Issuu on Google+

Recent Trends in the Arts of the Dominican Republic A u g u s t 2 5 t o N o v e m b e r 7, 2 0 0 8

Inside and Out

Adentro y Afuera Tendencias recientes en el arte dominicano I N T E R - AD MeElR I2 C5 A NdDeE A V Egos LO P M E Na T lB A7Nde K C UNo LT U L C Ere N T Ede R 2008 to vRi eAmb

I N T E R -A M E R I C A N D E V E LO P M E N T BA N K C U LT U R A L C E N T E R

C E N T R O C U LT U R A L D E L BA N C O I N T E R A M E R I C A N O D E D E SA R R O L LO


THE INTER-AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT BANK Luis Alberto Moreno President

Daniel M. Zelikow Executive Vice President

Otaviano Canuto Vice President for Countries

Santiago Levy Vice President for Sectors and Knowledge

Manuel Rapoport Vice President for Finance and Administration

Steven J. Puig Vice President for Private Sector and Non-Sovereign Guaranteed Operations

Pablo Halpern External Relations Advisor

• THE CULTURAL CENTER Félix Ángel General Coordinator and Curator Soledad Guerra Assistant General Coordinator Anne Vena Inter-American Concert, Lecture and Film Series Coordinator Elba Agusti Cultural Development Program Coordinator Debra Corrie IDB Art Collection Management and Conservation Assistant Mone-Renata Holder Intern, University of Heriot Watt, UK Lorena Rebollo del Valle Intern, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland Cover: Aquiles: el corazón cayó al mar (Achilles: The Heart Fell into the Sea) • 2007 J U L I O VA L D E Z

Cataloging-in-Publication data provided by the Inter-American Development Bank Felipe Herrera Library Inside and out : recent trends in the arts of the Dominican Republic = adentro y afuera: tendencias recientes en el arte dominicano. p. cm. ISBN: 1-59782-081-4 ISBN: 978-1-59782-081-3 Text by Marianne de Tolentino and Sara Hermann. Text in English and Spanish. Exhibition at the Inter-American Development Bank Cultural Center from August 25, 2008 to November 7, 2008. 1. Painting, Dominican—Catalogs. 2. Art—Dominican Republic—Catalogs. 3. Art, Modern—Dominican Republic—Catalogs. 4. Art, Modern—21st century--Catalogs. I. Tolentino, Marianne de. II. Hermann, Sara. III. Inter-American Development Bank. IV. IDB Cultural Center. V. Added title. ND315.D6 I76 2008 759.97293 I76------dc22


Inside and Out Adentro y Afuera

Recent Trends in the Arts of the Dominican Republic

Tendencias recientes en el arte dominicano

0 8 / 2 5 / 0 8 ~ 1 1 / 0 7 / 0 8

1


D E TA I L :

Cabezas llenas de plátanos (Heads Full of Plantains) RADHAMÉS MEJÍA

2

• 2008


Introduction The Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) is proud to host an exhibition honoring

the Dominican Republic, a Caribbean country with a rich and diverse cultural tradition, and a dynamic contemporary arts scene. Just as important as the artistic activity in the cities of Santo Domingo, Altos de Chavón, Santiago de los Caballeros, and Puerto Plata — four of the most active Dominican cultural enclaves in the island nation, is the presence of Dominican artists outside their country, working in New York, Madrid, and Paris, to name a few. In today’s globalized world, the challenges of development are causing fundamental changes in the personalities of the nations in our hemisphere. The region is not marginalized, and neither is it indifferent to such a perception. It is extremely important to establish an uninterrupted dialogue between citizens of the same nationality and their peers living elsewhere. All countries in Latin America and the Caribbean may benefit from such an exchange, which could be mutually enriching for their ongoing efforts to create a better future with the benefit of the lessons learned. With this exhibition, in which half of the artists live in the Dominican Republic, and the other half live somewhere else, the IDB encourages such a dialogue under the umbrella of its Cultural Center. It also celebrates the Dominican artists for the distinguished position they have achieved for their country at the international level. Luis Alberto Moreno PRESIDENT Inter-American Development Bank Washington, D.C.

Aproximación (Approximation)

• 2006

FA U S TO O R T I Z

3


D E TA I L :

Después de la siesta (After the Nap) POLIBIO DÍAZ

4

• 2001-2004


The Advancement of Dominican Art For many years the artistic movement in the Dominican Republic was a “best-kept

secret.” Their growing international contributions to contemporary visual arts have been changing that picture, but may also be characterized by even greater drive, selectivity, and regularity. We could say that of all the islands of the Caribbean, the Dominican Republic is, along with Cuba, Puerto Rico, and Haiti, the country most prolific in regard to modern and contemporary artists. It now boasts over three hundred painters, sculptors, installation artists, draftsmen, and printmakers, without counting the ever-growing myriad of photographers, the core of video artists, and a number of “performance artists.” A good portion of these artists pursue several artistic languages, as is the case with those on display here. However, whereas plastic artists also tend to do photography, photographers limit themselves to the “writing of light.” In the 1980s, there was a boom in art shows, in prices, in private and institutional collections, in the people comprising the latest artistic generation. The decade was characterized by the “demographic explosion” of new names who were particularly distinguished by their creativity, their inquiries, and their experimental temperament. Post expressionists or postmodernists drew on familiar cultural legacies (Indo-American, African, European) while acknowledging American models. These artists brought anthropological, ethnic, and social signs and symbols into drawings, paintings, and installations (the most widespread type of artwork), and their combined categories. They are distinguished by their continual searching and avant-garde language. The artists on display in the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) gallery are from among these creators who emerged in the last two decades of the last century. Boom times tend to be short in art. . . . The last decade of the twentieth century was cruel to the fortunes of artists, with few exceptions. Creative enthusiasm nevertheless continued, enhanced by something new: incipient international dimension, in Latin America and the Caribbean and in various countries in Europe. The United States had begun to welcome the visual arts of the Caribbean with the extensive group exhibition at the Americas Society Art Gallery in New York in 1996.

The Artists of the Diaspora With the exception of the United States, and New York in particular, Dominican art-

ists do not emigrate much to other countries in the Hemisphere, and even less to other Caribbean islands. The exception in the latter case is Puerto Rico, a prosperous land developed in the field of visual arts and, above all, a gateway to the United States. When it is said that the increasingly active and firmly established Dominican

5


diaspora has grown, it is in reference to native-born artists who took up residence in Europe, and primarily in the United States. They are first and also second generation, those whose parents had already left Santo Domingo. By way of exception, they are labeled “the transplanted”—as Sara Hermann called them on the occasion of a Biennial—and “absent Dominicans,” a term applied to all those living abroad, regardless of the kind of work they do! We recall that etymologically “diaspora” means a people scattered beyond its borders. In art the word has been used more widely during the past thirty years. From the standpoint of lifestyles and creation, Christine Chivallon defines it as “the ability to retain unity and an identity despite being uprooted.” Thus in regard to the visual arts, Dominican artists settled in Europe (Spain, France, Germany, the Netherlands) or in North America do not express in their work a depersonalizing mimicry or an appropriation of images, but an enriching renewal. They preserve their cultural identity and communicate into it multiple dimensions, utilizing materials, techniques, and technologies, placing them at the service of kindred signs and symbols, freely choosing their affiliations. In fact, “nondisplaced” native artists may be much more susceptible to outside currents and fashions, in a desire for originality and being au courant, which does not always prevent plagiarism (whether detected or not!). I share the view of an artist of the diaspora who lives in Paris, when he says that the issue of Caribbean (and therefore Dominican) art cannot be addressed without taking artistic diasporas into account. Artists highlight references to their land of origin or to similar cultures, and some even exploit their lineage to lend themselves an exotic air for their own success. . . . The Dominican colony in New York City is huge, around a million people, of all generations, doing all kinds of work, including several dozen artists. That is where the artistic diaspora is largest and most solid. The contemporary artists who have emigrated to the United States or major European cities (Paris, Madrid, Rome, Amsterdam) generally have a strong personality, are young or on the threshold of young middle age, and have settled there because of family ties (older relatives or spouses), although not always. If they are part of a first generation of immigrants, they have regarded immigration as the best, if not the only, way of making themselves known, apart from learning, subsisting, and disseminating the country’s art, as one of its best visual artists, a disillusioned traveler, recently told me with a hint of bitterness. Long stays in places with exceptional means for the development of artistic activities are no doubt a true privilege that is advantageous for the Dominican Republic, the evolution of its visual arts, and the diffusion of its expressions, and that exercises a great influence on the nation’s art. Their imprint is obvious, even if those who stayed behind do not like to admit it. Immigration may also be driven by an inner discomfort, by the sensation of creative impasse: the aim will not be to lose oneself but to find oneself, a phenomenon that has been examined by Dominique Berthet1 in connection with

6


l’errance, from a general standpoint. The artist sets out searching for the acceptable place for discovering himself and/or the creative process, both to improve his or her condition and to find the chance to exhibit his or her work. With regard to Dominicans who live and work in their country, the impact of testimonies and environments, habits and behaviors, tastes and objects, resulting from the diaspora, transmitted particularly through photography,2 is well known. Investigations into memory and cultural origins have given rise to masterworks, with their tropical sources of inspiration metaphorized and reinvented depending on the artist’s familial ties. It may be noted that while most diaspora artists do not intend to return to the land of their birth permanently, they periodically go back there to recover direct contacts and their deep roots, as well as to attend specific events. The overall analysis that I have just sketched is especially relevant to the four diaspora artists participating in this exhibition, in accordance with their respective circumstances.

A Contemporary Art on the Move Art exhibitions by Dominican artists in New York, Washington, Chicago, and Miami

are undoubtedly increasingly common. At the start of the third millennium having shows abroad and participating in international events is no longer utopian. Among other auspicious signs, it should be noted that Santo Domingo is a gathering point for the Caribbean, because this city has hosted the Biennial of Art of the Caribbean and Central America five times, thereby helping to strengthen ties between artists and critics of the region, who generally attend all the international competitions open to the so-called magic arc of islands. In 2003 the Eduardo León Jimenes Cultural Center was created in the Dominican city of Santiago de los Caballeros, a source of pride for Dominican art and culture. In late September 2006 El Museo del Barrio in New York City inaugurated the wonderful exhibit “Que no me quiten lo Pinta’o!” [“Don’t let them take away what’s painted!”] showcasing art inspired by the merengue, a popular Dominican dance. A multimedia exhibit of radical contemporary art opened in the Brooklyn Museum in 2007. The exhibition “Inside and Out: Recent Trends in the Arts of the Dominican Republic” was inaugurated in Washington in August 2008 at the IDB Cultural Center. And I have limited myself here solely to group exhibitions. The numerous young Dominican artists from the last two decades of the twentieth century constituted a powerful force, as they diversified their modes of expression. Installation art flourished quickly, the end of the century dominating as a renewing category, very soon integrating image in movement. Doing installation art means feeling less subjected to the academic aegis, mixing archaism and sophistication, Caribbean spirit and planetary vision. The magic of the tropics and the fantastic imaginary find a terrain of choice, often externally and internally critical.

7


Reeducando a Mónica V (Reeducating Monica V)

• 2008

MÓNICA FERRERAS

Contemporary art, full of boldness, questioning, and uncertainties as well, is confronting previous currents and generations, and the incipient twenty-first century confirms the triumph of photography as art and the preoccupations of video. Photographers from Santiago de los Caballeros, the cradle of Dominican photography since the 1960s, have developed a passion for topics that continually regenerate, by a magic redeployment of their visions, a way of questioning the viewer about the mestizo cultural legacy. Despite changes and “subversive” influences, an aesthetic tradition of balance, even of harmonies, in color and composition, has remained in place. If we look for common denominators in painting, which has continued to dominate the artistic scene (even though some wanted to announce its death), when encompassed in a single view, we note the subtle song of color, the energy and subtlety of brushstroke, the impasto or transparency of pigment (oil, acrylic,

8


mineral mixtures). Its expression continues alternating between baroque and contained, organic and constructivist forms, while organizing space. We could speak of real, imaginary, and introspective poetics. And figurativeness always surpasses abstract treatments, since this is not some ancient division, but rather the two are indicators for interpreting works that are certainly presented here. Drawing is brilliant and varied, as demonstrated by virtuoso draftsmen, and their line is made with any medium, whether traditional or not, including embroidery. Printmaking is almost in its death throes, victim of prejudices, ignorance, and preference for the unique work . . . but the myth of the phoenix allows one to harbor hopes of yet another flight. Another category in crisis is the scarcely present sculpture, which is caught between the tradition of direct carving and an art of rupture that makes use of plastics, resins, and recycled materials, or the modified ready-made. Myths and rites, religiosity, syncretism, and magic, dreams and anxieties, sensuality and eroticism, are still fruitful sources of inspiration, eleven years after the exhibit “Mystery and Mysticism in Dominican Art,” presented at the IDB Cultural Center. Recently, however, environmental defense, the disadvantageous condition of women and children, the denouncing of violence, the abuse of the weak, the problems of illegal immigration and displacements, the Caribbean diaspora in the United States, the tragedy of AIDS, the collapse of peace, and the arms race have all become part of Dominican art. Social commitment, which so inspired the Dominican visual arts in the 1960s, has made a comeback, leaving behind “art for art’s sake,” and has directed its attention to the crossroads of the city. The big difference is that the contemporary artist, caught up in globalization and instant communications, is concerned with expressing national and world problems alike, and the latter increasingly have greater impact than the former. In brief, it is obvious that in the first decade of the twenty-first century, the Dominican visual arts manifest an accentuated diversification and, indifferent to how they are defined, are deployed freely and openly. That is proven by the eight artists grouped together in this exhibition. Marianne de Tolentino ART CRITIC Member, Board of Directors, International Association of Art Critics, and Director, Cariforum Cultural Center Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic

1-Dominique Berthet, Figures de l’errance (Paris: L’Harmattan, 2007). 2-Diaspora: identité plurielle, ed. Christine Eyene and Christine Sitchet (Paris: L’Harmattan, 2008).

9


DETAIL:

Coseré mi corazón en el tuyo (I Will Sew My Heart to Yours) I N É S TO L E N T I N O

10

• 2008


Eight Ways of Seeing, Eight Ways of Entering and Leaving It seems like a good idea today to present some entryways into the variety of artistic

discourses produced in the Dominican Republic. The exhibition “Inside and Out: Recent Trends in the Arts of the Dominican Republic” approaches these matters from a variety of perspectives. Its very breadth is what makes it rich. By exploring how much there is or is not of what has been conventionally called or recognized as Dominican art, one is pointing precisely at that diversity. Challenging or, on the contrary, being reconciled to what has been inherited or imposed from the standpoint of expectations that people have regarding the art of the region situates the artists gathered by this show in a privileged position. It is likely that they do not share the way they do their art, but in some instances they share starting points, focuses, or strategies when the time comes to produce. One of these is the relationship that they establish between their private being and their public existence. Polarities between private and public could be transferred to the Dominican terrain as the possible antagonisms and dichotomies existing between inside and outside. Much of the work included in this exhibit alludes, in one way or another, to being inside or being outside, it speaks of being inside or being outside. . . . Such antagonisms and concurrences are quite relevant today, at the confluence of the public and private, forced by the mass media, “reality” TV, and even computer hacking processes that expose our lives to whoever wants to look. There are many ways to be inside or outside, most of them for entering and leaving. Here are only eight.

Outside I think, with migration, when we come to a new country, we all come with fragments. When you leave, you take what you can—you take some pictures, you take your stories, you take your memories, and the rest you feel like you can get better, and more of, in the other place. You can get better apples, you can get better plantains. But your memories, you can’t get better memories. They just stay.“ — Edwige Danticat3

11


Brother and Plรกtanos (Hermano y plรกtanos) J U L I O VA L D E Z

12

โ€ข 20 05


In his photography Fausto Ortiz speaks to us from the standpoint of migration and its

impact on the space that produces it and welcomes it and on the people who move away. Although this focus starts from the weight of these processes taking place in his own familiar environment, in his photography Ortiz directs his efforts at the migration that takes place between Haiti and the Dominican Republic. The relationship of these two countries is asymmetrical and unbalanced in almost all respects, and it therefore produces consequences of a social nature. The individual who migrates, in most cases for survival and economic reasons, becomes a stranger in the new space. The “invisibility” of such individuals is what Ortiz portrays: “the shadow . . . represents absence, I let myself play with identity, which is like a myth, I seek the stories that give meaning to this identity.” Hence shadow is nonexistence, but paradoxically it is also imprint, existence. That is visible in his work Aproximación (Approximation) (2006), in which the passing shadow is imposed transitorily on the walls and their own stories. Julio Valdez, for his part, deals with identity and existential issues in his paintings.

Having personally experienced migration from island to “island” (from the Dominican Republic to Manhattan) gives him a special aptitude for dialoguing from his canvases and papers about his identity: “Personal circumstances, as someone who has lived inside the island and now lives outside of it, allow me to keep exploring myself, building myself, with sharper perception. Horizons were expanded. Thus, the social drama of migrations and exile in the Caribbean also leaks out of my inner core.” His series in which the sea plays the leading role is intriguing and reflective. Even more so is his allusion, in the title of one of his works, to “the accursed circumstance . . . of water on all sides,” as the wonderful Cuban writer Virgilio Piñera expressed it in La isla en peso (1943). The symbols and metaphors used by Valdez in La maldita circunstancia (Accursed Circumstance) (2007) are defined by the very multiplicity of readings, “from the local (internal) to the universal (external) and thus the sea/water is what unites us (internally) and separates us (mentally, in terms of temperament, and emotionally) from the others, from what is ‘outside.’” The idea of immersion has become very important in so-called virtual reality inasmuch as its visual paradigm means that the observer is inside the world he is observing. Hence, the figures (he himself, his brother, his acquaintance) are immersed in the sea, and at the same time surrounded by it. The sea is here more extensive (as if it were possible); it is water. It was also Piñera who spoke of the plantain (“musa paradisiaca”) from the island.4 Valdez utilizes it like wallpaper to leave the imprint of the portrait. Thus, the face is as constant as the reference to this very fruit, which is so common and representative of Dominican culture. A painter and draftsman by calling and choice, Gerard Ellis establishes an interesting dichotomy between the practice of painting and social critique. His pictorial work is highly expressive and vigorous for those who directly or indirectly participate in the multiple strata of the contexts of which this artist speaks. The violence, cor-

13


ruption, and lack of willpower characteristic of our times and everything that reveals human stupidity are central topics of his meticulous pictorial work. There is a studied connection and interdependence between what is his work and what constitutes his life experiences, which translates into a certain underlying politicization of life’s experience. His work reintroduces issues as to how a gaze articulated around reality can at the same time shape areas of reflection in relation to each individual’s life experience . . . and conceal the most absolute rebellion. His are pieces that lead us to those delicious territories of sarcasm and irony that this artist knows how to create. Good Companion (2007) and Winter Wonderland (2008) are characteristic works of this play of words and images in which not everything is said but is indeed suggested. Mar bravo (Rough Sea) (2008), on the other hand, testifies to the act of creating, the creative process on which Ellis has embarked. Self-referential and sometimes autobiographical, it presents to us the creative and destructive act of the painter on a sheet of paper while his skeleton is covered with fish. In this blank space, akin to pages in children’s books, there is an emotional weight that is less sarcastic and more analytical of the particularities of his activity. A strange picture, printed in a box in a nationally circulated newspaper, was something that caused widespread concern: “East Santo Domingo. A black BMW SUV with no one in it was dumped into the bottom of the Caribbean for no apparent reason. The BMW was discovered underwater by a resident of the area who sounded the alarm.” This intriguing and strange text was for Limber Vilorio the driving force behind a series of works, bodies of work, and hundreds of hours of ruminations. The absurd and tantalizing event became a logical sequence of all his previous discursive lines. Through his gaze, the city and its inhabitants, as well as its constituent elements (tangible or not), had adopted an emotional dimension that spoke of artificial, chaotic, catastrophic, apocalyptic spaces . . . in the same way in which Santo Domingo was being transformed before his eyes. This kind of urban obsession led Vilorio to rescue the prohibited and unnamable spaces of the city, to embody the condemnation and the sorrow of passing through it. Under his gaze there appear myth, signs, marginalization, violence, and the private lives that go passing through public places. I once said that through this set of works Vilorio confronts a society that feels an absolute fascination with the automobile as a status symbol and something that arouses passions. In the artist’s view, the power of the image, in works like Ahogado en su gasolina (Drowned in Its Own Gasoline) (2004), Vértigo (Vertigo) (2004), and A la deriva (Adrift) (2006), lies “in its destruction (that of the car).” The disappearance of the automobile (thus . . . generically) is, in his own words, “the liberation, the triumph of the ego over the collective superego.” Finally, the work of Radhamés Mejía is connected to the Dominican Republic, his homeland, through varied symbolic devices, ranging from the pictographs, petroglyphs, and geometrical system of the native Taino Indians, to those associated with the current everyday life of Dominicans. Mejía spontaneously speaks of his islander

14


Reeducando a Mónica III (Reeducating Monica III)

• 2008

MÓNICA FERRERAS

self out of the collective memory, the music, the dance, and the habits that make up an identity forever being built. In Cabezas llenas de plátanos (Heads Full of Plantains, 2008), he divides the work into three fundamental planes, the bottom of which is this Taino-style mnemotechnic device, rising to the faces in profile, which are crowned by plantains. The piece is completed at the very top by some shoes with springs that allude to the movement, the displacement, and the nomadism of the Dominican self. Las boquitas o la pomme (The Hors d’Oeuvres or the Apple) (2008) and Posesión ritual (Ritual Possession) (2008) strive for a more visceral and emotional tie to the Afro-Caribbean, also from the perspective of the symbolic, geometrical, and fragmented aspects of the islander condition. Santiago Villa Chiappe thought that Antonio Benítez Rojo “conceives of the Caribbean as a nexus, and at the same time as a dissemination. Nexus because it is a point of union between different worlds, an encounter of histories that create an imagined community, a cultural ‘universe’ and a geography. Dissemination, because the Caribbean is a flow of signifiers.” And it is precisely to these nexuses and signifiers and that encounter of histories that Mejía refers when he confronts color with geometry, and the symbol with its essence.

Inside Polibio Díaz is a photographer who in his career has evaluated the contradictions and

relationships of the two categories, inside and outside, from multiple perspectives. In laying out the depth of the conscious act of the photographer in revealing these polarities, he had already made it clear that the production of images in his series Interiors (2001–2004) is conscious of itself, of the tools that build it, of the language

15


C.A.E. Cuerpo, alma y espíritu (Body, Soul and Spirit)

• 2005

MÓNICA FERRERAS

that can be articulated by means of it, and of the perceptive mechanisms that allow a viewer to receive it and be able to interpret by relating it to his or her own experience (that of the subject and that of the photographer). Díaz provides a shrewd impression of contemporary Dominican life through a perspective from “within.” To do so he draws on the furnishings and household paraphernalia of Dominicans, creating an exuberant although paradoxically serene coloring, with interesting observations on the daily life and memory of those who dwell in these spaces. His interiors illustrate an attitude of contemporary society based on the inner nucleus of the dwelling. Conscious of the influence of consumer culture and of growing materialism, he attempts to record in his photography the scenes to which these forces lead. Advertising, the mass media (represented by TV sets and radios), the iconic and transcendent images of popular religiosity, and flowers made of plastic all start their journey to the sacred during these frozen moments. Inés Tolentino is continually renewing herself. Her paintings, drawings, and col-

lages are a reflective reference to her own life story . . . and with her own, that of women in general. Her most recent body of work guides us to understand body memory as a place of confluence and paradoxical conflict. Memory, her memory embodied through the “noble” act of embroidery, reconfigures the categories of the feminine and of representation, from her own imaginaries to those she considers collective, metaphors of place and rituals, beliefs, and labors. From the outset, Tejiendo mi historia (Weaving My Story) (2008) provides us with this idea of the act of embroidery as a gesture of intimate references, whether domestically or in the obsessive passion for adorning and beautifying. So, how do these stitches adorn? They do so with simple and plain symbols that take us to war, sex, harmless dialogues, animated cartoons, and even the Sacred Heart of Jesus. These references, which in appearance look naïve, gradually build up a discourse on the structures and schemes that “organize” the life of women in our societies. Likewise Hilos de vida (Threads of Life) (2008) constructs a story of violence and death that, even though its author appropriates it from the title, could well constitute the story of thousands of women assaulted and sacrificed by domestic violence and armed conflicts worldwide.

16


Mónica Ferreras calls herself a Jungian, and the ideas of Carl Jung appear increas-

ingly in her work. Her fundamentally autobiographical paintings reflect her process of individuation (the way, as defined by Jung, that each of us comes to be what he or she inherently and potentially is), through which she proposes to us a labyrinth that symbolizes the journey to being. From these pieces full of organic (amoebas, cells, DNA chains) and somewhat labyrinthine forms, Ferreras presents us with the complexity of the psychological world (the intricacies of the conscious and subconscious of the individual), instinctively transferred to canvas. Her way of introducing it into this body of work starts from a life experience, a metaphor of her life as an individual and of her life as a social being. Reeducando a Mónica (Reeducating Monica) (2008) is a series of paintings that reflect this discursive line out of a semantic density based on analytic theories about the human being and his or her personality. Her video C.A.E. Cuerpo, alma y espíritu (Body, Soul and Spirit) (2005) shows us on the first and sole plane a scene of three women in constant movement who act out certain rites and functions that, it is understood, are theirs within the (literal) framework of a domestic setting. In doing so, the artist starts from the trinity established by the body, the soul, and the spirit as compositional basis. This vision, associated with the deconstruction of social representations of woman in society, questions viewers about the expectations they have regarding what is happening on the screen. Significant shows have taken place outside of the Caribbean that include projections of Dominicans visually and in terms of meaning—some with more substance than others, some with fewer prejudices than others. Nevertheless, if something transcends these efforts to organize a way of seeing or energize a vision, it is precisely the fact that interactions are established between artists, institutions, and curators, and in some fashion discourses are contaminated so as to allow for interpretations that emerge from the connections suggested by these interactions. On that basis, movements of opening and dialogue may spread out between these connections, making possible a new dynamic, that which has been and will be determined and laid out by the producers of meaning themselves. Sara Hermann ADVISOR ON VISUAL ARTS Eduardo León Jimenes Cultural Center Santiago de los Caballeros, Dominican Republic

3-Edwige, Danticat. “A Conversation with Edwige Danticat: Interview with Eleanor Wachtel,” 2000. 4-Fragrance can rip off the masks of civilization; it knows that man and woman will be sinless in the plantain grove. Musa paradisiaca, protect the lovers! The world need not be won in order to be enjoyed, two bodies in the plantain grove are worth as much as the first couple, that odious couple that served to mark off the separation. Musa paradisiaca, protect the lovers! (Virgilio Piñera, La isla en peso, 1943)

17


DETAIL:

Las boquitas o la pomme (The Hors d’Oeuvres or the Apple) RADHAMÉS MEJÍA

18

• 2008


Introducción El Banco Interamericano de Desarrollo (BID) se enorgullece de presentar una ex-

posición en homenaje a la República Dominicana, país del Caribe que alberga una rica y diversa tradición cultural y cuya escena artística contemporánea se caracteriza por su gran dinamismo. La presencia de los artistas dominicanos fuera de su país –en Nueva York, Madrid y París, por nombrar sólo algunos de los lugares donde trabajan– es tan importante como las actividades artísticas que se desarrollan en las ciudades de Santo Domingo, Altos de Chavón, Santiago de los Caballeros y Puerto Plata, cuatro de los enclaves culturales más efervescentes de la nación isleña. En el mundo globalizado de hoy, los desafíos que plantea el desarrollo producen cambios fundamentales en la personalidad de cada nación de nuestro hemisferio. La Región no está marginada ni es indiferente a tal percepción. El establecimiento de un diálogo ininterrumpido entre los ciudadanos connacionales y sus pares que viven en otros lugares reviste suma importancia. Todos los países de América Latina y el Caribe están en condiciones de beneficiarse con intercambios de este tipo, que podrían resultar mutuamente enriquecedores en el marco de su actual esfuerzo por crear un futuro mejor con la ventaja de las lecciones ya aprendidas. Con esta exposición, en la cual la mitad de las obras pertenecen a artistas que viven en la República Dominicana, y la otra mitad, a artistas dominicanos que viven en otros países, el BID alienta a que se establezca un diálogo como el que describo aquí en el marco de su Centro Cultural. También celebra a los artistas dominicanos por la posición distinguida que han logrado para su país en el ámbito internacional. Luis Alberto Moreno PRESIDENTE Banco Interamericano de Desarrollo Washington, D.C.

Sombras pasajeras (Passing Shadows)

• 2005

FA U S TO O R T I Z

19


D E TA I L :

Después de la siesta (After the Nap) POLIBIO DÍAZ

20

• 2001-2004


El avance del arte dominicano En la República Dominicana, el movimiento artístico fue, durante muchos años, el

“secreto mejor guardado”. La creciente proyección internacional de los valores de la plástica actual ha ido modificando dicho panorama, pero esta difusión puede marcarse aun con mayor empuje, selectividad y regularidad. Podríamos afirmar que, junto con Cuba, Puerto Rico y Haití, la República Dominicana es, en toda la región del Caribe insular, el país más fecundo en artistas modernos y contemporáneos. Se enorgullece actualmente de sus más de trescientos pintores, escultores, instaladores, dibujantes, grabadores, sin contar la legión de fotógrafos en permanente crecimiento, el núcleo de video artistas y unos cuantos “performanceros”. Buena parte de ellos cultivan varios lenguajes artísticos, como es el caso de quienes exponen en esta muestra. Ahora bien: si los creadores plásticos también suelen hacer fotografía, los fotógrafos se limitan a la “escritura de la luz”. En los años ochenta se produjo un boom de las exposiciones, de los precios, de las colecciones particulares e institucionales, de un colectivo integrado por la última generación. La “explosión demográfica” de nombres nuevos caracterizó a la década, y ellos se distinguieron especialmente por su creatividad, sus investigaciones, su naturaleza experimental. Posexpresionistas o posmodernos, activaron, de manera estudiada y con impronta propia, la consabida herencia cultural —indoamericana, africana, europea—, sin olvidar la irrupción de modelos norteamericanos. Esos artistas llevaron signos y símbolos, antropológicos, étnicos, sociales, a dibujos, pinturas e instalaciones —el tipo de obra de mayor auge— y categorías mixtas. Ellos se distinguen por la búsqueda permanente y un lenguaje de avanzada. De estos creadores, aquellos que surgieron en las dos últimas décadas del siglo pasado son los que exponen en la galería del Centro Cultural del Banco Interamericano de Desarrollo (BID). Los tiempos de bonanza suelen ser breves para el arte... El último decenio del siglo XX fue cruel en cuanto a la holgura de los artistas, salvo pocas excepciones. No obstante, el entusiasmo creador prosiguió, reforzado por un elemento nuevo: la incipiente proyección internacional, en América Latina y el Caribe y en distintos países de Europa. Estados Unidos había empezado a acoger a nuestra plástica con la extensa muestra colectiva de la American Society en 1996.

Los artistas de la diáspora Con excepción de Estados Unidos, y de Nueva York en particular, los artistas domini-

canos raramente emigran hacia otros países del continente, y menos aún del Caribe insular, salvo Puerto Rico, territorio próspero y desarrollado en el campo de las artes

21


C.A.E. Cuerpo, alma y espíritu (Body, Soul and Spirit)

• 2005

MÓNICA FERRERAS

visuales y, sobre todo, puerta de entrada a Estados Unidos. Cuando se afirma que la diáspora dominicana ha ido creciendo, cada vez más activa y firme, es con referencia a los artistas criollos que se establecieron en Europa y principalmente en Estados Unidos, que constituyen la primera generación e incluso la segunda— ya habían salido de Santo Domingo sus padres— Se los designa excepcionalmente “transterrados”— como los denominó Sara Hermann en ocasión de una bienal—y “dominicanos ausentes”, ¡expresión que se aplica a todos los que residen en el exterior, sea cual fuere su oficio! Recordemos que la diáspora, según la etimología, hace referencia a un pueblo dispersado más allá de sus fronteras; y en arte, esta palabra ha alcanzado mayor difusión en los últimos treinta años. Desde el punto de vista de los modos de vida y de la creación, Christine Chivallon la define como “la capacidad de mantener la unidad y una identidad más allá del desarraigo”. Asimismo, en las artes visuales, el artista dominicano instalado en Europa —España, Francia, Alemania, Holanda— o en Norteamérica no expresa en su obra un mimetismo despersonalizante o una apropiación de imágenes, sino una renovación enriquecedora. Él conserva su identidad cultural y le comunica múltiples dimensiones, aprovechando materiales, técnicas y tecnologías, poniéndolas al servicio de signos y símbolos afines, eligiendo libremente sus afiliaciones. Más aún: el artista criollo “no deslocalizado” puede ser mucho más permeable a corrientes y modas externas, en un deseo de originalidad y actualización ¡que no siempre evita el plagio, detectado o no! Compartimos la opinión de un artista de la diáspora residente en París cuando plantea que no se puede abordar el tema del arte caribeño, y por tanto del dominicano, sin tomar en cuenta las diásporas artísticas. Los artistas exaltan las referencias a la tierra de origen o a culturas similares, y no falta quien explote aun su estirpe como un factor de exotismo y éxito… La colonia dominicana en la ciudad de Nueva York es muy grande, ya que ronda el millón de habitantes, de todas las generaciones y clases de labores; y entre ellos hay varias decenas de artistas: es allí donde la diáspora artística es la más numerosa y sólida. Los artistas contemporáneos que han emigrado a Estados

22


Unidos o a metrópolis europeas —París, Madrid, Roma, Ámsterdam— poseen, en general, una fuerte personalidad, son jóvenes o están en el umbral de su joven madurez y se han instalado allí porque tienen vínculos familiares —ascendentes o cónyuges—, aunque no en todos los casos. Si forman parte de una primera generación de migrantes, han considerado la migración como la mejor, sino la única, forma de darse a conocer, aparte de aprender, subsistir y difundir el arte del país, como nos lo decía en fecha reciente uno de nuestros mejores artistas plásticos, viajero desilusionado, con un dejo de amargura. No caben dudas de que las estadías prolongadas en lugares que cuentan con medios excepcionales para el desarrollo de actividades constituyen un verdadero privilegio, que no puede sino ser provechoso para la República Dominicana, la evolución de sus artes visuales y la difusión de sus expresiones, y que ejerce gran influencia sobre el arte nacional. Aunque para muchos no es grato admitir esto, su impronta se advierte en aquellos que se quedaron. La migración puede estar impulsada también por un desajuste interior, por la sensación de estancamiento creativo: el objetivo no será perderse, sino encontrarse, un fenómeno que ha sido analizado por Dominique Berthet1 a propósito de l’errance, desde un enfoque general. El artista sale en busca del lugar acceptable para el descubrimiento de sí mismo y/o del acontecer creativo, tanto como para mejorar sus circunstancias y hallar la oportunidad de proyectar su obra. En la temática de los propios artistas dominicanos que viven y trabajan en su país es notorio el impacto de testimonios y ambientes, hábitos y conductas, gustos y objetos, que son producto de la diáspora, particularmente transmitidos por la fotografía.2 En cuanto a las investigaciones sobre la memoria y los orígenes culturales, ellas han dado origen a trabajos magistrales, con sus fuentes tropicales de inspiración, metaforizadas y reinventadas según la filiación del autor. Cabe señalar que si bien la mayoría de los artistas de la diáspora no tienen en vista el retorno definitivo al suelo natal, periódicamente vuelven a él para recuperar los contactos directos y sus raíces profundas, además de concurrir a eventos puntuales. El análisis global que acabamos de esbozar puede muy bien aplicarse a los cuatro artistas de la diáspora que participan en esta exposición, de acuerdo con sus circunstancias respectivas.

Un arte contemporáneo en movimiento Indudablemente, cada vez son más frecuentes las exposiciones en Nueva York,

Washington, Chicago y Miami. En los inicios del tercer milenio, exponer en el exterior y participar en eventos internacionales ya no es una utopía. Entre las perspectivas auspiciosas, cabe señalar que Santo Domingo constituye un punto de encuentro para la región caribeña, pues en esa ciudad se han celebrado cinco ediciones de la Bienal de Arte del Caribe y Centroamérica, contribuyendo así a estrechar los contactos entre artistas y críticos de la región, cuya

23


presencia es habitual en todas las justas internacionales abiertas al llamado “arco mágico” de islas. En la ciudad de Santiago de los Caballeros se creó en 2003 el Centro Cultural Eduardo León Jimenes, orgullo para la cultura y el arte dominicanos. A fines de septiembre de 2006, el Museo del Barrio, de la ciudad de Nueva York, inauguró el magnífico conjunto plástico Que no me quiten lo Pinta’o!, inspirado en el merengue, danza popular dominicana. En 2007 se llevó a cabo una exposición multimedia de arte contemporáneo radical en el Museo de Brooklyn. En agosto de 2008, en la ciudad de Washington, D.C., se abre en el Centro Cultural del BID la exposición titulada Adentro y afuera: tendencias recientes en el arte dominicano. Y nos hemos circunscripto exclusivamente a eventos colectivos. Los numerosos artistas jóvenes constituyeron una poderosa fuerza, al diversificar los modos de expresión. La instalación floreció rápidamente, dominando el ocaso del siglo como categoría renovadora e integrando muy pronto la imagen en movimiento. Instalar significa sentirse menos sujeto a la égida académica, mezclando arcaísmo y sofisticación, espíritu caribeño y visión planetaria. La magia del trópico y el imaginario fantástico encuentran terreno de elección, a menudo crítico exterior e interiormente. El arte contemporáneo, inmerso en audacias, cuestionamientos e incertidumbres también, se confronta con las corrientes y generaciones anteriores, y el incipiente siglo XXI confirma el triunfo de la fotografía como arte y las inquietudes del video. Los fotógrafos de Santiago de los Caballeros, cuna de la fotografía dominicana desde los años sesenta, se han apasionado por temas que regeneran continuamente, por un mágico redespliegue de sus visiones, una manera de interpelar al espectador acerca del legado cultural mestizo. A pesar de los cambios e influjos “subversivos”, una tradición estética de equilibrio, de armonías incluso, en el color y en la composición, se ha mantenido vigente. Si buscamos denominadores comunes en la pintura, que no ha dejado de dominar la escena artística —aunque se pretendió decretar su muerte—, al abarcarla en una sola mirada es posible advertir el canto sutil del color, la energía y la sutileza de la pincelada, la untuosidad o la transparencia del pigmento —óleo, acrílico, mezclas minerales—. Su expresión continúa alternando las formas barrocas y contenidas, orgánicas y constructivistas, pero ordenando el espacio. Podríamos hablar de poética real, imaginaria e introspectiva. Y siempre la figuración sobrepasa las intervenciones abstractas, tratándose no de una escisión añeja, sino de indicadores para la lectura de obras, por cierto, aquí presentadas. El dibujo es brillante y variado, como lo demuestran dibujantes virtuosos, y su línea es instrumentada por cualquier medio, tradicional o no, incluyendo el

24


bordado. El grabado casi agoniza, víctima de los prejuicios, la ignorancia y el favor de la obra única… pero el mito del Ave Fénix permite abrigar esperanzas. Otra categoría en crisis es la escasa escultura, que se debate entre la tradición de la talla directa y un arte de ruptura, recurriendo a plásticos, resinas y materiales pobres o al ready made intervenido. Mitos y ritos, religiosidad, sincretismo y magia, sueños y angustias, sensualidad y erotismo, continúan siendo fecundas fuentes de inspiración, once años después de la exposición Misterio y misticismo en el arte dominicano, presentada en el Centro Cultural del BID. Ahora bien: recientemente, la defensa de la ecología, la condición desfavorable de la mujer y los niños, la denuncia de la violencia, los abusos contra los débiles, los problemas de la migración y los desplazamientos ilegales, la diáspora caribeña en Estados Unidos de América, el drama del sida, la quiebra de la paz y la carrera armamentista, se han instalado en el arte dominicano. El compromiso social, que tanto inspiró a la plástica dominicana en los años sesenta, ha vuelto a manifestarse, dejando atrás “el arte por el arte”, y se ha volcado hacia las encrucijadas de la ciudad. La gran diferencia es que el artista contemporáneo, inmerso en la globalización y en la comunicación instantánea, se preocupa de igual modo por expresar problemas nacionales y mundiales, y estos últimos tienen cada vez mayor repercusión que los primeros. En pocas palabras, es evidente que las artes visuales dominicanas, en la primera década del siglo XXI, hacen gala de una acentuada diversificación e, indiferentes a una definición, se despliegan libre y abiertamente. Los ocho artistas reunidos en esta exposición así lo demuestran. Marianne de Tolentino CRÍTICA DE ARTE Miembro del Consejo de Administración de la Asociación Internacional de Críticos de Arte Directora del Centro Cultural Cariforo Santo Domingo, República Dominicana

1-Berthet, Dominique. Figures de l’errance. Ed. L’Harmattan. París, 2007. 2-Diaspora: identitplurielle. Obra colectiva bajo la dirección de Christine Eyene y Christine Sitchet. Ed. L’Harmattan. París, 2008.

25


DETAIL:

Tejiendo mi historia (Weaving My Story) I N É S TO L E N T I N O

26

• 2008


Ocho maneras de ver. Ocho maneras de entrar y salir Hoy parece oportuno plantear algunas vías de acceso hacia la heterogeneidad

de los discursos artísticos que se producen en la República Dominicana. La exposición Adentro y afuera: tendencias recientes en el arte dominicano se acerca a estos planteamientos desde una variedad de perspectivas. Su propia amplitud le confiere la riqueza. Al explorar cuánto hay o no hay de lo que convencionalmente se ha llamado o reconocido como arte dominicano, se está apuntando precisamente a esa diversidad. Desafiar o, por lo contrario, reconciliarse con lo heredado o lo impuesto desde el punto de vista de las expectativas que se tiene sobre el arte de la región ubica a los artistas reunidos por la muestra en una posición privilegiada. Es probable que ellos no compartan formas de hacer, pero en algunos casos comparten puntos de partida, enfoques y estrategias a la hora de producir. Una de estas es la relación que establecen con su ser privado y su existir público. Esas polaridades entre lo privado y lo público podrían trasladarse al territorio dominicano como los posibles antagonismos y dicotomías que hay entre adentro y afuera. Gran parte de la obra que integra este conjunto expositivo alude, de una manera u otra, a estar adentro o estar afuera, habla de estar adentro o estar afuera… Antagonismos o concurrencias que hoy, en la confluencia de lo público y lo privado, obligada por los medios masivos de comunicación, la TV “real” y hasta los procesos de exposición —“hackeo” que despliegan nuestras vidas a quien quiera ver—, tienen bastante pertinencia. Hay muchas maneras de estar adentro o afuera; las más, para entrar y salir. Estas son sólo ocho.

Afuera En cuanto a migración, pienso que cuando llegamos a un nuevo país, todos llegamos con fragmentos. En cambio cuando salimos, llevamos lo que podemos —llevamos fotos, historias, memorias, y por lo demás uno siente que puede mejorar; y más aún, en el otro lugar. Uno puede conseguir mejores manzanas, obtener mejores plátanos. Pero recuerdos, uno no puede adquirir mejores recuerdos. Estos simplemente se quedan. — Edwige Danticat3

27


Ahogado en su gasolina (Drowned in Its Own Gasoline)

• 2004

L I M B E R V I LO R I O

Fausto Ortiz nos habla en su fotografía desde la perspectiva del fenómeno migratorio y

su impacto en el espacio que lo produce y en el que lo acoge y en las personas que se trasiegan. Un enfoque que, aun cuando parte del peso de estos procesos en su propio entorno familiar, Ortiz los dirige en su producción fotográfica, fundamentalmente, al fenómeno migratorio que se produce entre Haití y la República Dominicana. La relación entre estos dos países en casi todos los aspectos es asimétrica, desequilibrada, y tiene, por ende, consecuencias de carácter social. El individuo que migra, en la mayoría de los casos por razones económicas y de supervivencia, se convierte, en el nuevo espacio, en un ente ajeno. La “invisibilidad” de estos personajes es la que Ortiz retrata: “la sombra (…) representa la ausencia, me permite jugar con la identidad, que es como un mito; busco las historias que le dan sentido a esta identidad”. De ahí que la sombra es inexistencia, pero paradójicamente también es impronta, existencia. Esto es visible en su pieza Aproximación (2006), en la cual la sombra, transeúnte, se impone transitoriamente a las paredes y sus propias historias. Por su parte, Julio Valdez aborda desde la pintura cuestiones de índole identitaria y existencial. Experimentar en carne propia la migración de isla a “isla” (de la República Dominicana a Manhattan) le confiere una especial aptitud para dialogar desde sus lienzos y papeles sobre su identidad: “Las circunstancias personales, como alguien que ha vivido dentro de la isla y ahora vive fuera de ella, me permiten continuar explorándome, construyéndome, con mayor agudeza de percepción. Los horizontes se ensancharon. Así, el drama social de las migraciones y el exilio en el

28


Caribe también se filtran desde mi centro”. La serie donde el mar es protagonista resulta intrigante y reflexiva. Lo es más su alusión, en el título de una de sus obras, a “la maldita circunstancia (…) de agua por todas partes”, como lo expresó en La isla en peso (1943) el magnífico escritor cubano Virgilio Piñera. Los símbolos y las metáforas a que recurre Valdez están definidos por la propia multiplicidad de lecturas, “desde lo local (interno) hasta lo universal (externo), y así el mar/agua es lo que nos une (internamente) y nos separa (mentalmente, a nivel de temperamento y emocionalmente) de los otros, de lo «de afuera»”. En cuanto al concepto de inmersión, ha cobrado enorme importancia en la llamada realidad virtual debido a que el paradigma visual de ésta implica que el observador está dentro del mundo que observa. Y así, los personajes (él mismo, su hermano, su conocido) están inmersos en el mar y, a la vez, rodeados por él. El mar es aquí más amplio (como si fuera posible), es agua. Fue también Piñera quien habló del plátano (“musa paradisíaca”) desde la isla. Valdez lo aprovecha a manera de empapelado para dejar la impronta del retrato. Así, el rostro es tan permanente como la referencia a este fruto tan común y representativo de la cultura dominicana. Pintor y dibujante por vocación y por voluntad, Gerard Ellis establece una interesante dicotomía entre el ejercicio de la pintura y la crítica social. Su obra pictórica resulta sumamente expresiva y vigorosa para quienes participan de manera directa o indirecta en los múltiples estratos de los contextos a que se refiere este artista. La violencia, la corrupción, la abulia propia de nuestros tiempos y todo aquello que nos remite a la estupidez humana son temas centrales de su cuidadísimo trabajo pictórico. Hay una estudiada conexión e interdependencia entre lo que es su trabajo y lo que constituyen sus experiencias de vida, lo cual se traduce en cierta politización subyacente de la experiencia vital. Su obra reactualiza cuestiones vinculadas al modo en que una mirada articulada en torno a la realidad puede, a la vez, configurar ámbitos de reflexión en relación con la experiencia de vida de cada individuo... y encubrir la más absoluta rebeldía. Son piezas que nos conducen a esos deliciosos territorios del sarcasmo y la ironía que sabe generar el autor. En buena compañía (2007) y Tierra maravillosa de invierno (2008) son obras características de ese juego de palabras y de imágenes en que no todo está dicho pero sí sugerido. Por otra parte, Mar bravo (2008) es un testimonio del acto de crear, del proceso creativo en que se embarca Ellis. Autorreferencial y en cierta medida autobiográfica, nos presenta el acto creador y destructor del pintor sobre una hoja de papel, al tiempo que su esqueleto se recubre de peces. En este espacio en blanco, relacionado con las hojas de las libretas infantiles, hay un peso emocional menos sarcástico y más analítico de las particularidades de su quehacer. Una imagen extraña, dispuesta en un recuadro en un diario de circulación nacional, fue motivo de preocupación general: “Santo Domingo Este. Una “yipeta” [camioneta] marca BMW, color negro, sin nadie a bordo, fue lanzada al

29


fondo del Mar Caribe no se sabe con qué propósito. La yipeta fue descubierta bajo las aguas por un morador del área, que dio la voz de alarma”. Este texto intrigante y extraño dio impulso a toda una serie de obras, cuerpos de trabajo y centenares de horas de cavilaciones de Limber Vilorio. Aquel hecho absurdo y tentador se convirtió en una secuencia lógica de todas sus líneas discursivas anteriores. A través de su mirada, la ciudad y sus habitantes, así como sus elementos constitutivos (tangibles o no), habían adoptado una dimensión emocional que los refería a espacios artificiales, caóticos, catastróficos, apocalípticos… del mismo modo en que Santo Domingo se transformaba ante sus ojos. Esa especie de obsesión urbana llevó a Vilorio a rescatar los espacios prohibidos e innombrables de la urbe, a materializar la condena y el pesar de transitarla. Bajo su mirada aparecen el mito, las señales, la marginalización, la violencia y las vidas privadas que transitan por lugares públicos. Ya alguna vez exterioricé que Limber se enfrenta, mediante este conjunto de obras, a una sociedad que siente una absoluta fascinación por el automóvil como símbolo de estatus y generador de pasiones. En opinión del autor, el poder de la imagen, en obras como Ahogado en su gasolina (2004), Vértigo (2004) y A la deriva (2006), radica “en su destrucción [la del carro]”. La desaparición del automóvil (así… genéricamente) es, según sus propias palabras, “la liberación, el triunfo del yo frente al súper ego colectivo”. Finalmente, la obra de Radhamés Mejía se vincula a la República Dominicana, su patria, a partir de variados recursos simbólicos, que van desde las pictografías, los petroglifos y el sistema geométrico de los aborígenes tainos hasta aquellos asociados a la vida cotidiana actual del dominicano. De manera espontánea, el autor refiere a su ser isleño desde la memoria colectiva, la música, la danza y los hábitos que conforman una identidad siempre en construcción. En Cabezas llenas de plátanos (2008) divide la obra en tres planos fundamentales, cuya base es ese recurso nemotécnico a lo taino y que asciende a los rostros de perfil coronados por plátanos. La pieza está rematada, en su extremo superior, por unos zapatos con resortes que aluden al trasiego, al traslado y al nomadismo del ser dominicano. Las boquitas o la pomme (2008) y Posesión ritual (2008) procuran un vínculo más visceral y afectivo con lo afrocaribeño también desde la perspectiva de lo simbólico, geométrico y fragmentado de la condición insular. Santiago Villa Chiappe había considerado que Antonio Benítez Rojo “concibe al Caribe como un nexo y al mismo tiempo como una diseminación. Nexo, porque es un punto de unión entre diferentes mundos, un encuentro de historias que crean una comunidad imaginada, un «universo» cultural y una geografía. Diseminación, porque el Caribe es un flujo de significantes”. Y es precisamente a estos nexos y significantes y a ese encuentro de historias que se refiere Mejía cuando confronta al color con la geometría y al símbolo con su esencia.

30


Reeducando a Mónica II (Reeducating Monica II)

• 2008

MÓNICA FERRERAS

Adentro Polibio Díaz es un fotógrafo que en su trayectoria ha evaluado desde múltiples pers-

pectivas las contradicciones y relaciones de las categorías de adentro y afuera. Al plantear la profundidad del acto consciente del fotógrafo en la revelación de estas polaridades, ya había expresado que la producción de imágenes en su serie Interiores (2001-2004) es consciente de sí misma, de las herramientas que la construyen, del lenguaje que es posible articular mediante ella y de los mecanismos perceptivos que permiten que un espectador la reciba y pueda interpretar relacionándola con su propia experiencia (la del retratado y la de quien retrata). Díaz brinda una sagaz impresión de la vida en la contemporaneidad dominicana a través de una perspectiva desde “adentro”. Incorpora para ello el mobiliario y la parafernalia hogareña del dominicano, creando un colorido exuberante aunque paradójicamente sereno, con

31


Después de la siesta (After the Nap)

• 2001-2004

POLIBIO DÍAZ

interesantes observaciones sobre la vida diaria y la memoria de quien habita esos espacios. Sus interiores ilustran una actitud de la sociedad contemporánea a partir del núcleo del hábitat. Consciente del influjo de la cultura consumista y del creciente materialismo, intenta registrar en su fotografía las escenas a que dan lugar estas situaciones. La publicidad, los medios masivos —representados por televisores y radios—, las imágenes icónicas y trascendentes de la religiosidad popular y las flores de plástico emprenden su camino a la sacralidad en estos momentos congelados. Inés Tolentino se renueva constantemente. Sus pinturas, dibujos y collages son

una referencia reflexiva a su propia biografía… y con la de ella, a la de la mujer en general. Su cuerpo de trabajo más reciente nos conduce a entender la memoria cuerpo como un lugar de confluencia y paradójico conflicto. La memoria, su memoria corporizada a partir del “noble” acto de bordado, redimensiona las categorías de lo femenino y de la representación, desde sus propios imaginarios hasta los que considera colectivos, metáforas de lugar y rituales, creencias y labores. Tejiendo mi historia (2008) nos aporta desde el principio esa idea del acto de bordado como un gesto de íntimas referencias, ya sea a lo doméstico como a la obsesiva pasión por adornar y embellecer. Ahora bien: ¿cómo ornamentan estas puntadas? Lo hacen a partir de símbolos simples y llanos, que nos remiten a la guerra, al sexo, a los diálogos inocuos, a los dibujos animados y hasta al sagrado corazón de Jesús. Estas referencias, que en apariencia se muestran ingenuas, van articulando un discurso sobre las estructuras y los esquemas que “organizan” la vida de la mujer en nuestras sociedades. Asimismo, Hilos de vida (2008) construye una historia de violencia y muerte que, aun cuando la autora se la apropia desde el título, bien podría constituir el relato acerca de los miles de mujeres agredidas y sacrificadas por la violencia doméstica y los conflictos armados en todo el mundo.

32


Mónica Ferreras se proclama junguiana, y los conceptos de Carl Jung aparecen

progresivamente en su obra. Sus pinturas, fundamentalmente autobiográficas, reflejan su proceso de individuación (la manera, definida por Jung, en que cada uno de nosotros viene a ser lo que intrínseca y potencialmente es), a través del cual nos propone un laberinto que simboliza el viaje hacia el ser. Desde estas piezas plenas de formas orgánicas (amebas, células, cadenas de ADN) y un tanto laberínticas, Ferreras nos expone a la complejidad del mundo psíquico (los vericuetos del consciente y el subconsciente del individuo), trasladado al lienzo de modo instintivo. Su forma de introducirlo en este cuerpo de trabajo parte de una experiencia de vida, una metáfora de su vida como individuo y de su vida como ser social. Reeducando a Mónica (2008) es una serie de pinturas que reflejan esta línea discursiva desde una densidad semántica sustentada en teorías analíticas acerca del ser humano y su personalidad. Su video C.A.E (cuerpo, alma y espíritu (2005) nos muestra, en primero y único plano, una escena de tres mujeres en constante movimiento que actúan ciertos ritos y funciones que, se entiende, les pertenecen dentro del marco (literal) de un entorno doméstico. Para ello, la artista parte de la trinidad establecida por el cuerpo, el alma y el espíritu como base composicional. Esta visión, asociada a la deconstrucción de las representaciones sociales de la mujer en la sociedad, interpela al espectador ante las expectativas que tiene sobre el accionar en pantalla. Fuera del Caribe se han realizado importantes exposiciones que incluyen las propuestas visuales y de sentido de los dominicanos —unas con mayor enjundia que otras, unas con menos prejuicios que otras—. Sin embargo, si algo trasciende de estos esfuerzos por organizar una visualidad o potenciar una visión es, precisamente, el hecho de que se establecen interacciones entre artistas, instituciones y curadores, y de cierta manera los discursos se contaminan para permitir lecturas que surgen de esos vínculos sugeridos. A partir de esto se pueden desplegar entre ellos movimientos de apertura y diálogo que posibiliten una nueva dinámica, aquella que ha sido y será determinada y pautada por los propios productores de sentido. Sara Hermann ASESORA DE ARTES VISUALES Centro Cultural Eduardo León Jimenes Santiago de los Caballeros, República Dominicana

1-“El olor sabe arrancar las máscaras de la civilización, sabe que el hombre y la mujer se encontrarán sin falta en el platanal. ¡Musa paradisíaca, ampara a los amantes! No hay que ganar el cielo para gozarlo, dos cuerpos en el platanal valen tanto como la primera pareja, la odiosa pareja que sirvió para marcar la separación. ¡Musa paradisíaca, ampara a los amantes!” (Virgilio Piñera. La isla en peso. 1943).

33


Good Companion (En buena compañía) GERARD ELLIS

34

• 2007


Artists’ Biographies

Biografías de los artistas

35


Pasiones interiores (Inner Passions)

• 2 0 0 1 -2 0 0 4

POLIBIO DÍAZ

Polibio Díaz { polidiaz @ codetel . net. do }

Polibio Díaz Barahona was born in 1952, in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic.

He studied photojournalism (1972) at the Texas A&M University, in College Station, Texas, graduating from that university as a civil engineer (1973). He has exhibited individually in Santo Domingo at the Museum of Modern Art (“Cátedras Santa María de la Encarnación, 6 A.M.–6 P.M.,” 1982), at the Dominican-German Cultural Center (2007), and at the Spanish Cultural Center (“Polibio Díaz, Photographs, Videoperformances and Installations,” 2008), as well as at the Galerie André Arsenec in Martinique (“Interiors and Videoperformances,” 2008). His show “Una isla, un paisaje” was exhibited at the Casa de América in Madrid (2002), at the Istituto Italo-Latinoamericano (IILA) in Rome (2001), at the Centro Cultural del Matadero in Huesca, Spain (2000), and at the Museum of Modern Art in Santo Domingo (1998). He has participated in group exhibitions at the Fifty-First Venice Biennale (Latin American Pavillion, IILA, Palazzo Franchetti, 2005) and at the Ninth Havana Biennial, in Cuba (2006), and in exhibits at the Brooklyn Museum, in New York (“Infinite Island, Contemporary Caribbean Art,” 2007) and at the OAS Art Museum of the Americas in Washington, D.C. (“¡Merengue! Visual Rhythms,” 2007). Additionally, he will participate in an exhibition at the Grande Halle de la Villette in Paris (“Des îles et leurs mondes,” 2009). Mr. Díaz lives in Santo Domingo.

36


Sin titulo (Untitled)

• 2001-2004

POLIBIO DÍAZ

Polibio Díaz Barahona nació en 1952 en Santo Domingo, República Dominicana.

Estudió Fotoperiodismo (1972) en la Universidad Internacional de Texas A&M, en College Station, Texas, Estados Unidos, en la cual se graduó como Ingeniero Civil (1973). Ha expuesto individualmente en el Museo de Arte Moderno (“Cátedras Santa María de la Encarnación, 6 am. – 6 pm.”, 1982), en el Centro Cultural DomínicoAlemán (2007) y en el Centro Cultural de España (“Polibio Díaz. Fotografías, videoperformances e instalaciones”, 2008), todos de Santo Domingo; en la Galería Andrés Arsenec, de Martinica (“Interiores y videoperformances”, 2008); y su muestra “Una isla, un paisaje” fue exhibida en la Casa de América, de Madrid (2002), en el Istituto Italo-Latinoamericano (IILA), de Roma (2001), en el Centro Cultural del Matadero, de Huesca, España (2000), y en el Museo de Arte Moderno en Santo Domingo (1998). Colectivamente, ha participado en la 51ª Bienal de Venecia (Pabellón de América Latina, IILA, Palazzo Franchetti, 2005); en la 9ª Bienal de La Habana, Cuba (2006); en el Brooklyn Museum de Nueva York (“Infinite Island, Contemporary Caribbean Art”, 2007); en el Museo de Arte de las Américas de la OEA, en Washington, D. C. (“¡Merengue! Visual Rhythms”, 2007), y participará en el Grande Halle de la Villete, de París, Francia (“Des îles et leurs mondes”, 2009). Vive en Santo Domingo.

37


Posesión ritual (Ritual Possession) RADHAMÉS MEJÍA

38

• 2008


Radhamés Mejía { mejia @ free . fr }

Leonidas Radhamés Mejía was born on February 24, 1960, in Santo Domingo, Do-

minican Republic.

He received his degree from the National School of Fine Arts in Santo

Domingo (1979), where he later taught as Professor of Drawing. He subsequently studied printmaking and sculpture at the École Nationale Supérieure d’Arts, in Paris-Cergy, France (1985). He has exhibited individually at the Casa de los Jesuitas (“Objectivo,” 1981) and at the Museum of Modern Art (1982), both in Santo Domingo; at the Galería Bernheim in Panama (1992); at the gallery of the Orly Sud Airport in Paris (“Limites archaïques,” 1996); and at the Museum of the Americas in San Juan, Puerto Rico (2000). He has participated in group exhibitions at the Eduardo León Jimenes Art Contest of the Centro León in Santiago de los Caballeros, Dominican Republic (1981); at the Third Biennial of Ibero-American Art of the Domecq Cultural Institute in Mexico City (1982); at the OAS Art Museum of the Americas in Washington, D.C. (“Signs and Symbols of the Dominican Republic,” 1986); in the Salons de mai at the Grand Palais in Paris (1989–1993); and in the Triennale des Amériques in Maubeuge, France (1993). He was also invited to participate in the experimental workshop “Cuerpos pintados” in Chile and in the design of the book by the same title (2004). Mr. Mejía lives in Asnières (near Paris), France. Leonidas Radhamés Mejía nació el 24 de febrero de 1960 en Santo Domingo,

República Dominicana. Obtuvo su diploma en la Escuela Nacional de Bellas Artes de Santo Domingo (1979), en donde ofició luego como profesor de Dibujo. Posteriormente estudió Grabado y Escultura en la École Nationale Supérieure d’Arts de ParísCergy, Francia (1985).

39


Las boquitas o la pomme (The Hors d’Oeuvres or The Apple)

• 2008

RADHAMÉS MEJÍA

Ha expuesto individualmente en la Casa de los Jesuitas (“Objetivo”, 1981) y en el Museo de Arte Moderno (1982), de Santo Domingo; en la Galería Bernheim de Panamá (1992); en la Galería del Aeropuerto de Orly Sud, París, Francia (“Limites Archaiques”, 1996), y en el Museo de la Américas de San Juan, Puerto Rico (2000). Colectivamente, ha participado en el Concurso León Jimenes del Centro León, en Santiago de los Caballeros (1981); en la III Bienal de Arte Ibero-Ame-

40


Cabezas llenas de plátanos (Heads Full of Plantains)

• 2008

RADHAMÉS MEJÍA

ricano del Instituto Cultural Domecq, en Ciudad de México (1982); en el Museo de Arte de las Américas de la OEA, en Washington, D.C. (“Signs and Symbols of the Dominican Republic”, 1986); en los Salons de mai, Grand Palais, de París, Francia (1989-1993); en la Triennale des Amériques, en Maubeuge, Francia (1993); y fue invitado a participar en el taller experimental “Cuerpos Pintados”, en Chile, y en la edición del libro que lleva el mismo nombre (2004). Vive en Asnière (cerca de París), Francia.

41


Inés Tolentino { engelmann@wanadoo.fr

}

Inés Tolentino was born in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, on June 30, 1962.

She studied at the École Nationale Supérieure d’Arts, in Paris-Cergy (1981–1985); she received both her B.A. (1983) and her M.A. (1984) in Plastic Arts and Art Sciences from the University of Paris I, Panthéon-Sorbonne. She also pursued specialized studies in aesthetics and ethno-anthropology (1986). She has exhibited individually at the Château-Musée Grimaldi in Cagnes-sur-Mer, France (“Inés Tolentino: Recent Works,” 1995); at the Galería Botello, in San Juan, Puerto Rico (“Babel de día y de noche,” 1999); at the Museum of Modern Art, in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic (“Imágenes de archivo,” 2002); at the Galerie d’Art Viviana Grandi in Brussels, Belgium (“Memoria del Caribe,” 2003); and at the Galerie JM’Arts in Paris (“Las hacendosas,” 2008). She has participated in group exhibitions at the Sixth Havana Biennial in Cuba (1997); at the OAS Art Museum of the Americas in Washington, D.C. (“Mastering the Millennium: Art of the Americas,” 1999); in the traveling exhibition entitled “200 Years of Pernod” (2005) shown at the Espace Paul Ricard in Paris and also in Nantes, Lyon, Bordeaux, and Marseilles; and in an exhibition at the Musée de l’Aquitaine in Bordeaux (“Art of the Caribbean Islands,” 2008). Ms. Tolentino currently lives in Paris. Inés Tolentino nació en Santo Domingo, República Dominicana, el 30 de junio de 1962.

Estudió en la École Nationale Supérieure d’Arts de París-Cergy (1981-1985), obtuvo su licenciatura en Artes Plásticas y Ciencias del Arte en la Universidad de París I, Panteón Sorbona (1983), y posteriormente la maestría en Artes Plásticas y Ciencias del Arte (1984). Realizó, además, estudios especializados en Estética y Etno-Antropología (1986). Ha expuesto individualmente en el Château-Musée Grimaldi de Cagnes-surMer, Francia (“Inés Tolentino, obras recientes”, 1995); en la Galería Botello de

42


Coseré mi corazón en el tuyo (I Will Sew My Heart to Yours)

• 2008

I N É S TO L E N T I N O

43


Hilos de vida (Threads of Life) I N É S TO L E N T I N O

44

• 2008


Tejiendo mi historia (Weaving My Story)

• 2008

I N É S TO L E N T I N O

San Juan, Puerto Rico (“Babel de día y de noche”, 1999); en el Museo de Arte Moderno de Santo Domingo, República Dominicana (“Imágenes de Archivo”, 2002); en la Galería Grandi de Bruselas, Bélgica (“Memoria del Caribe”, 2003), y en la Galería JM’Arts de París, Francia (“Las Hacendosas”, 2008). Colectivamente, ha participado en la VI Bienal de La Habana, Cuba (1997); en el Museo de Arte de las Américas de la OEA, Washington, D.C. (“Mastering the Millennium: Art of the Americas”, 1999); en el Espace Paul Ricard de París y Marsella, Francia (“Los 200 años de Pernod”, 2005), y en el Museo de Aquitania de Burdeos, Francia (“Arte del Caribe Insular”, 2008). Vive actualmente en París.

45


Mónica Ferreras { mdelamaza @ yahoo . com }

Mónica Ferreras De la Maza was born in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, on

February 17, 1965. She studied at the College of Arts and Communication of APEC University in Santo Domingo (1982–1983) and received a B.A. in Fine Arts and Illustration from the Altos de Chavón School of Design in La Romana, Dominican Republic (affiliated with New York’s Parsons School of Design) (1983–1985). Later she earned another B.A. in Interior Design from the Royal Academy of Art in The Hague, Netherlands (1985–1987). She has exhibited individually at various venues in the city of Santo Domingo: at the Fourth Caribbean Biennial in the Ozama Fortress (“Intervenciones urbanas,” 2001); at the Spanish Cultural Center (“Directrices,” 2002); at the Galería El Espacio (“Recent Works,” 2005); and at the Galería de Arte Distric & Co. (“Reeducating Monica,” 2008). She has participated in group exhibitions at the Twenty-Third National Biennial of Visual Arts of the Museum of Modern Art in Santo Domingo (2001), and in exhibitions at the Pablo de la Torriente Brau Cultural Center in Havana (“Miradas de mujer,” 2006); at the Cambridge Cultural Arts Center in Cambridge, Massachusetts; at the Dominican-German Center in Santo Domingo (2006); and at the Itaú Cultural Institute in São Paulo (“Visionarios,” an experimental video, 2008). Ms. Ferreras lives in Santo Domingo.

46


C.A.E. Cuerpo, alma y espíritu (Body, Soul and Spirit)

• 2005

MÓNICA FERRERAS

Mónica Ferreras De la Maza nació en Santo Domingo,

República Dominicana, el 17 de febrero de 1965. Estudió en la Facultad de Artes y Comunicación, APEC, de Santo Domingo (1982-1983), y obtuvo la licenciatura en Bellas Artes e Ilustración en la Escuela de Diseño de Altos de Chavón, La Romana, República Dominicana (adscripta a la Parsons School of Design de Nueva York, 1983-1985). Posteriormente, obtuvo la maestría en Diseño de Interiores en la Real Academia Holandesa de Bellas Artes de La Haya, Holanda (1985-1987). Ha expuesto individualmente en diferentes ámbitos de la ciudad de Santo Domingo: en la IV Bienal del Caribe, de Fortaleza Ozama (“Intervenciones Urbanas”, 2001); en el Centro Cultural de España (“Directrices”, 2002); en la Galería El Espacio (“Trabajos Recientes”, 2005), y en la Galería Distric & Co. (“Reeducando a Mónica”, 2008). Colectivamente, ha participado en la XXIII Bienal Nacional de Artes Visuales del Museo de Arte Moderno de Santo Domingo (2001); en el Centro Cultural Pablo de la Torriente Brau de La Habana, Cuba (“Miradas de Mujer”, 2006); en el Cambridge Cultural Arts Center de Cambridge, Massachusetts (2006); en el Centro Domínico-Alemán de Santo Domingo (2006), y en el Centro Itaú Cultural de São Paulo, Brasil (“Visionarios”, video experimental, 2008). Vive en Santo Domingo.

47


Julio Valdez { sil k a q uatint @ yahoo . com }

Julio Evangelista Valdez González was born in Santo Domingo, Dominican Re-

public, on January 10, 1969. He studied at the National School of Fine Arts in Santo Domingo (1984– 1986); afterwards he pursued illustration studies at the Altos de Chavón School of Design in La Romana, Dominican Republic (affiliated with the Parsons School of Design in New York) (1986–1988); later in New York he studied printmaking with Robert Blackburn and Kathy Caraccio (1994–1995). He has exhibited individually at the Legacy Fine Art Gallery, in Panama (2001); at Latin American Masters, an art gallery in Beverly Hills, California (2003); at the Galería Botello in San Juan, Puerto Rico (2004); at the Stella Jones Gallery in New Orleans (2005); and at the June Kelly Gallery in New York (2007). He has participated in group exhibitions at the XXXème Festival International de la Peinture in Cagnes-sur-Mer, France (1999); at the Ninth Biennial of the Eduardo León Jimenes Cultural Center in Santiago de los Caballeros, Dominican Republic (2002); at the Casa de las Américas in Havana, Cuba (“Myths of the Caribbean,” 2000); at the Center for Contemporary Printmaking in Norwalk, Connecticut (“Silk Aquatint: Painterly Graphics,” 2006); and at the Sidney Mishkin Gallery at Baruch College in New York (“Re-grouping: Three Generations of Latin American Artists in New York,” 2007). Mr. Valdez lives in New York. Julio Evangelista Valdez González nació en Santo Domingo, República Dominicana,

el 10 de enero de 1969. Estudió en la Escuela Nacional de Bellas Artes de Santo Domingo (19841986); posteriormente, hizo cursos de Ilustración en la Escuela de Diseño de Altos de Chavón, La Romana, República Dominicana (afiliada a la Parsons School

48


La maldita circunstancia (Accursed Circumstance)

• 2007

J U L I O VA L D E Z

of Design de Nueva York, 1986-1988), y en Nueva York realizó estudios de Grabado con Robert Blackburn y Kathy Caraccio (1994-1995). Ha expuesto individualmente en la galería Legacy Fine Art de Panamá (2001); en Latin American Masters de Beverly Hills, California (2003); en la Galería Botello de San Juan, Puerto Rico (2004); en la Stella Jones Galley de Nueva Orleans (2005), y en la June Kelly Gallery de Nueva York (2007). Colectivamente, ha participado en el XXXème Festival International de la Peinture de Cagnes-sur-Mer, Francia (1999); en la 9ª Bienal del Centro León Jimenes de Santiago de los Caballeros, República Dominicana (2002); en la Casa de las Américas de La Habana, Cuba (“Mitos en el Caribe”, 2000); en el Centro de Grabado Contemporáneo de Norwalk, Connecticut (“Silk Aquatint: Painterly Graphics”, 2006), y en la Sidney Mishkin Gallery, Baruch College, de Nueva York (“Re-grouping: Three Generations of Latin American Artists in New York”, 2007). Vive en Nueva York.

49


Fausto Ortiz faustoortiz @ gmail . com www. faustoortiz . com

Fausto Eldipio Ortiz Luna was born on March 2, 1970, in Santiago de los Caballeros,

Dominican Republic. He studied architecture at the Technological University in Santiago de los Caballeros, Dominican Republic (1993); photography at the Institut d’Études Supérieures des Arts, in Paris (2003); “Interpretative Portraiture,” with Andrea Modica, at the International Center of Photography (ICP) in New York (2005); and “Contemporary Art Trends” and “Strategies for Contemporary Artistic Production” at the Eduardo León Jimenes Cultural Center (Centro León) in Santiago de los Caballeros, Dominican Republic (2005, 2007). He has exhibited individually at the Spanish Cultural Center in Santo Domingo (“Reflejos,” 2002); at the Centro León in Santiago de los Caballeros (“Memoria al desnudo,” 2005); at the Casa Dominicana in Patterson, New Jersey (“Face Off,” 2006); at the Lyle O. Reitzel Gallery in Santo Domingo (“Deshechos,” 2006); and at the DominicanAmerican Cultural Institute in Santiago de los Caballeros (“Deidades ajenas,” 2007). He has participated in group exhibitions at the Katzen Art Center of American University in Washington, D.C. (2006); at the Ninth International Biennial of Cuenca Ecuador (2007); at the Brooklyn Museum in New York (“Infinite Island, Contemporary Caribbean Art,” 2007); at the OAS Art Museum of the Americas in Washington, D.C. (“Objects of Power and Devotion,” 2008); and at the Thirtieth Edition of the KnokkeHeist International Photography Festival in West Flanders, Belgium (2008). Mr. Ortiz lives in Santiago de los Caballeros. Fausto Elpidio Ortiz Luna nació el 2 de marzo de 1970 en Santiago de los Caba-

lleros, República Dominicana.

50


Descendiente (Descendant)

• 2003

FA U S TO O R T I Z

51


Realizó cursos de Arquitectura en la Universidad Tecnológica de Santiago de los Caballeros, República Dominicana (1993); de Fotografía en el Institut d’Études Supérieures des Arts de París, Francia (2003); sobre “Interpretative Portraiture”, con Andrea Modica, en el International Center of Photography (ICP) de NuevaYork (2005); y sobre “Tendencias del arte contemporáneo” y “Estrategias para la producción artística contemporánea”, en el Centro León Jimenes de Santiago de los Caballeros (2005, 2007). Ha expuesto individualmente en la Casa de la Cultura de España, de Santo Domingo (“Reflejos”, 2002); en el Centro Cultural de Santiago de los Caballeros (“Memoria al Desnudo”, 2005); en la Casa Dominicana de Patterson, Nueva

52


Fragmentos de paz (Peace Fragments)

• 2008

FA U S TO O R T I Z

Jersey (“Face Off”, 2006); en la Galería Lyle O. Reitzel, en su filial de Santo Domingo (“Deshechos”, 2006), y en el Instituto Cultural Domínico-Americano de Santiago de los Caballeros (“Deidades Ajenas”, 2007). Colectivamente, ha participado en exposiciones en el Katzen Art Center de la American University, Washington, D.C. (2006); en la IX Bienal Internacional de Arte de Cuenca, Ecuador (2007); en el Brooklyn Museum de Nueva York (“Infinite Island, Contemporary Caribbean Art”, 2007); en el Museo de Arte de las Américas de la OEA, Washington, D.C. (“Object of Power and Devotion”, 2008); y en la 30ª edición del International Fotofestival Knokke-Heist de Flandes Occidental, Bélgica (2008). Vive en Santiago de los Caballeros.

53


Bajo las aguas (Under Water) L I M B E R V I LO R I O

54

• 2006


Limber Vilorio { limbervilorio @ yahoo . com }

Limber Bienvenido Vilorio Villanueva was born in Santo Domingo, Dominican Re-

public, on July 13, 1972. He received his B.A. in Plastic Arts from the National School of Fine Arts in Santo Domingo (1993); he later graduated as an architect from the Pedro Henríquez Ureña National University in Santo Domingo (2000). He has exhibited individually at various venues in the city of Santo Domingo: at the Casa de Teatro (“Espacio interior,” 1997); at the House of Bastidas, under the Museum of the Royal Houses (“Caminantes en la Ciudad Herida I,” 2001); at the DominicanAmerican Institute (“Caminantes en la Ciudad Herida II,” 2001); and on two occasions at the Museum of Modern Art (“Carros 0.04,” 2004, and “¿Quién tiró la yipeta al Mar Caribe?” [“Who Threw the SUV in the Caribbean Sea?”], 2008). He has participated in group exhibitions at the Fifth Caribbean Biennial of the Museum of Modern Art in Santo Domingo (2003); at the Ninth Havana Biennial in Cuba (2006); at El Museo del Barrio, New York (“This Skin I Am In,” 2006); at the Caguas Art Museum in Puerto Rico (“El juego de la diferencia,” 2007); and at the Twenty-Fourth National Biennial of Visual Arts of the Museum of Modern Art in Santo Domingo (2007). Mr. Vilorio currently lives in Madrid. Limber Bienvenido Vilorio Villanueva nació en Santo Domingo, República Do-

minicana, el 13 de julio de 1972. Recibió la licenciatura en Artes Plásticas en la Escuela Nacional de Bellas Artes de Santo Domingo (1993), y posteriormente se graduó como Arquitecto en

55


Vértigo (Vertigo)

• 2004

L I M B E R V I LO R I O

56


A la deriva (Adrift)

• 20 0 6

L I M B E R V I LO R I O

la Universidad Nacional Pedro Henríquez Ureña de esa capital (2000). Ha expuesto individualmente en diversos ámbitos de la ciudad de Santo Domingo: en la Casa de Teatro (“Espacio Interior”, 1997); en la Casa Rodrigo de Bastidas del Patronato de las Casas Reales (“Caminantes en la Ciudad Herida I”, 2001); en el Instituto Domínico-Americano (“Caminantes en la Ciudad Herida II”, 2001), y en dos ocasiones en el Museo de Arte Moderno (“Carros 0.04”, 2004, y “Quién tiró la yipeta [camioneta] al Mar Caribe”, 2008). Colectivamente, ha participado en la V Bienal del Caribe del Museo de Arte Moderno de Santo Domingo (2003); en la IX Bienal de La Habana, Cuba (2006); en el Museo del Barrio, de Nueva York (“This Skin I am In”, 2006); en el Museo de Arte de Caguas, de Puerto Rico (“El Juego de la Diferencia”, 2007), y en la XXIV Bienal Nacional de Artes Visuales del Museo de Arte Moderno de Santo Domingo (2007). Vive actualmente en Madrid.

57


Winter Wonderland (Tierra maravillosa de invierno)

• 2008

GERARD ELLIS

Gerard Ellis { ly legaller y miami @ bellsouth . net gellis 8 1 @ hotmail . com gerardellis 1 @ yahoo . com www. artnet. com / reitzel . html www. ly leor . com . do }

Gerard Philippe Ellis Ruiz was born on July 3, 1976, in Santo Domingo, Domini-

can Republic. He graduated with honors from the National School of Fine Arts in Santo Domingo (1997) and later earned a degree in Advertising Communication from the Autonomous University of Santo Domingo. He has exhibited individually at the Spanish Cultural Center in Santo Domingo (“En lo obscuro de la habitación,” 2002) and at the Lyle O. Reitzel Gallery in Miami (“Crossroads,” 2008). He participated in the Eduardo León Jimenes Art Competition of the Centro León in Santiago de los Caballeros (2004) and at the Twenty-Third National Biennial of Visual Arts of the Museum of Modern Art in Santo Domingo (2005). He participated in the group exhibition “The Triumph of Madness” on the occasion of the twelfth anniversary of the Lyle O. Reitzel Gallery in Santo Domingo (2007) and in the Sixth Salon of Contemporary Drawing of the

58


Mar bravo (Rough Sea)

• 2008

GERARD ELLIS

Museum of Modern Art in Santo Domingo (2007). Additionally, he was invited to the Ninth Edition of the International Biennial of Cuenca Ecuador (2007). Mr. Ellis lives in Santo Domingo. Gerard Philippe Ellis Ruiz nació el 3 de julio de 1976 en Santo Domingo, Repúbli-

ca Dominicana. Se graduó con honores en la Escuela Nacional de Bellas Artes de Santo Domingo (1997) y posteriormente obtuvo la graduación en Artes y Comunicación de la Universidad Autónoma de Santo Domingo (2001). Ha expuesto individualmente en el Centro Cultural de España, de Santo Domingo (“En lo Obscuro de la Habitación”, 2002), y en la Galería Lyle O. Reitzel, de Miami, Estados Unidos (“Crossroads”, 2008). Participó en el Concurso E. León Jimenes, del Centro León, en Santiago de los Caballeros (2004); en la XXIII Bienal Nacional de Artes Visuales del Museo de Arte Moderno de Santo Domingo (2005); en la muestra colectiva “El Triunfo de la Locura”, con motivo del 12º Aniversario de la Galería Lyle O. Reitzel, en Santo Domingo (2007); en el VI Salón de Dibujo Contemporáneo del Museo de Arte Moderno de Santo Domingo (2007); y fue invitado a la IX edición de la Bienal Internacional de Cuenca, Ecuador (2007). Vive en Santo Domingo.

59


WORKS IN THE EXHIBITION Polibio Díaz

Sin título (Untitled), 2001–2004 photograph on aluminum (fotografía sobre aluminio) 177.2 x 39.4 inches (450 x 100 cm) Photo: Courtesy of the artist

Las boquitas o la pomme (The Hors d’Oeuvres or the Apple), 2008 mixed media on canvas (técnica mixta sobre tela) 70.9 x 70.9 inches (180 x 180 cm)

Pasiones interiores (Inner Passions), 2001–2004 photograph on aluminum (fotografía sobre aluminio)

Photo: Courtesy of the artist

190.9 x 65 inches (485 x 165 cm) Photo: Courtesy of the artist

Después de la siesta (After the Nap), 2001–2004 photograph on aluminum (fotografía sobre aluminio) 190.9 x 65 inches (485 x 165 cm) Photo: Courtesy of the artist

Radhamés Mejía

Cabezas llenas de plátanos (Heads Full of Plantains), 2008 70.9 x 70.9 inches (180 x 180 cm) Photo: Courtesy of the artist

60 Adan y Eva (Adam and Eve), 2006

Posesión ritual (Ritual Possession), 2008 mixed media on canvas (técnica mixta sobre tela) 51.2 x 38.2 inches (130 x 97 cm) Photo: Courtesy of the artist


Inés Tolentino

Mónica Ferreras

Reeducando a Mónica I (Reeducating Monica I), 2008 acrylic on canvas (acrílico sobre lienzo) 30 x 40 inches (76.2 x 101.6 cm)

Coseré mi corazón en el tuyo (I Will Sew My Heart to Yours), 2008 acrylic and thread on canvas (acrílico e hilo sobre lienzo)

Photo: Courtesy of the artist

51.2 x 38.2 inches (130 x 97 cm) Photo: Courtesy of the artist

Reeducando a Mónica II (Reeducating Monica II), 2008 acrylic on canvas (acrílico sobre lienzo) 30 x 40 inches (76.2 x 101.6 cm) Photo: Courtesy of the artist

Tejiendo mi historia (Weaving My Story), 2008 acrylic and thread on canvas (acrílico e hilo sobre lienzo) 51.2 x 38.2 inches (130 x 97 cm) Photo: Courtesy of the artist

Reeducando a Mónica III (Reeducating Monica III), 2008 acrylic on canvas (acrílico sobre lienzo) 30 x 40 inches (76.2 x 101.6 cm) Photo: Courtesy of the artist

Hilos de vida (Threads of Life), 2008 acrylic and thread on canvas (acrílico e hilo sobre lienzo) 51.2 x 38.2 inches (130 x 97 cm) Photo: Courtesy of the artisT

Reeducando a Mónica V (Reeducating Monica V), 2008 acrylic on canvas (acrílico sobre lienzo)

C.A.E. Cuerpo, alma y espíritu (Body, Soul and Spirit), 2005 video: DVCam 6:30 minutes (minutos) six stills from the video (seis fotos extraídas del video) Photo: Courtesy of the artist

30 x 40 inches (76.2 x 101.6 cm) Photo: Courtesy of the artist

61


Julio Valdez

Brother and Plátanos (Hermano y plátanos), 2005 archival pigment print on paper (grabado sobre papel) 22 x 30 inches (55.88 x 76.2 cm) Photo: Courtesy of the artist

Fausto Ortiz

Fragmentos de paz (Peace Fragments), 2008 From the series City of Shadows (De la serie Ciudad de sombras) digital photography (fotografía digital), place: Monte Cristi, Dominican Republic 24 x 61.5 inches (61 x 156.2 cm) Photo: Courtesy of the artist

Aquiles: el corazón cayó al mar (Achilles: The Heart Fell into the Sea), 2007 archival pigment print with hand coloring, on nylon reinforced paper, mounted on styrene and wood panel (grabado impreso con coloración manual, en nylon y papel, montado sobre panel de madera). 40 x 44 inches (101.6 x 111.76 cm) Photo: Courtesy of the artist

La maldita circunstancia (Accursed Circumstance), 2007 acrylic and oil on wood panel (acrílico y óleo sobre panel de madera) 96 x 114 inches (243.84 x 289.56 cm) Photo: Courtesy of the artist

Aproximación (Approximation), 2006 From the series City of Shadows (De la serie Ciudad de sombras) digital photography (fotografía digital), place: Santiago, Dominican Republic 24 x 51 inches (61 x 129.5 cm) Photo: Courtesy of the artist

Sombras pasajeras (Passing Shadows), 2005 From the series City of Shadows (De la serie Ciudad de sombras) digital photography (fotografía digital), place: Santiago, Dominican Republic 24 x 66 inches (61 x 167.6 cm) Photo: Courtesy of the artist

62


Ahogado en su gasolina (Drowned in Its Own Gasoline), 2004 mixed media on paper (técnica mixta sobre papel) 23.6 x 29.5 inches (60 x 75 cm)

Descendiente (Descendant), 2003 From the series City of Shadows (De la serie Ciudad de sombras) black and white photo (fotografía en blanco y negro), place: Santiago de los Caballeros, Dominican Republic

Winter Wonderland (Tierra maravillosa de invierno), 2008 mixed media on canvas (técnica mixta sobre tela) 44 x 92 inches (111.8 x 233.7 cm) PHOTO: COURTESY OF LYLE O. REITZEL GALLERY, MIAMI/SANTO DOMINGO

PHOTO: COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

Mar bravo (Rough Sea), 2008 mixed media on canvas (técnica mixta sobre tela) 50 x 80 inches (127 x 203.2 cm)

16 x 22 inches (40.6 x 55.9 cm)

PHOTO: COURTESY OF LYLE O. REITZEL GALLERY, MIAMI/SANTO DOMINGO

Photo: Courtesy of the artist

Limber Vilorio Vértigo (Vertigo), 2004 mixed media on paper (técnica mixta sobre papel) 23.6 x 29.inches (60 x 75 cm) PHOTO: COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

A la deriva (Adrift), 2006 mixed media on paper (técnica mixta sobre papel)

Gerard Ellis

19.7 x 23.6 inches (50 x 60 cm) Photo: Courtesy of the artist

Good Companion (En buena compañía), 2007 mixed media on canvas (técnica mixta sobre tela) 39.5 x 39.5 inches (100.3 x 100.3 cm) PHOTO COURTESY OF LYLE O. REITZEL

Bajo las aguas (Under Water), 2006 mixed media on paper (técnica mixta sobre papel)

GALLERY, MIAMI/SANTO DOMINGO

29.5 x 27.2 inches (75 x 69 cm) Photo: Courtesy of the artist

63


Books and Catalogs of The IDB Cultural Center by Year, Country, and Region Books 1994 Latin America and the Caribbean

Art of Latin America: 1900–1980. Essay by Marta Traba. 180 pp.

1997 Latin America Identidades: Centro Cultural and the Caribbean del BID (1992–1997). 165 pp. 2001 Latin America and the Caribbean

Art of Latin America: 1981-2000. Essay by Germán Rubiano Caballero. 80 pp.

Catalogs 1992 Peru • Peru: A Legend in Silver. Essay by Pedro G. Jurinovich, 28 pp. 1993 Costa Rica Journey to Modernism. Costa Rican Painting and Sculpture from 1864 to 1959. Essay by Efraím Hernández V. 20 pp. Spain Picasso: Suite Vollard.* Text provided by the Instituto de Crédito Español, adapted by the IDB Cultural Center. 8 pp. Colombia • Colombia: Land of El Dorado. Essay by Clemencia Plazas, Museo del Oro, Banco de la República de Colombia. 32 pp. Colombia The Medellín Art-el.* Essay by Félix Ángel. 6 pp. [Collaborative exhibit]. 1994 Latin America • Graphics from Latin America. and the Caribbean Selections from the IDB Collection. Essay by Félix Ángel. 16 pp. Paraguay Other Sensibilities. Recent Development in the Art of Paraguay. Essay by Félix Ángel. 24 pp. Ecuador • 17th and 18th Century Sculpture in Quito. Essay by Magdalena Gallegos de Donoso. 24 pp. Latin America Selected Paintings from the and the Art Museum of the Americas. Caribbean Presented in Washington, D.C. Essay by Félix Ángel. 32 pp. Latin America • Graphics from Latin America and the and the Caribbean.* Caribbean Presented in Rehoboth, Delaware. Essay by Félix Ángel. 12 pp. [Traveling exhibition] Latin America • Latin American Artists in and the Washington Collections. Caribbean Essay by Félix Ángel. 20 pp.

64

1995 Israel Japan Latin America and the Caribbean Brazil Uruguay Panama

Timeless Beauty. Ancient Perfume and Cosmetic Containers.* Essay by Michal Dayagi-Mendels, The Israel Museum. 20 pp. Treasures of Japanese Art. Selections from the Permanent Collection of the Tokyo Fuji Art Museum.* Essay provided by the Tokyo Fuji Art Museum, adapted by the IDB Cultural Center. 48 pp. Painting, Drawing and Sculpture from Latin America. Selections from the IDB Collection. Presented in Washington, D.C. and at Salisbury State University, Maryland. Essay by Félix Ángel. 28 pp. Serra da Capivara National Park.* Essay by Félix Ángel. 6 pp. [Collaborative exhibit] Figari’s Montevideo (1861–1938). Essay by Félix Ángel. 40 pp. Crossing Panama. A History of the Isthmus as Seen Through Its Art. Essays by Félix Ángel and Coralia Hassan de Llorente. 28 pp.

1996 Argentina Nicaragua Latin America and the Caribbean United States Bolivia

• What a Time It Was...Life and Culture in Buenos Aires, 1880–1920. Essay by Félix Ángel. 40 pp. Of Earth and Fire. PreColumbian and Contemporary Pottery from Nicaragua. Essays by Félix Ángel and Edgar Espinoza Pérez. 28 pp. América en la Gráfica. Obras de la Colección del Banco Interamericano de Desarrollo.+ Presented in San José, Costa Rica. Essay by Félix Ángel. 16 pp. [Traveling exhibition] Expeditions. 150 Years of Smithsonian Research in Latin America. Essay provided by the Smithsonian Institution. 48 pp. Between the Past and the Present. Nationalist Tendencies in Bolivian Art, 1925–1950. Essay by Félix Ángel. 28 pp.

1997 Spain

Design in XXth Century Barcelona. From Gaudí to the Olympics. Essay by Juli Capella and Kim Larrea, adapted by the IDB Cultural Center. 36 pp.


Brazil Dominican Republic Jamaica

• Brazilian Sculpture from 1920 to 1990. A Profile.** Essays by Emanoel Araujo and Félix Ángel. 48 pp. Mystery and Mysticism in Dominican Art. Essay by Marianne de Tolentino and Félix Ángel. 24 pp. Three Moments in Jamaican Art. Essay by Félix Ángel. 40 pp.

1998 Colombia Suriname Guatemala

Points of Departure in Contemporary Colombian Art. Essay by Félix Ángel. 40 pp. • In Search of Memory. 17 Contemporary Artists from Suriname. Essay by Félix Ángel. 36 pp. A Legacy of Gods. Textiles and Woodcarvings from Guatemala. Essay by Félix Ángel. 36 pp.

1999 France L’Estampe en France. Thirty Four Young Printmakers.* Essays by Félix Ángel and Marie-Hélène Gatto. 58 pp. Latin America • Identities: Artists of Latin and the America and the Caribbean.+++ Caribbean Presented in Paris. Essays by Jean-Jacques Aillagon, Daniel Abadie and Christine Frérot. 150 pp. [Collaborative exhibit] Barbados Parallel Realities. Five Pioneering Artists from Barbados. Essay by Félix Ángel. 40 pp. Latin America and Selections from the IDB Art the Caribbean Collection.* Essay by Félix Ángel. 8 pp. Venezuela Leading Figures in Venezuelan Painting of the Nineteenth Century. Essays by Félix Ángel and Marián Caballero. 60 pp. France L’Estampe en France. Thirty-Four Young Printmakers.* Selection from the IDB Collection. Presented in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Essays by Félix Ángel and Marie Hélène Gatto. 58 pp. [Traveling exhibit] Norway Norwegian Alternatives. Essays by Félix Ángel and Jorunn Veiteberg. 42 pp. 2000 United States Bahamas

• New Orleans: A Creative Odyssey. Essay by Félix Ángel. 64 pp. On the Edge of Time. Contemporary Art from The Bahamas. Essay by Félix Ángel. 48 pp.

El Salvador Latin America and the Caribbean Canada

Two Visions of El Salvador. Modern Art and Folk Art. Essays by Félix Ángel and Mario Martí. 48 pp. • Graphics from Latin America and the Caribbean. From the Collection of the Inter-American Development Bank, Washington, D.C. Presented at York College of Pennsylvania. Essay by Félix Ángel, 32 pp. [Traveling exhibit] • Masterpieces of Canadian Inuit Sculpture.* Essay by John M. Burdick. 28 pp.

2001 Chile Latin America and the Caribbean Honduras Sweden

Tribute to Chile. Violeta Parra 1917–1967, Exhibition of Tapestries and Oil Painting.* Essay by Félix Ángel. 10 pp. Art of the Americas. Selections from the IDB Art Collection.* Essay by Félix Ángel, 10 pp. Honduras: Ancient and Modern Trails. Essays by Olga Joya and Félix Ángel. 44 pp. Strictly Swedish. An Exhibition of Contemporary Design.* Essay by Félix Ángel. 10 pp.

2002 Latin America Paradox and Coexistence. and the Caribbean Latin American Artists, 1980– 2000.* Essay by Félix Ángel. 10 pp. Brazil Faces of Northeastern Brazil. Popular and Folk Art.* Essay by Félix Ángel. 10 pp. Latin America • Graphics from Latin America and the and the Caribbean* Caribbean Presented at Riverside Art Museum, Riverside, California. Essay by Félix Ángel. 28 pp. [Traveling exhibit] Trinidad A Challenging Endeavor. and Tobago The Arts in Trinidad and To bago.* Essay by Félix Ángel. 36 pp. Belize The Art of Belize, Then and Now. Essays by Félix Ángel and Yasser Musa. 36 pp. Latin America • Graphics from Latin America and the and the Caribbean* Caribbean Presented at Fullerton Art Museum, State University, San Bernardino, California. Essay by Félix Ángel. 10 pp. [Traveling exhibit] Latin America First Latin American and and the Caribbean Video Art Caribbean Competition and Exhibit.* Essays by Danilo Piaggesi and Félix Ángel. 10 pp.

65


66

2003 Italy Latin America and the Caribbean Mexico Washington, D.C. Panama

DigITALYart (Technological Art from Italy).* Essays by Maria Grazia Mattei, Danilo Piaggesi and Félix Ángel. 36 pp. • First Latin American Video Art Competition and Exhibit.++ Presented at IILA, Rome. Essays by Irma Arestizábal, Danilo Piaggesi and Félix Ángel. 32 pp. [Traveling exhibit] Dreaming Mexico. Painting and Folk Art from Oaxaca.* Essays by Félix Ángel and Ignacio Durán-Loera. 24 pp. Our Voices, Our Images. A Celebration of the Hispanic Heritage Month. Essay by Félix Ángel. 24 pp. A Century of Painting in Panama.* Essay by Dr. Monica E. Kupfer. 40 pp.

2004 Uruguay Peru Haiti Bolivia Peru Latin America and the Caribbean Latin America and the Caribbean

First Drawing Contest for Uruguayan Artists.* Presented at the Uruguayan Cultural Foundation for the Arts, Washington, D.C. Essays by Hugo Fernández Faingold and Félix Ángel. 10 pp. [Collaborative exhibit] Tradition and Entrepreneurship. Popular Arts and Crafts from Peru. Essay by Cecilia Bákula Budge. 40 pp. • Vive Haïti! Contemporary Art of the Haitian Diaspora.+* Essay by Francine Farr. 48 pp. Indigenous Presence in Bolivian Folk Art. Essays by Silvia Arze O. and Inés G. Chamorro. 60 pp. • Tradizione ed Impresa: L’arte Popolare e mestieri di Perú. *** Presented at IILA, Rome. Essay by Cecilia Bákula Budge. 10 pp. [Traveling exhibit] • The IDB Cultural Center at ARTomatic.* Essay by Félix Ángel. 6 pp. [Collaborative exhibit] II Inter-American Biennial of Video Art of the IDB Cultural Center. * Essay by Félix Ángel. 10 pp.

2005 Japan

Nikkei Latin American Artists of the 20th Century. Artists of Japanese Descent from Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, and Peru.* Essay by Félix Ángel, 32 pp.

Latin America and the Caribbean Latin America and the Caribbean Paraguay

Paradox and Coexistence II. Art of Latin America 1981– 2000.* Presented in Bogotá, Colombia, and in Washington, D.C. Introduction by Félix Ángel, 10 pp. • II Inter-American Biennial of Video Art of the IDB Cultural Center.++ Presented at the Istituto Italo Latino Americano, Rome, Italy; and at the XXII Festival de Cine de Bogotá, Colombia. Essays by Félix Ángel and Irma Arestizábal, 52 pp. [Traveling exhibit] At the Gates of Paradise. Art of the Guaraní of Paraguay. Essays by Bartomeu Melià i Lliteres, Margarita Miró Ibars and Ticio Escobar, 42 pp.

2006 Brazil Guyana Latin America and the Caribbean Latin America and the Caribbean

A Beautiful Horizon. The Arts of Minas Gerais, Brazil. ** Essay by Félix Ángel. 52 pp. The Arts of Guyana. A Multicultural Caribbean Adventure. * Essays by Félix Ángel and Elfreida Bissember. 36 pp. Selections from the IDB Art Collection. In Celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month.* Essay by Félix Ángel. 10 pp. III Inter-American Biennial of Video Art of the IDB Cultural Center Essay by Félix Ángel. 62 pp.

2007 Guatemala Costa Rica Latin America and the Caribbean The Caribbean Latin America and the Caribbean

Guatemala: Past and Future. Essays by Eduardo Cofiño and Félix Ángel. 42 pp. Young Costa Rican Artists: Nine Proposals. Essays by Dora María Sequeira, Ileana Alvarado V. and Félix Angel. 60 pp. Selections from the InterAmerican Development Bank Art Collection. Presented at the Arkansas Arts Center, Little Rock, Arkansas. Essays by Ellen A. Plummer, Joseph W. Lampo and Luis Alberto Moreno. 10 pp. Highlights from the Collection of the Art Museum of the Americas of the Organization of American States (OAS). Outstanding works by artist from the Spanish, English, French and Dutch Carib- bean. Essays by José Miguel In- sulza and María Leyva. 44pp. Artful Diplomacy. Art as Latin America’s Ambassador in Wash- ington, D.C. Essay by Félix Angel. 60 pp.


2008 United States Extended Boundary. Latin American and Caribbean Artists in Miami. Essays by Helen L. Kohen, Brian A. Dursum, Ricardo Pau-Llosa, Jeremy Chestler, and Carol Damian. 62 pp. United States Beyond Borders. Modernism Through a Selection of Artwork from the Collection of the Inter- American Development Bank (IDB), Washington, D.C.* Essay by the IDB Cultural Center. 2 pp.

Argentina Latin America and the Caribbean

ON WITH THE SHOW! A Cel- ebration of the 100th Anniver- sary and Restoration of the Teatro Colón in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Essays by Horacio Sanguinetti, José María Lentino, Luciano Marra de la Fuente and Fabián Persic. 84 pp. Far From Home. The Migration Experience in Latin America and the Caribbean.* Essay by Donald Terry and the IDB Cul- tural Center. 12 pp.

Books and catalogs of exhibits presented at the IDB Cultural Center Gallery are in English and Spanish unless otherwise indicated. * English only ** English and Portuguese *** Italian only + Spanish only ++ Spanish and Italian +++ English, Spanish, French and Portuguese +* English and French • Out of print Selected books and catalogs may be purchased from the IDB Bookstore, 1300 New York Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20577 Website: www.iadb.org/pub E-mail: idb-books@iadb.org

67


The IDB Cultural Center was created in 1992 and has two primary objectives: (1) to contribute to social development by administering a grants program that sponsors and co-finances small-scale cultural projects that will have a positive social impact in the region, and (2) to promote a better image of the IDB member countries, with emphasis on Latin America and the Caribbean, through culture and increased understanding between the region and the rest of the world, particularly the United States. Cultural Programs at headquarters feature new as well as established talent from the region. Recognition granted by Washington, D.C. audiences and press often helps propel the careers of new artists. The center also sponsors lectures on Latin American and Caribbean history and culture, and supports cultural undertakings in the Washington, D.C. area for the local Latin American and Caribbean communities, such as Spanish-language theater, film festivals, and other events. The IDB Cultural Center Exhibitions and the Inter-American Concert, Lecture and Film Series stimulate dialogue and a greater knowledge of the culture of the Americas. The Cultural Development Program funds projects in the fields of youth cultural development, institutional support, restoration and conservation of cultural patrimony, and the preservation of cultural traditions. The IDB Art Collection, gathered over several decades, is managed by the Cultural Center and reflects the relevance and importance the bank has achieved after four decades as the leading financial institution concerned with the development of Latin America and the Caribbean.

68


EXHIBITION COMMITTEE Felix Ángel Curator of the Exhibition Sara Hermann Visual Arts Advisor Eduardo León Jimenes Cultural Center Santiago de los Caballeros, Dominican Republic Advisor and Essay Contributor Marianne de Tolentino Art Critic Member of the Administrative Council of the International Association of Art Critics, and Director of the Cariforo Cultural Center Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic Advisor and Essay Contributor Ada Hernández Cultural Attaché Embassy of the Dominican Republic in Washington, D.C. Advisor

• Larry Hanlon and Lilia Mosconi English and Spanish Translators Michael Harrup and Rolando Trozzi English and Spanish Editors Lisa A. Schreiber Catalogue Designer Photographs provided by the participant artists.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The IDB Cultural Center would like to thank all the artists who were invited to present their portfolios during the pre-selection process.


INTER-AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT BANK CULTURAL CENTER GALLERY

1300 New York Avenue, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20577 Tel. 202 623 3774 • Fax 202 623 3192 e-mail IDBCC@iadb.org

www.iadb.org/cultural

August 25 to November 7, 2008 Monday - Friday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Cert no. SW-COC-002589


inside and out: recent trends in the arts of the dominican republic