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viewbook

Coquitlam College established 1982

2009/2010


University of Pennsylvania

Yale

MIT

Dartmouth Wake Forest Cornell

NYU Caltech Stanford

Harvard Princeton

Duke

U.S.A.

ty of Chicago C Columbia UniversitĂŠ Laval

Georgetown

Vanderbilt Francis Xavier University

University of Prince Edward Island

Nova Scotia Nov

St Mary’s University Dalhousie University

PEI

Acadia University

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Brock University

New Brunswick University of Guelph University of Moncton

York University

University of New Brusnwick Memorial University of Newfoundland University of Waterloo

Newfoundland

University of Ottawa


viewbook 2009:2010

1

University Programs

High School Programs

English Studi

Coquitlam College:

is where the world’s students come to expand their academic networks. For over 25 years, we’ve been preparing young people from all over the globe for university success in Canada, the United States and beyond.

Become a student Information Founded: 1982 Networks: Global Location: 516 Brookmere Avenue Coquitlam, British Columbia Canada V3J 1W9 Website: www.coquitlamcollege.com Email: admiss@coquitlamcollege.com

University of British Columbia welcome to coquitlam college coquitlam college quick facts the academic experience coquitlam college study options Concordia University university programs • certificate program • diploma program Quebec • curriculum • university transfer guide

Simon Fraser University

2 6 9 10

British Columbia

13 14 McGill University 16 18 26

Coquitlam College

Royal Roads

Bishop’s highUniversity school programs University 33 sity of Toronto english study programs 39 • english certificate program 40 • university prep program 41 of Western Ontario • holiday-study tours University41 Lakehead University ersity homestay program 42 tuitions fees & living expenses 43 academic schedule 44 how to apply 45 Queen’s University

O Ontario

University of Manitoba Trent University

University of Victoria

University of Northern BC

Alberta CANADA ADA

Univers

Manitoba

Saskatchewan

University of Saskatchewan University of Alberta


welcome to coquitlam college

Will Eckford, principal Welcome to an exciting new educational adventure where your opportunities to succeed are without boundaries. Since 1982, thousands of our graduates have completed degrees at universities in Canada and the United States. On behalf of our dedicated instructors and staff, we invite you to join us. Come and discover just how far you can go.

Wendy Gould, vice-principal We invite you to join our college community and experience an educational program designed to suit your needs and chosen career path. Our dedicated and caring team of instructors and support staff work tirelessly to ensure that your time at Coquitlam College is rewarding and memorable.

Linda Bao

Sun Hye Kim

Chris Rands

Melita O’Neill

DIRECTOR OF CHINESE RELATIONS, ACADEMIC COUNSELLOR

DIRECTOR OF KOREAN RELATIONS, ACADEMIC COUNSELLOR

ACADEMIC COUNSELLOR

HOMESTAY COORDINATOR HOLIDAY-STUDY DIRECTOR melita@coquitlamcollege.com


2

3

Coquitlam College:

has built a reputation for superb educational standards and inspiring, highly qualified instructors— all in a safe, supportive, and social environment. That’s why students choose us. And that’s why students leave us equipped with deep knowledge, great memories, and life-long friendships.


To Sunshine Coast & Gulf Islands

Downtown Vancouver


4

5

To Whistler Blackcomb

West Vancouver

Stanley Park

WELCOME TO

VANCOUVER


coquitlam college quick facts

Over 90%

of our graduates go on to achieve university degrees in Canada.

Our academic counsellors are fluent in many languages and available every day to help you with course selection and career planning.

Our average class size is just

20 students. Small classes mean individual attention from our highly qualified instructors.

50% less

Our fees are up to than most Canadian universities— greater value for a superior academic experience.

We enhance your education with organized sports and supervised camping and skiing trips.

We have 1,000 to 1,200 students each year from over

20

countries.

Cultural experiences include visits to live theatre performances, art exhibitions, museums, and professional sporting events.


6

22

minutes by Skytrain to downtown Vancouver

7

3 semesters

With per year and over 100 courses per semester, you’ll have the option to graduate sooner.

50 teachers,

most with master’s or doctorate degrees.

2.5

hectares of dedicated, tree-lined campus.


welcome to coquitlam college

University Programs Get credits for science, business, and arts courses that are transferable to any Canadian university.


the academic experience

8 9

Coquitlam College:

has the options and the expertise that you need to reach your academic goals. It doesn’t matter if you are ready to begin your university studies right now, or if you need to do more English or high school courses first—our diverse programs let you start moving forward right away. And thanks to our small class sizes, you’ll get plenty of personalized attention from our highlyqualified, experienced instructors.

High School Programs Complete the high school courses you need to begin your university degree.

English Studies Improve your language skills before you move on to success in high school and university.

From intensive English learning, to high school classes, to a wide range of challenging university courses, Coquitlam College offers you the flexibility to begin your university studies as gradually or as quickly as needed. Outstanding teachers are the key to our success. The college is well regarded for its highly qualified instructors who know exactly how to inspire students. Our multilingual counsellors are also readily available to help you choose courses to meet your education and career goals. We proudly offer our programs on a dedicated campus in a beautiful setting. Our campus includes 36 classrooms, computer and science labs, a gymnasium, study hall, library, cafeteria, an outdoor sports field, student parking lots, and surrounding gardens. It’s a secure and nurturing learning environment, ideal for academic excellence.


coquitlam college study options

Our program options are designed for flexibility. Choose the best academic pathway for you, and we’ll help you succeed.

If you are ready to begin your university studies.

University Program We offer one-year certificates and two-year diplomas in business, science, and the arts (including mathematics and economics). Credits from these programs can be transferred to universities across North America.

page 13 If you need more high school before starting university.

High School Program We have four different high school programs to choose from, depending on your age and previous education.

page 33

If you need to improve your English while preparing for university.

English Studies Our options for English study allow you to improve your language skills before moving on to high school or university programs.

page 39


10 11

SELECT A PROGRAM

 ONE YEAR CERTIFICATE PROGRAM page 14  TWO YEAR DIPLOMA PROGRAM page 16

GRADUATION WITH A COQUITLAM COLLEGE DIPLOMA OR CERTIFICATE.

University Degree Once you transfer your Coquitlam College credits, you’ll be only two or three years away from a four year degree at any Canadian university, including:  University of British Columbia  Simon Fraser University  University of Victoria  University of Northern BC  University of Alberta

In addition to Canadian universities, your credits may also be transferable to any number of universities in the United States.


welcome to coquitlam college

Economics Humanities Languages Mathematics Social Sciences Sciences YOUR FUTURE CAREER

Accounting Business Economics English Mathematics Statistics YOUR FUTURE CAREER

Accounting Finance Management Marketing SCIENCE CERTIFICATE/DIPLOMA

Law Economics Education Media

BUSINESS CERTIFICATE/DIPLOMA

ARTS CERTIFICATE/DIPLOMA

COURSES

COURSES

COURSES

Biology Chemistry Computer Science Mathematics Physics YOUR FUTURE CAREER

Engineering Medicine Information technology Pharmacy


university programs

12 13

Coquitlam College:

specializes in getting students ready to excel at North American universities. Our university programs cater to the ambitions of every student, whether you want to go into law, medicine, engineering, computer science or another area of study that you are passionate about. And our graduates are definitely passionate; over 90% of them go on to complete their university degrees.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS To enter our university programs, you must have an accredited high school diploma or certificate. Certain university programs may require one or more terms of additional preparation in order for you to meet the prerequisites. You must also be able to show fluency in English at a university level. If your native language is not English, you may present TOEFL, IELTS or CAEL documents. In some cases, we may require that you write the Coquitlam College English Diagnostic Test.

We offer one-year certificates and two-year diplomas in business, science, and the arts (including mathematics and economics). All of these are readily transferable to degree programs at universities all across Canada, as well as in the United States and beyond. In fact, we are one of the few private institutions in Canada to offer certificates and diplomas that are accepted at all Canadian universities. In British Columbia, our students often go on to complete degrees at the University of British Columbia, Simon Fraser University, the University of Victoria, the University of Northern British Columbia, and Royal Roads University. For several years, our special relationship with the University of British Columbia in particular has ensured the smooth transfer of our graduating students to UBC programs. Our course content and governing regulations are modelled on British Columbia’s five major universities. We regularly review both to ensure that we always maintain the highest standards expected by these institutions.


university program : ONE YEAR CERTIFICATE PROGRAM

Our one-year certificate programs in the arts, business, and science are designed YEAR CERTIFICATE to give you a strong foundation in your PROGRAM intended area of study. For most university degree programs, your certificate will allow you to enter directly into your second year of study at the BC university of your choice. (Since the requirements at other universities may differ, our academic counsellors can help you look at your options at universities outside of BC.)

1

All certificate programs require you to complete 30 or 31 credits worth of courses. If you have already completed some courses at another institution, you may transfer up to 18 credits toward our certificate programs. Your final three courses (nine credits) must be completed at Coquitlam College.

Arts certificate

Business Certificate

The Arts Certificate is a one-year (30 credits) program in general arts designed to provide students with a broad education in humanities and the social sciences.

The Business Certificate is a one-year (30 credits) program in business designed to provide the foundation coursework for completion of a university degree in business or entry into a professional program in accounting, finance or financial planning.

Arts Certificate requirements In order to ensure the breadth of the arts programs, all students are required to complete courses in five subject areas. Remaining courses may be chosen from any area.

BUSINESS Courses

Credits

Courses

Credits

POTENTIAL CAREERS:

English (ENGL)

6

ACCT 101 and ACCT 102

6

Law Economics Education Media

Second Language (CHIN, JAPA or FREN)

6

CSCI 100

3

ENGL 101 or PHIL 101

3

Humanities (ASIA, ENGL, HIST or PHIL)

3

Science (BIOL, CHEM, CSCI, GEOG (101 and 102 only), MACM, MATH, PHYS or STAT)

3

Social Sciences (ANTH, CMNS, ECON, GEOG, POLI, PSYC or SOCI)

6

Electives

6

Total Credits

30

ECON 100

3

MATH 100 and MATH 111

6

Electives

9

Total Credits

30

POTENTIAL CAREERS:

Accounting Finance Management Marketing


14 15

For students who want to apply for a second certificate, you must complete an additional two courses (six credits) at Coquitlam College. Up to six credits from another institution may be transferred to your second certificate.

Science Certificate The one-year Certificate in Science is designed to provide students with a complete overview of first year science. It is intended for students who wish to go on to further studies in science or engineering at a university in British Columbia and it satisfies the first year requirements in science faculties at all BC universities. The program requirements depend upon students’ intended major at university.

POTENTIAL CAREERS:

Engineering Medicine Information technology Pharmacy

BIOLOGY Courses

GENERAL SCIENCES Credits

BIOL 101 and BIOL 102

8

CHEM 101

5

MATH 101 and MATH 102

6

PHYS 101

3

English

6

Electives

3

Total Credits

31

CHEMISTRY, PHYSICS OR ENGINEERING Courses

Credits

CHEM 101 and CHEM 102

10

MATH 101 and MATH 102

6

PHYS 101 and PHYS 102

6

English

6

Electives

3

Total Credits

31

COMPUTER SCIENCE OR MATHEMATICS Courses

Credits

CSCI 101

4

CHEM 101

5

MATH 101 and MATH 102

6

PHYS 101

3

English

6

Electives

6

Total Credits

30

*Students may take CSCI 120 (3) in lieu of CSCI 101 in order to complete the Certificate Program in Computer Science or Mathematics.

Courses

Credits

MATH 101 and MATH 102

6

Science courses *

12

English

6

Electives

6

Total Credits

30

*Science Courses must be chosen from courses with the following prefixes: BIOL, CHEM, CSCI, PHYS or GEOG (101 and 102 only).


university program : TWO YEAR DIPLOMA PROGRAM

2

YEAR DIPLOMA PROGRAM

Our two-year diploma programs in the arts, business, and science will give you the chance to begin specializing in your academic area of interest.

For most university degree programs, your diploma will allow you to enter directly into your third year of study at the British Columbia university of your choice. (Since the requirements at other universities may differ, our academic counsellors can help you look at your options at universities outside of BC.)

ARTS PROGRAMS These two-year diploma programs (60 or 61 credits) will provide you with a broad education, with special emphasis in humanities and the social sciences. You may complete a general studies diploma, or you may choose to specialize in computer science, economics, or mathematics. All students working toward an Arts Diploma must complete core requirements in five subject areas. Each specific Arts Diploma also has additional course requirements. Any remaining courses may be chosen from any area.

Arts Diploma Requirements In order to ensure the breadth of the arts programs, all students are required to complete courses in five subject areas. Remaining courses may be chosen from any area. Courses

Credits

English (ENGL)

6

Second Language (CHIN, JAPA or FREN)

6

Humanities (ASIA, ENGL, HIST or PHIL)

3

Science (BIOL, CHEM, CSCI, GEOG (101 and 102 only), MACM, MATH, PHYS or STAT) Social Sciences (ANTH, CMNS, ECON, GEOG, POLI, PSYC or SOCI) Total Credits

Core requirements Second year courses Electives Total Credits

6–10

6

27–36

Credits

27–31 21 9–12 60–61

Diploma in Arts (Computer Science) Courses

Core requirements CSCI 101 or CSCI 120 & CSCI 201

Credits

27–31 7–8

MACM 101

3

MATH 101 and MATH 102

6

Two of: CSCI 103, 110, 150, 165

6

One of: CSCI 275, MACM 201

3

2nd year MATH or STAT

3

Electives Total Credits

Diploma in Arts (Economics) Courses

Core requirements

0–4 60–61

Credits

27–31

ECON 100

3

ECON 201 and ECON 202

6

ECON 203

3

MATH 111 and MATH 112

6

STAT 291

3

One of: ECON 210, ECON 250

3

Electives Total Credits

Diploma in Arts (General Studies) Courses

All diploma programs require you to complete 60 or 61 credits worth of courses. If you have already completed some courses at another institution, you may transfer up to 30 credits toward our diploma programs. Your final three courses (nine credits) must be completed here at Coquitlam College.

5–9 60–61

Diploma in Arts (Mathematics) Courses

Credits

Core requirements

27– 31

CSCI 101 or CSCI 120

3–4

MATH 101 and MATH 102

6

MATH 232

3

STAT 270

3

Two of: MATH 201, MATH 202, MATH 215

6

Electives Total Credits

9 –12 60–61


16 17

BUSINESS PROGRAMS

SCIENCE PROGRAMS

The two-year (60 credits) diploma programs in business are designed for students who wish to pursue a career in a field where knowledge of sound business practices is an advantage. The programs are designed to provide the foundation coursework for completion of a university degree in business, entry into a professional program in accounting, finance or financial planning, or direct entry into the world of business.

The two year (60 - 61 credits) science diploma programs build upon the foundations established in the science certificate program for computer science and mathematics majors. They are designed for students who wish to complete their second year of studies at the College prior to entering university or who wish to prepare for work in areas requiring a sound academic background in computer science or mathematics.

Diploma in Business (General Program) The General Program is intended for students who wish to obtain business credentials that will allow them to go on to professional programs in accounting, finance or financial planning or directly into the world of business.

Diploma in Science (Computer Science)

Courses

ACCT 101 and ACCT 102

Credits

6

ACCT 205

3

BUSI 237 (or CSCI 100)

3

BUSI 272

3

ENGL 101

3

ECON 201 and ECON 202

6

ECON 250

3

Courses

CHEM 101 CSCI 101 or CSCI 120 and CSCI 201

Diploma in Science (Computer Science and Mathematics)

Credits

5 7–8

MACM 101

3

MATH 101 and MATH 102

6

MATH 201 and MATH 232

6

PHYS 101

3

English

6

Two of: CSCI 103, 110, 150, 165

6

One of: CSCI 275, MACM 201

3

Electives

15

Total Credits

60–61

Diploma in Science (Mathematics)

MATH 111 and MATH 112

6

STAT 291

3

Courses

One of: ENGL 103, ENGL 111, ENGL 121

3

CHEM 101

5

CSCI 101 and CSCI 201

8

Arts electives

9

MACM 101

3

Electives

12

MATH 101 and MATH 102

6

Total Credits

60

MATH 201 and MATH 232

6

Courses

CHEM 101 CSCI 101 or CSCI 120 and CSCI 201

Credits

5 7–8

MACM 101

3

MACM 201

3

MATH 101 and MATH 102

6

MATH 201 and MATH 232

6

MATH 215

3

PHYS 101

3

STAT 270

3

English

6

TWO of: CSCI 103, 110, 150, 165

6

Electives

9

Total Credits

60– 61

Note Students may transfer 6 courses (18 credits) from another institution for the certificate programs and 10 courses (30 credits) from another institution for the diploma programs. Additionally, 2 courses (6 credits) from other institutions may be transferred for a second certificate or diploma. Students must complete the last 3 courses of certificate and diploma programs at Coquitlam College.

Credits

MATH 215

3

PHYS 101

3

STAT 270

3

English

6

One of: MACM 201, MATH 202

3

Electives

15

Total Credits

61

Students applying for multiple certificates or diplomas must complete 2 additional courses (6 credits) for certificates and 4 courses (12 credits) for diplomas at Coquitlam College.


university program : CURRICULUM

Curriculum The course content, governing regulations, and policies are modelled on those of British Columbia’s five major universities. The College regularly reviews curricula to maintain academic standards acceptable to all universities. UNIVERSITY PROGRAM COURSES ACCT 101 Financial Accounting I 3 CREDITS This course introduces students to the basic principles, concepts, and applications of financial accounting. Upon completion of this course, students will be competent in all functions of the accounting cycle including preparation of financial statements, applying the basic principles and concepts of financial accounting in the evaluation of assets, and being conversant with internal control procedures involving assets. Prerequisites: None

ACCT 102 Financial Accounting II 3 CREDITS Accounting 102 continues the basic principles, concepts, and applications of financial accounting that were introduced in Accounting 101. Upon completion of this course, students will have a complete understanding of the balance sheet, income statement, and statement of changes in owner’s equity, and apply the basic principles and concepts of financial accounting in the evaluation of assets, liabilities, and owner’s equity. Prerequisites: ACCT 101

ACCT 205 Managerial Accounting I 3 CREDITS Students will examine the basics of managerial accounting including the gathering of costs, allocation of costs to products and services and the effects of these costing methods on the managerial use of the information. In addition, measurement, control and alternative choice information are examined as outputs of a managerial accounting system. Specific topics include direct cost analysis, overhead application methods, budgeting (static and flexible) and alternative choice decisions based on relevant revenues and relevant costs. Also, the uses of responsibility centres

(cost, revenue income and ROI) are analyzed from a motivational point of view, and the establishment of supervisory information (variance analysis) and related departmental responsibility techniques are examined. Prerequisites: ACCT 101 and 102

ANTH 101 Introduction to Anthropology 3 CREDITS This course will explore the scope, nature, and methods of the discipline through an examination of selected societies. The main topics covered are human origins and pre-history; foraging; horticultural, pastoral, agricultural and industrial societies; environmental adaptation; kinship and descent; political systems and social control. Prerequisites: None

ANTH 102 Anthropological Concepts 3 CREDITS This course examines the major concepts employed by cultural anthropologists in some of the classic works in the discipline. Debates about culture, methods of field research, gender relations, the structure of religion and myth and the role of warfare will all be analyzed. Prerequisites: None

ASIA 200 Introduction to Traditional Asia 3 CREDITS The course is a sweeping survey of the histories and cultures of Asia from its pre-historic beginnings to the end of the 18th century. The course is interdisciplinary in nature, which means that students explore Asian civilization using the methods and insights of archaeology, history, geography, sociology, anthropology, philosophy, religious studies, political science, economics, women’s studies, art, literary studies and so forth. From a backdrop of historical development, students examine political and social structures, war and military campaigns, court intrigues, philosophical and religious foundations, work and economic changes, geo-political demographics, art, and literary developments. The course focuses primarily on China. Furthermore, the course pays close attention to important figures in the history of Asia such as Qin Shi Huangdi, Empress Wu, Zuanzong, Chinggis Khan, etc. Prerequisites: Minimum of 3 social science and/or arts courses.

ASIA 210 The Emergence of Modern Asia 3 CREDITS This course is an exploration of the emergence of modern China covering main events of the 19th and 20th centuries. The course begins by exploring the background of China’s encounter with the imperial West and the end of its isolation. Prerequisites: Minimum of 3 social science and/or arts courses.

BIOL 101 Principles of Biology I 4 CREDITS This course is designed as the first in a pair of courses in biological sciences that provide a detailed examination of the basic unit of life — the cell. Organisms are studied with a particular emphasis on the structure and function of systems in both plants and animals. Three-hour labs are an integral part of the course. Prerequisites: BI 12 required, CH 12 recommended.

BIOL 102 Principles of Biology II 4 CREDITS This course provides an introduction to the biological concepts of continuity of life, unity and the diversity of living things, change of organisms through time and interactions of living things. Three-hour labs are an integral part of the course. Prerequisites: BI 12 required, CH 12 recommended.

BIOL 104 Introduction to Biology 4 CREDITS This course is designed to provide students with a scientific perspective and to introduce general concepts of biology. Topics covered include structure, function, physiology and reproduction at the cellular and organismal levels of organization, mechanisms of inheritance, evolution and ecological relationships. Prerequisites: None. The course is intended for non-science students. It is a prerequisite for students without Biology 11 and 12 who intend to take Principles of Biology 101/102. Students who have completed Biology 101 and/or 102 may not take this course for further credit.


18 19

BUSI 237 Introduction to Computers and Information Systems in Business 3 CREDITS This course provides students with a fundamental overview of computerbased information systems and their applications in business, including a discussion of issues involved in the use of information systems by management. The course also provides students with a “handson� tutorial experience in the use of microcomputers with particular emphasis on business productivity tools which include spreadsheets, database management systems, operating systems, etc. Prerequisites: Minimum of any 15 university CREDITS/transfer CREDITS

BUSI 272 Organizational Behaviour 3 CREDITS This course offers students theories, concepts and issues to consider in the field of organizational behaviour with an emphasis on individual and team processes. Core topics include employee motivation and performance, stress management, communication, work perceptions and attitudes, decision-making, team dynamics, employee involvement and conflict management. Prerequisites: Minimum 15 university/transfer CREDITS including one of ENGL 101, 103, 111, 121 or PHIL 100, 101, 200.

CHEM 101 Principles of Chemistry I 4 CREDITS In this course students will be introduced to the basic concepts of chemistry with emphasis on chemical principles and methods. Topics include a review of definitions; structure of matter; treatment of experimental data; nomenclature; chemical reactions and stoichiometry; atomic structure and periodic relationships; chemical bonding and molecular geometry; intermolecular forces; organic chemistry; structures of compounds; and chemistry of basic functional groups. Prerequisites: CH 12 and Math 12 CHEM 102 Principles of Chemistry II 4 CREDITS In this course students will continue studying the basic concepts of chemistry begun in CHEM 101. Topics include reaction kinetics

and mechanisms; organic reaction mechanisms; equilibrium; acids, bases and solubility; thermochemistry and thermodynamics; redox reactions and electrochemistry. Prerequisites: CHEM 101

CHIN 100 Introductory Chinese I 3 CREDITS This course is an introduction to the Chinese language for students with little or no background in the language. The concept of pinyin Romanization is introduced; grammar is emphasized, and the study of both the traditional and simplified forms of the Chinese writing system is begun. The course also offers an introduction to the spoken forms of Chinese necessary to carry on conversations in daily situations. Prerequisites: None. Native Mandarin speakers may not register.

CHIN 101 Introductory Chinese II 3 CREDITS In this course students will continue the study of oral, reading, writing and listening comprehension skills in Mandarin Chinese begun in Chinese 100. At the end of the course, students will be able to demonstrate mastery of a minimum of 550 characters, write an essay of 250 words and reproduce grammatical structures in Mandarin Chinese. Prerequisites: CHIN 100. Native Mandarin speakers may not register.

CHIN 151 Spoken Mandarin for Speakers of Other Chinese Dialects I 3 CREDITS This course is designed for speakers of non-Mandarin Chinese through practice in listening, speaking and reading. Students will be introduced to the pinyin orthographic system and will learn spoken Mandarin Chinese. Prerequisites: CHIN 100. Native Mandarin speakers may not register.

CHIN 152 Spoken Mandarin for Speakers of Other Chinese Dialects II 3 CREDITS This course is a continuation of Chinese 151 and is designed to help students to further develop their overall communication in Mandarin Chinese. Students will review the pinyin

orthographic system with emphasis on accurate pronunciation, improve aural comprehension and oral expression, and develop an ability to translate English into Mandarin Chinese. Students will also be introduced to advanced grammatical and semantic structures of Mandarin Chinese. At the end of the course, students will be expected to speak fluent Mandarin, to write key Chinese characters and to master essential Mandarin grammar as presented in the required text. Prerequisites: CHIN 151.

CMNS 110 Introduction to Communication Studies 3 CREDITS In this course students will be introduced to a range of topics and concepts explored within communication studies. Beginning with a look at communication as a direct consequence of face-to-face human interaction, students will also consider the nature of the spoken language and non-verbal communication. The technological extensions of language and culture will also be examined. Prerequisites: None

CMNS 130 Explorations in Mass Communication 3 CREDITS This course is an introduction to the role of mass communication in Canadian society. Students will examine the structure and process of mass communications, emphasizing television, radio and the press. The role of mass communication in socialization, public opinion formulation and social change will also be investigated. Prerequisites: None

CMNS 210 History of Communication 3 CREDITS Students will explore the historical development of communications and the influence of communications on history and examine the applications and outcomes of communication media in the context of human history. In addition, the role that communications has played in both implementing change and maintaining social order will also be studied by placing the history of communication within the broader context of social, economic and political factors. Prerequisites: CMNS 110 or CMNS 130


university program : CURRICULUM

CMNS 223 Advertising as Social Communication 3 CREDITS

This course is an introduction to advertising from a critical perspective. Students will explore the history of advertising to show how it has come to occupy a privileged position in contemporary culture. Students will also investigate the relations of the advertising agency to the media, to the state and especially to its target audiences. Prerequisites: None but CMNS 110 or CMNS 130 recommended

CSCI 103 Introduction to Scientific Programming 3 CREDITS This course is an introduction to programming for students of Math and Science. Students will be introduced to fundamental programming concepts and techniques and will gain some knowledge of problem solving, data structures, algorithm design and programming using the C language. At the end of the course students will have a good working knowledge of C and experience with commercial numerical algorithm packages.

CSCI 125 Introduction to Computer Science and Programming II 3 CREDITS This is an intermediate course in computer science and programming. The course is suitable for students who have completed course CSCI 120 and intend to major in computer science or a related program. Topics include: algorithms; algorithmics; computational complexity and correctness; object-oriented programming in C++ or Java. Prerequisites: CSCI 120

Co-requisite: MATH 102

CSCI 100 Software Packages & Programming 3 CREDITS This is an introductory course in computer science. The course provides students with an overview of the fundamentals of hardware and software. The use of software packages is emphasized, focusing on word processing, spreadsheets, databases and presentation software. Students will be introduced to problemsolving techniques and computer programming using object-oriented languages. Prerequisites: MATH 12 or MATH 100 or MATH 110

CSCI 101 Introduction to Computer Programming Using C++ 4 CREDITS This course is an introduction to computer programming using the C++ programming language. Students will be introduced to the principles of problem solving and algorithm design with emphasis on object-oriented programming. By the end of the course, students will be able to design, develop, test and document well-structured programs. Prerequisites: MATH 12 or MATH 100 or MATH 110

CSCI 102 Introduction to Computer Programming Using Java 4 CREDITS This course is an introduction to computer programming using the Java programming language. Principles of problem solving and algorithm design will be introduced. Students will learn the fundamental programming concepts and techniques in the context of Java. Prerequisites: MATH 12 or MATH 100 or MATH 110

CSCI 110 Event-Driven Programming in Visual Basic 3 CREDITS This course is an introduction to event-driven programming using the Visual Basic language. Students will be introduced to the principles of problem solving and algorithm design. By the end of the course, students will be able to design, develop, test and document well-structured programs. Prerequisites: MATH12 or MATH 100 or MATH 110

CSCI 117 Introduction to Internet Programming Using Java 3 CREDITS This course is an introduction to programming using the Java language and will provide students with a good working knowledge of this language. Students will be introduced to the principles of object-oriented analysis and design, and will study some of the tools and techniques required to develop Internet based applications. Prerequisites: CSCI 101

CSCI 120 Introduction to Computer Science and Programming I 3 CREDITS This course is an elementary introduction to computers, computer science and computer programming. No prior computing background is required. Students will study the history of computers and computing and be introduced to a range of user applications and programming languages. The current and future impact of computers on society will be discussed. Students will learn the fundamental concepts and terminology of computer science, and acquire elementary programming skills in the Python 3.x programming language. Prerequisites: MATH 12 or MATH 100 or MATH 110

CSCI 150 Introduction to Computer Design 3 CREDITS In this course students will be introduced to the basic concepts of digital logic design, and the function and use of typical digital components belonging primarily to the small and medium scale integration (SSI, MSI) families. The design principles will be used to develop an understanding of how the functional capabilities can be provided by hardware for the operation of a microprocessor. Assembly language programming will also be introduced. Prerequisites: None

CSCI 165 Introduction to Multimedia and the Internet 3 CREDITS In this course students will examine some of the concepts underlying the use of multimedia and the Internet in society. In the process, students will obtain basic skills in the use of computers for multimedia applications including graphics, text processing, HTML, and programming with Python and PHP. Prerequisites: None

CSCI 201 Data & Program Organization 4 CREDITS This course is an introduction to the definition and application of abstract data structures and modular program design. Students will examine some of the fundamental tools available in object-oriented programming languages for the implementation of complex algorithms. Prerequisites: CSCI 101 or CSCI 102 or equivalent, and MATH 101 or equivalent.


20 21

CSCI 275 Software Engineering 3 CREDITS In this course students will examine a comprehensive range of software engineering tools and techniques. Emphasis is placed on the structured and formal specifications of software requirements, the use of well-defined design techniques, and the systematic verification and validation of software products. Practical experience in the application of the concepts discussed in class is acquired through a group project. Prerequisites: CSCI 201, MATH 101 and MACM 101

ECON 100 Introduction to Economics 3 CREDITS Economics 100 introduces students to basic economic concepts such as scarcity, opportunity, cost, demand, supply and benefit-cost analysis. Prerequisites: None

ECON 201 Introduction to Microeconomics Principles 3 CREDITS This course is an introduction to the analytical principles of microeconomics. Topics include consumer theory, theory of the firm, factors of production and non-market inputs and outputs. Prerequisites: None but ECON 100 and MATH 100 recommended

ECON 202 Introduction to Macroeconomics Principles 3 CREDITS This course is an introduction to the analytical principles of macroeconomics. Topics include macroeconomic measurement, fiscal and monetary policy and economic growth. Prerequisites: None but ECON 100 and MATH 100 recommended

ECON 203 Introduction to Labour Economics 3 CREDITS In this course students will apply economic principles to labour markets and the Canadian labour relations system. The first part of the course introduces the theory of laboureconomics. In the remainder of the course students will be introduced to additional theory and labour-market institutions. The Canadian experience is the basis of most examples. Prerequisites: ECON 201 and 202

ECON 210 Money & Banking 3 CREDITS In this course students will study the evolution of money and the payments system, the role and function of banks and the responsibilities, functions and policy actions of central banks. Basic theories of interest rates, inflation rates and asset prices will be explored Prerequisites: ECON 201 and 202

ECON 240 Introduction to Economic Data Analysis 3 CREDITS In this course students will apply economics theories to real-world problems using theory, data and statistical techniques. No prior knowledge of statistics analysis is expected. Prerequisites: ECON 201 and 202

ECON 250 Managerial Economics 3 CREDITS This course includes an introduction to microeconomics analysis, consumer choice, analysis of consumer demand, elasticity of supply and demand, theory of production, costs of production, competitive markets, pricing in monopoly markets, oligopolistic markets and employment and pricing in factor markets. Differential calculus is used in the course. Prerequisites: ECON 201, 202 and MATH 101 or equivalent

ECON 290 Canadian Microeconomic Policy 3 CREDITS In this course students will be provided with an overview of current policy issues within the context of Canadian institutions. Microeconomic tools are used to analyze policy objectives and methods. This is a “hands-on� course in which students will apply their previously learned micro-economic principles. Prerequisites: ECON 201 and 202 and MATH 100

ECON 291 Canadian Macroeconomic Policy 3 CREDITS In this course students will be provided with an overview of current policy issues within the context of Canadian institutions. Macroeconomic tools are used to analyze policy objectives and methods. Students will employ

previously learned macroeconomics principles in examining selected issues. Prerequisites: ECON 201 and 202 and MATH 100

ENGL 098 TOEFL This is a non-credit course for students for whom English is a second or additional language. The course covers all aspects of preparation for the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) with particular emphasis on reading, grammar and listening skills. Prerequisites: None

ENGL 099 University Writing This non-credit course is intended for students whose writing skills require upgrading to the university level. Students must successfully complete two University Preparation courses prior to enrolling in ENGL 099. In this course, students practice specific reading and writing skills such as interpreting, summarizing, paraphrasing and quoting. Students are also required to master complex reading material and to write frequently in and out of the classroom. Prerequisites: None

ENGL 101 College Composition 3 CREDITS This course deals with the process of writing academic essays. Students learn techniques for note-taking, how to organize material from their reading and how to write summaries. Students analyze scholarly prose, are introduced to a variety of styles and structures and gain practice identifying and using logical argument. Prerequisites: English 12 with a passing grade on the B.C. provincial exam, and an overall grade of B, or an English 12 equivalent course, or English 099 with a minimum grade of C+, or a minimum score of 60 on the writing component of the CAEL, or a minimum score of 6.5 on the I.E.L.T.S. with a minimum score of 6 on the writing component of this test, or a minimum score of 5 on the writing component of the L.P.I., or a minimum score of 5 on the T.W.E. with a minimum score of 230 (computer based score) or 570 (paper based score) on the TOEFL, iBT min. 86 (min. 20 for each section) or a passing grade on the Coquitlam College English Assessment Test.


university program : CURRICULUM

ENGL 103 Canadian Literature 3 CREDITS In this course students are introduced to the major themes in Canadian literature. The course is intended for students who have a strong interest in literature and who have shown themselves to be good writers. Students are expected to compare and analyze various works for style, content, historical perspective and literary history, and for their own response to the act of reading. The course includes the study of poetry, short fiction, the novel and some secondary criticism. Prerequisites: Refer to ENGL 101.

ENGL 111 Introduction to Poetry and Short Fiction 3 CREDITS In this course students are introduced to an intensive study of the genres of poetry and fiction. Several works of short fiction and a range of modern poems will be examined within their social, historical or biographical contexts. Students explore the significance of genre, culture and/ or class to any reading. The primary concern, however, is the close reading of texts — analyzing the form each writer chooses to represent his/her perception. Prerequisites: Refer to ENGL 101.

ENGL 121 Introduction to the Novel and Drama 3 CREDITS In this course students continue with the development of academic writing skills through an examination of the relationship between close reading and writing. Students are introduced to the different forms of storytelling found in drama and novels. Prerequisites: Refer to ENGL 101.

FREN 101 Basic French I 3 CREDITS This course is an introduction to the French language and French culture intended for students who have little or no background in French. Skill development activities are based on listening, speaking, reading and writing components. Songs and games are also introduced as cultural and language activities. Prerequisites: None

FREN 102 Basic French II 3 CREDITS In this course students will be offered the second half of a two-course sequence in French devoted to the continued development of oral and written expression and further knowledge of French culture. Prerequisites: FREN 101

GEOG 100 Introduction to Human Geography 3 CREDITS In this course students will be introduced to the major traditions, themes and theories of human geography. Special emphasis will be placed on the concepts, methods and data used by human geographers including comparative and historical analyses of cultural landscapes, studies of the origin of diffusion of cultural phenomena and an introduction to the cultural ecology/ecosystematic perspective. Field trips are an integral part of the course. Prerequisites: None

GEOG 101 Weather and Climate 3 CREDITS This course is an introduction to the study of the elements and processes of the atmosphere and atmospheric circulation which produce variations in weather and climate around the globe. The aim of this course is to develop an understanding of the interrelationships of the processes which occur in the biosphere, where most of man’s activity takes place. The course involves lectures, laboratory assignments and field trips. Prerequisites: None

GEOG 102 Introduction to Earth Science 3 CREDITS This course offers students an introduction to the earth sciences. An emphasis is placed upon the study of geomorphology, soils and vegetation. Lab work and field trips are an integral part of the course. Prerequisites: None

GEOG 120 The Geography of Canada 3 CREDITS This course is an introduction to the basic geography of Canada. Students will study the physical characteristics of Canada including climate, soils, vegetation and water resources. In addition, students will study

populations, economies, urbanization, and Canada’s relationship to the rest of the world in relation to these areas of study. Prerequisites: None

GEOG 201 Economic Geography 3 CREDITS In this course students will focus on population distribution and growth, the location of economic activity, and patterns of economic growth and development — all at the local, national and global levels. Prerequisites: GEOG 100

GEOG 203 Environmental Geography 3 CREDITS This course is an introduction to environmental science focusing on the relationship between the natural environment and human intervention. In the first half of the course students will deal with the characteristics and interactions of the biosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere. In the second half of the course students will address contemporary issues in resource management and environmental science. Prerequisites: None

GEOG 204 Cultural Geography 3 CREDITS This course involves an analysis of the processes of cultural change, migration and acculturation, and their roles as determinants of changing cultural landscapes and regional differences. The form and structure of urbanization is considered from the historical roots of the city to the present features of the megalopolises. Prerequisites: GEOG 100

GEOG 205 Geography of the Pacific Rim 3 CREDITS Comprising some of the world’s most populous countries, the Pacific Rim has emerged as a powerful economic region whose importance in world trade and world affairs is likely to increase more in the future. In this course students will use geographic underpinnings to explore economic trends in the Pacific Rim. Students will also focus on the attendant demographic, social and political changes that are unfolding in the Pacific Rim. Prerequisites: GEOG 100


22 23

GEOG 206 Urban Geography 3 CREDITS In this course students will be introduced to the geography of human settlements with a specific focus on urban areas. Attention will be devoted to their origin and development; their impacts on the landscape; their role in human culture and current driving forces, problems and prospects. Throughout much of the course, Vancouver resources and examples will be used to illustrate many of the themes. Prerequisites: GEOG 100

HIST 101 Canada to Confederation 3 CREDITS In this course students will examine the basic conditions in British North America between the British Conquest and Confederation. An examination of internal and external political, social and economic forces that shaped Canadian history will also be stressed. Prerequisites: None

HIST 102 Canada Since Confederation 3 CREDITS This course is an examination of developments in Canada from 1867 to the present. The internal and external political, social and economic forces which shaped Canadian history will be reviewed. Prerequisites: None

HIST 203 Europe 1890–1939: Illusion and Disillusion 3 CREDITS In this course students will examine European history from the turn of the century to 1939. The illusion that preceded World War I and the disappointments and frustrations that led to World War II will be reviewed, stressing social, economic and political change. Prerequisite: None

HIST 204 Europe Since 1939: From Destruction to Rejuvenation 3 CREDITS In this course students will analyze the recovery of Europe from the devastation of World War II to the prosperity and stability of the present. The role of Europe in East-West relationships will be reviewed, noting the political patterns which historically affect the economic and cultural strength of the continent. Prerequisites: None but HIST 203 recommended.

JAPA 100 Introduction to Japanese I 3 CREDITS This introductory course is designed for students with little or no previous knowledge of Japanese. It includes instruction in basic grammar, speaking, reading and writing

graphs, conic sections, limits and continuity, derivatives, techniques and applications of differentiation, trigonometric functions, logarithms and exponentials, extrema, the mean value theorem and polar coordinates. Prerequisites: MATH12 with grade of B or MATH 100

Prerequisites: none

JAPA 101 Introduction to Japanese II 3 CREDITS This course is a continuation of Japanese 100. The focus of this course is on the development of communicative skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing. Prerequisites: JAPA 100

Macm 101 Discrete Mathematics I 3 CREDITS This course is an introduction to discrete mathematics. Students will examine some areas of mathematics that are frequently applicable to problems in computer science. Topics include logic and formal reasoning, sets, relations and functions, basic concepts of number theory, mathematical induction, enumeration, formal languages and automata, and graphs and trees.

MATH 102 Calculus II 3 CREDITS This course is the second half of first year calculus intended primarily for science, mathematics or computer science students. Topics include integrals, techniques and applications of integrations, approximations, sequences and series, and area and arc length in polar coordinates. Prerequisites: MATH 101 with minimum grade of C–

MATH 111 Business Calculus I 3 CREDITS This is a first course in calculus intended primarily for students in business and the social sciences. Topics include limits, growth rates, differentiation and integration, logarithmic and exponential functions and their application to economics and optimization. Prerequisites: MATH 12 with grade of B or MATH 100 or MATH 110

Prerequisites: MATH 100 or MATH 12

Macm 201 Discrete Mathematics II 3 CREDITS This course is a continuation of MACM 101. Topics include asymptotics, complexity of algorithms, graphs and trees, relations, recurrence relations, generating functions, and Boolean algebra. Prerequisites: MACM 101

MATH 100 Pre-Calculus 3 CREDITS The emphasis in this course is placed upon relations, functions and transformations, linear and quadratic functions and inequalities, exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometry, polynomials and rational functions and conic sections. Prerequisites: MATH 11 with minimum grade of B or MATH 12

MATH 101 Calculus I 3 CREDITS This is a first course in calculus intended primarily for science, mathematics or computer science majors. Topics include functions and

MATH 112 Business Calculus II 3 CREDITS This course is a continuation of MATH 111. Topics include the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, applications of integration, an introduction to differential equations and multi-variable calculus. Prerequisites: MATH 111

MATH 190 Principles of Mathematics 4 CREDITS This course develops the fundamental mathematical concepts and practices included in the elementary and middle school curriculum. Discussed are concepts from elementary number theory and geometry, as well as probability and statistics. Introduced are practices such as problem solving, identifying patterns, and mathematically interpreting everyday contaxts. In addition, the course aims to develop a positive attitude towards mathematics and an ability to convey mathematical ideas to others. Prerequisites: Principles of Mathematics 11 (or equivalents) with a grade of C or higher.


university program : CURRICULUM

MATH 201 Multivariable Calculus 3 CREDITS This is a first course in multidimensional calculus. Topics include vectors, solid analytic geometry, differential calculus of several variables, multiple integrals, cylindrical and spherical coordinates and line integrals. Prerequisites: MATH 102 required with MATH 232 recommended.

MATH 202 Vector Calculus 3 CREDITS This course is a continuation of MATH 201. Topics include vector functions of a single variable, space curves, scalar and vector fields, conservative fields, surface and volume integrals, and theorems of Gauss, Green and Stokes. Prerequisites: MATH 201

MATH 215 Ordinary Differential Equations 3 CREDITS In this course topics include first order differential equations, second and higher order linear equations, series solutions, an introduction to Laplace transformation, systems and numerical methods, phase plane analysis, and applications in the physical, biological and social sciences. Prerequisites: MATH 102 required with MATH 232 recommended.

MATH 220 Introduction to Analysis 3 CREDITS This course introduces students to mathematical induction. Topics include mathematical induction, limits of real sequences and real functions, continuity and its consequences, and the Mean Value Theorem, the fundamental theorem of calculus. Prerequisites: MATH 102

essential features of various schools of philosophical thinking and their main proponents, from the early Greeks, the beginnings of Christianity, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Enlightenment and Romanticism to the 19th and 20th centuries. A number of questions will be examined from their historical roots including: What is the soul? How is the mind and body connected? What is reality and how can we comprehend it? What is being? Does language provide us with the tools to know everything? What is the perfect political system? Is there a God? How should we live? How should we think? Prerequisites: None

PHIL 101 Critical Thinking 3 CREDITS This course provides students with the skills that are needed to recognize, analyze, evaluate and construct good arguments by studying the structures and conditions that make up arguments, both good and bad. The course will also examine the strategies and techniques used in the reasoning process while paying close attention to certain elements of language such as how analogies and statistics are used in arguments.

Prerequisites: MATH 101 or MATH 111

PHIL 100 The History of Philosophy 3 CREDITS This course is an introduction to the entire field of philosophy covering the

Prerequisites: PHYS 101 required with MATH 102 as corequisite

POLI 101 Canadian Government 3 CREDITS This course is an introduction to the Canadian political system emphasizing the social and economic realities of regional and federal authority. The course will include topics such as political parties, voting behaviour, nationalism, regionalism, federalism, parliament, bureaucracies, the courts and the policy processes. Prerequisites: None

POLI 103 Contemporary Ideologies 3 CREDITS The focus of this course will be on several topics in contemporary political theory, such as the nature of democracy, the role of ideology and the functions of the state. Students will be encouraged to think critically about the nature of political society and the ideological themes presented. Prerequisites: None

Prerequisites: None

PHIL 200 Business Ethics 3 CREDITS This course is designed to provide students with a solid understanding of the application of ethical theories and reasoning to current moral issues facing individuals and corporations doing business in Canada. Students will investigate the general nature of ethical decision-making by considering specific ethical and moral issues. Prerequisites: None

MATH 232 Linear Algebra 3 CREDITS This is a first course in linear algebra. Topics include matrix arithmetic and linear equations and determinants; real vector spaces and linear transformations; inner products and orthogonality; Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors.

introduction to electricity, magnetism, optics and some modern physics. A weekly three-hour lab is included as an integral part of the course, bridging theory and experiment.

PHYS 101 Principles of Physics I 3 CREDITS This course is a general survey and introduction to mechanics emphasizing the motion of particles and rigid bodies, work and energy, harmonic motion and sound. A weekly three-hour lab is included as an integral part of the course, bridging theory and experiment. Prerequisites: PH 12 required with MATH 101 as corequisite

PHYS 102 Principles of Physics II 3 CREDITS This course follows PHYS 101 as the second course in a general survey of physics and includes a survey and

PSYC 101 Basic Psychological Processes 3 CREDITS This course is an introduction to the field of psychology and the major psychological processes of learning, memory, language, cognition, motivation, sensation, ,perception, physiological psychology, history, methodology and statistics. Prerequisites: None

PSYC 102 Areas and Applications of Psychology 3 CREDITS In this course students will focus on the major areas of study and applications of psychology. Personality, social, developmental and abnormal psychology are examined in relation to the basic psychological processes already studied. Theory is related to the applied areas of psychological testing and measurement, group processes, personal adjustment, child rearing practices, personnel and administrative practices, and the modification of disordered behaviour. Prerequisites: PSYC 101


24 25

PSYC 201 Theories of Personality 3 CREDITS The main focus of this course is on the principal theories of personality. Some relevant research will be discussed. Theoretical approaches such as psycho-analysis, behaviourism and phenomenology will be included. Prerequisites: PSYC 101 and PSYC 102

PSYC 202 Introduction to Research Methods 3 CREDITS In this course students will be introduced to research design. The lectures and readings will cover a variety of designs employed in psychological research (correlational, experimental and quasi-experimental). Also, in addition to learning how to critically analyze experimental research, students will learn how to plan and conduct well-designed research and how to write research reports in APA format. Prerequisites: PSYC 101 and 102

PSYC 204 Child Development and Behaviour 3 CREDITS This course is an introduction to human development from conception to adolescence. The lectures and readings will present theory and contemporary research on a variety of topics in development including language, cognition and intelligence, learning, personality, socialization and emotion. Applications of the research and theory will also be discussed. Prerequisites: PSYC 101 and PSYC 102

PSYC 206 Data Analysis in Psychology 3 CREDITS In this course students are introduced to the analysis of data obtained from simple research designs. Basic concepts to be discussed include hypothesis testing, displaying data, characteristics of normal distribution, and power and probability. Elementary statistics to be covered include measures of central tendency, measures of dispersion, the t-test, chi-square analysis, Pearson product moment correlation, point-biserial correlation and one-way analysis of variance. Students will be required to complete weekly problem sets. Prerequisites: PSYC 101, PSYC 102 and PSYC 202

PSYC 208 Introduction to Psychopathology 3 CREDITS This course is designed to provide an overview of the major classes of mental disorders including mood disorders, organic mental syndromes, anxiety disorders, dissociative disorders, adjustment disorders, personality disorders, schizophrenia, and somatoform disorders. Case studies will be presented, and classification, treatment and etiological issues will be discussed from biological, psychoanalytic, behavioural, cognitive and humanistic perspectives. Prerequisites: PSYC 101 and PSYC 102

SOCI 101 Introduction to Sociology I 3 CREDITS This course is an introduction to some of the principal concepts, theories and methods used by sociologists to make sense of society. The course includes an analysis of the origins of sociology and an examination of the relevance of classical concepts such as division of labour, alienation, anomie, class, power and rationalization of the contemporary world. Prerequisites: None

SOCI 102 Canadian Society 3 CREDITS In this course students will examine some major sociological issues in the analysis of Canadian society. Differing theoretical perspectives will be applied to the following topics: the development of the economic structure, the class structure and its relationship to regional development, ethnicity as a sociological phenomenon, the creation of a gendered social world, population characteristics, processes and theories, and sociological theories of religion. Prerequisites: None

SOCI 201 Introduction to Sociological Theory 3 CREDITS This course provides students with an understanding of the main strands of contemporary sociological theorizing through an examination of the methods and assumptions used in each. Three broad approaches will be analyzed: positivist sociology, including functionalism; interpretive sociology, including ethnomethodology; and the political economy approach to sociology. Prerequisites: SOCI 101 and SOCI 102

SOCI 202 Industrial Sociology 3 CREDITS This course familiarizes students with the considerable body of sociological work that has been done within specific industries as well as with the effects of the industrialization of society itself. It will be shown how industrialization can deepen our understanding of contemporary industrial society. Prerequisites: SOCI 101 and SOCI 102

STAT 101 Introduction to Statistics 3 CREDITS This is an introductory course in statistics which discusses procedures that are most commonly used in the summary of statistical surveys and the interpretation of experimental data. Prerequisites: MATH 12

STAT 270 Introduction to Probability & Statistics 3 CREDITS This course introduces students to probability theory and its applications to statistics, management science, reliability, quality control, insurance, computing science and other similar fields of endeavour. Prerequisites: MATH 102 or 112 with minimum grade of B

STAT 290 Quantitative Methods 1 3 CREDITS This course provides students with an introduction to operations research. Linear programming models are used to formulate a variety of problems of optimal allocation of resources. Complex decision problems are analyzed via simulation and include an introduction to probability and statistics to deal with uncertainty. Prerequisites: MATH 111 with MATH 112 recommended

STAT 291 Quantitative Methods ll 4 CREDITS This course covers basic statistical concepts and methods used in business and commerce. Topics include types of data, graphical displays, probability, statistical inference, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing and linear regression techniques. Prerequisites: MATH 111 with MATH 112 recommended


course by course transfer guide

COQUITLAM COLLEGE COURSE

THOMPSON RIVERS UNIVERSITY OPEN LEARNING COURSE (Credits)

SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY COURSE (Credits)

TRINITY WESTERN UNIVERSITY COURSE (Credits)

UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA COURSE (Credits)

UNIVERSITY OF VICTORIA COURSE (Units)

UNIVERSITY OF NORTHERN BC COURSE (Credits)

UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE COURSE (Units)

ACCT 101

COQU ACCT 101 & ACCT 102 =TRU-OL ADMIN 231 (3)

COQU ACCT 101 & ACCT 102 = SFU BUS 251 (3) Q

BUSI 221 (3)

COQU ACCT 101 & ACCT 102 = UBC COMM 293 (3)

COQU ACCT 101 & ACCT 102 = UVIC COM 200 lev (1.5)

COQU ACCT 101 & ACCT 102 = UNBC COMM 210 (3)

MANAG 2100 (3) With Coquitlam ACCT 102. Both courses must be taken.

ACCT 102

COQU ACCT 101 & ACCT 102 =TRU-OL ADMIN 231 (3)

COQU ACCT 101 & ACCT 102 = SFU BUSI 251 (3) Q

BUSI 222 (3)

COQU ACCT 101 & ACCT 102 = UBC COMM 293 (3)

COQU ACCT 101 & ACCT 102 = UVIC COM 200 lev (1.5)

COQU ACCT 101 & ACCT 102 = UNBC COMM 210 (3)

MANAG 2100 (3) With Coquitlam ACCT 101. Both courses must be taken.

ACCT 205

Individual Assessment

BUSI 254 (3) Q

COMM 294 (3)

COM 200 lev (1.5)

COMM 211 (3)

CREDIT PENDING

ANTH 101

ANTH (3)

SA 101 (3)

ANTH 101 (3)

ANTH (3) First Year

ANTH 100 lev (1.5)

ANTH (3) 1XX

ANTH 1000 (3)

ANTH 102

ANTH (3)

SA (3) ANTH

ANTH 100 lev (3)

ANTH (3) First Year

ANTH 100 lev (1.5)

ANTH (3) 1XX

ANTH 2200 (3)

ASIA 200

ASIA (3)

HIST 254 (3) B-HUM

HIST 200 lev (3)

ASIA 100 (3)

CHIN 201A (1.5)

HIST (3) 2XX

ASIA 210

ASIA (3)

HIST 255 (3) B-HUM

HIST 200 lev (3)

ASIA 101 (3)

CHIN 201B (1.5)

HIST (3) 2XX

BIOL 101

BISC 121 (3) & 126 (1)

BISC 101 (4) B-SCI

BIOL 113 (3)

UBC BIOL (3) 1st; COQU BIOL 101 & BIOL 102 = UBC BIOL (7) 1st. Exempt UBC BIOL 111, UBC BIOL 121, UBC BIOL 140

UVIC BIOL 100 lev (1.5); COQU BIOL 101 & BIOL 102 = UVIC BIOL 190A (1.5) & BIOL 190B (1.5)

BIOL (4) 1XX COQU BIOL 101 &102 = UNBC 101 (4) & BIOL 102 (4)

BIOL 102

BISC 120 (3) & 125 (1)

BISC 102 (4) B-SCI

BIOL 114 (3)

UBC BIOL (3) 1st; COQU BIOL 101 & BIOL 102 = UBC BIOL (7) 1st. Exempt UBC BIOL 111, UBC BIOL 121, UBC BIOL 140

UVIC BIOL 100 lev (1.5); COQU BIOL 101 & BIOL 102 = UVIC BIOL 190A (1.5) & BIOL 190B (1.5)

BIOL (4) 1XX COQU BIOL 101 &102 = UNBC BIOL 101 (4) & BIOL 102 (4)

BIOL 104

BISC 100 (3)

BISC 100 (4) B-SCI

BIOL 100 L (3)

BIOL (3) Not for science credit

BIOL 100 lev (1.5)

BIOL (3) 1XX

BUSI 237

CMPT (3)

BUS 237 (3)

CMPT 101, CMPT 121, CMPT 122, CMPT 125 & CMPT 127 (3) or ISYS 120 (3)

COMM 391 (3)

CSC 105 (1.5)

COMM (3) 2XX

COMM 292 (3)

COM 220 (1.5)

COMM 230 (3)

BUS 272 (3)

BUSI 272

BIOL 1000 (3)

CHEM 101

CHEM 110 (3) & 115 (1)

CHEM 121 (4) Q/B-SCI

COQU CHEM 101 & CHEM 102 = TWU CHEM 111( 3) & CHEM 112 (3)

COQU CHEM 101 & CHEM 102 = UBC CHEM 121 (4) & CHEM 123 (4)

CHEM 101 (1.5)

CHEM 100 (3) & CHEM 120 (1)

CHEM 1000 (3)

CHEM 102

CHEM 111 (3) & 116 (1)

CHEM 122 (2) Q CHEM 126 (2) Q

COQU CHEM 101 & CHEM 102 = TWU CHEM 111( 3) & CHEM 112 (3)

COQU CHEM 101 & CHEM 102 = UBC CHEM 121 (4) & CHEM 123 (4)

CHEM 102 (1.5)

CHEM 101 (3) & CHEM 121 (1)

CHEM 2000 (3)

CHIN 100

CHIN (3)

CHIN 1XX (3)

CHIN 101 (3)

COQU CHIN 100 & CHIN 101 = UBC CHIN 100 (3) & CHIN 101 (3). No credit if taken alone.

CHIN 100 lev (1.5)

INTS 151 (3)

CHIN 1XXX (3) With Coquitlam CHIN 101

CHIN 101

CHIN (3)

CHIN 1XX (3)

CHIN 102 (3)

COQU CHIN 100 & CHIN 101 = UBC CHIN 100 (3) & CHIN 101 (3). No credit if taken alone.

CHIN 100 lev (1.5)

INTS 152 (3)

CHIN 1XXX (3) With Coquitlam CHIN 100


26 27

COQUITLAM COLLEGE COURSE

THOMPSON RIVERS UNIVERSITY OPEN LEARNING COURSE (Credits)

SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY COURSE (Credits)

TRINITY WESTERN UNIVERSITY COURSE (Credits)

UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA COURSE (Credits)

UNIVERSITY OF VICTORIA COURSE (Units)

UNIVERSITY OF NORTHERN BC COURSE (Credits)

CHIN 151

CHIN 151 (2)

CHIN 1st (3)

CHIN 220 (1.5)

HUMN (3) IXX

CHIN 152

CHIN 152 (2)

CHIN 1st (3)

CHIN 200 lev (1.5)

HUMN (3) IXX

CHIN 105 (3)

CHIN 200 lev (1.5)

UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE COURSE (Units)

CHIN 200

CHIN (3)

CHIN 1XX (3)

CHIN 102 (3)

CMNS 110

CMNS (3)

CMNS 110 (3) B-SOC

COMM 100 lev (3)

THEA 100 lev (1.5)

HUMN (3) 1XX

CREDIT PENDING

CMNS 130

CMNS (3)

CMNS 130 (3)

COMM 112 (3)

SOCI 100 lev (1.5)

HUMN (3) 1XX

CREDIT PENDING

CMNS 210

SOCI (3)

CMNS 210 (3)

HIST 265 (1.5)

HIST (3) 2XX

CMNS 223

SOCI (3)

CMNS 223 (3)

COM 100 lev (1.5)

SOSC (3) 2XX

CRWR 101

ENGL (3)

GE 1XX (3). This course does not receive SFU ENGL (3) credit.

ARTS (3)

WRIT 100 lev (1.5)

ENGL (3) 1XX

CRWR 102

ENGL (3)

GE 1XX (3)

ARTS (3)

WRIT 100 lev (1.5)

ENGL (3) 1XX

CSCI 100

TRU-OL CPSC 1XX(3). May not take CPSC 100 or 101, CMPT 118. 119 or 150 for further credit

CMPT 100 (3)

CMPT 100, CMPT 111, CMPT 112, CMPT 115 & CMPT 117 (3)

CPSC 1st (3)

CSC 100 (1.5)

CPSC 150 (3)

CSCI 101

CPSC (3)

CMPT 120 (3) Q/B-SCI & CMPT 1XX (1)

CMPT 165 (2)

CPSC 1st (4) Credit will be given for only one of COQU 101, 102 or 103

CSC 110 (1.5)

CPSC 100 (4)

CSCI 102

CPSC (3)

CMPT 120 (3) Q/B-SCI & CMPT 1XX (1)

CMPT 160 (1), CMPT 167 (2), and CMPT 100 L (1)

CPSC 1st (4) COQU CSCI 102 & 120 = UBC CPSC 1st (2) & CPSC 111 (4). Credit will be given for only one of COQU CSCI 101, 102 & 103

CSC 110 (1.5)

CPSC (3) 1XX; possible waiver from CPCS 100 (4) on instructor approval

CMPT 102 (3) Q

CMPT 100L (3)

CPSC 1st (3)

CSC 110 (1.5)

CPSC (3) 1XX Credit will be awarded for only one COQ CSCI 102 or 103. Credit will not be granted once UNBC CPSC 100 or 110 or equivalent is completed.

CSCI 103

COMM 200 lev (3)

CSCI 110

CPSC (3) 100 lev

CMPT 110 (3) Q

INDIV. ASSESSMENT

CPSC 1st (3)

CSC 100 lev (1.5)

CPSC (3) 1XX

CSCI 117

CPSC (3)

CMPT 1XX (3)

CMPT 160 (1) & CMPT 167 (2)

CPSC 1st (3)

CSC 110 (1.5)

CPSC (3) 2XX

CMPT 120 (3) Q/B-SCI

IOSYS 100 L (3)

CSCI 120

CSC 110 (1.5)

CSCI 125

CPSC 1XX (3)

CMPT 120 (3) Q/B Sci

CSCI 150

CPSC (3)

CMPT 150 (3) Q

CMPT 100 lev (3)

CPSC 1st (3) or COQU MACM 101 & CSCI 150 = UBC CPSI 121 (4) & CPSC 1st (2)

CSCI 165

CMPT 165 (3) B-SCI

ISYS 100 lev (3)

CPSC 1st (3) Credit will be given for only one of COQU CSCI 110, 120 or 165.

CSCI 201

CMPT 225 (3) Q & CMPT 1XX (1)

CMPT 231 (3)

CMPT 100 lev (3)

CSCI 250

CMPT (3)

CPSC 1000 (3)

CSC 110 (1.5)

CSC 100 lev (1.5)

CPSC (3) 1XX

CPSC 2nd (3) or COQU CSCI 201 & MACM 201 = UBC CPSC 221 (4) & CPSC 2nd (3)

CSC 115 (1.5)

CPSC 200 (3)

CPSC 2600 (3)

CPSC (3)

CSC 115 (1.5)

CPSC 101 (4)

CSCI 1600 (3) With Coquitlam CSCI 150


course by course transfer guide

COQUITLAM COLLEGE COURSE

THOMPSON RIVERS UNIVERSITY OPEN LEARNING COURSE (Credits)

SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY COURSE (Credits)

TRINITY WESTERN UNIVERSITY COURSE (Credits)

UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA COURSE (Credits)

UNIVERSITY OF VICTORIA COURSE (Units)

UNIVERSITY OF NORTHERN BC COURSE (Credits)

UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE COURSE (Units)

CSCI 275

CMPT (3)

CMPT 275 (3)

CMPT 285 (3) or ISYS 285 (3)

CPSC 2nd (3)

CSC 200 lev (1.5)

CPSC (3) 2XX

ECON 100

ECON (3)

ECON 110 (3) B-Soc

ECON 100 lev (3)

ECON (3)

ECON 100 (1.5)

ECON (3) 1XX

ECON 1001 (3)

ECON 201

ECON 200 (3)

ECON 103 (3) Q/B-Soc

ECON 201 (3)

ECON 101 (3)

ECON 103 (1.5)

ECON 100 (3)

ECON 1001 (3)

ECON 202

ECON 201 (3)

ECON 105 (3) Q/B-Soc

ECON 202 (3)

ECON 102 (3)

ECON 104 (1.5)

ECON 101 (3)

ECON 1012 (3)

ECON 203

ECON (3)

BUEC 280 (3) Q

ECON 200 lev (3)

ECON 2nd (3) Precludes credit for ECON 360. Refer to transfer notes.

ECON 200 lev (1.5)

ECON 300 (3)

ECON 2000 (3)

ECON 210

ECON (3)

ECON 210 (3) Q

ECON 200 lev (3)

ECON 2nd (3) Precludes credit for ECON 345

ECON 200 lev (1.5)

ECON 317 (3)

ECON 3400 (3)

ECON 211

ECON 2XX (3)

BUS 2XX (3)

ECON 2nd (3)

ECON 200 lev (1.5)

ECON (3) 2XX

ECON 240

ECON (3)

BUEC 1XX (3)

ECON 226 (3)

ECON 200 lev (1.5)

ECON (3) 2XX

ECON 250

ECON (3)

BUS 207 (3) Q

ECON 200 lev (3)

COMM 295 (3)

ECON 205 (1.5)

ECON (3) 2XX

ECON 3001 (3)

ENGL 101

ENGL (3)

ENGL 199 (3) W

ENGL 100 lev (3) Composition

ENGL 112 (3)

ENGL 115 (1.5)

ENGL 170 (3)

ENGL 2 Unspec. 1000 lev (6) With Coquitlam ENGL 101 & 102. ENG 1900 waived.

ENGL 103

ENGL (3)

ENGL 2XX (3) W Students may request credit for ENG101 (3) W / B-HUM instead.

ENGL 103 or 104

ENGL (3) 1st year

ENGL 202 (1.5)

ENGL (3) 1XX

ENGL 111

ENGL (3)

ENGL 102 (3) W & B-HUM Students may request credit for ENG101 (3) W / B-HUM instead.

ENGL 103 (3) In order to receive credit, students must still meet TOEFL req’mt.

ENGL (3) 1st year

ENGL 125 (1.5)

ENGL (3) 1XX

ENGL 2XXX (3)

ENGL 121

ENGL (3)

ENGL 101 (3) W & B-HUM Students may request credit for ENGL 103 (3) W instead.

ENGL 104 (3) In order to receive credit, students must still meet TOEFL req’mt.

ENGL (3) 1st year

ENGL 145 (1.5)

ENGL (3) 1XX

ENGL 2XXX (3)

FREN 101

FREN 100 (3)

FREN XXX (2) See Transfer Notes

FREN 111 (3)

FREN 101 (3)

FREN 101 (3)

INTS 151 (3)

FREN 1000 (3)

FREN 102

FREN 101 (3)

FREN XXX (2) See Transfer Notes

FREN 112 (3)

FREN 102 (3)

FREN 102 (3)

INTS 152 (3)

FREN 1100 (3)

GEOG 100

GEOG (3)

GEOG 100 (3)

GEOG 100 lev (3)

GEOG 1st (3)

GEOG 100 lev (1.5)

GEOG 101 (3)

GEOG 101

GEOG IXX (3)

GEOG ISECTNA (3) Coquitlam GEOG 101 & 102 = SFU GEOG 111 (3) B-SCI & GEOG ISECTNA (3)

GEOG 100 lev (3) lab

GEOG 102 (3) COQU GEOG 101 & 102 = UBC GEOG 101 (6)

GEOG 216 (1.5)

ENSC 201 (3)

GEOG 1 Unspec. 1000 lev (3) Coquitlam GEOG 101/102 = GEOG 1000/1 Unspec. (2000 lev) (6)

GEOG 102

GEOG IXX (3)

GEOG ISECTNA (3) Coquitlam GEOG 101 & 102 = SFU GEOG 111 (3) B-SCI & GEOG ISECTNA (3).

GEOG 100 lev (3) lab

GEOG 103 (3) COQU GEOG 101 & 102 = UBC GEOG 101 (6)

GEOG 217 (1.5)

SCIE (3) 1XX

GEOG 1 Unspec. (1000 lev) (3) Coquitlam GEOG 101/102 = GEOG 1000/1 Unspec. (2000 lev) (6)

GEOG 120

GEOG (3)

GEOG 162 (3) B-Soc

GEOG 230 (3)

GEOG 290 (3)

GEOG 100R lev (1.5)

GEOG 203 (3)


28 29

COQUITLAM COLLEGE COURSE

THOMPSON RIVERS UNIVERSITY OPEN LEARNING COURSE (Credits)

SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY COURSE (Credits)

TRINITY WESTERN UNIVERSITY COURSE (Credits)

UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA COURSE (Credits)

UNIVERSITY OF VICTORIA COURSE (Units)

UNIVERSITY OF NORTHERN BC COURSE (Credits)

UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE COURSE (Units)

GEOG 201

GEOG 231 (3)

GEOG 221 (3)

GEOG 100 lev (3)

GEOG 2nd (3)

GEOG 211 (1.5)

GEOG 202 (3)

GEOG 1 Unspec. (3)

GEOG 203

GEOG (3)

GEOG ISECTNA (3)

GEOG 252 (3)

GEOG (3)

GEOG 101A (1.5)

GEOG 100 (3)

GEOG 3050 (3)

GEOG 204

GEOG (3)

GEOG 241 (3)

GEOG 200 lev (3)

GEOG (3)

GEOG 100 lev (1.5)

GEOG 101 (3)

GEOG 2200 (3)

GEOG 205

GEOG (3)

GEOG 2XX (3)

GEOG 200 lev (3)

GEOG (3)

GEOG 200R lev (1.5)

GEOG (3) 2XX

GEOG 2 Unspec. (3)

GEOG 206

GEOG (3)

GEOG 261 (3) B-Soc

GEOG 200 lev (3) Waive GEOG 352 or SOCI 352

GEOG 210 (3)

GEOG 200H lev (1.5)

GEOG (3) 2XX

HIST 101

HIST 120 (3)

HIST 101 (3) B-HUM

HIST 135 (3)

COQU HIST 101 & HIST 102 = UBC HIST 235 (6)

UVIC HIST 131 (1.5); COQU HIST 101 & HIST 102 = UVIC HIST 130 (3)

HIST 210 (3)

HI 2710 (3)

HIST 102

HIST 121 (3)

HIST 102 (3) B-HUM

HIST 136 (3)

COQU HIST 101 & HIST 102 = UBC HIST 235 (6)

UVIC HIST 132 (1.5); COQU HIST 101 & HIST 102 = UVIC HIST 130 (3)

HIST 211 (3)

HI 2720 (3)

HIST 203

HIST (3)

HIST 1XX (3)

COQU HIST 203 & HIST 204 = UBC HIST 125 (6)

HIST 240 pc (1.5)

HIST (3) 2XX

HI 2150 (3)

HIST 204

HIST (3)

HIST 1XX (3)

COQU HIST 203 & HIST 204 = UBC HIST 125 (6)

HIST 200 lev (1.5)

HIST (3) 2XX

HI 1 Unspec. 2000 lev (3)

JAPA 100

JAPN (3)

JAPN 100 (3)

JAPA 101 (3)

JAPN 100 (3)

JAPA 149 (1.5) partial credit

INTS 121 (3)

JAPA 101

JAPN (3)

JAPN 101 (3)

JAPA 102 (3)

JAPN 101 (3)

JAPA 149 (1.5) partial credit

INTS 122 (3)

MACM 101

MACM 101 (3)

MACM 101 (3) Q/B-SCI

MATH 240 (3)

CPSC 1st (3) or COQU MACM 101 & CSCI 150 = UBC CPSC 221 (4) & CPSC 2nd (3)

MATH 122 (1.5)

MACM 201

MACM (3)

MACM 201 (3) Q

MATH 200 lev (3)

CPSC 2nd (3) or COQU CSCI 201 & MACM 201 = UBC CPSC 121 (4) & CPSC 1st (2)

MATH 222 (1.5)

MATH 100

MATH 100 (3)

MATH 100 (3) Q

MATH 105 (3)

NO EQUIVALENCY

MATH 120 (1.5)

MATH 115 (3)

MATH 101

MATH (3) COQU MATH 101 & 102 = TRU-OL MATH 120 (3) & 121 (3)

MATH 151 (3) Q

MATH 123 (3)

MATH 100 (3)

MATH 100 (1.5)

MATH 100 (3)

MATH 1560 (3)

MATH 102

MATH (3) COQU MATH 101 & 102 = TRU-OL MATH 120 (3) & 121 (3)

MATH 152 (3) Q

MATH 124 (3)

MATH 101 (3)

MATH 101 (1.5)

MATH 101 (3)

MATH 2560 (3)

MATH 110

MATH (3) Credit granted for only one of COQU Math 100 or 110

MATH 151 (1.5)

MATH 115 (3)

MATH 111

MATH (3) COQU MATH 111 & 112 = TRU-OL MATH 104 (3) & MATH (3)

MATH 157 (3) Q

MATH 120 (3)

MATH 104 (3)

MATH 102 (1.5)

MATH 152 (3)

MATH 1510 (3)

MATH 112

MATH (3) COQU MATH 111 & 112 = TRU-OL MATH 104 (3) & MATH (3)

MATH 158 (3) Q

MATH 100 lev (3)

MATH 1st (3) Not for credit in Science. Exempt Math 105 for Commerce students

MATH 100 lev (1.5)

MATH 152 (3)

MATH 1 Unspec. 2000 lev (3)

MATH 190

MATH 1XX (3)

MATH 190 (4) Q

MATH 190 (3)

MATH 1st (3) Precludes MATH 335 Not for credit in Science or Applied Science

MATH 160A (1.5)

MATH 1XX (3) No credit MATH or CPSC major

MATH 101 (3)


course by course transfer guide

COQUITLAM COLLEGE COURSE

THOMPSON RIVERS UNIVERSITY OPEN LEARNING COURSE (Credits)

SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY COURSE (Credits)

TRINITY WESTERN UNIVERSITY COURSE (Credits)

UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA COURSE (Credits)

UNIVERSITY OF VICTORIA COURSE (Units)

UNIVERSITY OF NORTHERN BC COURSE (Credits)

UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE COURSE (Units)

MATH 201

MATH (3) COQU MATH 201 & 202 = TRU-OL MATH 210 (3)

MATH 251 (3) Q

MATH 224 (3)

MATH 200 (3)

MATH 200 lev (1.5)

MATH (3) 2XX

MATH 2570 (3)

MATH 202

MATH (3) COQU MATH 201 & 202 = TRU-OL MATH 210 (3)

MATH 252 (3) Q

MATH 250 (3)

MATH 2nd (3) Precludes credit for MATH 317

MATH 200 (1.5)

MATH 200 (3)

MATH 3570 (3)

MATH 215

MATH 411 (3)

MATH 310 (3) Q

MATH 321 (3)

MATH 215 (3) or MATH 255 (3)

MATH 201 (1.5)

MATH 332 (3)

MATH 2800 (3)

MATH 200 lev (3)

MATH 220

MATH (3) 2XX

MATH 232

MATH 230 (3)

MATH 232 (3) Q

MATH 223 (3)

MATH 221 (3)

MATH 233A (1.5)

MATH 220 (3)

MATH 1450 (3)

PHIL 100

PHIL (3)

PHIL 1XX (3)

PHIL 100 lev (3)

PHIL (3) 1st year

PHIL 100 lev (1.5)

PHIL (3) 1XX

PHIL 1000 (3)

PHIL 101

PHIL (3)

PHIL XX1 (3) Q

PHIL 100 lev (3) May not take PHIL 103 for credit.

PHIL 120 (3)

PHIL 200 lev (1.5)

PHIL (3) 1XX

LOGI 1000 (3)

PHIL 200

PHIL (3)

BUS 1XX (3)

PHIL 100 lev (3)

PHIL 2nd (3)

PHIL 100 lev (1.5)

PHIL (3) 2XX

PHYS 101

PHYS 110 (3) & 115 (1)

PHYS 120 (3) Q/B-SCI; COQU PHYS 101 & 102 = SFU PHYS 120 (3) Q/B-SCI, PHYS 121 (3) Q/B-SCI, PHYS 131 (0)

PHYS 111 (3)

PHYS 101 (3)

COQU PHYS 101 & PHYS 102 = UVIC PHYS 102 (3)

PHYS 110 (4)

PHYS 1000 (3)

PHYS 102

PHYS 111 (3) & 116 (1)

PHYS 121 (3) Q/B-SCI; COQU PHYS 101 & 102 = SFU PHYS 120 (3) Q/B-SCI, PHYS 121 (3) Q/B-SCI, PHYS 131 (0)

PHYS 102 (3)

COQU PHYS 101 & PHYS 102 = UVIC PHYS 102 (3)

PHYS 111 (4)

PHYS 2000 (3)

POLI 101

POLI 200 (3)

POL 221 (3)

POLI 101 (3)

POLI 102 (1.5)

POLS 200 (3)

POL.SC. 2210 (3)

POLI 102

POLI (3)

POLI 103

POLI (3)

POL 2XX (3)

POLS 101 (3)

POLI 2nd (3)

POLI 201

POLI (3)

POL 241 (3) B-SOC

POLS 200 lev (3)

POLI 260 (3)

POLI 202

POLI (3)

PSYC 101

PSYC 101 (3)

PSYC 100 (3) B-SOC

PSYC 105 (3)

COQU PSYC 101 & PSYC 102 = UBC PSYC 100 (6)

PSYC 100A (1.5)

PSYC 101 (3)

PSYC 1000 (3)

PSYC 102

PSYC 102 (3)

PSYC 102 (3) B-SOC

PSYC 106 (3)

COQU PSYC 101 & PSYC 102 = UBC PSYC 100 (6)

PSYC 100B (1.5)

PSYC 102 (3)

PSYC 2XXX (3)

PSYC 201

PSYC (3)

PSYC 270 (3)

PSYC 301 (3)

PSYC 2nd (3)

PSYC 200 lev (1.5)

PSYC (3) 2XX

PSYC 2500 (3)

PSYC 202

PSYC 210 (3)

PSYC 201 (3) Q

PSYC 201 (3)

PSYC 2nd (3)

PSYC 201 (1.5)

PSYC 215 (3)

PSYC 204

PSYC (3)

PSYC 250 (3)

PSYC 2nd (3)

PSYC 200 lev (1.5)

PSYC (3) 2XX

PSYC 206

PSYC 220 (3)

PSYC 210 (3) Q

PSYC 2nd (3)

PSYC 201 (1.5)

PSYC 315 (4)

POLS 100 lev (3)

POL.SC. 1 Unspec. 2000 lev (3) POLI 202 (1.5)

POLS (3) 1XX POLS (3) 1XX

POLS 200 lev (3)

PSYC 207 (3)

POL.SC. 2110 (3) POL.SC. 1 Unspec. 2000 lev (3)


30 31

COQUITLAM COLLEGE COURSE

THOMPSON RIVERS UNIVERSITY OPEN LEARNING COURSE (Credits)

SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY COURSE (Credits)

TRINITY WESTERN UNIVERSITY COURSE (Credits)

UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA COURSE (Credits)

UNIVERSITY OF VICTORIA COURSE (Units)

UNIVERSITY OF NORTHERN BC COURSE (Credits)

PSYC 208

PSYC (3)

PSYC 241 (3)

PSYC 200 lev (3) Student may not take PSYC 305 for credit

PSYC 2nd (3)

PSYC 200 lev (1.5)

PSYC 303 (3)

SOCI 101

SOCI 101 (3)

SA 150 (3) B-SOC

SOCI 101 (3)

COQU SOCI 101 & SOCI 102 = UBC SOCI 100 (6)

SOCI 100 (1.5)

SOSC (3) 1XX

SOCI 1000 (3)

SOCI 102

SOCI (3)

SA 100 (3) B-SOC

SOCI 100 lev (3)

COQU SOCI 101 & SOCI 102 = UBC SOCI 100 (6)

SOCI 103 (1.5)

SOSC (3) 1XX

SOCI 2010 (3)

SOCI 201

SOCI (3)

SA ISOCI (3)

SOCI 200 lev (3)

SOCI 2nd (3)

SOCI 200 lev (1.5) Satisfies UVIC SOCI 308 req. Cannot take UVIC SOCI 308 for credit.

SOSC (3) 2XX

SOCI 2210 (3)

SOCI 202

SOCI (3)

SA ISOCI (3)

SOCI 200 lev (3)

SOCI 2nd (3)

SOCI 200 lev (1.5)

SOSC (3) 2XX

SOCI 2000 lev (3)

SPAN 103

SPAN (3)

SPAN 102 (3)

SPAN 101 (3)

SPAN 101 (3)

SPAN 100A (1.5)

INTS 151 (3)

SPAN 104

SPAN (3)

SPAN 103 (3)

SPAN 102 (3)

SPAN 102 (3)

SPAN 100B (1.5)

INTS 151 (3)

STAT 101

STAT (3)

STAT 101 (3) Q

MATH 102 (3)

STAT 203 (3) Not for credit in the Faculty of Science

STAT 100 lev (1.5)

MATH 240 (3)

STAT 270

MATH (3)

STAT 270 (3) Q

MATH 200 lev (3)

STAT 241 (3) or STAT 251 (3)

STAT 260 (1.5)

No credit

STAT 290

STAT 1XX (3)

BUS 1XX (3)

MATH 102 (3)

COMM 290 (3) or STAT 2nd (3)

MATH 151 (1.5)

COMM 251 (3)

STAT 291

STAT (3)

BUEC 232 (4) Students may request credit for SFU STAT 101(3) Q instead.

BUSI 275 (3)

COMM 291 (3)

STAT 252 (1.5)

ECON 205 (3)

For the most up-to-date version of this data, check the online transfer guide of the British Columbia Council on Admissions and Transfer: www.bctransferguide.ca

UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE COURSE (Units)

STAT 1000 (3)


high school programs

32 33

Coquitlam College:

understands that our students come from a wide variety of educational backgrounds. For exactly that reason, we offer four distinct high school programs to help you get the courses you need to start your university studies in Canada without delay.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS Students are accepted into Grade 10, 11 or 12 of the high school program based on an evaluation of the official transcripts from their previous school, as well as their English language fluency.

The high school programs at Coquitlam College are all about giving our students the foundational skills and knowledge they need to succeed at a university level. We have a full range of high school courses, all of which are certified by the Independent Schools Branch of the Ministry of Education of the Province of British Columbia.


high school programs

REGULAR HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION (DOGWOOD DIPLOMA) This program is for local students under 19 years of age who need only a few more courses to complete their high school graduation requirements. HIGH SCHOOL COURSES Accounting 11 Applied Skills 11 Biology 11 Biology 12 Prerequisite: Biology 11

Career & Personal Planning 11 & 12 Communications 11 Communications 12 Prerequisite: Communications 11

Chemistry 11 Chemistry 12 Prerequisite: Chemistry 11

Comparative Civilizations 12 Economics 12 English 10 English 11 Prerequisite: English 10

English 12 Prerequisite: English 11

Financial Accounting 12 Fine Arts 11 Geography 12 Graduation Transition

adult graduation program

SCHOOL COMPLETION certificate

Students who are 19 years of age or older may complete their high school requirements in the BC Adult Graduation Program. You must complete at least three courses after enrollment in the program, and two of those must be at the Grade 12 level. Provincial exams are optional.

This program is a great option for international students who are under 19 years of age and who have not graduated from high school.

Selected courses must include: • One of English 12, Communications 12, or French 12 • One of Mathematics 11 or 12, or Accounting 11 or 12 • At least three provincially authorized Grade 12 courses, or two provincially authorized Grade 12 courses plus Social Studies 11 • All courses must be four credits each for a total of 20 credits and a total of 5 courses.

advanced program This program is for highly motivated and capable students under the age of 19 who want to begin their university studies as soon as possible. Students in the Advanced Program must complete four high school courses and write the corresponding provincial exams. They may then begin university courses at Coquitlam College. After completing at least 30 university course credits here, they may choose to transfer to a university.

Students must complete eight to ten courses in this program, including English 12 and the corresponding provincial exam. After meeting all requirements, they will receive a BC Ministry of Education Completion Certificate. Upon completion of at least 30 university course credits at Coquitlam College, students are then eligible to enter a university at the second-year level. COMPLETION CERTIFICATE COURSES English 11 Math 11 Science 11 • Physics 11 • Chemistry 11 • Earth Science 11 Social Studies 11 Writing ESL 11 Comparative Civilization 12 English 12 / Communications 12 Humanities 12 • Economics 12 • Financial Accounting 12 • Management Innovations 12 Math 12

History 12

Physical Education 12

Management Innovation 12

Science 12 • Biology 12, • Chemistry 12 • Physics 12

Mandarin Chinese 11, 12 Marketing 12 Mathematics 10, 11 Mathematics 12 Prerequisite: Mathematics 11

Planning 10 Physical Education 10, 11 & 12 Physics 11 Physics 12 Prerequisite: Physics 11

Science 10 Social Studies 10, 11 Writing ESL 11


34 35

Curriculum

HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAM COURSES Accounting 11 This course is an introduction to accounting concepts. Students gain insight into financial problems and solutions which have far-reaching benefits for entrepreneurial and professional careers. Applied Skills 11 This course focuses on the relevant knowledge, skills and attitudes which will help students develop an active, healthy lifestyle and function effectively in a changing technological environment. Application of such skills will be done in meaningful contexts using problem-solving strategies. Biology 11 This course is presented for students to gain an appreciation of the biological world. Biology 11 examines the role of the single cell in terms of how its’ own structure and function allows for the development of a vast array of organisms. This diversity of life will be examined using established classification systems, with an emphasis on unifying characteristics for kingdom and phyla groupings. The course includes a representative sample of organisms and introduces students to a variety of biological skills and scientific processes. Biology 12 Students in Biology 12 are introduced to biochemistry, cell structure and cellular processes (respiration, protein synthesis and general cell physiology) as foundation for understanding human anatomy and physiology. The major human organ systems are covered in detail. Laboratory experiences include experiments, demonstrations and some dissections. Knowledge of general chemistry (chemistry 11 equivalent) is needed in understanding much of the material in this course. Prerequisite: Biology 11 recommended

Communications 11 The course will involve instruction in basic reading and writing skills. An additional focus will be on basic concepts in literature. Students will be encouraged to read short stories and novels. They will also be encouraged to practice their public speaking. Oral presentations will be required throughout the term. Communications 11 will lead to Communications 12 and will fulfill graduation requirements for English.

Comparative Civilizations 12 In this course, students will study some of the events in history which have helped to shape civilization in the Western world. Rather than looking at a series of dates and specific events, the focus of the course will be on the art of different eras. An examination of sculpture, painting, architecture, literature and music will provide an overview of different beliefs and ideologies which have helped to define Western society.

Communications 12 This course is for students who wish to master the fundamentals of English without an emphasis on literature. Emphasis is on listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Common useful written communications such as notes, letters, job applications, etc., will be the focus of writing. Everyday English, such as that found in newspapers and magazines will be the focus of reading. Students will also study reading selections from a variety of sources.

Drama Film and Television 12 In this course students will analyse: how artistic components of film and TV affect meaning, how society, culture and history influence and are influenced by images and messages. Students will also critique their own and others’ performances and products, work together to solve acting, scriptwriting and production problems and use appropriate procedures for specific positions in film productions. Students will gain experience in the use of standard formats to develop screenplays, scripts and commercials. Through involvement in drama, students will use voice, movement, concentration and belief to create effective roles throughout performances. Students may also gain skills and training with reference to film industry careers.

Chemistry 11 A student with an interest in chemistry and how it is applied in today’s world will enjoy Chemistry 11. A lab-oriented course requiring no previous chemistry background, Chemistry 11 involves the study of atoms, molecules and matter, chemical reactions, solution chemistry and organic chemistry. The course may deal with optional topics such as environmental chemistry, nuclear chemistry and how chemistry concepts are relevant in everyday life. Chemistry 12 Chemistry 12 builds on students’ experience in Chemistry 11 and has an emphasis on the many ways in which atoms, molecules and ions interact. Many interesting experiments help students to understand the rates of chemical reactions, chemical equilibrium, analysis of ions in solution, acid base chemistry and electrochemistry. Prerequisite: Chemistry 11

Economics 12 This course establishes a sound knowledge base in economics. It helps students to develop the ability to engage in appropriate forms of inquiry and to select and apply economic skills and knowledge as well as enhance the understanding and acceptance of a variety of societies. English 10 This course covers the following areas of study: poetry, literature, (short story and novel study), grammar and writing. All language skills will be practiced: listening, speaking, reading and writing, with particular emphasis on the former two. Active participation is expected. To be eligible for this course, students must have successfully completed Advanced Writing or demonstrate English language competence of an acceptable level.


high school program : CURRICULUM

English 11 This course places emphasis on appreciation of literature and the development of language skills and deals with a variety of topical themes. Selections from various literary works, including Shakespeare for fun are used to enrich the core curriculum and stimulate the intellectual and creative growth of the student. The course also covers a review of punctuation, writing and grammar skills. English 12 English 12 is a comprehensive writing and literature course, which prepares students for the English 12 Government Exam and focuses on the study of the modern short story, poetry, and the modern novel. Assignments include narrative, des-criptive and expository compositions. Students are also required to participate in at least one drama scene and complete a research essay. Financial Accounting 12 This is a course for students wishing to pursue post-secondary studies in accounting, finance, business management and commerce. Advanced concepts of accounting encourage students to develop analytical decision-making and communication skills. Fine Arts 11 This course will employ theatre games and creative activities to sharpen sense awareness, encourage the imagination and develop speech, movement and improvisational skills. By the end of the course, students should be able to sustain concentration through exercises in storytelling, improvisation and scene work. French 11 (Beginner) This course will provide students with both oral and written experiences in the French language. Students will have the opportunity to both learn and experiment with the new language through a variety of activities such as skits, dialogues and other interactive activities. The course will be organized around language functions and vocabulary groups that are essential to communication at the beginner level.

Geography 12 Geography 12 is divided into four parts. In Focus One students will study environments and people by asking: What is geography? What is an environment? What is the role of the individual in the world? In Focus Two students will study physical and biological processes of the world. Topics include the earth’s atmosphere (weather, climate), biosphere (vegetation, soil, ecosystems), land and water (volcanoes, glaciers, earthquakes, rivers, seas). History 12 In this course students will examine important forces, events, personalities, and institutions that shaped the 20th Century. Themes include nationalism, imperialism, internationalism, political philosophies and technology. Throughout the course, an underlying emphasis will be on the roles of the individual in history and in a changing society. Management Innovation 12 This course introduces students to the organizational and management skills necessary to function efficiently in a business environment. Management styles and issues related to the global economy are studied, and students are encouraged to apply problem-solving skills to situations. Mandarin Chinese 11 In this course students explore the Chinese language with emphasis on verbal communication and pronunciation using the pinyin system. The course covers pronunciation, meaning, and writing of the key Chinese characters (both the traditional and the simplified forms wherever applicable) in lessons 1 – 25 of the Practical Chinese Reader 1. It also includes the key sentence structures and Chinese grammar used in lessons 1 – 25 of the Practical Chinese Reader 1.

Marketing 12 This project-oriented course helps students to understand the impact of international trade on British Columbia and other economies. Students also learn strategies used by businesses to respond to the changing consumer environment. At the same time, students also develop skills in marketing research while evaluating the effectiveness of the marketing strategies used. Mathematics 10 This course covers the following areas of study: Numbers and number operations—rationals and irrationals; data analysis–organizing and interpreting data; geometry –similarity, reasoning and analytic geometry; trigonometry; algebra; — expressions and equations. Mathematics 11 This course covers fundamental mathematics concepts and skills. Included are real numbers, radicals, exponents, algebraic expressions and equations, functions, transformations of relations, geometry, analyzing survey data, and trigonometry. Mathematics 12 This course is designed for students going on to post-secondary studies in mathematics, pure and applied science, commerce or other areas which require higher level mathematics. Mathematics 12 requires a strong background in the basics and desire to work consistently. It extends and completes high school math with trigonometry including trigonometric functions and trigonometric equations and identities. It will also cover exponents, logarithms, sequences and series, and a variety of graphic calculator applications. The data analysis component will now deal with probabilities, permutations and combinations. (A graphing calculator will be required) Prerequisite: Mathematics 11

Mandarin Chinese 12 The emphasis in this course is on reading and writing Mandarin Chinese. The course objectives are to master more complex dialogues, to become familiar with stroke order, components of Chinese character, multiple usages of selected characters, grammatical structures and the values and customs of Chinese culture.

Physical Education 10, 11 & 12 The goal of these courses is to promote a positive attitude toward active living in the pursuit of lifelong health and well-being. Students will be expected to fully and safely participate in and develop appropriate skills to the best of their abilities.


36 37

Physics 11 The course is intended to provide students with insight into the scope, nature, relevance and limitations of physics (physical science). In this introductory level course, the topics covered include the study of kinematics (mathematics of motion), vector diagrams, gravity, the fundamental forces (electrical, gravitational and nuclear), nuclear and light phenomenon physics. Physics 12 In Physics 12 a problem-solving approach is taken with various topics that include kinematics, vectors, equilibrium forces, circular motion, work and kinetic energy, collisions/ momentum, gravitation, electric charges/fields, electric potential, current and resistance, magnetic fields and magnetism and electromagnetism. Planning 10 This course enables students to develop skills they need to become self-directed individuals who can meet the demands of the working world. Students will become informed decision makers, be able to access and analyze information and develop attitudes and skills that will help them in the transition from secondary school to post secondary years. This is a required course for students entering Grade 10.

Science 10 This course entails fact, theory and skills and processes from the three primary areas of science: biology, chemistry and physics. In Science 10 students are encouraged to have a personal, practical and investigative approach to the learning of science. Science and Technology 11 This course is designed to provide opportunities to observe the interactions between science, technology and society. It will assist the student in the development of critical thinking and problem solving skills as they relate to technology and technological issues.

Social Studies 10 Students will gain factual information regarding Canadian geography, history and government while developing writing skills and discussion skills, which will enable them to competently express opinions and give reports on course content. Social Studies 11 The course is divided into the study of geography, history and government as these disciplines relate to Canada. 1. Geography includes the relationship between Canada and the world. Subjects include the global village, population and development, resources and urbanization. 2. History includes the growth of Canada as a nation from Confederation to the present. 3. Government includes selected political systems throughout the world, the Canadian parliamentary system, the Canadian electoral system and the Canadian constitution. Studio Arts 12 Drawing and Painting Art Foundation 12 is a comprehensive course designed to facilitate a broad range of experiences in visual arts. Students will be engaged in creating and responding to a variety of images. Art foundation courses are designed to provide a balanced program of study in both traditional and contemporary art forms, such as drawing, painting, printmaking, photography, design and digital imaging. Art Foundation courses provide opportunities for students to develop their technical skills in relation to perceiving, responding to, creating and communicating about a wide variety of types of images. Writing ESL 11 This course provides a systematic development of writing skills through both guided writing and a variety of free compositions. Structural and functional use of English will be incorporated throughout and will be reinforced through reading, listening and speaking activities.


English Certificate Programs

University Preparation Programs This program focuses on advanced academic and business English and is specifically for students who are about to begin a university program at Coquitlam College.

This general program is for any student who wants to improve his or her English language skills.

The English studies programs at Coquitlam College are for students who are looking to develop their language skills as they prepare for high school and university studies. We also welcome people These campsyoung combine and professionals who simply to improve qualitywant English studies their English fluency to meet with their an personal or career goals. fun holiday

Summer & Winter Camps

experience in and around Vancouver. Our courses cover everything from beginner’s conversational English, to TOEFL preparation, to advanced academic and business writing. In addition, our holiday-study tours offer an immersive English experience that takes you outside of the classroom and into Vancouver and its surroundings.


english studies

38 39

Coquitlam College:

knows that strong English language skills are the key to reaching your academic and career goals in Canada and the United States. That’s why we have a varied selection of English courses and immersion experiences for students of any ability level.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS Students must be at least 15 years of age when they begin their studies. In some cases, you will need to take the Coquitlam College English Diagnostic Test to find the best courses for your ability level.

The English studies programs at Coquitlam College are for students who are looking to develop their language skills as they prepare for high school and university studies. We also welcome young people and professionals who simply want to improve their English fluency to meet their personal or career goals. Our courses cover everything from beginner’s conversational English, to IELTS preparation, to advanced academic and business writing. In addition, our holidaystudy tours offer an English immersion experience that takes you outside of the classroom and into Vancouver and its surroundings.


english studies

ENGLISH certificate PROGRAM The English Certificate Program is for all students who need to improve their English language skills. Courses include grammar, conversation, reading, writing, and TOEFL preparation, and are offered at beginner, intermediate, and advanced levels. The Coquitlam College English Diagnostic Test will show you which courses are best for you. You must be at least 15 years old to be admitted into this program. Promotion from one level to the next usually takes place at the end of a semester. ENGLISH CERTIFICATE COURSES Beginner Conversation Students will develop the basic skills necessary for understanding and participating in day-to-day conversations. They will practice fluency through paired and group work on a variety of topics. Students will practice expressing likes and dislikes in addition to supplying reasons. They will also practice telephone skills, giving directions, advice and expressing intentions. Beginner Grammar This course is designed to provide students with the essential grammar, vocabulary, language, and study skills required at the beginner’s level of spoken, written and grammatical English competency. A variety of subject areas such as math, science, and social studies will be examined so that the student will have the opportunity to improve his/ her language and critical thinking skills. Students will work on various communicative tasks and assignments either individually or with partners to improve their ability to perform in an academic environment.

Beginner Reading Students will build their vocabulary and develop the ability to effectively find word meaning, recognize at least 500 works and read pharasal units silently and aloud. Beginner Writing Students will develop the ability to write grammatically correct compound sentences and write clear and wellorganized paragraphs. Intermediate Conversation Students will develop the conversational abilities that go beyond simple question and answer responses. Students will speak clearly and confidently in English groups, use previously acquired information and language patterns in an oral context, organize thoughts and be able to produce more fluent responses. Students will ask and respond to verbal questions with increasing competence, conduct oral interviews and surveys with native speakers, role play, discuss in a group an assortment of topics, and use a variety of common verb phrases and idioms. Intermediate Grammar Students will develop a practical understanding and knowledge of commonly used grammar structures and be able to competently use the following grammar points in coherent, complete sentences within a paragraph: the perfect tenses, passive voice, basic gerunds and infinitives, modals, articles, conditionals and a variety of clauses. Intermediate Reading Students will build vocabulary, language decoding skills, and develop an understanding of the story elements: plot, character, setting, theme and conflict. Students will also be able to summarize and find the main points of a story, as well as identify setting, character, climax and theme of a story, increase reading speed and comprehension, skim and scan passages effectively, and read and understand a variety of passages such as short stories, essays and newspaper articles.

Intermediate Writing Students will develop an understanding of the writing process and use it to generate clear, descriptive and narrative paragraphs. This includes writing grammatically correct compound and complex sentences that combine a variety of interesting and logical ideas which express ideas and thoughts clearly. Advanced Conversation Students will develop the ability to communicate orally and express ideas with clarity and fluency. This includes recognizing and understanding a number of common verb phrases and idiomatic expressions, understanding the elements that affect efficient spoken language (pace, clarity, audience, delivery and interest), discussing and giving a talk on a variety of topics spontaneously, and following preparation. Advanced Grammar Students will develop a working knowledge of all the verb tenses and all major grammatical structures. This includes all verb tenses, a variety of clauses, conditionals, articles, gerunds and infinitives. Advanced Reading Students will build vocabulary, language decoding skills and develop an understanding of the story elements: plot, character, setting, theme and conflict. Advanced Writing Students will develop the ability to write a variety of clear, well-written essays using all steps of the writing process. This includes using proper sentence and paragraph transitions in a well-organized expository or comparative essay with a minimum of three paragraphs.


40 41

UNIVERSITY PREPARATION PROGRAM This program is for students who are about to begin their university studies at Coquitlam College. The courses emphasize general advanced English skills as well as specialized academic and business English. All students must pass Advanced Reading and Writing before entering this program. Academic English Students will learn to master a variety of skills involving oral and written communication, summarizing, paraphrasing, researching, discussing and presenting material. Students will develop competency in reading from multi-disciplinary sources and do self assessments in order to gauge their current knowledge and skill level to discover areas for improvement. Academic Media Through exposure to documentary film, news media, taped lectures and various reading materials, students will explore and discuss both established and controversial concepts. This course gives students an opportunity to expand vocabulary as well as broaden general knowledge and identify areas of personal interest. Academic Preparation Students will develop reading, writing, speaking and listening skills essential for University Program study. Material for study will be taken specifically from content areas. Video tapes of university lectures will be used for listening and note-taking practice. Students will have an opportunity to write essays and research papers, and also to practice the MLA/Chicago style. TOEFL/IELTS Preparation Students will learn the essential skills and strategies to achieve a high score on the four sections of the (IBT) TOEFL and the IELTS. In listening, students develop the academic language to comprehend long conversations and lectures. In reading, students utilize scanning and skimming strategies to choose correct answers for complex text questions. In speaking, students learn good note taking and proper organization to give comprehensive answers. Finally, students learn to write accurate summaries and well-developed essays. Vocabulary is an additional focus of this course to help students do better on the tests. Business Conversation The goal of the course is for students to develop an ability to orally express business concepts with clarity and fluency. This course will utilize an interactive and multi-disciplined approach to build business communication skills both individually and in small groups. Students will be encou-raged to learn from one another as well as from native speakers through polls, interviews, speeches, surveys, guided discussions, games, etc.

SUMMER & WINTER CAMPS Our summer and winter camps are a great opportunity for students of all ages to develop their English language skills while learning about Canada in a fun, safe, and welcoming environment. Your camp group will take classes in English as you take part in exciting outings and activities throughout the Vancouver area, all adding up to an immersive and fun learning experience. Vancouver is one of the world’s most beautiful and friendly cities. Ski or snowboard on our local mountains in the winter or discover Vancouver’s beautiful beaches and parks in the summer. There are hundreds of great activities you can choose from. We can also provide English instruction at any level: from language games and fun for our youngest visitors, to intensive business English for groups of professionals. We welcome individuals who are seeking to join a group, or we can design a custom holiday-study tour for groups with specific interests. SAMPLE CAMPS Regular Camp Combine English classes with the excitement of exploring Vancouver. University Preparation Option Get a head-start on university success while getting to know your new city. Intensive English-Only Option Improve your language skills quickly in an English-only total immersion program Parent and Child Camps A great way to enjoy a family vacation while learning English at the same time. Camps are two to four weeks long and can be arranged for any time of the year. Students who take part in a summer or winter camp usually also participate in our homestay program, which matches students with Coquitlam College-approved family homes for the length of their stay (see following page for more details). For more information and to book a tour, contact our Summer & Winter Camp Coordinator: Melita O’Neill, tel 604 939 6633 melita@coquitlamcollege.com


homestay program

Coquitlam College:

lets you experience Canadian customs and culture for yourself through our homestay program. We’ll place you in a safe and comfortable local home, close to the college, where you’ll enjoy home-cooked meals and a great family atmosphere.

HOW TO APPLY Apply for the homestay program on our website or by contacting our Homestay Coordinator: Melita O’Neill, tel 604 939 6633 melita@coquitlamcollege.com

The homestay experience gives you a unique chance to experience Canadian culture, improve your English in daily conversation, and take part in fun family activities. Our homestay families are carefully screened and each home is inspected to make sure that every student has a rewarding, comfortable, and safe environment. Homestay families provide our students with three meals a day and a private bedroom, as well as shared laundry and bathroom facilities. As a more affordable alternative, you may also choose to prepare your own meals.


tuition fees & living expenses

42 43

ALL FEE AMOUNTS ARE IN CANADIAN DOLLARS

ONE SEMESTER

4 COURSES

Application (non-refundable)

High School Program

$ 4,600.00

English Studies Program

$ 4,600.00

University Transfer Program

$ 4,980.00 (12-15 credits)

Book Deposit (High School & English Studies - $150.00 refundable)

$ 175.00

Homestay Application Fee (non-refundable)

$ 200.00

Homestay (monthly)

$ 800.00

Airport Pick-Up

$ 65.00

Notes. 1. At Coquitlam College, a normal full-time course load for a university level student is four courses per semester; full-time study in high school programs and English studies programs is four courses per semester. 2. As the minimum initial period of acceptance for an overseas applicant is two semesters of full-time study, the required initial tuition deposit is for two semesters, due and payable upon a student’s acceptance into the College.

$ 100.00

3. Fee increases may occur after the printing of this publication (August 2009) making the fee schedule herewith null and void. 4. Coquitlam College tuition fees are bonded with the Independent Schools’s Branch of the Ministry of Education for British Columbia (for high school and English studies programs). 5. All students are required to have medical insurance. The college can enroll students in a medical plan upon registration.


academic schedule : SEPTEMBER 2009 TO DECEMBER 2010

Fall 2009

Spring 2010

Sept. 4

Student Orientation

Jan. 4

School Office re-opens

Sept. 7

Labour Day, College Closed

Jan. 5

Student Orientation

Sept. 8

Classes begin for the Fall Semester Late Registration Begins

Jan. 6

Classes Begin for the Spring Semester Late Registration Begins

Sept. 18

Last Day to Add/Change Courses

Jan. 19

Last Day to Add/Change Courses

Oct. 12

Thanksgiving, College Closed

Oct. 19-23

MID-TERM EXAMS

Feb. 15-19

MID-TERM EXAMS

Nov. 6

Pro-D Day, No classes for ESL/SS Programs

March 12

Pro-D Day, No Classes for ESL & SS Programs

Nov. 11

College Closed, Remembrance Day

March 19

UT Course Drop Deadline

Nov. 20

UT Course Drop Deadline

April 1

UT Classes End for Spring Semester

Dec. 7

UT Classes End for Fall Semester

April 2

Good Friday, College Closed

Dec. 11

ESL/SS Semester End for Fall Semester

April 5

Easter Monday, College Closed

Dec. 8-12

UT FINAL EXAMS

April 9

ESL/SS Semester End for Spring Semester

Dec. 18

Final Marks Mailed to Students

April 6-10

UT FINAL EXAMS

Dec. 24-Jan. 1

Christmas Break, College Closed

April 16

Final Marks Mailed to Students

Summer 2010

Late Registration Ends

Fall 2010

April 30

Student Orientation

Sept. 3

Student Orientation

May 3

Summer Semester Classes Begin Late Registration Begins

Sept. 6

Labour Day, College Closed

Sept. 7

May 14

Last Day to Add/Change Courses Late Registration Ends

Classes Begin for the Fall Semester Late Registration Begins

Sept. 17

May 24

Victoria Day, College Closed

Last Day to Add/Change Courses Late Registration Ends

June 7-11

MID-TERM EXAMS

Oct. 11

Thanksgiving, College Closed

July 1

Canada Day, College Closed

Oct. 18-22

MID-TERM EXAMS

July 2

Course Drop Deadline

Nov. 11

College Closed, Remembrance Day

July 19

UT Classes End for Summer Semester

Nov. 12

Pro-D Day, No classes for ESL/SS Programs

July 23

ESL/SS Semester End for Summer Semester

Nov. 19

UT Course Drop Deadline

July 20-24

UT FINAL EXAMS

Dec. 6

UT Classes End for Fall Semester

July 30

Final Marks Mailed to Students

Dec. 10

ESL/SS Semester End for Fall Semester

Dec. 7-11

UT FINAL EXAMS

Dec. 17

Final Marks Mailed to Students

Dec. 24-Jan. 1

Christmas Break, College Closed


how to apply to coquitlam college

44 45

Coquitlam College:

welcomes students from countries all around the world. To apply for admission, students must complete and submit the application on the opposite side of this page and mail it to:

Coquitlam College 516 Brookmere Avenue Coquitlam, British Columbia Canada V3J 1W9 or fax application to: 604

939 0336

or submit the application online through the College’s website at:

www.coquitlamcollege.com/english/higherlearning/admissions/applicationforms/

2) Official transcripts from previous schools;

Method of Payment and Bank Information Payment of fee should be made in bank draft form payable to Coquitlam College or wire transfer to:  BANK: Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce Coquitlam Town Centre Branch Coquitlam, B.C. V3B 7L9, CANADA

3) One passport size photo; and

 ACCOUNT NAME:

4) TOEFL, IELTS, CAEL or English language test scores if available.

 ACCOUNT NUMBER: 00920-010-2600919

Applications must also include: 1) The application fee of $100 in Canadian funds – payment by Visa credit card is accepted and can be made online through the College’s website.

Upon acceptance, Coquitlam College will issue new students an official letter of acceptance and a statement of tuition fees due. All students are required to have medical insurance. The College can enroll students in a medical plan upon registration.

Coquitlam College

 SWIFT CODE : CIBCCATT

Please add CDN $20 for bank surcharge and include student’s name with the payment.


application for admission

Surname (family name), First (given names)

■ FEMALE ■

NAME

MALE

CITIZENSHIP

DATE OF BIRTH (D/M/Y)

CHECK HERE IF HOMESTAY REQUIRED

VISA STUDENT? YES

NO

(Address in home country)

ADDRESS

CITY

COUNTRY

PROVINCE/STATE

POSTAL/ZIP CODE

PHONE

FAX

EMAIL

PLACE OF BIRTH

PARENT FAMILY NAME

PARENT TEL #

Program of Choice

First Semester

■ University Program ■ High School Program ■ English Studies Program

■ Spring Semester (January to April) ■ Summer Semester (May to July) ■ Fall Semester (September to December)

Parent Consent Form At Coquitlam College, we feel that extra-curricular activities are an important part of the College’s programs and that all students benefit greatly by participating in them. I give permission for my son/daughter to participate in the following activities: Please tick off any activities you DO NOT want your son/daughter to participate in:

■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■

Badminton Baseball Basketball Camping Field Trips Floor Hockey Golf Hiking

■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■

Horseback Riding Ice-skating Skiing Snowboarding Snowshoeing Volleyball Whale Watching Water Sports

SIGNATURE OF PARENT OR GUARDIAN

DATE (D/M/Y)

It is mandatory that all students have medical insurance

* non-response indicates full approval The Application Fee of $100 CDN must be sent with the Application for Admission form. Please provide the following information if you are paying with a VISA or MasterCard credit card. CARD NUMBER

EXPIRY DATE

NAME ON CARD

I declare that the information in this application is complete and correct.

SIGNATURE OF PARENT OR GUARDIAN

How did you hear about Coquitlam College?

DATE (D/M/Y)


2 47

student homestay application

page 1

Surname (family name), First (given names)

■ FEMALE ■

NAME

MALE

CITIZENSHIP

DATE OF BIRTH (D/M/Y)

ADDRESS

COUNTRY

EMAIL

PHONE

LOCAL CONTACT (If available)

FAX

WHICH HOMESTAY PROGRAM ARE YOU APPLYING FOR?

■ $800/month (Includes three meals a day)

$500/month (Meals are not uncluded. Simple cooking facilities provided.)

Accomodations & Flight Information ACCOMMODATION REQUIRED FROM (D/M/Y)

TO

DO YOU NEED AIRPORT PICKUP? YES

ARRIVAL INFORMATION (D/M/Y)

TIME

FLIGHT #

NO

If your arrival time is not known, please contact Coquitlam College Homestay Department — Tel: 604 939 6633 or email: melita@coquitlamcollege.com

The Homestay Application Fee of $200, the Airport Fee of $65, if applicable, must be sent with this application along with a notarized guardianship document fee of $75 for students under 18 years of age. Please provide the following information if you are paying with a VISA credit card. CARD NUMBER

EXPIRY DATE

NAME ON CARD

Medical Insurance (Medical Insurance is mandatory at Coquitlam College) DO YOU REQUIRE MEDICAL INSURANCE? YES

NO

PLEASE MAKE A LIST OF KNOWN ALLERGIES TO ANIMALS, MEDICATIONS, FOODS, ETC)

MEDICATIONS PRESENTLY BEING TAKEN PHYSICAL DISABILITIES

SPECIAL DIET? YES

■ ■ ■

CHECK YOUR HOBBIES AND INTERESTS

Tennis Basketball

■ ■

Reading Volleyball

■ ■

Swimming

■ ■

FLUENT

Bike Riding

Other (Please List)

English Proficiency YEARS OF FORMAL ENGLISH STUDY

■ ■

NONE

WRITTEN ENGLISH ABILITY: SPOKEN ENGLISH ABILITY:

NONE

■ ■

LITTLE LITTLE

■ ■

FAIR FAIR

FLUENT

HOW LONG DO YOU INTEND TO STUDY AT COQUITLAM COLLEGE? (APPROX.) DO YOU COOK? YES

NO

DO YOU SMOKE? YES

NO

IN YOUR OPINION, WHAT DO YOU WANT IN A HOMESTAY? DO YOU WANT TO LIVE IN A HOUSE WITH ANOTHER HOMESTAY STUDENT? YES

NO

■ MAYBE ■

■ ■

Photography Skiing

■ ■

NO

Weight Lifting Track and Field


student homestay application

page 2

COQUITLAM COLLEGE STUDENT HOMESTAY AGREEMENT Every student in the Coquitlam College Homestay Program must follow the regulations and policies of Coquitlam College and its host families. 1. There is a two-week trial period. If a student is not satisfied with his or her homestay, the student will meet with the Homestay Coordinator to discuss options. There are two options:

 Move to another family: If a student wants to move out of the homestay, he or she must inform the Homestay Coordinator.

 Withdraw from the Homestay Program. Written permission from a parent or guardian must be supplied. Students under the age of 18 must have a local guardian.

Please note: Students must give two weeks notice prior to moving; otherwise, homestay fees will apply.

2. Students pay $500.00 or $800.00 directly to their host parents. 3. The illegal use of drugs or consumption of alcohol by minors is not permitted. 4. Radios, music, musical instruments and televisions should only be played at a reasonable volume and time. 5. Most families do not allow smoking in their homes. Please abide by your homestay family’s smoking rules. 6. Long distance calls must be paid in FULL every month. 7. Students are responsible for any abnormal cleaning charges or damages that occur during their stay. 8. If a student repeatedly ignores homestay rules, he or she will be removed from the homestay without a refund of the homestay payment. No other homestay will be found for them. 9. The consent form, attached to the school application, MUST be signed by a parent or guardian in order to participate in any school activities. 10. It is MANDATORY for a student to obtain MEDICAL INSURANCE. Please inquire at the Administration Office upon arrival. 11. If you are under the age of 18, the attached custodianship agreement must be signed.

I have read and agree to the above mentioned conditions and terms. YES ■

STUDENT SIGNATURE

NO

PARENT OR GUARDIAN SIGNATURE (IF UNDER 18 YRS OLD)

LOCAL GUARDIAN TELEPHONE # & ADDRESS (IF AVAILABLE)

Custodianship Agreement (For students under the age of 18 yrs) 1. Students are required to stay with their host family but permission may be granted by the host family for weekend sleepovers. 2. Students must always tell their host family where they are going.

STUDENT SIGNATURE

PARENT OR GUARDIAN SIGNATURE (IF UNDER 18 YRS OLD)

If you have any questions, please contact the Homestay Coordinator by e-mail at: melita@coquitlamcollege.com Applications can be mailed or faxed to: Coquitlam College, 516 Brookmere Ave, Coquitlam, BC, Canada V3J 1W9, Fax 604 939 0336


VANCOUVER

Coquitlam College

CANADA

U.S. A

To Whistler Ski Resort

WEST VANCOUVER

N

NORTH VANCOUVER

Expo SkyTrain Line

5

Millennium SkyTrain Line Canada Line

6

SeaBus crossing

9 COQUITLAM

2

3

1 VANCOUVER

8

BURNABY

NEW WESTMINSTER

4 SURREY

7

RICHMOND

To Seattle, Washington, USA

To Victoria

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Lougheed Shopping Mall Simon Fraser University University of British Columbia Vancouver International Airport Stanley Park Downtown Vancouver/Robson Street Downtown Richmond Metrotown Shopping Centre Coquitlam Centre Shopping Mall


516 Brookmere Avenue Coquitlam, British Columbia Canada V3J 1W9 tel 604 939 6633 fax 604 939 0336 www.coquitlamcollege.com admiss@coquitlamcollege.com

Coquitlam College 2009/10 Viewbook  

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