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snow much fun! Winter 2013 icmags.com

Special Section: Health & Wellness Page 13

Township News Page 33


Contents winter

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features 13 Special Section: Health & Wellness How to live a healthier, happier, longer life.

28 How Will You AJO? Buying coffee becomes an act of charity and global awareness.

30 Lucy’s First Steps After losing their daughter, Lesley and Pete Mitchell now help others who have lost a child.

13 on the cover It’s the most wonderful time…to stay fit. Winter sports abound in western Pennsylvania, but if you prefer indoor workouts, we’ve provided several local fitness centers and classes in our Health & Wellness section so you can stay fit, motivated and warm this season.

departments 2 7

From the Publisher IN the Loop

33 56

Township News INCognito

sponsored content Industry Insights 5 Senior Living: Brevillier Village 11 Your Finances: Widget Financial

24 Your Health: The Circulatory Center

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IN Community is a publication dedicated to representing, encouraging and promoting the Millcreek area and its comprising municipalities by focusing on the talents and gifts of the people who live and work here. Our goal is to provide readers with the most informative and professional regional publication in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.


FROM THE

PUBLISHER PUBLISHER Wayne Dollard EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Julie Talerico j.talerico@icmags.com REGIONAL EDITORS Mark Berton [South, West and Erie] m.berton@icmags.com

At Seven Springs with my wife Lisa and our three sons.

Top-notch health care, education, banking and technology are what make Erie known, but our communities are what make us home. Home – where you live, go to school, shop, work and play – is what IN Community Magazines is all about. Each quarter, we bring you the latest news and information about schools, businesses, nonprofits and the people who make them exceptional. We also bring you coverage of interesting events and articles about historical sites you may pass every day without even knowing. We like to surprise you with little-known facts about your community and profile intriguing people who’ve made their mark locally – and sometimes even globally. One thing that makes our communities in western Pennsylvania special is the beautiful seasons. As autumn comes to an end and the snow begins to fall, we hope you take some time to enjoy the many winter activities our area has to offer and hit the slopes, sled ride, cross-country ski or ice skate at one of our many beautiful parks. Or simply build a snowman in the backyard! The staff at IN Community Magazines wishes you and your family a wonderful holiday season and a happy, healthy New Year!

Wayne Dollard Publisher

Send Us Your Story Ideas!

To Advertise

We’d love to hear from you if you know someone in your community who is making a difference or has done something extraordinary. We’re also looking for interesting story ideas (little-known facts, history or other news) within your community.

As the largest magazine publisher in Western Pennsylvania, IN Community Magazines are direct mailed to more than 518,000 households, reaching 1.15 million readers. If you’d like to partner with us, please contact our general sales manager, Tamara Myers, at sales@icmags.com.

If you have suggestions, email us at editors@icmags.com.

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Pamela Palongue [North and East] p.palongue@icmags.com OFFICE MANAGER Leo Vighetti l.vighetti@icmags.com ADVERTISING COORDINATOR Debbie Mountain d.mountain@icmags.com DESIGN DIRECTOR Michael Miller m.miller@icmags.com DESIGNERS Cassie Brkich Jim Paladino Melissa St. Giles Anna Buzzelli Tamara Tylenda Sharon Cobb Jan McEvoy Contributing Writers Jonathan Barnes Leigh Lyons Jennifer Brozak Joanne Naser Earl Bugaile Melanie Paulick Tracy Fedkoe Melissa Rayworth Brenda Haines-Cosola Marilyn Wempa Elvira Hoff Mandie Zoller Heather Holtschlag Contributing Photographers Ginni Klein Kathleen Rudolph Evan Sanders Jennifer Steenson Primetime Shots Gary Zak GENERAL SALES MANAGER Tamara Myers t.myers@icmags.com SALES MANAGER Brian McKee b.mckee@icmags.com ADVERTISING SALES Sophia Alfaras Holly Hicks-Opperman Pamela Arder Aimee Nicolia Nikki Capezio-Watson Connie McDaniel Jennifer Dahlem Gabriel Negri Tina Dollard Vincent Sabatini Julie Graff Michael Silvert Robin Guest RJ Vighetti ICM Printing Sales Manager Tom Poljak ©2013 by IN Community Magazines. All rights reserved. Reproduction or reuse of any part of this publication is prohibited without the written permission of the publisher. Direct all inquiries, letters to the editor and press releases to:

IN Community Magazines 603 East McMurray Road McMurray, PA 15317 724.942.0940; Fax: 724.942.0968 icmags.com Please recycle this magazine when you are through enjoying it.


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INDUSTRY INSIGHT

Senior Living

Sponsored Content

Home Community Based Services Keep People Independent By Lisa Anderson, Vice President of Community Outreach, Brevillier Village

M

any have heard it before: “You will have to drag me out of my house kicking and screaming.” Or, “I don’t want to leave my house. This is my home.” Our homes are our retreat. It is where we go to unwind at the end of a busy day. It is a source of comfort, security and protection. Imagine living in a house for 50+ years where you were newly married, raised your family, and had your grandchildren visit. Now imagine getting older and the upkeep of the house and other activities of daily living becoming very difficult and cumbersome. As a family member or loved one, imagine that person descending the stairs to the basement with a basket of laundry, or getting in and out of the bathtub, falling and unable to get up to call for help. Or, not making hot, nutritious meals to eat because he/she doesn’t want to go to the trouble of cooking for one person.

Sue Czarnecki, Brevillier Home Care Aide, assists Freda Shaffer with some grocery shopping from the lower shelves at the store.

These scenarios occur in the community every single day. Several years ago a person who was unable to maintain his independence at home was admitted to a nursing home or personal care home. Today, however there are so many more alternatives and services available in the community to keep people independent. Skilled home health care agencies are numerous throughout the area and can provide skilled nursing care, physical, speech and occupational therapies, social work services and even a nurse’s aide. These services are short term and must be ordered by a physician. Home health services are ordered primarily when someone is discharged from the hospital or a skilled nursing facility. Care providers will monitor a medical condition, educate on a new diagnosis and strengthen the participant through skilled therapies. Home health is a great transition from a facility back to home. How about everyday activities in the home when there is no skilled need? The options are endless. Non-medical home care programs can provide services such as meal preparation, housekeeping, laundry, errands, grocery shopping, medication reminders, bathing and light personal care. Usually, when an older person starts to show some decline with age, his or her personal appearance and the housekeeping duties are the first things to slide. By incorporating non-medical services into the home, it relieves the burden of these everyday tasks that have to be done. And, it keeps the person safe in her home. Examples? Participants don’t need to go down basement stairs to do laundry. They don’t have to get in and out of a bathtub by themselves. They won’t risk a fall by pushing a vacuum. When life becomes too hard, that is when accidents occur, and that is when alternative housing arrangements need to be made. By utilizing home care services, the risk of accidents decreases and maximum independence is achieved. The person has more time to engage in activity that is enjoyable. And loved ones have more peace of mind knowing their loved one is being cared for and checked on regularly. If you would like more information on non-medical home care services, please contact Kristin Laine, director of admissions at Brevillier Village, at 814.899.8600. Millcreek | Winter 2013 | icmags.com 5


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in the

Loop What’s news in Millcreek

Grants Awarded to Restore, Protect Pennsylvania’s Coastal Zones

The Corbett Administration has awarded more than $800,000 in annual coastal zone management grants to organizations dedicated to protecting and preserving Pennsylvania’s coastal zones along Lake Erie. “These grants play a crucial role to ensure that Pennsylvania’s coastal areas continue to thrive,” acting Department of Environmental Protection Secretary Chris Abruzzo said. “We are thrilled to be able to support projects that positively impact the environment and enhance Pennsylvania’s natural beauty.” The annual grants, largely funded by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), were awarded to 19 non-profit and government organizations in counties that border Pennsylvania’s coastal zones or have a direct impact on water quality in those areas. NOAA is a federal agency under the Department of Commerce with programs in each state that work to inform residents of the changing impacts of weather and water resources. In Pennsylvania, those programs include the National Ocean Service and National Weather Service. Coastal zone management grants support programs that measure the impact of various pollution sources, improve public access, preserve habitats and educate the public about the benefits of the state’s coastal zones. Coastal zones and adjacent shore land face increasing pressure from development, erosion, biodiversity losses and pollution. Pennsylvania’s two coastal areas are a 112-

mile stretch along the Delaware Estuary and 76 miles along Lake Erie. The Lake Erie coastal zone is in Erie County and includes several major tributaries’ shorelines. Erie County City of Erie - $45,000 to complete Phase II of a comprehensive plan for the City of Erie; County of Erie - $71,000 for coordination and technical assistance with Lake Erie coastal zone projects; County of Erie - $9,000 to administratively assist Lake Erie coastal communities required to administer bluff setback ordinances;

Erie County Conservation District $27,000 to develop a master site plan to provide guidance for the direction and future growth of Headwaters Park and its Best Management Practices (BMPs); Erie County Conservation District $22,500 to implement and track coastal non-point pollution program management measures; Erie Times-News in Education $38,760 for a recurring Newspaper in Education weekly page focusing on coastal zone environmental issues; Lawrence Park Township - $21,500 to construct a 1,600-foot, ADA accessible trail from Lake Cliff Park to Lakeside Boat Launch/Beach;

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in the

Loop

McKean Township - $15,000 to update the McKean Area Comprehensive Plan with McKean Borough; and Regional Science Consortium $49,525 to quantify yellow perch and walleye mortalities through improved monitoring and recommended management strategies to reduce the mortality rate.

Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP)

The Department of Public Welfare kicked off the start of the Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP) application process for 2013-14. LIHEAP provides assistance for home heating bills to keep low-income Pennsylvanians warm and safe during the winter months. “LIHEAP offers assistance to millions of Pennsylvania families and individuals to help them make ends meet, something that

is of great importance in these challenging economic times,” said Department of Public Welfare Secretary Beverly Mackereth. “Apply now to be certain your home is heated when the frigid temperatures arrive.” Online applications can be completed by visiting www.compass.state.pa.us. Paper applications are still available through local county assistance offices, or interested applicants can download and print an application from the department’s website. For helpful tips on how to keep your home warm throughout the winter, while saving money on utility costs, the department suggests visiting www. energysavers.gov. For more information on the LIHEAP program, or to download an application, visit the Department of Public Welfare website at www.dpw.state.pa.us and click on “For Adults.”

PennDOT Ready for Winter Travel, Motorists Urged to Prepare for Season

PennDOT Secretary Barry J. Schoch called on motorists to join the department in its efforts to keep roadways safe through the upcoming season. PennDOT has 5,400 operators and more than 2,250 trucks ready to maintain more than 40,000 miles of state-maintained roadway or 96,000 snow lane miles – enough miles to circle the globe nearly four

times. A snow-lane is calculated as the miles of road multiplied by the number of lanes; which means a one-mile section of four-lane roadway would equal four snow-lane miles. “With our roadways and roughly 25,000 bridges combined, PennDOT is responsible for 96,000 snow-lane miles. That is an enormous undertaking to keep the public safe regardless of what winter throws our way,” Schoch said. “Drivers too play a key role in making sure that we all get home safely, so preparing for winter driving is essential.” During storms, interstates and expressways are PennDOT’s primary focus 8 724.942.0940 to advertise | Millcreek

and equipment may be redirected to these routes during significant winter events. During heavier storms, motorists may find deeper accumulations on less-traveled routes and should adjust their driving for those conditions. If motorists encounter snow or icecovered roads, they should slow down, increase their following distance and avoid distractions. Last winter, there were 427 crashes resulting in two fatalities and 130 injuries on snowy, slushy or ice-covered roadways where aggressive-driving behaviors such as speeding or making careless lane changes were factors in the crash. Motorists should carry an emergency kit including items such as non-perishable food, water, first-aid supplies, warm clothes, a blanket, cell phone charger and a small snow shovel. However, motorists should tailor their kits to any specific needs that they or their families may have. Consider adding such items as baby supplies, extra medication, pet supplies, or even children’s games. Last winter, PennDOT used more than 901,574 tons of salt on state-owned roads. Currently, PennDOT has approximately 550,000 tons of salt stockpiled and will continue to take salt deliveries throughout the winter. Motorists can check road conditions on more than 2,900 miles of state roads by visiting www.511PA.com. 511PA, which is free and available 24 hours a day, provides traffic delay warnings, weather forecasts, average traffic speeds on urban interstates and access to more than 650 traffic cameras. 511PA also provides easy-to-use, colorcoded winter road conditions for all interstates and other routes covered in the 511 reporting network. Access to 511PA is also available by calling 5-1-1. For more information on PennDOT’s winter preparations and additional winterdriving resources for motorists, visit the department’s “Ready for Winter” website at www.dot.state.pa.us/winter.


Burton Funeral Homes Serving Families in West & East Millcreek Burton’s has served Millcreek Township families for generations. In West Millcreek, look for the Burton Westlake Funeral Home at 26th & Powell. The experienced staff offers caring guidance in arranging funerals, grief support counseling, and free pre-planning assistance. There is a beautiful chapel conveniently on site for people of all faiths. Ericson Memorial Studios, which crafts monuments, headstones and markers, is adjacent to the funeral home. Pet Loss Services by Burton is also close by. In East Millcreek, look for the Burton Wintergreen Funeral Home across from Wintergreen Gorge Cemetery on Norcross Road. The eastside branch offers expert guidance arranging funerals and preplanning. There is an all-faith chapel and Ericson Memorial Studios has a office on site. The Wintergreen funeral home sits amid Whispering Pines Cremation Garden, a beautifully landscaped woodland garden for the cremated remains of loved ones. Get more information by calling 814.838.0596 (West Millcreek) or 814.825.0458 (East Millcreek). Visit Burton online at BurtonFuneralHomes.com.

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Great Ways to Live a Healthier, Happier, Longer Life in Millcreek

Millcreek Health & Wellness Section By Michele Thompson

Though finding the fountain of youth (or miracle product) is unlikely, you can embrace the following ways to feel and look younger. Gleaned from age-defying experts this list is a must-keep for your desk or refrigerator.

So turn the page — hack into the havoc that aging can wreak on your body! ››

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H e a l t h & W e l l n e s s / Millcreek

Health & Fitness Exercise to live longer. Millcreek has many walking and biking trails to help you stay fit. According to the American Council on Exercise (ACE), regular exercise helps control blood pressure, body weight and cholesterol levels, and reduces the risks of hardening of the arteries, heart attack and stroke. Not to mention you will look and feel better! Warm up and cool down. Regardless of the types of exercises you do, warming your muscles as well as cooling down with slow rhythmic stretches is key to avoiding injury, reducing soreness, and speeding up your recovery. Commit to daily fitness. Getting out there and staying active translates into better health and well-being — both physically and mentally. Focus on total fitness. ACE recommends aerobics and muscular conditioning along with exercises to stretch your body and promote good posture. Year-round exercise. Don’t ditch your fitness routine because of inclement weather. Try new activities, such as snowshoeing, swimming at an indoor pool, or fitness classes at your local fitness or senior housing facility. Join a health club. Be social and get fit. This one’s worth its weight in sheer motivation points.

Take supplements. Don’t mega-dose, just take a daily multivitamin and mineral supplement. Get aerobic. The American College of Sports Medicine recommends getting moderate aerobic activity 30 minutes per day, five days per week or 20 minutes of vigorous cardiovascular activity, three days per week. Break it up. Instead of 20 or 30 minutes of exercise, break up your cardio into 10-minute segments throughout the day. Make working out fun. Getting out of the house and traveling to interesting places where you can walk around is one of the best ways to get exercise without even trying, and you get to enjoy the sightseeing, too. Put a set of dumbbells by your television set — and use them!

Stop smoking. Nuff said.

Pump it up. Margaret Richardson, author of Body Electric, says one pound of fat burns three calories a day while one pound of muscle burns 30-plus.

Go green. Eat organic, use eco-friendly products and practice green living to protect your health as well as the environment.

Challenge yourself. To counteract age-related muscle loss, do exercises with progressively challenging resistance.

“Swimming is relaxing, easy on the joints and a great way to stay fit during the winter,” said Londa Cirillo, secretary to the director of the parks department for Millcreek Township.

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H e a l t h & W e l l n e s s / Millcreek

Cognitive Boosters Music therapy. Music can regulate mood, decrease aggression and depression, improve sleep, and, because old songs are stored in memory, even create new brain cells. Brain food. Keep your mind sharp by eating salmon, nuts, olive oil, soy, meat, eggs, dairy, leafy greens, beans, oatmeal and dark skinned fruits.

P

Train your brain Working a daily crossword, Sudoku puzzle or another brain teasing game can help improve your mental fitness.

Oral Health & Hearing Brush and floss your teeth. According to research, chronic inflammation caused by periodontal disease has been linked to a greater risk of cardiovascular disease. Turn it down. According to the House Ear Institute, noiseinduced hearing loss is a leading cause of permanent hearing loss that can be prevented by turning down the volume on your TV, radio, or headsets to a level that you can comfortably hear.

P Practice healthy sleeping habits. Not getting enough nightly rest puts you at risk for accidents, depression and other illnesses, and it decreases your quality of life.

Posture Avoid sitting cross-legged. Pain management specialists at New York Chiropractic warn that crossing your legs puts excessive stress on your knees, hips and lower back. Sit up straight. When you slouch or strain to look at the screen, these patterns stick and posture learns these positions. Listen to your body. See a chiropractor, physical therapist or post-rehabilitation specialist for postural exercises to reduce pain and risk of injury. Stretch. Stretching your neck and chest can prevent short and tightened muscles that can lead to injury. A simple stretch involves bending your head to your shoulder, holding it there and slowly bringing it back to the mid line and then switch sides. Belly button to spine. Not only will this exercise help you stand taller, it will take five pounds off your waistline! Head up. Instead of scrunching your head to your shoulder to hold the phone, get a headset and avoid injury to your neck and shoulders.

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H e a l t h & W e l l n e s s / Millcreek

Eat Healthy Eat an anti-inflammatory diet. Holistic guru Dr. Andrew Weil recommends eating a diet high in fresh fruits and vegetables and minimal processed foods to reduce inflammation in your body.

Eat and drink coconut. The type of saturated fat in coconuts does not contribute to heart disease and it is rich in lauric acid, which boosts your immune system.

Eat all natural. Avoid high-calorie foods full of sugar, fat and

primarily derived from animal products, and trans fats, which are used in commercial fried foods, margarines, and baked goods like cookies and crackers.

artificial ingredients and concentrate on eating high-nutrient, high-flavor foods such as fruits, vegetables, herbs and spices.

Eat many small meals. Eat something every three hours to keep your metabolism high and your blood sugar and insulin levels steady. Don’t skip breakfast. The easiest meal to skip but the most important. Eat something small, even if you aren’t hungry.

Read labels. Opt for products with at least three grams of fiber, low sugars and no hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated oils. Eat less and live longer. Maoshing Ni, author of Secrets of Longevity: Hundreds of Ways to Live to be 100, suggests the “three-quarters rule,” essentially not eating any more after you feel three-quarters full.

Avoid bad fats. Bad fats include saturated fats, which are

Spice it up. Dr. Wendy Bazilian, author of The SuperFoodsRx Diet: Lose Weight with the Power of SuperNutrients, recommends high-antioxidant spices and herbs such as cinnamon, ginger, curry, rosemary, thyme, oregano and red pepper.

Drink up. Drinking water throughout the day can decrease your urges for sweets, lower your cholesterol and blood pressure, minimize pain associated with arthritis, migraines, and colitis, hydrate your skin, and help with your digestion. Limit your alcohol intake to one or two drinks per day. According to the Centers for Disease Control, too much alcohol can increase your risk for developing various diseases and physiological and social problems.

Drink tea. Ni recommends daily tea because tea is a proven preventive and treatment for hardening of the arteries and has potent antioxidant powers.

Sideline the soda. The phosphoric acid in carbonated beverages, particularly colas, can put you at risk for osteoporosis.

Slim down with soup. People who eat soup before a meal reduce the total number of calories they consume. Sink your teeth into superfoods. Experts say superfoods can help ward off heart disease, cancer, diabetes, cholesterol, bad moods, high blood pressure, and improve digestion, skin, hair, nails, bones and teeth. Superfoods recommended by WebMD.com are beans, blueberries, broccoli, oats, oranges, pumpkin, salmon, soy, spinach, green and black tea, tomatoes, turkey, walnuts and yogurt.

Drink red wine. Red wine is renowned for its many health benefits, primarily for the heart. However, new research from the Institute of Food suggests that wine may also protect you from potentially fatal food-borne pathogens, such as E. coli, salmonella, listeria, and H. pylori.

Eat more healthy fats. According to University of Michigan Integrative Medicine, healthy fats to include in your diet are monounsaturated fats, found in vegetable oils, nuts, seeds and some plant foods as well as polyunsaturated fats, like omega-3s found in fatty fish and omega-6s found in nuts.

Marinate your meat. Research from the Food Safety Consortium recommends marinades with rosemary, thyme, peppers, allspice, oregano, basil, garlic and onion to cut down on carcinogens.

P Eat a variety

Eating a variety of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean proteins, dairy, and omega-3 fats better ensures you get all the nutrients your body needs. Millcreek | Winter 2013 | icmags.com 17


A relatively new approach to gynecological surgery is revolutionizing the standard of care in obstetrics and gynecology. daVinci is a technology that enhances a surgeon’s capabilities while offering patients the benefits of minimally invasive surgery, such as less surgical trauma, smaller incisions and a faster recovery time. “daVinci is like an extension of the surgeon’s hands,” said Shannon McGranahan, MD, a board-certified obstetrician and gynecologist at St. Clair. “It can mimic the natural movements of my hand while causing less bleeding, less pain and fewer complications than traditional surgery.” Gynecological procedures being performed with daVinci include hysterectomies, which is the most common utilization; complicated hysterectomies; pelvic pain present with endometriosis; and myomectomies, or 18 724.942.0940 to advertise | Millcreek

removal of fibroids. daVinci also is being used across many other disciplines as well, including urology, colorectal surgery and thoracic surgery. “In the past, surgery such as hysterectomy would require an extended recovery period of several weeks or more, which is a large reason why many women procrastinated with their care. The long recovery interfered with their daily responsibilities,” Dr. McGranahan said. “Surgery performed with daVinci, however, usually requires only one overnight stay in the hospital, and the woman can return to work in about one to two weeks.” A common patient misconception, however, is that daVinci is a programmed robot that will be performing the surgery. “That’s simply not true,” Dr. McGranahan noted. “Boardcertified surgeons are still managing and performing the operation. daVinci is there to enhance their capabilities.”


Protect Young Athletes

symptoms of a concussion Difficulty concentrating Difficulty completing tasks Changes in behavior

The risks of sports-related traumatic brain injuries among professional athletes are making national headlines. However, prevention should begin at childhood, especially among those involved in contact sports. Each year, approximately 300,000 people in the United States experience sports-related concussions. A concussion is a type of traumatic brain injury most often caused by a sudden bump or blow to the head or other parts of the body. It also can be caused by a fall. As a result of the sudden impact, the brain moves around in the skull causing chemical changes. These changes make the brain more sensitive to stress and other injuries until it fully recovers. In addition, the immature brain of a young athlete is known to take longer to recover. Most people who have experienced a concussion realize that something is wrong, however, the symptoms can be tricky, so those around the injured person must pay close attention for the warning signs. This is especially apparent among football players who are conditioned to being knocked down and getting back up again, only to realize later that they’ve been hurt. Many athletic directors for public schools require that

Worsening headache Persistent double vision Excessive drowsiness Stroke-like symptoms athletes who participate in “high-risk” sports must have a baseline neurocognitive test before their first contact football practice, within the first week of cheerleading or before the first game for other sports. Although treatment for concussions is individualized, almost all physicians recommend physical and mental rest immediately after the injury. This includes no texting, video games, TV, reading or physical activity. It’s also important to understand that medications will mask the pain and do not heal the brain. In fact, anti-inflammatory medications can be dangerous because they increase the risk of bleeding. However, there are situations where medications are warranted. It is paramount to have an evaluation and obtain clearance by a physician experienced in diagnosing and treating concussions before returning to sports activities.

Source: UCF Pegasus Health/UCF College of Medicine

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H e a l t h & W e l l n e s s / Millcreek

Fighting Childhood Obesity With a Passport to Better Health By Aimee Nicolia In 1980 the number of children and adolescents in the U.S. who were considered to be obese was only about a third of what it is today. Now, approximately 1 out of 6 children are obese. In an effort to combat this epidemic, First Lady Michelle Obama developed a national program called Let’s Move! Its goal is to encourage individuals and families to increase physical activities and set healthy lifestyle goals. In Erie County, that initiative was taken a step further. The Erie County Department of Health, along with Visit Erie and Erie Yesterday, developed a program to get kids moving, while at the same time exercising their brains. Let’s Move Outside! Erie County Recreational Passport promotes hiking or biking along a series of trails throughout Erie County. In addition, it fosters an appreciation of local history and culture by identifying historical landmarks that can be seen along the route or nearby, as well as local points of interest. “We’ve tried to create a resource for families to get outside and walk in a way that appeals to both kids and adults,” says Melinda Meyer, coordinator of the LMO Passport. “It makes history fun, by having the trails pass through historic sites.” Also found along each trail are public works of art, created by local artist Tom Ferraro, with the help of students from 20 724.942.0940 to advertise | Millcreek

schools throughout the county. In all, 250 kids took part in helping to design these trail markers. For example, the markers found along the trails in Girard, Pleasant Ridge Park and Albion were created with the help of students from Girard High School, Fairview High School, and Northwestern High School respectively. While students from Clark Elementary and Iroquois High School contributed to the trail markers found along the Harborcreek Community Park Trail and the Lawrence Park Trail. This was the second year for the LMO Passport program, which was introduced in 2012 with 10 trails, located throughout the county in both rural and urban settings. Five additional trails were added to the LMO Passport this year for a total of 15 trails. Each trail found on the passport brochure is intended to be easily accessible to walkers, strollers and in most cases bicycles. The trail lengths range from about a half-mile to approximately 5 miles. The passport includes directions to and around the trails, with information such as trail amenities, surface (paved or natural), and difficulty rating. LMO Passports can be obtained at a number of Erie County locations, including the Blasco Library and branch libraries, City Hall, the Tom Ridge Environmental Center, museums,

letsmoveoutside.org

and township and borough buildings. Passports can also be downloaded from the website www.letsmoveoutside.org. While using the passports and hiking trails at any time of the year is absolutely encouraged, there is also a special contest that runs from May through October for folks who have completed each and every trail. The contest provides a scavenger hunt component to the passport, adding to the fun. On each trail, participants can hunt down the trail marker and find a tendigit passkey and write it in their passport. Later participants enter the passkeys on the project website to be entered into the grand prize drawing. Another fun activity along the trails is letterboxing, a hobby that involves tracking down a box that contains a rubber stamp and recording the stamp in a journal. The Girl Scouts of Western Pennsylvania placed 10 letterboxes along the trails. According to Melinda Meyer, LMO Passport coordinator, the Erie County Recreational Passport program is entirely funded by local sponsors. Among this year’s grand prizes were a cabin stay at Camp Sherwin donated by the YMCA, and a bicycle donated by Lake County Bike. “We’ll be broadening the scope of the program in 2014, with additions we’ll reveal soon,” said Meyer. And although she wouldn’t divulge what that might include, she did hint that plans are “rolling along nicely.”


H e a l t h & W e l l n e s s / Millcreek

Stress Control Smile. Smiling lowers blood pressure, heart rate, and the stress hormone cortisol.

Aromatherapy. Essential oils improve your mood, reduce stress and even improve your memory. Try lavender, lemongrass, cinnamon or cedarwood. Being outdoors with green plants, fresh air and the sounds of nature is a proven stress buster.

Yoga. The Mayo Clinic recommends practicing yoga to reduce stress and anxiety.

Get kneaded. Research from the Touch Research Institute indicates that regular massage lowers heart rate, blood pressure, anxiety levels, depression, hostility, and the stress hormone cortisol.

See a therapist. Mental health professionals can help you deal with stress.

Begin with breathing. The first thing you ever did for yourself was breathe. And consciously focusing on your breath remains the epitome of self-care throughout your entire life.

P Humor your stress Laughing improves circulation, lowers blood pressure, releases tension, and improves your immune system.

Reprinted with the permission from SeniorsForLife.com

Let nature take your stress away.

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Get Fit In Millcreek Here are just some of the fitness classes available:

Millcreek Recreation and Parks Commission Water Aerobics

McDowell Intermediate High School Pool, 3320 Caughey Rd.,; 814.835.4122 millcreektownship.com Take advantage of an eight-week Water Aerobics class, starting on January 7, for just $40! Call or visit the website for registration, regulations and scheduling information on this and other affordable fitness programs offered.

Ice Center of Erie

3515 McClelland Ave., Erie; 814.899.0808 erieice.com Get fit and have fun together on an ice skating date at the Ice Center on most Friday and Saturday evenings! The cost is approximately $8 each per public skating session, which includes admission and skate rental. Call or check the website for available dates and times.

YogaErie, LLC

2560 West Eighth St., Colony Plaza, Erie; 814.520.6998 yogaerie.com

Presque Isle State Park

301 Peninsula Dr., Erie; 814.833.7424 presqueisle.org Dust off your hiking boots, snow shoes or cross-country skis and “experience the natural wonders of Presque Isle during the winter months. Look for the impressive ice dunes, formed by the combination of lake ice, wave surge and freezing spray. Take a walk along the beach and you will likely see animal footprints in the snow.” Call or visit the website for more information on planning your winter fitness adventure!

Zumba at Dance Vibe Studio, Inc.

2307 West 12th St., Erie; 814.455.2250 dancevibestudio.com “Zumba is all about fun and an exciting Latin-inspired dance fitness program. It’s an exhilarating, effective, step-by-step, calorie-burning dance fitness class fun that’s moving millions of people toward happiness and a healthy lifestyle.” Take advantage of a pay-as-you-go Zumba class for just $6, or an eight-week session for $40! Visit the website or call for class schedule and other information.

Try hot, power flow yoga, basics yoga or deep flow yoga at YogaErie, LLC, voted Erie’s Best Yoga Studio in 2013! New students who live locally can take advantage of trying their first class for free or two weeks of unlimited yoga for $25. Call or visit the website for restrictions and more information.

Millcreek | Winter 2013 | icmags.com 23


24 724.942.0940 to advertise | Millcreek


Say What? Your mother was right when she warned you that loud music could damage your hearing, but now scientists have discovered exactly what gets damaged and how. In a research report published in the September 2013 issue of The FASEB Journal, scientists describe exactly what type of damage noise does to the inner ear, and provide insights into a compound that may prevent noise-related damage. “Noise-induced hearing loss with accompanying tinnitus and sound hypersensitivity is a common condition which leads to communication problems and social isolation,” said Xiaorui Shi, M.D., Ph.D., study author from the Department of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery at the Oregon Hearing Research Center at Oregon Health and Science University. “The goal of our study is to understand the molecular mechanisms well enough to mitigate damage from exposure to loud sound.” To make this discovery, Shi and colleagues used three groups of six- to eight-week-old mice, which consisted of a control group, a group exposed to broadband noise at 120 decibels for

three hours a day for two days, and a third group given singledose injections of pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) prior to noise exposure. PEDF is a protein found in vertebrates that is currently being researched for the treatment of diseases like heart disease and cancer. The cells that secrete PEDF in control animals showed a characteristic branched morphology, with the cells arranging in a self-avoidance pattern which provided good coverage of the capillary wall. The morphology of the same cells in the animals exposed to wide-band noise, however, showed clear differences - noise exposure caused changes in melanocytes located in the inner ear. “Hearing loss over time robs people of their quality of life,” said Gerald Weissmann, M.D., editor-in-chief of The FASEB Journal. “It’s easy to say that we should avoid loud noises, but in reality, this is not always possible. Front-line soldiers or first responders do not have time to worry about the long-term effects of loud noise when they are giving their all. If, however, a drug could be developed to minimize the negative effects of loud noises, it would benefit one and all.”

Source: Medical News Today

Millcreek | Winter 2013 | icmags.com 25


health &Wellness DIRECTORY Brevillier Village 814.899.8600 • www.brevillier.org

The Exercise Store 814.453.5348 • www.exerstore.com

Brevillier Village is a housing and health care community for older adults that sits on 17 acres of lakefront property in Harborcreek Township. It consists of Ball Pavilion, Barnabas Court North and South and Conrad House. Just added to the list of services is the Brevillier Village Home Care Program. Now, residents living at home can enjoy the quality of Brevillier Village services right at home. Call 814.899.8600 for more details.

The Exercise Store has been supplying the home and commercial market with top quality fitness equipment for over 17 years. We are a locally owned family operated company that listens to your needs and matches you with the exercise equipment that will help you reach your goals. Stop by and see that The Exercise Store truly believes in fitness for Every Body.

LECOM lecomtotalhealth.com

Manchester Commons 814.838.9191 • ManchesterCommons.org

The Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine (LECOM) is part of a growing Academic Health Center. With Millcreek Community Hospital (MCH) and Medical Associates of Erie (MAE), the college is the core of a highly innovative medical education and health care system. LECOM has endeavored to add to the quality of life of our neighbors by bringing total health care to the community.

Here’s a place that feels like home. At Manchester Commons you can choose from a complete range of senior living options, including independent living, personal care, skilled nursing or short-term rehabilitation. Our community also is home to Woodside at Manchester Commons, a dedicated neighborhood for those with Alzheimer’s and other related dementia. Learn more and schedule a visit at www.ManchesterCommons.org.

Peach Street Dental 814.866.7500 • www.PeachStreetDental.com

Saint Mary’s Home of Erie 814.459.0621 • www.stmaryshome.org

Now you don’t have to worry about having the time and money for quality dental and denture care – Peach Street Dental & Dentures in Erie, PA makes it easy. As Erie’s hometown choice for dentures and general dentistry, we are committed to providing you with outstanding service and value, including free new patient exams and x-rays, and flexible payment plans. Schedule an appointment at www. PeachStreetDental.com.

Saint Mary’s Home of Erie has served the Erie community for more than 129 years. As a Catholic Continuing Care Retirement Community, we are proud to offer faith-based care. Saint Mary’s residential and nursing services offer all private rooms that include linen, laundry and housekeeping services. Residents also enjoy full course meals at breakfast, lunch and dinner with restaurant style dining. Call one of our campuses today to find out how our services can benefit you or a loved one.

Tri-State Pain Institute 814.833.7246 • www.TriStatePain.com

Westlake Woods/LSJ & Gray Inc. 814.835.0330 • LifeServicesAssistedLiving.com

For advanced treatment and proven relief, turn to the Pain Institute. Our specialists work with you to avoid unnecessary surgery, prevent problems with addicting medications and help you return to the activities you enjoy. And if you need x-rays, MRI or fluoroscopy the Greater Erie Imaging Center offers convenient services adjacent to the Pain Institute. Schedule an appointment at www.TriStatePain.com.

Westlake Woods, the Erie area’s only licensed assisted living community, has been delivering excellent care for seniors for more than 15 years. One simple monthly fee provides a beautiful, private apartment home and superior personal care from our trained caregivers and nurses. It’s a caring atmosphere our seniors appreciate—at the only assisted living community in the area licensed by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

26 724.942.0940 to advertise | Millcreek


How will you

AJO? By Aimee Nicolia Alyssa Josephine O’Neill’s initials have taken on a whole new meaning since the beginning of September. In fact, the letters AJO have evolved into a verb, most closely defined as “paying it forward.” In what was to be the beginning of her freshman year at Penn State Behrend, Alyssa suffered an epileptic seizure while in the shower. Sadly, it turned out to be fatal. But in the wake of her death, her parents, Sarah and Jason O’Neill, were determined that Alyssa’s life would not be in vain. They remembered her simple request for a Pumpkin Spice Latte just one day before she died. So they went to a local Starbucks shop and paid enough for the next 40 customers to receive a free Pumpkin Spice Latte. They only asked that “#AJO” be written on the side of the cups to direct the recipients to a website set up in Alyssa’s memory with the goal of increasing epilepsy awareness. What they could never have anticipated was how their random act of kindness would spark a movement that took on a life of its own. In the days and weeks that followed, not only were Starbucks and the original coffee drinkers inspired to make their own donations, but as the word spread via social media, so did the pay-it-forward acts. In a very short time the movement grew exponentially. Coffee cups with the letters AJO were spotted throughout the country and even in places as far away as Australia, Germany, India and Afghanistan. It prompted 28 724.942.0940 to advertise | Millcreek

Buying coffee becomes an act of charity and global awareness.

charitable acts by complete strangers everywhere. With support coming from all around the globe, nowhere could it be felt stronger than in Alyssa’s own community and from the school she loved. She graduated in 2013 from McDowell High School, where she had been an honor student and a cheerleader for football and basketball, as well as a member of the Competitive Cheer Team traveling around the county. Jason has been astounded by the response. “We feel so blessed to have this kind of support from friends, her school and our community. We know that if Alyssa were looking down she would say the same and she would be smiling. It has been more than two months and we still cannot believe the support. It feels very good to know what an impact she made.” The O’Neills also have been both touched and surprised by some of the many random acts of kindness done in Alyssa’s memory. In addition to paying for other people’s coffee, folks have stepped forward to buy complete meals, and to find their own ways to help others. “Someone bought all of the white tube socks at Walmart and donated them to a mission for the needy,” says Jason. “And people have paid off Christmas layaways anonymously for others. It is just incredible what people are doing to pay it forward!” Sarah and Jason firmly believe that the pay-it-forward movement can make a real difference. “If just a few people do acts of kindness like this every day, it makes Erie a better place,” said Jason. “People are


Jason and Sarah knew very little about the condition. “I had trouble even spelling it,” Jason laughed. “People have a lot of misconceptions about epilepsy. They might think that it is a disease or that it’s contagious, but that’s not true.” The fact is that one in 26 people will develop epilepsy in their lifetime, according to the Epilepsy Foundation. But you can’t tell that someone has epilepsy simply by looking at him/her, and the person is not likely to talk about it. “I would want everyone to take five to 10 minutes to think, if your father, mother, sister, brother, or friend had epilepsy, what would you do?” says Jason. “How would you prepare yourself? Be the person who could step forward and do something to help out.” One might say that Alyssa’s Alyssa Josephine O’Neil life was simply too short – and they would be right. continually finding unique and creative ways Except that in her life of just 18 years, she left to do things for complete strangers. It’s just a bigger legacy than most people who live awesome.” a life four times that number. She impacted The publicity surrounding #AJO was the world around her and left it a better another thing the O’Neill family could place, one in which people who never knew never have expected. Their story has been her are associating her with acts of kindness covered by major national news programs and finding a way to help others. People are and publications – the “Today Show,” CNN, asking themselves and each other, “Did you USA Today, and “Inside Edition” just to name AJO anyone today?” ■ a few. Sports figures have taken an interest too, such as former professional football player Dan Marino who tweeted about AJO. James Conner, a Pitt Panthers football player who had been a friend of Alyssa, dedicated a game in her memory. It was a surreal moment for the O’Neills when Conner scored a touchdown for Alyssa at the game. In October, Sarah and Jason were guests at a Rascal Flatts concert at the Erie Insurance Arena. They were completely overwhelmed when the band’s lead singer, Gary LeVox, showed up on stage wearing a hat with the AJO logo. LeVox had heard Alyssa’s story and was touched by it. Seeing him in the hat, the crowd began chanting “A-J-O.” “It wasn’t planned,” said Jason. “It just happened, and it was amazing.” Besides the powerful response the O’Neills have experienced, it is also their hope that people learn a little more about epilepsy. In 2012 when Alyssa had been diagnosed, Millcreek | Winter 2013 | icmags.com 29


Lucy’s First Step After losing their daughter, Lesley and Pete Mitchell now help others who have lost a child. By Deborah McQuaid

30 724.942.0940 to advertise | Millcreek

Lesley and Pete Mitchell cherish the framed photograph of a sonogram of their baby girl. That’s all they got to see of her. She was stillborn on Feb. 17, 2011. They like to say she was born an angel. The couple had no idea there was anything wrong with their daughter until they went to a prenatal checkup where the doctor listened for a heartbeat and there was none. “We were kind of in shock and didn’t understand what happened,” Lesley remembered. She was in her 17th week of pregnancy and their oldest son had named the baby Lucy. She went through 10 hours of labor and, when the baby was born, the Mitchells said they wanted to see her. But their midwife advised against it. “She thought she had been dead for awhile,” Lesley said. “We have her little footprints and pictures of her legs and that was it,” Pete said. “That was the worst day of my life,” Lesley said. Pete and his father went to the funeral home to make the arrangements, and then to the cemetery. “You don’t prepare for that,” he said. “It was the most empty feeling I’ve ever had in my life. It’s a physical pain in your heart. I didn’t even get to know her. It hurt so bad.” Lesley is a detective sergeant with the Millcreek Police Department and Pete is a patrolman with the Erie Police Department. Both took some time off work and found it difficult to be around other people. “I didn’t leave the house or socialize for a very long time after that,” Lesley said, adding that she still thinks about it every day. “When people act like it never happened it can be hurtful.” They went to a support group for people who had lost children. Lesley found it overwhelming. “It was very scary–really, really sad and heartbreaking to hear all the stories,” she said. “For Pete, it was helpful to be around other people who had such an experience.” Lesley and Pete continued with private counseling and raising their two sons, Peter, then 6, and Andrew, then 4. Pete wanted to try to have another baby. Lesley was reluctant but then agreed.


“I was very anxious the whole time. I was afraid something would happen,” she said. “When something like [losing a child] happens, it’s a hard hurdle to get around.” They call their son Michael their “Easter surprise” because Lucy’s First Step Fund he was born on Easter, 2012, three weeks early. “We were overjoyed and he was perfect,” Lesley said. PO Box 9372 During her pregnancy, Lesley thought about how profoundly Lucy’s death had impacted her life. Erie, PA 16505 “I didn’t want to have her death be who I’ve become. She 814.969.1267 will always be part of me, but I didn’t want it to define me,” she said. “It’s choosing to heal yourself. It’s a choice. Trying to lucysfirststep@gmail.com heal your heart after something like that…I didn’t know how you got started. I didn’t want to be sad all the time for my family. It’s life changing. I love my husband and my children so much differently than before.” Lesley and Pete, in July 2011, held a golf tournament and raised over $8,000, which they donated to an existing support group. And they began talking about starting a foundation of their own. They thought that what was missing was a group session where a counselor covers a specific topic. They also wanted to offer financial aid for private counseling and infant burials. The Mitchells met with a financial advisor and got backing from a local medical institution. They called their foundation “Lucy’s First Step Fund” after their daughter, and run it from their home. Money comes from donations and fundraisers. It is available to any parent who has lost a child of any age. The first group therapy session was in August, 2012, and nine people attended. Counselors volunteer for the six-week program.

How to Help:

ij

“I feel very fortunate that we’re able to help people heal, keep families together, deal with heartbreak and learn to keep on living.” ij “We couldn’t do it without them. They are wonderful,” Lesley said of the volunteer counselors. Each week they cover topics like “What is grief,” or “When will I feel normal again.” Lesley says there is no other program like it in Erie County. “I feel very fortunate that we’re able to help people…to heal, keep families together, deal with heartbreak and learn to keep on living,” she said. “The idea came to us and we were able to put it together. We like to make things happen.” The foundation has also paid for several people to go through private counseling and for two infant burials. Abby Lombardo and her husband, Thomas Wallace, also found out at a 17-week checkup in September, 2012, that their son, Isaiah, had no heartbeat. “I had to make a decision how I was going to lay him to rest,” she said. A relative had learned of Lucy’s First Step through Facebook and contacted the Mitchells.

continued on next page

Millcreek | Winter 2013 | icmags.com 31


ij “It’s a wonderful program. It helps to talk to people.”

ij

“They practically did everything for me,” Lombardo said. They contacted the funeral director and made all the arrangements. She added that the Mitchells also offered her counseling. “But at the time I didn’t want to be around anybody else. [Lesley] said, ‘If you need anything, I’m there,’” Lombardo recalled. “She was a big help.” Louise Pier lost her 18-year-old son, Billy Welkner, in 2008 when he was walking his dog and was hit and killed by a train. Pier heard about the six-week counseling program through Lucy’s First Step and decided to give it a try. She said that since it had been several years since her son’s death, it was too much for her to tell the story again. But she said she believes it’s a good opportunity for people who are new to the grieving process. “It’s a wonderful program. It helps to talk to people. Nobody’s getting the help they need. I would say you learn to live with it. I’ll probably grieve for the rest of my life. I learned to get through every day. You can go on [even though] you can’t change it,” Pier said. Lesley Mitchell said running the foundation helps her heal. “It helps me give a positive spin to what happened. I try not ever to think about why she died. That takes me to a really, really bad place,” she said. “With the foundation, the people who come up to me and say what we’re doing is a wonderful thing gives me more of an identity for me. I carried Lucy for 17 weeks. I feel this is who she was meant to be.” ■

32 724.942.0940 to advertise | Millcreek


Millcreek Township News

Millcreek Township 34

Millcreek Township

44

Millcreek Township Recreation and Parks

• Letter from the Supervisors

• Registration Information

• Public Services

• Swim Registration Form

• West Ridge Fire Department

• Notes and Events

• J.O.Y. Center Senior Recreation Center

• Swimming Program Information

• Millcreek Sewer Authority

• Physical Fitness for Adults

Millecreek Township Water Authority

• Activities for Children & Youth

Recycling Department Announcements

• Arts & Crafts Programs

• 47th Annual Millcreek Art Show

40 42

52

Millcreek Township Paramedic Services

Millcreek | Winter 2013 | icmags.com 33


Millcreek Township Building Directory

Hours Monday through Friday 8 a.m. – 4:30 p.m

Main Switchboard 814.833.1111 Supervisors 814.833.1111 Water/Sewer Authorities 814.835.6721 Sewer Revenue 814.835.6721 Millcreek Police 814.833.7777 **non.emergency Millcreek Paramedic Service 814.836.8677

Letter from the Supervisors Unfortunately, our wet Spring weather continued through the Summer and Fall. It might have been good for lawns and gardens, but for those who enjoy outdoor activities… not so much. Hopefully the dire predictions for record snows will be as wrong as the Groundhog’s prediction for an early Spring. The Holiday season is here and this edition of In Millcreek includes information on the “Giving Tree,” located in the lobby of the Municipal Building. Not that a reminder is needed, but the next “season” is the not so popular tax season. This issue has news of expanded VITA/ TCE (Volunteer Income Tax Assistance/Tax Counseling for the Elderly) services. Our senior readers should also be sure to see the information on the new “JOY” Center. Another Millcreek volunteer fire department is featured this issue. Check out a brief history of the West Ridge Fire Department. Each year, the Erie County Association of Township Officials awards scholarships to deserving high school students. See how our Township was well represented this year. Every issue of In Millcreek provides news and information on the Township’s recycling program. This issue includes schedules for the Christmas “TreeCycling”, telephone book collection and how to “Retire Old Glory”. In future issues, watch for the latest on some new Millcreek businesses presently under construction. Millcreek Marketplace will soon be the home to Jared’s and Field and Stream, while a new 30,000 square foot, multi-tenant business incubator is taking shape on Powell Avenue. We wish everyone Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays, hoping that 2014 brings good health and happiness to you and yours. Joe, Brian and Rick

Streets 814.833.4527 Millcreek Tax Collector 814.838.8666 Berkheimer Associates 814.833.4870 Judge Paul Manzi 814.451.6518

Millcreek Township

illcreek

Zoning 814.833.2935 Engineering 814.833.6096 Parks & Recreation 814.835.4122 MYAA Schedule www.myaasports.com Millcreek School District www.mtsd.org Millcreek Township www.millcreektownship.com 34 Millcreek

Ecato Scholarships Awarded For the past seven years, the Erie County Association of Township Officials has been awarding grants to deserving area high school students to help defray the cost of furthering their education. This year, three $700.00 grants were awarded to students selected from nearly 40 applications. To be eligible, the student must be a resident of an Erie County township. Community service remains as the top to r): Brian McGrath – Millcreek Supervisor; Molleen Maloney – priority in selecting the winners, (lMcDowell HS; Julia Marn – McDowell HS; Lydia Whisler – North East with academic achievement HS; Sandy Anderson – Girard Supervisor; Rick Huston – Conneaut Supervisor and financial need also being considered. The scholarships were presented at the May 16th ECATO dinner to Molleen Maloney of McDowell HS, Julia Marn of McDowell HS and Lydia Whisler of North East HS.


1. You must be retired and receiving Social Security or other pension regardless of age. Parttime employment is permitted if you are retired from your principal occupation.If you receive only unemployment compensation or public assistance, or are a student or other individual who is not retired, you do not qualify. 2. Total gross income from all sources must not exceed $19,200. Other income includes Business/ Rental Income, Wages, Public Assistance and Unemployment Compensation. 3. If only a husband or wife qualify, the vehicle must be titled and registered in that individual’s name or in both names jointly. If both husband and wife qualify, each may register one vehicle for the $10 processing fee. One or both vehicles may be titled and registered in both names jointly. NOTE: The applicant must be the principal driver of the vehicle unless physically or mentally incapable of driving. 4. Only one vehicle, (9,000 lbs. or less), per person may be registered for the $10 processing fee. Applications should be submitted when registering your vehicle and are available in the Public Service Department at the Millcreek Municipal Building.

Free income tax preparation Deadline extended to December 31,2013 The Property Tax/Rent Rebate Program is one of five programs supported by the Pennsylvania Lottery. The rebate program benefits eligible Pennsylvanians ages 65 or older; widows and widowers ages 50 and older; and people with disabilities ages 18 and older. The income limit is $35,000 per year for homeowners and $15,000 annually for renters. Half of Social Security income is excluded. Depending on income, rent, and tax costs, rebates can be as high as $650. Your rebate may even be higher if you pay more than 15% of income in property taxes. Homeowners receive: Income

$0 $8,001 $15,001 $18,001

to to to to

Maximum Rebate

$8,000 $15,000 $18,000 $35,000

$650 $500 $300 $250

renters receive: Income

$0 $8,001

to to

Maximum Rebate

$8,000 $15,000

$650 $500

The deadline to apply for a rebate has been extended to December 31, 2013. For more information or to see if you may qualify for this program, call Judy in Public Services at 833.1111 Ext. 329.

The Millcreek Municipal Building will continue to be one of the many sites for AARP free income tax preparation again in 2014. We are expanding the tax service to two days this coming year. The IRS sponsored TCE Program (Tax Counseling for the Elderly) along with AARP offer the tax preparation program for those with low to middle income (generally $49,000 and below) with special attention to those 60 years of age and older. Tax preparation will be held every Monday and Friday at the Municipal Building beginning February 3, 2014 and continuing through April 13, 2014. Items to bring for your appointment: • Driver License or photo ID • Social Security Number for filer and dependents • All income documentation (example: W2’s, 1099’s, interest, Social Security statement) • Paid property tax receipts • Last years income tax return Appointments are necessary. For more information or to schedule your appointment, contact Judy after January 1, 2014, in the Public Service Department at 814.833.1111 Ext. 329. Millcreek | Winter 2013 | icmags.com 35

Millcreek Township

The Holiday Season is fast approaching and once again Millcreek Township will sponsor a giving tree to provide Christmas gifts for the less fortunate children in our community. An evergreen tree will appear in the lobby of the Millcreek Township Building around Thanksgiving. Along with twinkling lights and shiny ornaments, this tree will be decorated with goodwill. The Giving Tree returns for the eleventh year and offers Millcreek Township residents a chance to help those who are less fortunate this holiday season. Approximately 200 tags will adorn the tree that list the gender, age, clothing sizes and a wish list for a needy child in our community. Envelopes holding the information for families with multiple children will also be available for anyone wishing to sponsor those children, says Gail Jares, township employee and Giving Tree organizer. “We contact elementary schools in our township and they give us a list of children who are less fortunate. Many of our residents do not realize there are families in Millcreek struggling and cannot afford extras like Christmas Gifts for their children. The Giving Tree gives everyone a chance to help these families.” Interested parties are urged to stop by and select a tag or envelope and simply return the wrapped gifts to the municipal building no later than Monday, December 16, 2013. For more information, please call Gail at 814.833.1111 ext. 316.

REDUCED AUTO REGISTRATION

Millcreek

The Giving Tree


West Ridge Fire Department

Millcreek Township

illcreek

In the 1920’s, the area which comprised the West Ridge Fire District was primarily agricultural. The Zuck family, owners of Zuck Greenhouses on Ridge Road (now W. 26th St.), had accepted responsibility for providing fire service to southwest Millcreek. They would send their employees along with two hose carts equipped with chemical tanks to handle any fire in the area. Two substations were eventually built, one behind Parkers Garage at Rt. 20 & Cemetery Rd. (Sterrettania Rd.) and the other behind the Millcreek High School (now the Millcreek Education Center). Lines were laid along the Ridge Road Blvd. to Asbury Road and down Powell Avenue to 23rd Street. Along with this, fire hydrants were installed by the residents to protect their own properties. A chemical cart and three hose carts were procured, and the nucleus of a volunteer fire department was formed. This loose knit organization served as fire protection for the next fifteen years. Calls were received by phone and an alarm was sent out by whistle on Zuck’s Boiler House. On January 24, 1940, a charter was granted to form the West Ridge Volunteer Fire Department. On January 27 a group of men met at Kallenbach’s Greenhouse to begin formalizing the company. This group consisted of the following men: J.W. Evans E.C. Feidler Glenn Halderman A.L. Norwall Floyd Anderson William Schreader

Ray Smith Harold Koh Floyd Brown Francis Flynn Kenneth Kallenbach Harry Love Jr.

George Keinath Hayes McCreary Clem Frank Karl Von Buseck Chris Rabe

Once the organization was completed along with the location of a building and the adoption of by-laws it was time to acquire a fire truck. To house equipment West Ridge leased the old Grange Hall from C.W. Zuck & Son and with relief labor, constructed a two-stall garage attached to the rear of the hall to house the equipment. In September 1940, a used Diamond T Fire Truck was purchased. That same year turnout gear was purchased, which consisted of rubber coats, hats, and boots. In 1941, a used chassis, four new tires and a used gasoline tank was acquired. This was the first tank truck. In 1949,

36 Millcreek

a new International Truck with a Metro body was purchased to be used as a first aid truck and ambulance. A new 1951 Mack Fire Truck was added, giving West Ridge a total of four pieces of equipment. With these new equipment additions, the original fire hall had reached its capacity. With all eyes looking toward the future, the firemen drew up plans for a new fire hall. It was to be centrally located with ample room to house fire equipment, a multi-purpose room, full kitchen, and an area where there would be additional room to grow. Local businesses were approached for donations of money and materials. Area builders donated to the project and the firemen donated countless hours completing the finish work. The residents came through with donations to cover any final items that needed to be purchased. The end result of this wonderful community cooperation was an excellently constructed modern fire hall in the area. The new home of the West Ridge Hose Company, 3142 West Ridge Road was dedicated in the summer of 1955. Once this project was under their belts, it was time to modernize West Ridge’s communication system. Until now they used the telephone chain method to alert the firemen in an emergency. Once the trucks left the hall, they had no way of communicating with anyone. Surplus civil defense radios were purchased and installed in the emergency vehicles and in each fireman’s home. The 1960’s


Millcreek Township

Millcreek

“Proudly Serving the Millcreek Township Community Since 1940”

showed the addition of a new tank truck and ambulance. In 1970, a 75-foot snorkel, pumper, and pocket pagers were acquired. A second station at Grubb and Sterrettania Roads with a training building and picnic grove was built. By building a modestly priced butler building as a second station, the company almost doubled their equipment capacity and was better able to provide coverage to the rapidly growing southern portion of Millcreek Township. There was, however, a need for expansion at the headquarters building at West 26th St. and Homer Ave. As a result, a two story addition was added and the work was completed and dedicated in 1984. The 1980’s were also a time of great population growth in the West Ridge area. This increase in population and in property to be protected resulted in the 1989 purchase of a new state of the art 100-foot aerial tower truck. The 1990’s through today challenged members of West Ridge with increased demands in the area of Emergency Medical Services, fire protection and fire prevention. The West Ridge Fire Department currently operates with 6 pieces of apparatus. The fleet is comprised of 2 engine companies, 1 truck company, 2 support services vehicles, 1 Argo UTV, 1 special operations trailer, and 1 Chief ’s vehicle. Members belong to several regional teams, including Hazardous Materials Response, Swat and Rope Rescue. Areas of expertise in West Ridge include, but not limited to:

Emergency Medical, Firefighting, Fire Police, Vehicle Rescue, water rescue (both swift water and SCUBA), and Incident Management. Members regularly attend local and regional training sessions, as well as state and national classes for training in various topics. Members are all trained in firefighting, emergency medicalincluding CPR, and the National Incident Management System. The Fire Prevention Program runs year around, and last year reached approximately 1500 children. During this educational program, we cover fire prevention, general safety, weather, and various other related topics, depending on the audience. West Ridge has been servicing the community since 1940 and would like to thank previous members for their dedication of service and present members for their continued efforts. A special thank you also goes out to the members of the community which we serve. Without your continued support the West Ridge Fire Department would not be able to provide you with all the services that are essential to a safe community.

Millcreek | Winter 2013 | icmags.com 37


Applications for membership and daily schedules are available online at the Millcreek Township website at www.millcreektownship.com. (Click on the “Senior” tab.)

MILLCREEK TOWNSHIP

Yearly Single Membership - $45 Yearly Couples Membership - $80

J.O.Y. CENTER

Senior Recreation Center 814.806.3876 • 2709 LEGION ROAD - ERIE, PA 16506 joycenter@millcreektownship.com

“Come Grow with Us”

Millcreek Township JOY Center Hours of Operation: 8:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays & Fridays Please park on the north side of the building.

• Computer Lab will be open for members to use the internet, except during computer classes. • Library and Billiard Room are open for member use. • Lounge and Auditorium are open for social activities including: board games, puzzles, and cards for Pinochle, Poker, Bridge, Euchre, etc. 8:00 - 9:00 (MWF)

Indoor Walking

9:00 - 9:45 (WF)

Chair Aerobics & Flexibility

9:00 - 10:00 (MWF)

Open Activities

10:30 - 11:30 (Mondays)

Qigong (gentle movement for health, healing and longevity)

11:00 - 12:00 (MWF)

Basic Computer Training

12:00 - 1:00 (MWF) Lunch

Millcreek Township

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The daily schedule is made from social activities, such as ones listed above. Upcoming on the schedule, there will be card clubs, crafting activities, guest speakers from Jefferson Educational Society and other local organizations, health and wellness seminars, social gatherings, dances, parties –and more! We also

1:15 - 2:15 (MWF)

Introduction to Computers (enroll at front desk)

2:15 - 3:30 (MWF)

Open Activites/Educational Programming (call for details)

offer out of center activities including but not limited to bowling leagues, bus trips, Jefferson Educational Society lectures and community service opportunities. You must be a member to take part in daily activities at no cost, though instructed class may require a small fee.

Upcoming Events • Intro. to Genealogy Lecture December 4, 2013 (12:00pm) By Carl Anderson III (Jefferson Educational Society)

• Christmas Party December 18, 2013 (12:30pm - 3:30pm) Open to the public. RSVP required!

• Intro. to Local Heroes Including Brigadier General Strong Vincent December 6, 2013 (10:30am - 11:30am) By Dr. William P. Garvey (President & Founder of JES)

Please call for additional details. Fees apply.

Scheduled classes and events are updated regularly and may be subject to change. 38 Millcreek


our last article published in the Fall 2013 Edition of In Millcreek Magazine (Page 24). Millcreek Township Sewer Revenue Department and Millcreek Township Sewer Authority staff worked closely with the Harborcreek Township Sewer Authority staff to benefit from overall cost reductions by bidding the Chemical Grouting project together in order to achieve lower costs for each Authority. In addition, Millcreek Township Sewer Revenue Department staff conducted inspections on behalf of Harborcreek Township Sewer Authority looking for illegal connections to the sanitary sewer system in an effort to reduce or eliminate sources of inflow or infiltration into Harborcreek’s sanitary sewer system. Reductions in the volume of non-polluted ground or surface waters going into the city of Erie’s sanitary sewer system helps all of the municipalities who share in the cost of the city operations at the Erie Wastewater Treatment Plant. By working together for a common good, the Millcreek Township Sewer Authority enjoys a very professional working relationship with our municipal neighbors and continues to look for opportunities to partner in order to improve the environment in a cost effective manner.

8

The Route 8 (Wattsburg Road) sanitary sewer connection…will transport sanitary sewerage generated within Greene Township to flow through facilities of Millcreek Township Sewer Authority and into the city of Erie’s sanitary sewer system.

Millcreek | Winter 2013 | icmags.com 39

Millcreek Township Sewer Authority

A

s was previously reported in an earlier edition of In Millcreek Magazine, Millcreek Township, Millcreek Township Sewer Authority, the city of Erie, Erie Sewer Authority and Greene Township continue to work together striving to achieve serving Greene Township’s environmental and development efforts by planning for the Route 8 (Wattsburg Road) sanitary sewer connection which will transport sanitary sewerage generated within Greene Township to flow through facilities of Millcreek Township Sewer Authority and into the city of Erie’s sanitary sewer system for transportation and ultimate treatment at the Public Owned Treatment Works of the Erie Sewer Authority’s wastewater treatment plant. The project has been estimated at nearly $1 million and will be cost shared between Greene Township (80%) and Millcreek Township Sewer Authority (20%). The planning, permitting applications and transportation/ treatment agreements are being worked on and will lead to construction in 2014. The Millcreek Township property owners within the project area along Route 8 (Wattsburg Road) will be assessed for their proportional cost of the project following completion of the construction. A second example of Inter-Municipal Cooperation is the sanitary sewer flow metering Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) for Permanent Flow Metering which the Millcreek Township Sewer Authority and the city of Erie agreed upon in August. The MOU outlines items including ownership and maintenance of the meters and sites, equipment and software to be used and perhaps most important, both the city and Millcreek agreed to how the flow data generated will be readily available to each other and used for billing purposes. The cooperation and mutual respect between the staff members who negotiated the MOU was very much appreciated. The final example being presented pertains to the Chemical Grouting of the sanitary sewer mains which was the subject of

Millcreek

Inter – Municipal Cooperation Continues


Water Authority nears end of Year 1 of multi-year contract

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Millcreek Township Water Authority

T

he Millcreek Township Water Authority is nearing the end of Year 1 of a multiyear water storage tank management/ maintenance contract. The Authority entered into the contract with Utility Service Co., Inc. following interviews and negotiations with firms that provided comprehensive tank management and maintenance programs. The contract and its maintenance program has been planned out over a 16 year period and covers all five (5) water storage tanks within the Authority service area. The contract calls for all tanks to be annually inspected and serviced. We wish to highlight that during August 2013, an active mixing system called PAX Mixers were installed in both of the tanks along Asbury Road known as Asbury 1 and 2 as well as the Bundy Tank along Wager Road. The PAX Mixer units circulate water within the storage tanks to promote mixing of the stored water to keep the water fresh, improving taste and quality and will aid in the prevention of ice formation within the tank during cold winter weather. The other two (2) tanks in the system, Lancaster and Sterrettania, had passive mixing systems previously installed. In addition to the PAX Mixers, additional improvements including interior chemical washes to the three tanks which received the PAX Mixers and safety efforts such as an additional manway access hatch on Asbury 1 have been accomplished. The Authority is committed to the long term preventive maintenance of the water storage tanks and this maintenance contract assures the

40 Millcreek


The Authority is committed to the long term preventive maintenance of the water storage tanks and this maintenance contract assures the customers that a planned, budgeted and achievable program is in place. customers that a planned, budgeted and achievable program is in place. The Authority also wishes to inform our customers of the 2014 water rates and fees which will become effective January 1, 2014. Due to the obligation to match the water rates and fees of the Erie City Water Authority, which they have established based upon their 2009 Cost of Services study, a 6.8% increase of water rates will be implemented. For 2014, customers of the Millcreek Township Water Authority will pay $4.40/1,000 gallons. Increases for all other service or related fees will also be based upon those adopted by the Erie City Water Authority.

Millcreek | Winter 2013 | icmags.com 41

Millcreek Township Water Authority

Millcreek Township Water Authority Erie, PA Projected Schedule of Work and Fees for Tank Asset Management Program

Millcreek

Water Storage Tank Project Schedule


Recycling Department Announcements

From Telephone Books To Building Insulation While you may no longer have a use for your 2013 phonebook, a local Erie business does! Erie Energy Products will collect the outdated phonebooks and transform them into new building insulation. From December 1st to January 31st, Millcreek Township will host two drop off bins for the collection. For each book that is donated, Erie Energy Products will also donate 100% of the proceeds to the Second Harvest Food Bank. Drop-off bins at the Township Building will be available during normal operating hours (Monday – Friday, 8:00am-4:30pm) in the front and side lobby entrances.

Millcreek Township R ecycling NE WS

Earlier this year, residents brought in 6,470 pounds of phone books. As a result, Erie Energy Products donated $2,199.40 worth of food to the Food Bank.

Annual Christmas Tree Cycling Event

Retire Old Glory Campaign Lives On

In January 2013, residents from both Millcreek and Fairview Townships donated 197 of trees to the Compost Center along with $916 to the Soup Kitchen!

From June 10th to July 10th, Millcreek Township collected 531 flags! Your “Old Glory” may be returned to the Township Building Mondays-Fridays from 8:00 a.m.- 4:30 p.m.

After receiving a great turnout in 2013, the Recycling Department is looking forward to expanding the Christmas TreeCycling Event for 2014. On January 11th, ALL residents of Erie County are encouraged to bring their used Christmas Tree to the Millfair Compost & Recycling Center between 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Monetary donations will be accepted on behalf of the Emmaus Soup Kitchen. Residents will receive assistance removing the trees from their vehicles with help from the Millcreek Recycling Committee and volunteers. Prior to arriving, all tree stands, tinsel, ornaments, and decorations should be removed. Following the event, Christmas Trees will be processed into screened mulch products, which will be available for sale beginning April 1, 2014.

From Flag Day to Independence Day, Millcreek Township participated in a trial run of the Retire Your Old Glory Campaign. The Campaign stressed the importance of the National Flag Code, which gives specific guidelines on how our national flag should be displayed and how it should be retired when its condition makes it no longer fit for display. Any flag displayed should be replaced with new ones when it is torn, tattered, or faded, and retired in a dignified and respectful manner. A bin was made available in the Township front lobby and has found a permanent home there thanks to the sponsorship of Printing Concepts! All flags collected in the bin are taken to the American Legion Post #773 and disposed of honorably.

ASK THE RECYCLING COORDINATOR:

My blue recycle bin is broken. What do I do with it now and where can I get a new one? — Carol P. Once you are ready to discard your old blue bin, mark it “trash” and Waste Management will remove it on your regular collection day. (The bin will be recycled, but if you mark it “recycle” the driver may not realize you want to dispose of it.) Replacement or additional 25 gallon bins are available at the Millcreek Township Recycling Office for $5.00. We also carry a 65 gallon bin with wheels and an attached lid for $20.00. New residents will be given a 25 gallon bin at no cost upon moving into the Township. The Township Building is located at 3608 West 26th Street and is open Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.. To have your questions answered by Millcreek’s Recycling Department, please submit an email to jjames@millcreektownship.com or mail a letter to 3608 West 26th Street, ATTN: Recycling Department, Erie, PA 16506. Please indicate “Ask the Recycling Coordinator” in the subject line.

42 Millcreek


Utilizing recycling and trash services for residential pick-up is not a choice, but the law! Residents are required by Pennsylvania Act 101 of 1998 and Millcreek Township Ordinance #2006-11 to sign up for both trash and recycling with Waste Management. In addition, Township Ordinances require that recyclables and leaf waste be separated from municipal waste and disposed of properly. The Millcreek Township Recycling Department appreciates your cooperation. The following items are accepted BAGGED and placed within the blue recycle bin:

• Mixed Office Paper

• Steel, Tin, & Metal Cans

• Junk Mail

• Plastics #1-7

• Newspapers

• Brown Paper Bags

• Magazines

• Dairy & Juice Containers

• Cardboard • Chipboard & Paperboard • Aluminum Cans To review Millcreek Township’s Municipal Waste & Recycling Ordinance #2006-11, please visit our website at http://www.millcreektownship.com/Government/Ordinances.aspx To receive additional updates and reminders, please “Like” our new facebook page at: https://www.facebook.com/MillcreekTownshipRecycling

INCREASE RECYCLING & CUT COSTS THIS YEAR!

With Millcreek’s Per Bag Program, residents may opt out of the traditional Waste Management billing system and unlimited trash collection converting to a pay-as-you-throw system. With this program, residents are only required to pay for what is thrown away in the designated green bags! Benefits: 3 Cost savings 3 Trash collection day remains the same 3 Unlimited weekly recycling included 3 Continued participation in leaf/brush collection weeks 3 Decreasing the amount of garbage sent to the Lakeview Landfill

Especially beneficial to small households or elderly residents not generating large amounts of trash, residents enrolled in the program will only pay $5 for every 33-gallon bag placed out at the curb. With the quarterly bill ($60.54) eliminated, YOU take control of YOUR savings!

Up to 30% of what is gene rated in the trash is organic was te that can be com posted!

Tips on Extending the life of your green bag: 3 Recycle all 10 items listed above 3 Begin a backyard compost pile and/or bin 3 Maintain a good trash container with a tight lid 3 Place your trash bag out for pick-up when the bag is completely full **Any trash that is not able to fit into the 33-gallon green trash bag will not be picked up! Special arrangements must be made for those larger materials.

SIGN UP TODAY! Call Waste Management at 1.866.833.1327 to transfer your account to the Per Bag System and stop into the Millcreek Recycling Office to pick-up your green bags. Bags are sold in a pack of 5 for $25. (Only bags purchased at township building will be accepted.)

Millcreek | Winter 2013 | icmags.com 43

Millcreek Township Recycling N E WS

RESIDENTIAL RECYCLING


Millcreek Recreation and Parks Commission Millcreek Municipal Building 3608 West 26th Street Erie, Pennsylvania 16506-2037 814/835-4122

illcreek

Millcreek Township - Recreation & Parks

www.millcreektownship.com Click on Departments under Township Links

Please check our website for any closings or cancellations; see weather conditions or scheduling conflicts.

The Millcreek School Board has made Gold Cards available to all Millcreek residents who are 60 years of age or older. These Gold Card holders are entitled to free admission to all HOME athletic events (except for all District 10 post-season events), to all plays and musical productions in the schools of the Millcreek Township School District (except for McDowell Center for Performing Arts dinner theaters), and also to participate without charge (except for materials used or events noted as special events) in any of the programs sponsored by the Millcreek Township Parks and Recreation Department. (Gold Card information does not apply to Erie Veterans Stadium, Gannon Hammermill Center, and District or Metro meets.) Gold Cards can be obtained from the switchboard of the Millcreek Education Center, 3740 West 26th Street, Erie, Pa., any weekday during the hours of 8 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. or from the parks and recreation office in the Millcreek Municipal Building. Gold Card holders must register each season before attending their first class. Registration should be mailed in as soon as possible. Limit of three programs per season.

Mail-In Registration —Winter 2014

Applicants must complete their registration forms with all necessary information, signed waiver and release of liability (see page 46) and enclosed check (payable to Millcreek Township Supervisors). Registrations will be accepted immediately in order of postmark date. MAIL in your completed application to Millcreek Municipal Building c/o the Recreation Department at the above listed address. Once you have MAILED the registration form, you should consider the enrollee accepted for the activity unless otherwise notified. We will make all necessary calls regarding adjustments, etc., as soon as possible. Material lists and class information sheets can be printed from our website – www.millcreektownship.com

MAIL-IN Registration for Residents of Millcreek Township: This includes families who live in or own property in Millcreek Township. This privilege extends to persons who work in Millcreek Township but not their families. The Waiver and Release of Liability must be signed by adult participants or by a parent or legal guardian on behalf of minors before participation. The Recreation and Parks Commission, Millcreek Township and its supervisors, and the Millcreek Township School District assume no liability for injuries that may be suffered as a result of participation in these activities. If you have read, signed and agree to the Waiver and Release of Liability, fill out the proper registration form. Take care to include all the necessary information (your address and phone number, the class, skill level where applicable, location, etc. on each form). MAIL the

completed registration form, signed Waiver and Release of Liability (see page 46) and check or money order payable to Millcreek Township Supervisors. We are sorry, but the volume of registrations and other limitations make it impossible to reserve a particular place for you in a class if you telephone or if the registration requirements are not met when you first MAIL your application. It is important that you give us a phone number where you can be reached during our office hours and also during children’s class times. We will respect the privacy of unlisted numbers except for urgent calls. There will be no refunds unless a class is eliminated or changed by the recreation department, or a medical excuse is presented at the beginning of the program. There will be no refunds due to inclement weather!

Visit us on the web at www.millcreektownship.com/Residents/ParksandRecreation.aspx 44 Millcreek


]

FAMILY LAST NAME (Child name if different than parent) ­

HOME PHONE

WORK PHONE

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ m Mr.

m Mrs.

m Ms.

ADDRESS

ZIP CODE

Swimming, Activity & Season Pass Registrations (Please list a 2nd choice for all swimming registrations.) FIRST NAME

AGE

POOL

LEVEL

DAY

TIME

FEE

­______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ­______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

on

­______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

er v i a w

­______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

gn i s e leas P ATTENTION: Please list any medication(s) your child taking or needs to be administered during our programs. Please list any health or kis currently acis being behavior related conditions for which yourb child treated.

­______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ­______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ­______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ NAME MEDICATIONS/CONDITION

Winter 2014 PROGRAM Registration Form Please use this form for all other activities other than swimming. [ ] [ ] ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ FAMILY LAST NAME (Child name if different than parent) ­

HOME PHONE

WORK PHONE

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ m Mr.

m Mrs.

FIRST NAME

m Ms.

AGE

ADDRESS

ACTIVITY

DAY

TIME

ZIP CODE

FEE

­______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ­______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

er v i a w

on

­______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

gn i s e s Plea ckis currently taking or needs to be administered during our programs. Please list any health or achild ATTENTION: Please list any medication(s) b your

­______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ­______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ­______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ­______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

behavior related conditions for which your child is being treated.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ NAME MEDICATIONS/CONDITION

Please make checks payable to: Millcreek Township Supervisors / Please sign waiver on back Please mail registration and signed waiver to: Millcreek Recreation and Parks Department, Millcreek Municipal Building, 3608 West 26th St., Erie PA 16506

In applying to the Pool Season Passes listed on the following pages, I (we) agree to the regulations for operation of the facilities; understand that the use of the pools and gyms are at the risk of the participant; and further acknowledge that passes may not be loaned and are limited to my (our) immediate family; the permit and those privileges associated with it are not transferable and will be lifted if presented at the entrance by anyone else. Millcreek | Winter 2013 | icmags.com 45

Millcreek Township - Recreation & Parks

[

[ ] ­______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Millcreek

Winter 2014 SWIM Registration Form


Waiver and Release of Liability On behalf of all participants, adults, minors and parents of participating minors in Millcreek Township Recreation and Parks Department programs. On behalf of myself and any of my minor children listed below as applicants, I give permission to attend and participate in the program for which application is attached. I understand that the Recreation and Parks Commission of Millcreek Township, Millcreek Township and the Millcreek Supervisors, and the Millcreek Township School District assume no liability for injury incurred as a result of any participation in any of the various activities of the Recreation and Parks Department of Millcreek Township. On behalf of myself and on behalf of any of my minor children participating hereunder, I agree to release, give up, forego, waive and discharge the Recreation and Parks Commission of Millcreek Township, Millcreek Township and Supervisors, Millcreek Township School District, their officers, representatives, and employees from any and all liability, claims, demands, causes of action arising out of or in any way connected with any programs being

operated by the Recreation and Parks Department of Millcreek Township. The undersigned hereby assumes all risk of injury or damages to the person on behalf of myself and any minors to which I am parent, guardian, or next friend, as any injuries and damages would occur as a result of participation in the programs of the Recreation and Parks Department of Millcreek Township. This document is intended to be a complete and full release, waiver, relinquishment, giving up, foregoing, and discharge of all claims and damages of every kind against the Recreation and Parks Department of Millcreek Township, Millcreek Township and the Millcreek Supervisors, and the Millcreek Township School District which I or my minor children might incur as a result of participation in the programs of the Millcreek Recreation and Parks Commission; and the undersigned does hereby agree to hold the Recreation and Parks Commission of Millcreek

PARENT OR GUARDIAN OF MINOR CHILDREN

ADULT PARTICIPANT

Millcreek Township Recreation and Parks

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Millcreek Township - Recreation & Parks

Notes and Events RADIO CONTROL AIRPLANE  INSTRUCTION - FREE! MIHS Gym

DAY

Fridays

DATES

1/10 - 5/23

Instructor: Mark Coursey Cost: $10 / You must pre-register. Tasty wintertime hors d’oeuvres to share with family and friends during wintertime get-togethers or Super Bowl Sunday. Asbury Barn

TIME

7:00 - 10:30 p.m.

WINTER  ICE SKATING

At Asbury Park beginning when weather permits. Family ice skating - no ice hockey permitted. Monday through Sunday from 12:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.

RECREATION NOTES

Zuck, Scott and Asbury Main Pavilions will be available for 2014 reservations for Saturdays and Sundays from Memorial Day to Labor Day. Reservations begin on January 2, 2014.

COST IS $75 PER DAY. Asbury Barn reservations for 2014 are also available.

COST IS $40 PER HOUR.

GOURMET FINGER FOODS LOCATION

Phone John Schardt at 868-1580 for more information. Great FREE family fun! NO FEE. Register at MIHS Gym. LOCATION

Township, Millcreek Township and Millcreek Supervisors, and the Millcreek Township School District free and clear from all loss and liability of any kind. Furthermore, as parent, guardian, and next friend of any minors hereunder, the undersigned hereby expressly agrees to indemnify and forever hold harmless the Recreation and Parks Commission of Millcreek Township, Millcreek Township and the Millcreek Supervisors, and the Millcreek Township School District against loss or any claims, demands, causes of action that might be brought by any minor or on his/her behalf to defray damages incurred while participating in any programs of the Recreation and Parks Department of Millcreek Township. As parent, guardian, or next friend, I hereby waive all exemption rights under all state laws against any claims for reimbursement or indemnification.

DAY

Saturday

DATE

1/18

TIME

3:00 - 5:00 p.m.

Wedding and Party Dances-FREE!

Instructor: Charlotte Haggerty Learn all the fun dances popular at weddings and parties. Cha-Cha Slide, Electric Slide, Macarena, the “Soulja Boy,” and the Tush Push. Asbury Barn Saturday, March 8 2:00 - 3:30 p.m.

You need to register for this event

Attention Gold Card Holders Gold Card users will be limited to three programs per season at no charge. A $10 fee will be charged for any additional programs beyond the three-program limit. We ask all Gold Card participants to make every attempt to attend the programs you have registered for. We have encountered the problem of Gold Card participants signing up for numerous programs and then not attending class on a regular basis. Thank you for your cooperation in this registration process.

Call the Recreation office at 835-4122. Visit us on the web at www.millcreektownship.com/Residents/ParksandRecreation.aspx 46 Millcreek


Mail-in registrations will be accepted immediately. Consider your application accepted unless otherwise notified. Please respect our age requirements. Any age requirements are based according to your child’s age on the first day of class. RESIDENT FEE: $40 • NON-RESIDENT FEE: $80

SATURDAY January 11 - March 8 AGE (no class 2/15) 10:00 – 10:30 a.m . ........... Preschool A . .................................. 3, 4 & 5 10:00 – 10:50 a.m.............. Advanced Level 2............................ 6 & up 10:00 – 10:50 a.m.............. Level 3.................................................. 6 & up 10:30 – 11:00 a.m............... Preschool A . .................................. 3, 4 & 5 11:00 – 11:30 a.m................. Preschool B .................................... 3, 4 & 5 11:00 – 11:30 a.m................. Level 1B ............................................... 6 & up 11:00 – 11:50 a.m................. Level 2 ................................................. 6 & up 11:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m .... Level 1A ........................................... 3, 4 & 5 11:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m...... Preschool C.......................................... 4 & 5 12:00 – 12:50 p.m............... Level 4 . ............................................... 6 & up 12:00 – 12:50 p.m............... Level 5 ................................................. 6 & up 12:00 – 12:50 p.m............... Level 6A ............................................. 6 & up TUESDAY

January 7 - March 4 (no class 2/11) 7:00 – 7:30 p.m.................. Preschool A . .................................. 3, 4 & 5 7:00 – 7:50 p.m.................. Level 2.................................................. 6 & up 7:30 – 8:00 p.m.................. Preschool A.......................................3, 4 & 5

WEDNESDAY

January 8 - February 26 7:00 – 7:30 p.m.................. Preschool C ......................................... 4 & 5 7:00 – 7:50 p.m.................. Level 3 ................................................. 6 & up 7:30 – 8:00 p.m.................. Preschool B...................................... 3, 4 & 5

Recreational Swimming

Admission: $2 (per person) The MIHS pool will be open January 6 through March 8 Pool Closed 1/16, 1/20, 1/23, 1/30, 2/3, 2/6, 2/10, 2/11, 2/15 Long hair must be tied back. Bathing caps are not required. Groups of 15 or more planning to use the pool should call the Recreation Office at 835-4122. Children under 12 must be accompanied by a parent. Children 12 and above must be able to swim one length of the pool to be unattended. OPEN SWIM: Recreational swimming for all residents of Millcreek Township. (No lap swimming permitted.)  Fridays 7:00 - 9:15 p.m. Saturdays 2:00 - 4:45 p.m. ADULT SWIM (Adults only, 18 years +): Mondays 7:00 - 8:00 p.m. Wednesdays 7:00 - 8:00 p.m. Saturdays 1:00 - 2:00 p.m.

Swimming Prerequisites: INFANTS & TODDLERS: 6 - 18 mos. and 18 mos. - 2 yrs. If still in diapers, cloth diapers and rubber pants or little swimmer diapers are necessary. Students must be accompanied during lessons by an adult, 18 or older, at all times. PRESCHOOL LESSONS: Ages 3-5 without parental assistance. Preschool A Non-floaters. 30 min. lesson. Preschool B Floats without support (front and back). Front glide without support. 30 min. lesson. Preschool C (4 and 5 years old) Combined stroke front and back, deep water orientation. 30 min. lesson. To enroll in the following skill levels you must be able to accomplish the following skills: LEVEL 1A: Completed Preschool C but are not yet 6 years old. 30 min. lesson. LEVEL 1B: For students age 6 years and up who are apprehensive toward the water. LEVEL 2: 6 years old and up. Beginner lesson. No fear of the water. ADVANCED LEVEL 2: 6 years old and up who have passed Preschool C or have attended one Level 2 class. LEVEL 3: Orientation to deep water. Combined stroke front with kick and arm stroke 25 yards. LEVEL 4: Submerge and retrieve object. Survival float 1 minute in deep water, dive in deep water, surface and swim front crawl stroke 25 yards and back crawl stroke 25 yards, elementary back stroke 25 yards. LEVEL 5: Swim 25 yards of breast stroke. Swim 50 yards back crawl. Dive into deep water and swim 50 yards front crawl. Tread water for 1 minute and back float for 1 minute. LEVEL 6A: Swim 25 yards breast stroke. (Swimming & diving) 75 yards back crawl. Perform shallow dive and 75 yards front crawl. 50 yards elementary back stroke. To complete LEVEL 6A – 500 yards of continuous swim using the following strokes: 100 yards front crawl, 100 yards back crawl, 50 yards breast and elementary back stroke, side stroke, butterfly 100 yards of your choice. Jump into deep water – survival float 5 minutes and back float 5 minutes. LEVEL 6B: Lifeguard readiness for students 10 and up. LIFEGUARD TRAINING: Must be 15 years or older and be able to swim 500 yards, surface dive to nine feet, swim underwater and tread water for two minutes. ADAPTED AQUATICS: Includes learning disability, trainable or educable* special needs and visual/hearing impaired. Limited to three students per instructor. Students must be accompanied by an adult on deck as well as in the locker room.

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Millcreek Township - Recreation & Parks

2014 Winter Swimming Programs at McDowell Intermediate

Millcreek

Swimming Programs


PHYSICAL FITNESS  FOR ADULTS 2014 Winter

ADULT DANCE RESIDENT FEE:

$30.00 Line $40.00 American/Latin

NON RESIDENT FEE: Instructor: Carol Gilbo

$40.00 Line $60.00 American/Latin

A partner is required for all of these programs except Line Dance. Please wear comfortable clothes and dancing shoes. BEGINNER AMERICAN AND LATIN DAY

Asbury Barn Tuesdays

DATES

1/7-2/25

TIME

7:00 - 9:00 p.m.

INTERMEDIATE AMERICAN/LATIN LOCATION

DAY

DATES

J.S. Wilson Auditorium Thursdays

1/9-3/6

LOCATION

DATES

Asbury Barn Sundays

TIME

DAY

Asbury Barn Sundays

RESIDENT FEE: $40.00 • NON RESIDENT FEE: $60.00 LOCATION

7:00 - 8:00 p.m.

DATES

TIME

JS Wilson Cafeteria

8:00 - 9:00 p.m.

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Millcreek Township - Recreation & Parks

BEGINNER JAZZ & BROADWAY DANCE DAY

DATES

1/11-3/1

TIME

8:30 - 9:15 a.m.

BEGINNER TAP LOCATION

DAY

Asbury Barn

Saturdays

DATES

1/11/-3/1

TIME

9:15 - 9:50 a.m.

$40.00 $60.00

Kickboxing, which combines elements of boxing, martial arts, and aerobics, provides overall physical conditioning. Reduce stress, increase strength, and build muscle tone. An exercise mat and light weights are recommended. MIHS Dance Studio

DAY

DATES

Tues. & Thurs 1/7-3/20

Wednesday

DATES

1/8-3/12

TIME

7:00 - 8:00 p.m.

Instructors: Dave and Kathy Wayman Qi Gong (chee-kung) is an ancient healing art from China. The art consists of very slow and gentle movements. It will restore and increase your energy, reduce anxiety, improve balance, and help you maintain a healthy active lifestyle. LOCATION

DAY

DATES

1/7 - 3/18 (No class 1/14)

TIME

7:30 - 8:30 p.m.

RESIDENT FEE: $40.00 • NON RESIDENT FEE: $60.00 DAY

Asbury Barn Mon. & Thur.

DATES

1/6 - 3/13

TIME

9:30 - 10:30 a.m.

ADULT AEROBICS The following programs are for persons 18 years or older, or anyone ages 14 - 17 who attends class accompanied by a participating adult. Wear comfortable clothes and sneakers with good support. Bring a mat, towel, or a small blanket for floor work. You may also want to bring a water bottle and light weights. Instructor: Laurie Gualtier-King RESIDENT (1 class/week) $30.00 NON-RESIDENT: $50.00 (2 classes/week) $40.00 $60.00 (3 classes/week) $60.00 $80.00 (4 classes/week) $80.00 $100.00

Asbury Barn

Instructor: Karle Lyons

LOCATION

DAY

KETTLEBELL WORKOUT A cardio and strength training exercise program using the kettlebell or a single hand weight. This program is geared toward an experienced exerciser. Participants must supply their own kettlebell or hand weight.

BEGINNER KICK BOXING RESIDENT FEE: NON RESIDENT FEE:

8:00 - 9:00 a.m.

INTRODUCTION TO QI GONG

LOCATION

Saturdays

TIME

TIME

Instructor: Haley Haggerty RESIDENT FEE: $30.00 (Tap and Jazz combo $40.00) NON RESIDENT FEE: $50.00 (Tap and Jazz combo $60.00)

Asbury Barn

1/6 - 3/12

RESIDENT FEE: $30.00 • NON RESIDENT FEE: $50.00

JAZZ and TAP

LOCATION

DATES

JS Wilson Cafeteria Tuesdays

1/12-3/2

1/12-3/2

DAY

Asbury Barn Mon. & Weds

RESIDENT FEE: $30.00 • NON RESIDENT FEE: $50.00

INTERMEDIATE LINE DANCE LOCATION

Tai Chi is an ancient Chinese martial art. Today it is practiced as an exercise that promotes the flow of “Chi” or energy in the body, leading to good health, good balance, and a positive mental outlook.

7:00 - 9:00 p.m.

BEGINNER LINE DANCE

DAY

Instructors: Dave and Kathy Wayman

LOCATION

SOCIAL BALLROOM DANCING

LOCATION

INTRODUCTION TO TAI CHI

TIME

7:00 - 8:00 p.m.

Mondays

1/6 - 3/17

5:45 - 6:30 p.m.

1/6 - 3/17

6:30 - 7:15 p.m.

1/6 - 3/17

7:15 - 8:15 p.m.

1/9 - 3/20

5:45 - 6:30 p.m.

Thursdays

1/9 - 3/20

6:30 - 7:15 p.m.

MUSCLE CONDITIONING Asbury Barn Thursdays

1/9 - 3/20

7:15 - 8:15 p.m.

PILATES MAT WORK Asbury Barn

Mondays

MUSCLE CONDITIONING Asbury Barn

Mondays

Circuit Step Aerobics

Asbury Barn

Thursdays

Stability Ball Workout

Asbury Barn

Participants must supply their own ball.

Visit us on the web at www.millcreektownship.com/Residents/ParksandRecreation.aspx 48 Millcreek


LOCATION

DAY

MIHS Fitness Center Tue. & Thurs.

DATES

1/7 -3/20

This workout starts with cardio interval circuits high/low both shown by the instructor followed by a muscle conditioning interval. By the time the workout is over we have worked every muscle in your body. Please bring with you to class 3-5 lb. dumbbells and a mat for floor work.

TIME

5:30 p.m.

SELF-DEFENSE OF “TUITE” AGES 14 & ABOVE   RESIDENT FEE: $30.00 • NON RESIDENT FEE: $50.00 Teaches the student how to use muscle moving techniques to disbalance an attacker and redirect his aggression. A non-forceful method. Instructor: Joe Logue LOCATION

DAY

DATES

TIME

Grandview Elementary Mon. & Weds. 1/6 - 3/19 7:00 - 9:00 p.m. (No class 1/20, 2/3, 2/17)

Instructor: Nancy Rovin RESIDENT FEE: $30.00 • NON RESIDENT FEE: $50.00 CHAIR YOGA A gentle form of yoga for those with limited flexibility using seated and standing poses. Maintain joint mobility, stretch and strengthen the body using the chair for support — yoga mat required. Asbury Barn

DAY

Wednesdays

DATES

1/8 -3/19

TIME

5:30 - 6:15 p.m.

HATHA 1 YOGA BEGINNER AND BEYOND A multi-level format for beginners or for experienced students to strengthen their current practice. Posture, breath work, and guided relaxation. Yoga mat/block/strap recommended. LOCATION

Asbury Barn

DAY

Wednesdays

Combines high energy and motivating Latin music that allows you to dance away your worries, and it’s a great sweat! You DO NOT need a partner for Zumba nor do you need dance experience. Look, feel, live better and join the dance party! Instructor: Susan McCall RESIDENT FEE: $40.00 Tuesdays AND Thursdays (a.m. classes) NON RESIDENT FEE: $60.00 Tuesdays AND Thursdays (a.m. classes) RESIDENT FEE: $30.00 Tuesday OR Wednesday (p.m. classes) NON RESIDENT FEE: $50.00 Tuesday OR Wednesday (p.m. classes)

YOGA

LOCATION

ZUMBA

DATES

1/8 - 3/19

TIME

6:30 - 7:30 p.m.

CONTINUING YOGA

LOCATION

LOCATION

Asbury Barn

DAY

Tuesdays

DATES

1/7-3/18

TIME

9:15 - 10:15 a.m.

DATES

TIME

5:30 - 6:30 p.m. 5:30 - 6:30 p.m. 8:00 - 9:00 a.m.

ADULT SEASON GYM PASS A $20.00 Season Gym Pass entitles the holder (Adult - ages 18 and over) to these activities. Passes are purchased at the gym. BASKETBALL LOCATION

Westlake

DAY

DATES

TIME

DATES

TIME

Tues. & Thurs. 1/7 - 3/27

7:00 - 9:00 p.m.

TABLE TENNIS/BADMINTON LOCATION

MIHS

DAY

Tuesdays Saturdays

1/7-3/25 1/11-3/29

9:00 - 11:00 p.m. 7:00 - 10:00 p.m.

WATER EXERCISE

RESIDENT FEE: $30.00 • NON RESIDENT FEE: $50.00 BEGINNER CHAIR YOGA/STRETCH, FLEX AND POSE Instructor: Susan McCall For those interested in improving strength, flexibility and mobility. Limited weight bearing. Yoga mat required.

DAY

Asbury Barn Tuesdays 1/7-3/11 JS Wilson Cafeteria Wednesdays 1/8-3/12 Asbury Barn Tues. & Thurs. 1/7-3/13

RESIDENT FEE: $40.00 NON RESIDENT FEE: $60.00 LOCATION

MIHS Pool

DAY

DATES

TIME

Tues. & Thurs. 1/7-3/20 7:00 - 8:00 p.m. (No class 1/6, 1/23, 1/30, 2/6, 2/11)

RESIDENT FEE: $40.00 • NON RESIDENT FEE: $60.00 Instructor: Kathy Smith For beginners and experienced students. A combination of meditation, deep breathing exercises, stretches, and poses to maintain and improve strength and peace of mind. BEGINNER CONTINUING YOGA Previous Yoga practice required. LOCATION

Asbury Barn

DAY

DATES

Tuesdays/Thursday 1/7-3/20

TIME

11:00 a.m. - 12:00

Millcreek | Winter 2013 | icmags.com 49

Millcreek Township - Recreation & Parks

Instructors: Nylene Baney RESIDENT FEE: $40.00 • NON RESIDENT FEE: $60.00 This class is choreographed to focus on building lean muscle mass, cardio endurance and solid core strength. With this combination of moves you will be sure to bust through any plateaus you have faced in the past and pack on lean muscle that helps you fight osteoporosis and keeps weight off.

Millcreek

WEIGHT TRAINING/CARDIO WORKOUT/MUSCLE CONDITIONING


Activities for Children & Youth DANCE & BALLET/HIP HOP & ZUMBA

PRESCHOOL ACTIVITIES Instructor: Adrienne Steppic A combination of preschool activities including playtime, arts and crafts, song time, learning time, story time included with aerobics, a fun-filled interactive exercise program. These activities have been planned to help your child grow physically, emotionally, socially and intellectually. Children must be out of diapers and/or pull-ups and be able to use the restroom independently. Please pack a healthy snack and a spill proof drink bottle. Backpacks are not required but are useful to carry artwork home.

Instructor: Haley Haggerty Dance and ballet classes are held at Asbury Barn for eight weeks, January 11 through March 1. Parents of 3- and 4-year-olds must wait on the first floor of the barn while classes are taking place on the second floor.

AGE 3 • 1/6 - 3/12

ADVANCED BEGINNER

DAY

DATES

Asbury Barn Mon. and Weds. 1/6 - 3/12 DAY

DATES

Asbury Barn Mon. and Weds. 1/6 - 3/12

TIME

COST

9:30 a.m. - 12:00 $140.00 (Non. Res. $180.00)

DAY

DATES

Asbury Barn Mon. and Weds. 1/6 - 3/12

COST

9:30 - 11:00 a.m.

$80.00

TIME

COST

11:00 a.m. - 12:00 $60.00

(Non. Res. $80.00)

DATES

1/11 - 3/1

DAY

DATES

Saturdays

1/11 - 3/1

PRE-BALLET/TAP AGES

5 to 7 AGES

8 to 12

DAY

DATES

Saturdays

1/11 - 3/1

DAY

DATES

Saturdays

1/11 - 3/1

TIME

10:00 - 10:45 a.m.

TIME

11:00 - 11:45 a.m.

TIME

12:00 - 12:45 p.m.

TIME

1:00 - 1:45 p.m.

MYAA SPORTS REGISTRATION Parent or guardian must attend with proof of child’s age. For questions, please contact MYAA at 833-3298 or go online at myaasports.com. BASEBALL AND SOFTBALL

PRESCHOOL ACTIVITIES/TODDLER AEROBICS - COMBINED DAY

DAY

Saturdays

(Non. Res. $100.00)

AGES 4-5 • 1/7 - 3/13 LOCATION

3 and 4

HIP HOP TIME

TODDLER AEROBICS - SEPARATE LOCATION

AGES

3 and 4

PRESCHOOL ACTIVITIES - SEPARATE LOCATION

BEGINNER

AGES

PRESCHOOL ACTIVITIES/TODDLER AEROBICS - COMBINED LOCATION

RESIDENT FEE: $30.00 • NON RESIDENT FEE: $40.00

DATES

Asbury Barn Tue. and Thurs. 1/7 - 3/13

TIME

COST

12:00 - 3:00 p.m. $140.00

(Non. Res. $180.00)

LOCATION

DAY

DATES

TIME

Grandview School 4301 Lancaster Road Grandview School

Sunday

February 23

2:00 - 5:00 p.m.

Monday

February 24

7:00 - 9:00 p.m.

illcreek

Millcreek Township - Recreation & Parks

PRESCHOOL ACTIVITIES - SEPARATE LOCATION

DAY

DATES

Asbury Barn Tue. and Thurs. 1/7 - 3/13

TIME

COST

12:00 - 2:00 p.m. $80.00

(Non. Res. $100.00)

TODDLER AEROBICS - SEPARATE LOCATION

DAY

DATES

Asbury Barn Tue. and Thurs. 1/7 - 3/13

Our Recreation Program Our recreation program, and the facilities of the Department are available to Millcreek Township citizens and through the combined efforts of:

TIME

2:00 - 3:00 p.m.

COST

$60.00

(Non. Res. $80.00)

James G. Sperry, Director of the Millcreek Recreation and Parks Department Londa Cirillo, Secretary to the Director

Recreation and Parks Commission: Herbert Down, Sue Strohmeyer, Ed Peck, James Gildersleeve and Judy Wheaton, John DiPlacido

The Millcreek Township School District

Millcreek Supervisors: Brian McGrath, Joe Kujawa and Rick Figaski

Visit us on the web at www.millcreektownship.com/Residents/ParksandRecreation.aspx 50 Millcreek


Instructor: Betty Nelson RESIDENT FEE: $30.00 • NON RESIDENT FEE: $50.00 Asbury Barn

DAY

Wednesdays

DATES

1/8 - 3/5

TIME

3:00 - 5:00 p.m.

DRAWING FOR ALL LEVELS*

Asbury Barn

DAY

Thursdays

DATES

1/9-3/6

TIME

3:00 - 5:00 p.m.

PASTELS AND ACRYLICS* Instructor: Betty Nelson RESIDENT FEE: $30.00 • NON RESIDENT FEE: $50.00 LOCATION

Asbury Barn

DAY

Fridays

DATES

1/10-3/7

TIME

3:00 - 5:00 p.m.

KNITTING AND CROCHETING CIRCLE Instructor: Arlene Elliott This class covers intermediate and advanced levels, with special techniques thrown in. Project work is the norm in this class... basic skills are assumed but will be reviewed as needed. Students should choose a project and come get help with it any time during the day on Friday. Over the years, this class has become a social circle and we do special things such as carry-in lunches, day trips in spring, summer and fall with a yearly luncheon in January. RESIDENT FEE: $30.00 • NON RESIDENT FEE: $50.00 LOCATION

Asbury Barn

DAY

Fridays

DATES

1/10-3/7

TIME

9:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.

BEADWEAVING Instructor: Yvette Lombardi This class will be moving beyond the basic stringing techniques. Projects will be done by weaving with a needle, thread and beads, all entwined together by hand in an intricate pattern. Projects will vary each session. Instructor will have supplies for purchase in class. RESIDENT FEE: $30.00 • NON RESIDENT FEE: $50.00 LOCATION

Asbury Woods

DAY

Mondays

DATES

1/13-3/3

TIME

6:15 - 8:15 p.m.

SPECIAL BASKETS: AMERICAN HERITAGE BASKETS

Instructor: Charles Elliott Start with a small Berry Basket to practice some basic basket-making skills. We will then move to hand weave the following type of baskets: Letter wall basket • Kentucky rib basket • Holiday basket Materials cost $15.00 provided at class. RESIDENT FEE: $30.00 • NON RESIDENT FEE: $50.00 LOCATION

Asbury Barn

DAY

Thursdays

DATES

1/9-3/6

LOCATION

Asbury Barn

Instructor: Betty Nelson RESIDENT FEE: $30.00 • NON RESIDENT FEE: $50.00 LOCATION

Instructor: Arlene Elliott Learn to cast on, knit, purl and bind off. Learn to chain, single, double and triple crochet. We will complete a project of your choice. RESIDENT FEE: $30.00 • NON RESIDENT FEE: $50.00 DAY

Tuesdays

DATES

1/7-3/4

TIME

7:00 - 9:00 p.m.

INTRODUCTION TO CHAIR SEAT CANING AND BASKET MAKING

Instructor: Charles Elliott Bring your own chair for caning, fiber rush, shaker style. Material costs $20.00 to be paid in class/chair. $5.00/basket RESIDENT FEE: $30.00 • NON RESIDENT FEE: $50.00 LOCATION

Asbury Barn

DAY

Fridays

DATES

1/10-3/7

TIME

9:30 - 11:30 a.m.

SEAT WEAVING/CHAIR SEAT CANING

Instructor: Charles Elliott We specialize in antique chair restoration, specifically chairs that have woven seats. We have chairs woven with wicker cane webbing, fiber rush herringbone cane, flat reed, and of course, chair caning represented in these courses. It takes time to weave these seats, but our weavers are so proud of the finished products. RESIDENT FEE: $30.00 • NON RESIDENT FEE: $50.00 LOCATION

Asbury Barn

DAY

Tuesdays

DATES

1/7 - 3/4

TIME

7:00 - 9:00 p.m.

NEW

BUNDLED EMBROIDERY

Thursday evening: 7 - 9 p.m. Instructor: Florence Elliott. Materials provided by the instructor. Try your hand at timeless fiber arts. Learn basic embroidery. Those who want to try tatting and fine thread crochet may opt for those as well. Materials cost $7.00 provided at class. RESIDENT FEE: $30.00 • NON RESIDENT FEE: $50.00 LOCATION

Asbury Barn

DAY

Thursdays

DATES

1/9 - 3/6

TIME

7:00 - 9:00 p.m.

NEW

KNIT TOYS FROM YOUR YARN BASKET

Wednesdays: 7 - 9 p.m. Instructor: Florence Elliott Come and have fun making cute little critters and Topsy Turvy toys for the children in your life. We will attempt to complete one huggable toy (elephant, sheep, or giraffe) and one Topsy Turvy toy (choose from animals and dolls). Expect to do work at home between classes. These are time-consuming but worthwhile. Materials cost $7.00 provided at class. RESIDENT FEE: $30.00 • NON RESIDENT FEE: $50.00 LOCATION

Asbury Barn

DAY

Wednesdays

DATES

1/8-3/5

TIME

7:00 - 9:00 p.m.

TIME

7:00 - 9:00 p.m. Millcreek | Winter 2013 | icmags.com 51

Millcreek Township - Recreation & Parks

BEGINNER KNITTING AND CROCHETING

PAINTING FOR ALL LEVELS* LOCATION

k Chair caning, basket making and jewelry making materials are purchased at class. k Gold Card holders must pay for materials in classes where materials are included in cost of class.

Millcreek

k Must be 18 years old or 14-17 accompanied by an adult. k Registration is required for all classes. k Art classes and crocheting classes - NO materials are provided.


Keep to the

RIGHT

A

illcreek

M illcreek Township Paramedics

ccording to the National Fire Protection ambulance crash report dated November 9, 2011, motor vehicle crashes involving ambulances pose a serious risk to both crew and patient. Most ambulance accidents occur while an ambulance is trying to negotiate an intersection. Those intersection crashes involve the failure of vehicles to yield the right of way to the emergency vehicle. Drivers are frequently distracted by cell phones, text messaging and loud music. Even with flashing lights and blaring sirens, these distracted drivers fail to detect an approaching ambulance, fire truck or police vehicle. Erie County’s emergency light system played a critical role for many years controlling traffic signals at intersections

52 Millcreek

by control transmitters located in emergency vehicles. As the traffic control system fell into disrepair, elected officials from several county municipalities realized repair and upgrades to the emergency light system was necessary. When the system is again fully operational, the motoring public will find the white light attached to most traffic control signals flashes as an emergency vehicle is approaching the intersection. Motorist should move to the right, continue their direction of travel and yield the right of way to the passing emergency vehicle. We would like to thank some people who have been strong advocates of reviving this system. Their commitment to the safety of our emergency

responders is helping to protect those who risk their own lives to protect our community. A special thanks to Joe Kujawa, Millcreek Township Supervisor, Phil Fatica Erie County Council and Ryan Bizzaro, Pennsylvania State Representative. In addition Millcreek Paramedic Service would like to remind township residents that the annual membership campaign is currently underway Please mail your membership application today or visit our website at www.millcreekparamedics.com to join online. If you have questions concerning Millcreek Paramedics or your organization or group wishes a presentation concerning our service please call 814.836.8677.


Business Directory

Millcreek | Winter 2013 | icmags.com 53


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Business Directory

Millcreek | Winter 2013 | icmags.com 55


inCOGNITO

Did you know?

It’s a bad idea to walk across Lake Erie?

Did You Know? We are looking for little-known facts, history or other interesting stories about your community. Please send your ideas to editors@icmags.com. 56 724.942.0940 to advertise | Millcreek

L

iving on a lakefront presents unique circumstances to residents that their land-locked counterparts can’t even fathom. There’s lake-effect snow, in addition to maritime law and currents. There’s also the ill-conceived idea that walking across a frozen lake is a good use of time, especially when the other side of that lake is another country altogether. History shows, time and again, that trying to walk across a frozen Lake Erie is a fool’s errand. Archived news reports detail many missing persons reports starting out with the person’s trail going cold at the water’s edge. In 1977, Lake Erie froze over and two men, Brian Kinal and Bob Bliss of Findley Lake, N.Y., decided walking to Ontario was on their bucket list, despite warnings from the Coast Guard trying to discourage them from doing it. So, at dawn on Saturday, February 12, with a CB radio in hand, and a lifeline connected to each other, the pair made their way out onto the ice. By nightfall they set up camp, not knowing how much progress they had made in their 24-mile itinerary. Bliss recalled in news reports that they were encountering slushy ice with several inches of water in some places, and really slick ice in others. Fortunately for them, a helicopter dispatched from Millcreek flew out to warn them of bad weather heading their way. The helicopter was damaged by a pole the pair used for checking the integrity of the ice, so then-Millcreek supervisor Paul Martin stayed behind with them while another chopper was deployed to bring them all back. For all their trouble, Kinal and Bliss only made it eight miles into their trek before having to be rescued, and both returned with the newfound insight that walking across the lake was not the best of ideas. ■


Business Directory

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