mixes tones and textures and offers something for everyone.” the look is “high-end designer oC” but the price point is not: eightand nine-piece collections range from $200+ to $400+.” Collections are available by pre-order on llynne’s Web site. Needless to say, the West Coast diva enjoys being in her element—be it on her home coast or amid an east Coast crowd. the invitation to join fashion greenville offered the perfect opportunity for her to talk shop and promote her designs. In the process of creating her new bedding line, lynne l has also become a big fan of greenville. “We immediately fell in love with this area and the southern hospitality,” she says. and she loves being in the spotlight: “most people would think I get tired of it. let me just say, I love it! and I never get tired of all the excitement and pleasure of meeting new people.” —Heidi Coryell Williams

fashiongreenville.com


Zero

Tumble Frame Base Cascade

River Avenue

Dawn Light Wando Madison Dunes

Haywood Mall

700 Haywood Rd.

Greenville S.C.

864.297.2000 Still Life

september/october 2010 |


G Magazine’s Fashion Greenville

Beija-Flor Jeans

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magine if the perfect-f perfect-ftting pair of jeans was also comfortable? and nd stylish. and nd eco-friendly. and socially conscious. We might be tempted to run them for politipoliti cal of offce they’re so charismatic. but ut beijaeija-f flor jeans are that great. It’s no wonder their fan following has earned the nickname beija believers. (among mong those who count themselves as beija believers is fashion greenville reenville celebrity designer lynne lynne Curtin, star of the hit bravo television series, The Real Housewives of Orange County!) County !) “t the women who love our jeans have one thing in common: they struggle to fnd stylish designer jeans that ft and flatter,” explains emilie milie Whitaker, who—along with her mother Kathy moça—owns and operoper ates beijaeija-flor lor Jeans. since 2006, the mother-daughter team’s mission has been to provide women of all shapes and sizes with great-f great-ftting jeans that are produced in a socially and environmenenvironmentally friendly facility. “We have a passion for design and a commitment to providing a sociallyconscious product that helps women feel good about themselves,” emilie offers. although beija-flor Jeans are an investment, they’re well worth the cost-per-wear, which has earned the line recognition far and wide, most recently in People and Good Housekeeping magazines. this year, beijaeija-f flor introduces its jegging jean—a cross between a jean and a legging. “unlike nlike a lot of jeggings on the market, our stephanie tephanie jegging gives you the support of a traditional jean with the appeal of a stylish legging,” Kathy says. “It’s versatile enough to be worn with tunics, shorter tops, tucked into boots, paired with flats, or dressed up with stilettos.” Kathy and emilie milie jumped at the invitation to participate in fashion greenville reenville because it meant an opportunity to showshow case beija-flor’s lor’s spring collection. “We’re thrilled because fashion ashion greenville reenville celebrates two of the things we’re passionate about: greenville

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and fashion,” ashion,” emilie says. “as “ s greenville natives and entrepreneurs, the greenville reenville community has supported us since the beginning of beijaeija-f flor, and its dedication and support have helped us grow the brand to where it is today.”

beija-flor Jeans (800) 540-6241 www.ilovethesejeans.com Where to fnd them: beija-boutique at Plaza suite 550 south main street #200, greenville (864) 298-0081 Cocobella 3730 Pelham road, greenville (864) 676-1900

Southern Tide

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hat happens when a classic polo shirt gets infused with inspiration from Italian archiarchi tecture, high-performance sports cars, and couture clothing? the answer is the greenville-based line of superior-ftting superior- tting clothing: southern tide. since southern tide was founded in 2006, the brand has grown into an entire collection of classic, authentic apparel—all created from scratch, each piece setting a new standard for comfort and ft. today, southern tide still prides itself on creating comforttoday, comfort able, quality apparel. from rom the specially engineered yarn and fabric of its classic skipjack Polo to the meticulous design detail of its Channel marker Khaki, nothing about this clothing company is conventional. “o “our way may take a little longer, but we want our clothing to make you look and feel your best,” says


Artistic Tone: (Opening page) Designer Eric Brown built the décor of Tim and Lana Hockey’s condo around a collection of regional art from South Carolina, Georgia, and North Carolina—mostly assembled through the Hampton III Gallery. The family’s love of animals, particularly dogs, is reflected in several of the collection’s pieces, including Carl Blair’s Zero sculpture, which recently spent time on loan to a solo exhibit at the Morris Museum of Art in Augusta, Georgia. Also pictured, Tumble Frame Base by Paul Yanko. Left, Cascade by Julyan Davis above the home’s single antique piece. All fabric and paint colors were dictated by the artwork, says Brown, and the frames run from rich gilt to casual wood. Right, from top to bottom, Dawn Light Wando River by Mickey Williams, Madison Avenue by Betsy Havens, and Dunes by James F. Cooper.

Words here

Cozy Condo: Comfort is the watchword for the space, Brown says, and though the furniture styles vary, they all offer a relaxing seat. Above left, the Hockey’s dog, Jynx, tries out the new digs. Left, the furniture was selected from Brown’s preferred sources, including Verellen Home Collection, a company in High Point, North Carolina, specializing in handcrafted, modern, and green-built pieces. Still Life by Joseph Bradley hangs above the chaise. september/october 2010 |

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southern tide founder allen llen stephenson. tephenson. “s “superior ft, classic design, and comfort are key elements of our effortless style.” While it may look and feel effortless, the science behind the superior ft of southern tide’s ide’s clothing is anything but. “We strive to improve classic apparel by re-thinking the engineering of each product. from rom the fabric, the ft, and the styling, we are always looking for ways to improve the overall experience of our customers,” allen llen says. “We want to make products that look great, feel great, and last a long time.” being based in greenville reenville has its benef benefts. “o “one of the advanadvan tages to being here in south outh Carolina is the extraordinary depth of apparel-industry knowledge that exists here,” allen llen explains. “Whether we seek input on design, production, fabrics or color, we are surrounded by a wealth of knowledge.” When the skipjack kipjack Polo was frst rst conceived, allen llen focused on improving the ftt and how the use of top-quality materials and construction affect the wearer’s comfort and visual appeal. In addition to this, it would be essential that the polo be “fresh“fresh man proof,” when it came to laundering. “It took many months, and a lot of trial and error to arrive at a fabric composition that was so soft, yet highly breathable. many any proclaimed it to be the most comfortable, classic polo they had ever worn,” allen llen recalls. a fnishing process makes the inside of the shirt extremely soft, and a bit of stretch is also incorporated into the fabric, creating a more flattering ftt as well as superior shape and color retention. the he same concepts now apply to everything southern outhern tide makes—khaki pants, sports shirts, t-shirts, and pullovers. sizing is also highly consistent, so shoppers can count on the same ft and feel regardless of where a shirt is purchased. the result is a customer base that spans the generations. southern tide’s ide’s customers all share an appreciation for classic design, but they desire something better—a high-quality prodprod uct that reflects attention to detail. as this greenville-based reenville-based line graces the catwalk at fashion greenville, upstate pstate shoppers will get a frst-hand look at not only the line’s fashions, but the company’s broad fan base. “the he concept has proven itself in other markets,” allen offers. “and nd a few people may be surprised at the high level of interest here in the upstate!” pstate!”

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southern tide 501 east North street, greenville (864) 236-8015 www.southerntide.com

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Hincapie Sportswear

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tyle in motion™, otion™, the mission of greenville-based hincapie incapie sportswear, is much more than simply a motto; it’s a calling as strong as the hincapie passion for cycling itself. and it’s no wonder around the world that the hincapie name has become synonymous with competition, performance, and sophistication. Now, the hincapie sportswear portswear line, with its sophisticated designs, technitechni cally superior fabrics, and european uropean accents, has gained its own reputation as a premium apparel and accessories company. “our ur design and development team stays very in tune to the shifting developments in the fashion industry and we apply those trends to our product assortment on a seasonal basis,” says rich hincapie, brother of renowned cyclist george hincapie incapie of t tour our de france and olympic fame. “for the men’s collection, we strive to produce high-performance products. We select the most technical fabrics and features that bring added beneffts to one’s performance on the bike. bene ““f for the women’s collection, we strive to produce fun, flirty cycling apparel that the customer feels good wearing,” rich explains. “We have also added some “crossover pieces” in the women’s line, like our new bella Vita skirt, which will allow our customer to wear while biking, jogging, or simply running erer rands around town.” hincapie sportswear’s spring 2011 collection features a new technology that utilizes advanced body-mapping technology to strategically engineer garment panels. these panels deliver varying performance attributes simultaneously. In addition to their cycling apparel, hincapie sportswear launched its denim collection last fall. hincapie Premium Denim combines a modern european uropean style with a distinctively classic feel. utilizing tilizing llycra, ycra, the main component found in their cycling apparel, the denim has a unique feel and flawless ft. fashion greenville reenville showcases these styles and more to a broad audience of upstate shoppers. —Heidi Coryell Williams

hincapie sportswear 45 Pete hollis blvd. open monday-friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. (864) 400-3040 www.hincapie.com

fashiongreenville.com


Artistic Tone: (Opening page) Designer Eric Brown built the décor of Tim and Lana Hockey’s condo around a collection of regional art from South Carolina, Georgia, and North Carolina—mostly assembled through the Hampton III Gallery. The family’s love of animals, particularly dogs, is reflected in several of the collection’s pieces, including Carl Blair’s Zero sculpture, which recently spent time on loan to a solo exhibit at the Morris Museum of Art in Augusta, Georgia. Also pictured, Tumble Frame Base by Paul Yanko. Left, Cascade by Julyan Davis above the home’s single antique piece. All fabric and paint colors were dictated by the artwork, says Brown, and the frames run from rich gilt to casual wood. Right, from top to bottom, Dawn Light Wando River by Mickey Williams, Madison Avenue by Betsy Havens, and Dunes by James F. Cooper.

Words here

Cozy Condo: Comfort is the watchword for the space, Brown says, and though the furniture styles vary, they all offer a relaxing seat. Above left, the Hockey’s dog, Jynx, tries out the new digs. Left, the furniture was selected from Brown’s preferred sources, including Verellen Home Collection, a company in High Point, North Carolina, specializing in handcrafted, modern, and green-built pieces. Still Life by Joseph Bradley hangs above the chaise. september/october 2010 |

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hampDen clothing

Coplon’s 1922 augusta road, greenville monday-saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. (864) 271-1600 www.coplons.com

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coplon’s

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o step foot into Coplon’s sumptuous yet casual 10,000-square-foot fashion emporium on augusta road is to fnd a much-needed refuge in today’s world of hectic, impersonal shopping experiences. since 1995, Coplon’s has been greenville’s reenville’s leading specialty store for women, showcasing only the fnest nest fashions, shoes, accessories, and cosmetics. “We are thrilled to be part of fashion greenville,” reenville,” says Coplon’s owner bruce greenberg. reenberg. the he store not only offers a ref refned, friendly shopping environment, it is the upstate’s exclusive home to many of the world’s most famous fashion houses: oscar de la renta, enta, Valentino, missoni, lela rose, ose, michael Kors, Jason Wu, stella tella mcCartney, yigal igal azourel, halston, robert obert rodriguez, theory, milly, illy, and etro tro among them. Coplon’s also features an unsurpassed selection of fne ne shoes from Christian louboutin, ouboutin, Jimmy Choo, giuseppe iuseppe Zanotti, Kate spade, Pour la Victoire, and stewart Weitzman; and handbags and jewelry from Nancy gonzalez, lanvin, Chloe, marc Jacobs, Jude frances, temple t st. Clair, and alexis bittar. and the “total look” would not be complete without a complimentary skincare consultation and makeover by Coplon’s professionally trained trish mcevoy and Darphin specialist. from suburban “car pool chic” casual and fun daytime clothes to glamorous cocktail ensembles and stunning ball gowns, Coplon’s unique and knowledgeable specialists are always ready to coordinate and assist with your selections, often choosing one-of-a-kind creations.

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ffering a perfect blend of apparel from the lines of emerging designers to the best, most recognized names in fashion, hampden Clothing is one of the newest retailers to hit the greenville marketplace. the shop arrived in mcbee station in 2008—just one year after opening its frst store on Charleston’s swanky King street. since then, hampden Clothing has been named one of the top ffty stores in the country by Marie Claire magazine in 2009, priding itself on providing an inviting shopping experience. the result? shopping here feels more like stepping into your best friend’s closet than walking into a clothing store. from customer service with a handwritten thank-you note, to an assortment of lines that are all exclusive to hampden, this shop is the southeast’s shopping destination. hampden carries a variety of lines, both classic and trendy, including steven alan, a staple on the New y york fashion scene, who each season brings a great twist on a cool, basic sweater dress; malene birger, hailing all the way from Denmark, brings classic sensibility with a modern twist to her collection sold exclusively at hampden Clothing; and alexander Wang, the “it” designer of the moment who has been carried at hampden since its doors opened. “spotting designers early is our job,” says owner stacy smallwood. “that is why you can trust us to know the latest brands, so you don’t have to do the research. It’s also about being confdent with yourself and presenting externally to the world who you are on the inside. “Come with an open mind and let us help you fnd something that will ft your lifestyle.”

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hampden Clothing 500 east mcbee avenue, ste. 103, greenville (located in Charleston, as well) monday-friday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., sunday by appointment (864) 235-5755 www.hampdenclothing.com fashiongreenville.com


Artistic Tone: (Opening page) Designer Eric Brown built the décor of Tim and Lana Hockey’s condo around a collection of regional art from South Carolina, Georgia, and North Carolina—mostly assembled through the Hampton III Gallery. The family’s love of animals, particularly dogs, is reflected in several of the collection’s pieces, including Carl Blair’s Zero sculpture, which recently spent time on loan to a solo exhibit at the Morris Museum of Art in Augusta, Georgia. Also pictured, Tumble Frame Base by Paul Yanko. Left, Cascade by Julyan Davis above the home’s single antique piece. All fabric and paint colors were dictated by the artwork, says Brown, and the frames run from rich gilt to casual wood. Right, from top to bottom, Dawn Light Wando River by Mickey Williams, Madison Avenue by Betsy Havens, and Dunes by James F. Cooper.

Words here

Cozy Condo: Comfort is the watchword for the space, Brown says, and though the furniture styles vary, they all offer a relaxing seat. Above left, the Hockey’s dog, Jynx, tries out the new digs. Left, the furniture was selected from Brown’s preferred sources, including Verellen Home Collection, a company in High Point, North Carolina, specializing in handcrafted, modern, and green-built pieces. Still Life by Joseph Bradley hangs above the chaise. september/october 2010 |

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rUsh Wilson limiteD

sassy on augusta 18 West lewis Plaza, greenville monday-friday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. (864) 233-5252 www.sassyonaugusta.com

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assy on augusta is more than a fresh, expressive fashion boutique—it’s a second chance at life and a dream realized for lisa mcgehee ehee and her mother, libby sf sfris, ris, who opened the augusta road–area store in January 2007. libby and lisa pride themselves on fnding the latest clothing and accessory fashions from coast to coast and bringing them to greenville. reenville. the shop features top lines such as tibi, trina rina turk, urk, 7 for all mankind, belford, ella moss, and more. their unique, edgy clothing styles and beautiful accessories appeal to a diverse selection of tastes and ft a wide range of sizes. “We felt that greenville lacked a store where both the mother and daughter could both shop and fnd something in the same store,” exex plains lisa. “We feel like we achieved that goal here at sassy on augusta. We have sizes from 0 to 14, and we have styles that the young and young at heart love!” Not to be missed is sassy’s assy’s exclusive-to-g exclusive-to-greenville and totally inspired accessory line Virgins, saints, & angels, made with swarovski crystals, sterling silver or gold plate, with Vatican medallions. as a university of south Carolina grad, lisa started out working for a greenville-based bank. but in 2004 she was diagnosed with lymphoma. l after battling and beating her cancer, lisa gained a new appreciation for life and decided to pursue her dream of opening a ladies’ boutique. “In the process, I found a great partner to do it with: my mom! “We are truly a family-owned, specialty ladies' boutique, and our customers are a part of our family,” says lisa. “We truly enjoy what we do and it shows.”

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t’s not uncommon to fnd several generations shopping at rush Wilson limited on West North street in downtown greenville. tradition is an integral part of the upscale men’s clothier, which was founded sixty years ago by rush Wilson in Davidson, N.C. It was here that Wilson introduced the natural-shouldered, New england-style clothing to the southeast, and the rest is history. rush decided to expand to greenville, s.C., in 1959. his son, rush III, grew up in the store, sweeping the floors at age 13 and selling his frst suit at age 15. he continued working in the business part-time through high school and college. after serving four years as an army rmy of offcer, rush III came home to join the family business. t today, rush Wilson limited distinguishes itself from other stores or direct sellers with its unique perspective on style and its staff’s expertise in ftting. Not only do their associates have exceptional taste, they also offer a great deal of creativity in helping customers achieve a unique look in their business, social, and leisure-time wardrobes. a number of distinguished lines are carried at rush Wilson. among them is Peter millar, which features a complete collection from suits to sportswear. handmade suits by oxxford Clothes are popular for the most discerning afcionados of fne-tailored clothing. and greenville-based southern tide is a favorite for shoppers of all ages, featuring sportswear, knit, and woven shirts for an active lifestyle. “We are excited to be part of fashion greenville, to help showcase the top fashion stores in this area,” rush offers. “We have many very talented, energetic people in the fashion business in greenville. I believe we have as much to offer as the larger cities in the southeast and beyond.”

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rush Wilson limited 23 West North street, greenville monday-saturday, 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Wednesdays, 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. (864) 232-2761 www.rushwilson.com fashiongreenville.com


Artistic Tone: (Opening page) Designer Eric Brown built the décor of Tim and Lana Hockey’s condo around a collection of regional art from South Carolina, Georgia, and North Carolina—mostly assembled through the Hampton III Gallery. The family’s love of animals, particularly dogs, is reflected in several of the collection’s pieces, including Carl Blair’s Zero sculpture, which recently spent time on loan to a solo exhibit at the Morris Museum of Art in Augusta, Georgia. Also pictured, Tumble Frame Base by Paul Yanko. Left, Cascade by Julyan Davis above the home’s single antique piece. All fabric and paint colors were dictated by the artwork, says Brown, and the frames run from rich gilt to casual wood. Right, from top to bottom, Dawn Light Wando River by Mickey Williams, Madison Avenue by Betsy Havens, and Dunes by James F. Cooper.

Words here

Cozy Condo: Comfort is the watchword for the space, Brown says, and though the furniture styles vary, they all offer a relaxing seat. Above left, the Hockey’s dog, Jynx, tries out the new digs. Left, the furniture was selected from Brown’s preferred sources, including Verellen Home Collection, a company in High Point, North Carolina, specializing in handcrafted, modern, and green-built pieces. Still Life by Joseph Bradley hangs above the chaise. september/october 2010 |

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G Magazine’s Fashion Greenville

monKee’s of the West enD

trousseau 2222 augusta street, greenville monday-friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., saturday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. (864) 271-9382 www.trousseaugreenville.com

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f the occasion is formal, then the dress shop is trousseau. Designer dresses, formal gowns, daytime dresses, and dressy separates all grace the racks of this special-occasion boutique tucked off of augusta ugusta street treet in the beautiful augusta Commons shopping center. trousseau rousseau carries an inventory of dresses that are unique to greenville, all inside a customer-centric shop offering designer lines that simply can’t be found in any department store or mall shop. “We make it easy to fnd the perfect dress for any special occasion,” says shop owner hollis ollis smith. since trousseau opened its doors in august ugust 2004, their mission has been to provide customers with the best possible selection, service, qualqual ity, and value in elegant women’s wear. Carrying top designers including Nicole miller, t teri eri Jon, badgley mischka, and many others, their selection is as classic or trendy as it is stunning. “We work with so many mothers of the bride and groom who want something unique and not matronly for their special wedding,” hollis says, adding that they also carry dresses appropriate for wedding guests, bridal luncheons, and rehearsal dinners. “many of our customers are shopping for black-tie events in the area, or simply for a great dress for church or to go out to dinner,” she offers. and they have something for everyone and every occasion. that’s why they’re so excited to be part of the very frst fashion greenville—it’s just one more great event to join the already amazing calendar of social goings on around greenville. “We have so many wonderful art and music events,” hollis says. “Now we can all enjoy this fabulous fashion event that features many of our local retailers and up-and-coming designers.”

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ocated in the heart of greenville’s historic Westend District, you will fnd monkee's—a ladies’ store beyond your “girlie” imagination, known to have the fnest lines in ladies shoes, clothing, and accessories. No need to travel to atlanta, Charlotte, New y york, or miami to fnd the latest in contemporary ladies’ fashions. monkee's of the West end brings it straight to you. Designer apparel lines include milly, tibi, shoshanna, trina turk, alice and olivia, and many more. but the shopping doesn’t stop there. Pair the perfect shoe with any outft when choosing from lines such as tory t burch, frye, Pour la Victoire, Kate spade, Donald Pliner, Jack rogers, and others. and don’t forget the accessories lines such as Kenneth Jay lane, linea Pelle, tory t burch, Nu bra, hanky Panky, and others that will fnish off any outft. monkee's is a warm and enthusiastic boutique, offering one-stop shopping to their customers, with items appealing to a wide spectrum of ages, styles, and sizes. most any woman can leave dressed from head-to-toe in stylish apparel, shoes, and accessories. a shopping trip to monkee's of the West end is an experience in and of itself. Jeni, Carolyn, Jaymi, lauren, brittany, rachel, and mary Katherine all pride themselves in the personal attention given to each customer and are always on hand to help you fnd the perfect outft for any occasion. from dressed-up design to everyday apparel, you don’t need an excuse to head to monkee's, but you might need a bigger closet. so consider yourself warned.

G magazine’s

fashion greenville

monkee’s of the West end 103-a augusta street, greenville monday-friday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. (864) 239-0788 www.monkeesofthewestend.com

fashiongreenville.com


Artistic Tone: (Opening page) Designer Eric Brown built the décor of Tim and Lana Hockey’s condo around a collection of regional art from South Carolina, Georgia, and North Carolina—mostly assembled through the Hampton III Gallery. The family’s love of animals, particularly dogs, is reflected in several of the collection’s pieces, including Carl Blair’s Zero sculpture, which recently spent time on loan to a solo exhibit at the Morris Museum of Art in Augusta, Georgia. Also pictured, Tumble Frame Base by Paul Yanko. Left, Cascade by Julyan Davis above the home’s single antique piece. All fabric and paint colors were dictated by the artwork, says Brown, and the frames run from rich gilt to casual wood. Right, from top to bottom, Dawn Light Wando River by Mickey Williams, Madison Avenue by Betsy Havens, and Dunes by James F. Cooper.

Words here

Cozy Condo: Comfort is the watchword for the space, Brown says, and though the furniture styles vary, they all offer a relaxing seat. Above left, the Hockey’s dog, Jynx, tries out the new digs. Left, the furniture was selected from Brown’s preferred sources, including Verellen Home Collection, a company in High Point, North Carolina, specializing in handcrafted, modern, and green-built pieces. Still Life by Joseph Bradley hangs above the chaise. september/october 2010 |

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smith & James/chelsea’s

the runway 162 east main street, spartanburg monday-friday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., saturday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., and by appointment (864) 573-9134 www.shoptherunway.net

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G Magazine’s Fashion Greenville

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etail therapy comes gratis at downtown spartanburg’s partanburg’s the runway unway clothing boutique. because whether you love shopping or loathe it, a trip to this two-year-young boutique promises a comfortable and fun shopping expeexperience, where shoppers get help solving their wardrobe dilemmas, planning outf outfts for trips, or picking the perfect special-occasion piece. “our ur knowledge of the fashion world and our love of retail help us provide the best in style and customer service to everyone that walks in the door,” says store owner michele Woodward. michele has traveled the country buying for and managing women’s clothing boutiques, including the frst madewell store in the country for JCrew. her background has broadened the range she offers her customers at the runway. “We try to think outside the box when it comes to lines and offer things that you can’t fnd nd down the street, but we also carry lines that are well known for quality and style,” michele ichele says. the runway offers lines including 3Dots, ella moss, and 291 from Venice for the busy mom and girl on the run. and for those needing a little more professional wardrobe, Corey llynn Calter, frock! by tracy reese, and t-bags are perfect options. When it comes to shoes, michele relies on the lemon Peel at 183 Dunbar street. With a great selection of frye boots and a large selection of shoes and handbags, they always help pull an outft together. “We watch fashion shows on tV and see the fashions in magazines,” says michele. “but fashion greenville shows them how it can be done without traveling to Charlotte or atlanta.”

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ince 1916, smith & James menswear has been a fxture in the upstate, located in the heart of historic downtown greer. a second location was added on Woodruff road nearly nine decades after that frst shop opened, and the store’s traditions, style, and personalized service have stayed true through the years. today, both smith & James locations are adjacent to Chelsea’s, a ladies’ t boutique flled with fun, classy, and unique clothing and accessories. the result is an ideal shopping venue for fashionable men and women. “We try to get to know our customers on a personal basis and to assist them in making great selections that enhance their current wardrobes,” says brandon Price, who, with his father bernard, runs smith & James. bernard’s wife, brenda, with their daughter, t tarra, run the Chelsea’s boutique next door. and the common theme among all four stores is customer appreciation. featuring only the fnest men’s clothing lines, smith & James offers merchandise that simply can’t be found on the shelves of large-scale retailers, such as Kroon and Peter millar. along with a wide variety of premium denim, smith & James appeals to all ages as a great place to shop—be it for weekend wear or a night on the town. “right next door at Chelsea’s, women can choose from their own variety of name-brand labels, such as Jack rogers sandals and premium denim jeans 7 for all mankind, It! Jeans, ag, fortune Denim, Jag, or Not your y Daughter’s Jeans (NyDJ). “We want our customers and our future customers to know that smith & James and Chelsea’s have everything they need right here,” brandon explains. “they don’t have to go to New york, y atlanta, or Charleston to shop for unique clothing.”

G magazine’s

fashion greenville

smith & James/Chelsea’s 222 & 224 trade street, greer (864) 877-6525 1125 Woodruff road, ste. 1603, greenville (864) 234-8880 greenville, monday-saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. greer, monday-friday, 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. fashiongreenville.com


Artistic Tone: (Opening page) Designer Eric Brown built the décor of Tim and Lana Hockey’s condo around a collection of regional art from South Carolina, Georgia, and North Carolina—mostly assembled through the Hampton III Gallery. The family’s love of animals, particularly dogs, is reflected in several of the collection’s pieces, including Carl Blair’s Zero sculpture, which recently spent time on loan to a solo exhibit at the Morris Museum of Art in Augusta, Georgia. Also pictured, Tumble Frame Base by Paul Yanko. Left, Cascade by Julyan Davis above the home’s single antique piece. All fabric and paint colors were dictated by the artwork, says Brown, and the frames run from rich gilt to casual wood. Right, from top to bottom, Dawn Light Wando River by Mickey Williams, Madison Avenue by Betsy Havens, and Dunes by James F. Cooper.

Words here

Cozy Condo: Comfort is the watchword for the space, Brown says, and though the furniture styles vary, they all offer a relaxing seat. Above left, the Hockey’s dog, Jynx, tries out the new digs. Left, the furniture was selected from Brown’s preferred sources, including Verellen Home Collection, a company in High Point, North Carolina, specializing in handcrafted, modern, and green-built pieces. Still Life by Joseph Bradley hangs above the chaise. september/october 2010 |

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G Magazine’s Fashion Greenville

Plaza suite—a boutique 550 south main street at Camperdown Way monday-saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. open sundays during artisphere, euphoria, and other large-scale, downtown events (864) 298-0081 www.shopplazasuite.com

plaza sUite

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ince 1997, Plaza suite has been a unique and contemporary place for “girls of any age” to shop in the heart of downtown greenville—as long as they appreciate style, celebrate indiindi viduality, and are looking for something new and different. With a variety of price points, sizes, and appeal, customers shop at Plaza suite not seeking designer labels, but searching out unique and unusual pieces to fll their wardrobes. “our “ ur customers come in all sizes and all ages,” explains store owner terry t sadowski. adowski. “In other words, we are not a boutique for only sizes 0 to 2, or twenty-somethings. our approach to fashion leads us to choose contemporary and trendy styles, which are a bit edgy but can stand the test of time.” best of all, at Plaza suite they believe fashion needn’t be terribly exex pensive to be well made and beautifully designed. Case in point, is one of the shop’s favorite lines, greenville owned and designed beijaeija-flor Jeans. they were the frst beija boutique, which means they stock the line’s entire collection in every style and in every size, 0 to 16. Plaza suite’s Johnny Was Collection and JW los angeles are another great way to spice up your wardrobe. the collection is washable silk or rayon, featuring embroidered and printed tunics, shirts, and dresses. JW los angeles features embroidered tees and dresses. other lines include apparel from colorful, trendy Desigual, which just opened a store in soho, but can be found right here in greenville. sara Campbell, elliott lauren, emil rutenberg, three Dots red, and flax are other trendy and young-at-heart lines that are totally appropriate for moms and grandmoms.

macY’s

W

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ith more than thirty years of serving upstate shoppers from its space at haywood mall, greenville’s macy’s delivers fashion and affordable luxury from a newly remodeled space that was recently updated in 2009. the local macy’s is one of more than 800 locations in 45 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto rico, and guam. macy’s stores and macys.com offer distinctive assortments, including the most desired family of exclusive fashion brands for him, her, and home. macy’s is known for such epic events as macy’s fourth of July fireworks® and the macy’s thanksgiving Day Parade®, as well as spectacular fashion shows, culinary events, flower shows, and celebrity appearances. building on a 150-year tradition, macy’s also helps strengthen communities by supporting local and national charities that make a difference in the lives of its customers. macy’s proudly offers brands exclusive to its stores that provide outstanding fashion goods at a great value, including I.N.C. International Concepts, rachel roy, tommy t hilfger, style & Co., and alfani. Whether you are fashion forward or prefer more traditional styles, there is affordable luxury for everyone at macy’s. “We at macy’s are excited to participate and showcase our exclusive brands at fashion Week in greenville,” says mark fuhr, vice-president and general manager of macy’s at haywood mall. “from the trendsetting to the classic, our greenville shoppers are always looking for what’s new, and we’re looking forward to showing off all the latest looks for fall.”

G magazine’s

fashion greenville

macy’s at haywood mall 700 haywood road, greenville sunday, 11 a.m.-7 p.m., monday-Wednesday, 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., thursday-saturday, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. (864) 297-2000 www.macys.com

fashiongreenville.com


Artistic Tone: (Opening page) Designer Eric Brown built the décor of Tim and Lana Hockey’s condo around a collection of regional art from South Carolina, Georgia, and North Carolina—mostly assembled through the Hampton III Gallery. The family’s love of animals, particularly dogs, is reflected in several of the collection’s pieces, including Carl Blair’s Zero sculpture, which recently spent time on loan to a solo exhibit at the Morris Museum of Art in Augusta, Georgia. Also pictured, Tumble Frame Base by Paul Yanko. Left, Cascade by Julyan Davis above the home’s single antique piece. All fabric and paint colors were dictated by the artwork, says Brown, and the frames run from rich gilt to casual wood. Right, from top to bottom, Dawn Light Wando River by Mickey Williams, Madison Avenue by Betsy Havens, and Dunes by James F. Cooper.

Words here

Cozy Condo: Comfort is the watchword for the space, Brown says, and though the furniture styles vary, they all offer a relaxing seat. Above left, the Hockey’s dog, Jynx, tries out the new digs. Left, the furniture was selected from Brown’s preferred sources, including Verellen Home Collection, a company in High Point, North Carolina, specializing in handcrafted, modern, and green-built pieces. Still Life by Joseph Bradley hangs above the chaise. september/october 2010 |

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gregorY ellenbUrg

augusta twenty 20 augusta street, greenville monday-saturday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. (864) 233-2600 www.augustatwenty.com

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G Magazine’s Fashion Greenville

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reenville’s augusta t twenty wenty opened its doors in 2002, when the contemporary women’s clothing boutique pioneered the designer denim movement in the upstate. t today, oday, the shop continues to be the go-to spot for the latest cuts and washes from a variety of top designers, including Citizens of humanity, umanity, Vince, Joe’s Jeans, and William rast. augusta t twenty wenty is so much more than jeans. a wide range of dresses, jackets, skirts, trousers, handbags, jewelry, and gifts can all be found within the walls of this boutique, ideally located in greenville’s reenville’s historic West end. for those who are seeking some of the exclusive collections held by larger department stores, augusta t twenty wenty selects only the fnest and best pieces from these lines and offers them to their customers. shoppers enjoy a highly personalized level of customer service, one that caters to women of all ages and seeking all styles of fashion. buyer Jennifer romanstine omanstine and assistant manager melissa sturkie have worked for a combined ffteen years in the apparel industry, and they are often on hand helping customers with everything from fnding that fabulous new top for a night on the town to building a wardrobe of fgure-flattering staple pieces. traveling the country from New y york to los angeles, Jennifer is able to bring in a carefully edited mix of brands that cater to every lifestyle and budget. “augusta t twenty is so excited to be a part of fashion greenville,” Jennifer exclaims. “It is sure to bring culture and inspiration to style lovers from all across the upstate area.”

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omen across the nation who desire exactly what they envision seek out gregory ellenburg to create unique, original, one-of-a-kind pieces for their special occasions. since 1997, gregory ellenburg has designed, created, and stylishly outftted the nation’s fnest women in custom creations tailored to their specifc taste, need, and desire for quality, durable, and timeless garments. this downtown greenville boutique offers fair pricing for custom work and, when designs are not feasible, then high-fashion, quality garments from top-name designers in the formalwear industry can then be customized for a one-of-a-kind piece. a true designer in every sense, gregory ellenburg is a graduate of the fashion Institute of t technology in New y york City. his designs have been worn by miss usa and miss america contestants since 1994 and by such well-known celebrities as mtV’s Vanessa minillo and Days of Our Lives star, shelley hennig. “Now, in addition to pageantry, we design and makes custom gowns for the most discriminating brides in the southeast,” ellenburg says. “We also create special-occasion and resort wear for mothers, business and interview attire, custom swimwear, and elaborate dance costumes for both ballroom and performance competitions.” In addition to custom garments from day wear to bridal gowns, gregory ellenburg carries a variety of specialty eveningwear lines, along with stylish accessories, including Jovani fashions, macDuggal Couture, sherri hill Designs, t terrani Couture, Johnathan Kayne, la femme fashions, signature by landa Designs, and more.

G magazine’s

fashion greenville

gregory ellenburg 119 Cleveland street, greenville monday-friday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., evenings and sundays by appointment (864) 298-0072 www.gregoryellenburg.com

fashiongreenville.com


Artistic Tone: (Opening page) Designer Eric Brown built the décor of Tim and Lana Hockey’s condo around a collection of regional art from South Carolina, Georgia, and North Carolina—mostly assembled through the Hampton III Gallery. The family’s love of animals, particularly dogs, is reflected in several of the collection’s pieces, including Carl Blair’s Zero sculpture, which recently spent time on loan to a solo exhibit at the Morris Museum of Art in Augusta, Georgia. Also pictured, Tumble Frame Base by Paul Yanko. Left, Cascade by Julyan Davis above the home’s single antique piece. All fabric and paint colors were dictated by the artwork, says Brown, and the frames run from rich gilt to casual wood. Right, from top to bottom, Dawn Light Wando River by Mickey Williams, Madison Avenue by Betsy Havens, and Dunes by James F. Cooper.

Words here

Cozy Condo: Comfort is the watchword for the space, Brown says, and though the furniture styles vary, they all offer a relaxing seat. Above left, the Hockey’s dog, Jynx, tries out the new digs. Left, the furniture was selected from Brown’s preferred sources, including Verellen Home Collection, a company in High Point, North Carolina, specializing in handcrafted, modern, and green-built pieces. Still Life by Joseph Bradley hangs above the chaise. september/october 2010 |

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G Magazine’s Fashion Greenville

Doncaster sold through local representatives by appointment in private, trunk-show environment (800) 669-3662 www.doncaster.com

peDal chic

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Doncaster

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anner Companies, the parent company of Doncaster, got its start in 1931 as the Doncaster Collar and shirt Company in rutherfordton, N.C. the Doncaster business evolved from an unexpected opportunity in 1935, which transformed the company’s familiar shirt patterns to the fashionable shirtwaist dress. a call from the Junior league eague of Charlotte introduced the idea of selling these fashionable designs as a philanthropic endeavor and evolved into the frst direct seller of high-end women’s apparel. Nearly eighty years later, Doncaster is still privately held, family owned, with corporate of offces in rutherfordton, a design team in New y york, ork, and of offfces in Italy and asia. and Doncaster continues to appeal to an audience of women who have a desire for beautiful apparel of the highest quality. an n attitude, not an age, Doncaster women are engaged in their community and families. “We offer personal appointments in a private setting, and our trained consultants help ensure that your selections not only suit you and your lifestyle, but these pieces will remain in your wardrobe for seasons to come,” says ellyn Cooley, a vice-president with t tanner Companies. “our designers strive to offer newness each season while ensuring a balance that allows the client the opportunity to add items.” although much has changed in the world of fashion since the Doncaster business began, the company’s dedication to elegance and style continues. the New y york–based design team develops four distinctive collections a year using the fnest fabrics from around the world and draws inspiration from both contemporary trends and timeless classics.

cross the nation only a handful of athletic boutiques cater exclusively to women, and even fewer can call themselves “women-specifc” cycle shops. though such a marriage is virtually unheard of, a retailer is preparing to debut right here

in greenville. Pedal Chic is the only women-specifc cycling and athletic boutique in the southeast, offering an unparalleled selection for the female athlete, cyclist, urban commuter, and yogi, as well as lifestyle/comfort wear. the shop, which is both a brick-and-mortar store and an e-commerce retailer, is ramping up to a full-service bicycle/athletic boutique, with a planned opening in spring 2011. Pedal Chic is the destination for active women shopping for contemporary, stylish, and high-performance cycling, ftness, and lifestyle apparel. from “city bikes” and commuter accessories (think bike baskets, designer helmets, shoes, and cycling-friendly handbags) to athletic intimate apparel (up to size 40DD), Pedal Chic outfts every woman from head to toe, including with shoes from muse shoe studio. “to to date, there has not been an athletic boutique that exclusively caters t to the needs of women in our market,” says Pedal Chic founder and owner robin bylenga. “the business model is different than anything I have found in the country.” sizes range from Xs to 4X and include a wide selection of designer lines. among them are skirtsports, the original running skirt created by Nicole Deboom, an accomplished triathlete, along with their full line of cycling and running apparel and accessories; luna sport Wear, performance cycling wear exclusively for women; Ibex, beautiful merino wool clothing for casual/commuter wear; as well as various high-performance cycling gear and apparel by Primal Wear, gore, hincapie, and Zoic.

G magazine’s

fashion greenville

Pedal Chic Call or e-mail for a private, styling appointment (864) 201-2378 info@pedalchic.com www.pedalchic.com fashiongreenville.com


Artistic Tone: (Opening page) Designer Eric Brown built the décor of Tim and Lana Hockey’s condo around a collection of regional art from South Carolina, Georgia, and North Carolina—mostly assembled through the Hampton III Gallery. The family’s love of animals, particularly dogs, is reflected in several of the collection’s pieces, including Carl Blair’s Zero sculpture, which recently spent time on loan to a solo exhibit at the Morris Museum of Art in Augusta, Georgia. Also pictured, Tumble Frame Base by Paul Yanko. Left, Cascade by Julyan Davis above the home’s single antique piece. All fabric and paint colors were dictated by the artwork, says Brown, and the frames run from rich gilt to casual wood. Right, from top to bottom, Dawn Light Wando River by Mickey Williams, Madison Avenue by Betsy Havens, and Dunes by James F. Cooper.

Words here

Cozy Condo: Comfort is the watchword for the space, Brown says, and though the furniture styles vary, they all offer a relaxing seat. Above left, the Hockey’s dog, Jynx, tries out the new digs. Left, the furniture was selected from Brown’s preferred sources, including Verellen Home Collection, a company in High Point, North Carolina, specializing in handcrafted, modern, and green-built pieces. Still Life by Joseph Bradley hangs above the chaise. september/october 2010 |

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Fashion Greenville

Resources Augusta Twenty 20 Augusta St. (864) 233-2600 www.augustatwenty.com

Hincapie Sportswear 45 Pete Hollis Blvd. (864) 400-3040 www.hincapie.com

Beija-Flor 1803 Augusta St. (800) 540-6241 www.ilovethesejeans.com

Ivy Color Salon 19 S. Main St. (864) 370-1489 www.ivysalonandspa.com

Charter 17 Lindsay Ave. (888) 438-2427 www.charter.com Christa Hovis Special Events 3620 Pelham Rd., #189 (864) 304-9085 www.christahovis.com Coplon’s 1922 Augusta Rd. (864) 271-1600 www.coplons.com/home Doncaster (800) 669-3662 www.doncaster.com Gregory Ellenburg 119 Cleveland St. (864) 298-0072 www.gregoryellenburg.com Hampden Clothing 500 E. McBee Ave., Ste. 103 (864) 235-5755 www.hampdenclothing.com

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fashion greenville

Lynne Curtin Designs www.lynnecurtin.com Macy’s 700 Haywood Rd. (864) 297-2000 www.macys.com Monkee’s of the West End 103-A Augusta St. (864) 239-0788 www.monkeesofthewestend.com News Channel 7 250 International Dr., Spartanburg (864) 576-7777 www2.wspa.com Pedal Chic (864) 201-2378 info@pedalchic.com www.pedalchic.com Plaza Suite 550 S. Main St., Ste. 200 (864) 298-0081 www.shopplazasuite.com Rush Wilson Limited 23 West North St. (864) 232-2761

fashiongreenville.com


october 2010 |

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G Magazine’s Fashion Greenville

Fashion Greenville

Resources www.rushwilson.com Sassy On Augusta 18 West Lewis Plaza (864) 233-5252 www.sassyonaugusta.com Smith & James/Chelsea’s 1125 Woodruff Rd., Ste. 1603 (864) 234-8880 222 Trade St., Greer (864) 877-6525 http://secure.smithandjames.com Southern Tide 501 East North St. (864) 236-8015 www.southerntide.com Table 301 207 S. Main St. (864) 232-7007 www.table301.com The Runway 162 E. Main St., Spartanburg (864) 573-9134 www.shoptherunway.net Trousseau 2222 Augusta St. (864) 271-9382 www.trousseaugreenville.com Wilson’s on Washington 794 E. Washington St. (864) 235-3336 www.wilsonsonwashington.com

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fashiongreenville.com


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Fashion Greenville  

G Magazine's Fashion Greenville presented by Wireless Communications will be held October 22 and 23, 2010, in downtown Greenville, South Car...

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