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MUMBAI ` 200 SEPT 2012 VOL 26 (1) FOCUS 2012 Pritzker Architecture Prize Laureate: Wang Shu ARCHITECTURE The Leisure Pavilion: Ar. Palinda Kannangara Janakee Sadan: Artha Studio ART ArcelorMittal Orbit: Anish Kapoor & Cecil Balmond


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Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012


let’s partner

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Reflections on Architectural ‘Practice’ James Murray talks about TANDEM - his studio in collaboration with Tim Hill - and their journey to discover architecture that defines their ideas as they initiate their work in India, in conversation with Indian Architect & Builder. Image: courtesy TANDEM Design Studio & Genesis Burson Marsteller, South Asia

James Murray is the co-founder of TANDEM Design Studio. TANDEM was formed in the year 2005 by James Murray and Tim Hill with a focus on architecture that reflects design and sustainability. The studio’s sphere of operation is broad and encompasses large-scale urban design master planning, medium-scale residential and commercial dwellings. The studio believes that the best approach towards ‘responsible design’ is to apply their experience in achieving sustainable benchmarks at all stages of a project. Since its inception, TANDEM has been involved in a variety of projects ranging from residential to commercial for a diverse range of clients from Australia and overseas.

IA&B: What is TANDEM studio all about? What is, if we were to call it, your ‘Manifesto’? JM: At university, my favourite manifesto was by the Italian futurists; evidence that even the most misguided and bizzare proclamations could lead to interesting work nonetheless. When my partner Tim Hill and I started TANDEM in 2005, we were only sure of a few things; we wanted to be our own bosses, we wanted to able to make a living, and we had no idea how we were going to do it. As we found our way through our first projects, we discovered that there was much we had taken on working together at our previous employers and much of this needed to be discarded if we were to find our own voice. After seven years we are probably not much closer to a coherent manifesto but we have found recurring themes and interests that have emerged and evolved sometimes from that baggage that we tried to throw away during our initial rebellion. One expression we coined early on still holds true: “Every project deserves a new beginning.” At the core of our identity lies a need to treat each project as an opportunity to explore new ideas; at times this is as much for our own benefit as the clients’. “Our proof of concept is the built form”; in some ways this is a conventional approach to the definition of architecture and yet it captures our need to see ideas tested in the realities and vagaries of the construction industry. “Sustainability is intrinsic and inseparable from good design”; this captures our approach to finding ways to ‘design in’ the initiatives that maximise a

building’s performance, making it near impossible to remove them and ideally difficult to see them. We react strongly against the bolt-on approach to sustainability that puts technological systems over sensible design and equates to a building as a high-tech machine that must look like one to be green. We owe some of this approach to our time working on Federation Square where success was judged by how a well-designed building or building element was able to improve performance, and also engage at other levels; a case of not one or the other but ‘both’. The labyrinth passive-cooling system used beneath the plaza at Federation Square is a great example of an integral system that provides both the support structure for the plaza as well as the labyrinth through which air is pumped and cooled for re-use on other areas of the project. These are some, but not all, of the themes we have found within our work. IA&B: How do you work? Can you tell us about your design approach? JM: To some extent our design approach is the core of what we are about. To say that we are the product of our experiences both at university and in practice is to understand that we have deliberately appropriated some. Other techniques that have helped developed this inclusive design culture include making physical models of the project at all stages. We find having all objects that can be handled, scrutinised and attacked, moves the design forward rapidly and, more importantly, allows a forum for all members of the office to engage with the project. Part of our design process accepts that Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012


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moving between mediums, whether it be sketches, physical or computer models, can lead to loss of information or translation issues, but can also allow happy accidents and opportunities for recalibrating the design that are lost if a design is kept confined to a single-process tangent. IA&B: You have worked on various projects at varying scales. What would you call your ‘language’? Is there a thread that connects all your work? JM: I guess the simple answer is that our design approach is our ‘language’. We are not interested in developing signature elements or aesthetics that define our work; each project is unique and as such requires its own logic, approaches and reason. This is not to say that we do not re-use any elements of our previous designs; if you were to look across our projects as a whole you would see recurring materials such as exposed concrete floors, exposed structural timber beams and cladding. Also evident is an interest in pattern; often manifested through the simple articulation of conventional building materials; on the Kensington Lighthouse it was slippages of slightly different tones of corrugated roof sheets; at Creeds Farm, a variation of this technique was used on the external timber cladding which requires continuous horizontal jointing due to panel size. At another level we try to find interest in the most economical and banal of materials; in the case of the interior of Charcoal Lane Restaurant we explored this slippage pattern further using vertical-orientated standard white tiles. My hope is that an outsider looking at our work would find continuity in our work through the attention paid to the particularities of each project; be they client, climate, site, context, budget, construction techniques, cultural and social influences. Our success, we believe, is tied to our ability to find synergies between these interests and hopefully unearth and reveal connections in unexpected ways. IA&B: Theory & Practice – tell us about your perception of the two since you decided to go back to school after working. JM: My interests lie around where the two connect; theory for theories’ sake and built works with no theoretical context are two poles I try to avoid. RMIT, led by the distinguished academic Leon van Schaik, has a Master’s course that takes invited practices and asks them to reflect upon the work of the practice, why they work the way they do, what they hope to do and does this in a nurturing critical environment. Tim Hill and I were invited to participate in 2009 and completed the Master’s in 2011. Running a practice is about doing - day in, day out. The act of doing takes priority over everything and leaves little time for research or reflection. We found the disruption of removing ourselves from the office and placing our work in a new context liberating and revitalising. The act of reframing our work and theorising about what the work means to us captured many elements that were there in the doing but never articulated. This helped us twofold; explaining what we do and why to an audience outside clients gave us new ways of thinking about ourselves and as importantly allowed us to better explain what we trying to do with the people in our office. Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012

Surrounding ourselves with other practitioners during our Master’s allowed us an insight into what is happening around us and how similar theoretical beginnings were creating quite different lineages amongst our colleagues. While I see our practice as strengthened through our connection with University, I am glad that our experience was not operating in the abstract and was directly tied to our work and processes. IA&B: Australia and India are poles apart as countries and cultures. What is your understanding of the Indian landscape? How do you see your architecture in an Indian context? JM: Having had limited exposure to the Indian landscape, I cannot pretend to have extensive understandings of the complexities and intricacies of one of the most diverse and fascinating arenas to work within. I have been fortunate to have listened to some great thinkers while on two recent trips and what is very clear is the enormity of growth and the seriousness of the problem responding and planning for this growth. While we do not share the scale of growth, Melbourne nonetheless has experienced a rapid population increase that has put growing strain on its infrastructure and threatens its status as one of the world’s most liveable cities for many people who cannot afford to live in suburbs close to the city. In planning new cities such as the 10 new centres proposed between Delhi and Mumbai, there are lessons that can be learnt from the relatively new city of Melbourne as well of course as the ancient cities in India. The need for density to avoid the sprawl that has spread 40km from Melbourne’s CBD can be tackled in a multitude of ways; the most interesting of which tend to mimic what happens naturally within established cities. The need for master plans that encourage diversity of function and building stock as well as multiple layers of transport and infrastructure tailored to the pedestrian rather than the car require diverse design teams to enact. At a building level our interest is in creating economical high-performance projects that are site-specific; responding to the local climate, context and cultural conditions which vary hugely across the states of India. Using the same collaborative and integrated processes, working with specialists with local experience, we would hope to produce projects that have utilised our design processes and systems that relate and engage with the Indian conditions. IA&B: When you say “Research is an ongoing and integrated process in the TANDEM office,” what exactly is the office involved in for research? JM: At one level, every architect who has spent time on projects that are not billable is conducting research. The difficulty is making time for these activities that, at first, may not seem directly related to a specific issue within the office. We believe that in order to avoid stagnating, there needs to be a critical body of internal investigation that can fuel future projects. This may be as simple as keeping abreast of developments in material and construction technologies. Everyone would have heard of the success firms like Google have had with allowing, in fact, forcing employees to “free play” on things that interest


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them. We have found that activities that take you outside the office either physically or conceptually nearly always reap some benefit. Currently, areas of interest that we are researching include emerging materials such as CLT, cross laminated timber, which has been used to construct a 10-storey timber-framed high-rise in London. We are working with Curtin University and Melbourne University to submit for a grant to research into possible efficiencies within the construction sector utilising BIM modelling processes that take a project from conception to construction and, importantly, to the operating of the facility. Our focus is on how these approaches can be utilised by SMEs allowing productivity gains that keep these struggling smaller-scale practices competitive by giving them the tools to deliver more efficient, and therefore, better performing and more economical buildings. IA&B: When you say customised BIM technologies, what exact role does TANDEM play in customisation? Do you rigourously work on BIM systems? JM: Every project in our office is worked through using our BIM system. Initially we were merely continuing the processes we learnt and developed while on Federation Square. This followed the orthodox approach of creating a schematic computer model that was developed and detailed as the design progressed, eventually becoming the model that is used to generate 2D drawings from. This system has well-documented benefits that increase with customisation to suit practices particular approaches. During our seven years of operation, we have stayed abreast of developments on the software front and made a decision early on to stick with a single platform; Bentley Micro Station & Architecture. This has allowed us to refine our systems for visualisation design and documentation and maintain a single model for all stages of the project. The next level of customisation and one that we see as the future is the ability to take the BIM system and use it to produce a 3D model that is useful and used for all stages of the design-build-operate cycle. This is where our research and initial trials working with other consultants hopes to lead to an integrated delivery model where efficiencies are realised at all stages of the project. We have recently completed a test case for Federation Square which utilises a team of architects, MEP engineers and FM specialists to produce an as-built model that allows the owners of the facility to manage, audit and maintain their facilities much more efficiently. IA&B: Tell us about your project plans in India. What are you planning to build here? How do you plan to work? JM: We hope to realise work in India that exploits our experience working on cultural and commercial projects; we are not sector-specific but are more interested in finding clients who value innovation and new approaches to old questions. In order to deliver a project we are keen to collaborate with India-based designers and consultants who bring local knowledge and help us to

negotiate cultural, political and statutory questions as well as contributing to the design dialogue. Our experience working in countries outside Australia with local partners suggests that the size and type of work is not so important as the open dialogue and respect between parties. We believe the flow of knowledge should be equal in both directions and look to set up long-term alliances. We believe we have much to offer at the level of site masterplanning, working as part of a team, and are currently part of a consortium of five Victorian companies offering complete design and project management services for a 35-tower residential complex, north of Mumbai. In addition, we are looking for projects that can leverage from our experience working on cultural and civic buildings such as museums. TANDEM has been in the fortunate position of working on the two major galleries in Victoria and the largest privately owned gallery in the southern hemispheres, the Museum of Old and New Art in Tasmania. Our long-term goal is to invest in India through an office based there that will be able to service the market locally as well as share projects in Australia and other countries such as China. IA&B: Who were your mentors? Whom do you idealise? JM: I have been fortunate to work for and with some exceptional architects as well as being taught by people who have deeply affected my views and approaches. My final year tutor at RMIT was a practicing architect, Peter Brew, who continues to quietly inspire and create modest yet beautiful projects while camouflaged within big-name practices. Other mentors from university include Peter Raisbeck and Prof Leon Van Shaik AO. After graduating, I worked for a large commercial practice where the director, Tim Hurburgh, gave me a huge amount of independence and responsibility; something I try to foster with my own staff. I also had a complete re-education through my seven years of work at Lab Architecture Studio. Here my greatest mentor, and at times tormentor, Peter Davidson worked tirelessly to push the staff beyond what they thought possible of themselves and the work they produced. Also, my mum! She has an amazing eye for art and design and has always been a huge support. I still send through designs for her opinion, she has the brutal honesty you only get with family (or Peter Davidson). Finally, things tend to come unstuck when I begin idealising people; whenever I become convinced that a person has the answers, I lose critical reason. This happened a few times at University and resulted in some failed projects that looked like bad regurgitations of another person’s approach. I enjoyed a time when I believed Carlo Mollino was God as the man designed beautiful buildings, furniture, cars, airplanes and superb interiors. Unfortunately the more I researched the more it seemed he was a very human individual, slightly perverse and very selfish; no more design idols for me. Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012


INDIAN ARCHITECT AND BUILDER

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LET’S PARTNER Reflections on Architectural ‘Practice’ In conversation with IA&B, James Murray talks about TANDEM - his studio in collaboration with Tim Hill and their journey to discover architecture that defines their ideas as they initiate their work in India.

VOL 26 (1) | SEPT 2012 | ` 200 | MUMBAI RNI Registration No. 46976/87, ISSN 0971-5509 Chairman: Jasu Shah Printer, Publisher & Editor: Maulik Jasubhai Shah Chief Executive Officer: Hemant Shetty

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Au courant Updates on events, exhibitions, competitions and news.

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EDITORIAL

Assistant Editors: Maanasi Hattangadi, Ruturaj Parikh Writers: Rashmi Naicker (Online), Sharmila Chakravorty, Shalmali Wagle Design Team: Mansi Chikani, Prasenjit Bhowmick Event Management Team: Abhay Dalvi, Abhijeet Mirashi Subscription: Dilip Parab Production Team: V Raj Misquitta (Head), Prakash Nerkar, Arun Madye

the globe.

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MARKETING TEAM & OFFICES Mumbai Viresh Pandey / Parvez Memon 210, Taj Building, 3rd Floor, Dr. D. N. Road, Fort, Mumbai 400 001, Tel: +91-22- 4213 6400,+ 91 -22-4037 3636, Fax: +91-22-4037 3635 Email: viresh_pandey@jasubhai.com, parvez_memon@jasubhai.com

A distinctive hotel in Ahmedabad by Studio Symbiosis is all set to change Ahmedabad’s skyline with its state-of-the-art façade design technology.

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Bengaluru: Viresh Pandey Mobile: 09833747615, Email: viresh_pandey@jasubhai.com

Vishranthi Commercial Complex Vishranthi Commercial Complex on a busy stretch of Chennai streetscape by KSM Consultants reimagines the traditional ‘jali’ façade.

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POST EVENT Kyoorius DesignYatra 2012

Delhi: Preeti Singh / Manu Raj Singhal / Ankit Garg 803, Chiranjeev Tower, No 43, Nehru Place, New Delhi – 110 019 Tel: 011 2623 5332, Fax: 011 2642 7404, E-mail: preeti_singh@jasubhai.com, manu_singhal@jasubhai.com, ankit_garg@jasubhai.com Gujarat: Parvez Memon Mobile: 09769758712, Email: parvez_memon@jasubhai.com

CONSTRUCTION BRIEF Hotel in Ahmedabad

JMPL, 210, Taj Building, 3rd Floor, Dr. D. N. Road, Fort, Mumbai 400 001, Tel: +91-22- 4213 6400,+ 91 -22-4037 3636, Fax: +91-22-4037 3635 Brand Manager: Sudhanshu Nagar E-mail: sudhanshu_nagar@jasubhai.com

PRODUCTS Featured are contemporary, innovative and state-of-art products from across

Head Office:

SALES

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Noted speakers initiated thought towards newer insights, and a new era of communication at the Kyoorius DesignYatra2012.

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ARCHITECTURE Deducting Cuboids

Chennai / Coimbatore: Viresh Pandey Mobile: 09833747615, Email: viresh_pandey@jasubhai.com

The Leisure Pavilion by Colombo-based Palinda Kannangara, carved out of a

Hyderabad: Viresh Pandey Mobile: 09833747615, Email: viresh_pandey@jasubhai.com

creating an internal yet open idea of living.

Kolkata: Sudhanshu Nagar Mobile: 09833104834, E-mail: sudhanshu_nagar@jasubhai.com

dense urban fabric, surprises with its sudden revelation and obvious simplicity

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The restoration and refurbishment of Janakee Sadan in Sangamner by Pune-based architecture firm Artha Studio, characterised by layers of intent and renewed

Pune: Viresh Pandey Mobile: 09833747615, Email: viresh_pandey@jasubhai.com Printed & Published by Maulik Jasubhai Shah on behalf of Jasubhai Media Pvt. Ltd (JMPL), 26, Maker Chamber VI, Nariman Point, Mumbai 400 021 Printed at M.B.Graphics, B-28 Shri Ram Industrial Estate, ZG.D.Ambekar Marg, Wadala, Mumbai 400031and Published from Mumbai - 3rd Floor, Taj Building, , 210, Dr. D. N. Road, Fort, Mumbai 400 001. Editor: Maulik Jasubhai Shah, 26, Maker Chamber VI, Nariman Point, Mumbai 400 021 Indian Architect & Builder: (ISSN 0971-5509), RNI No 46976/87, is a JMPL monthly publication. Reproduction in any manner, in whole or part, in English or any other language is strictly prohibited. We welcome articles, but do not accept responsibility for contributions lost in the mail.

Expressions in Time

spatial order, reads evocatively of its 150-year-old latent spirit.

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FOCUS Architecture of Resistance 2012 Pritzker Laureate Wang Shu’s practice, Amateur Architecture Studio, demonstrates the makings of a virtuoso, in complete command of the instruments of architecture, form, scale, material, space and light.


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BOOK REVIEW

INDIAN ARCHITECT AND BUILDER

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IMAGINING THE HOUSE This book by Lars Muller Publishers presents exact reproductions of Wang Shu’s drawings from six projects with a unique insight into the course of design.

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ART In Defiance The involuted expression of The Orbit rises in extraordinary scale and defiance as a single element of an odd asymmetrical notion in steel by world-renowned sculptor Anish Kapoor and award-winning designer Cecil Balmond.

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YOUNG DESIGNERS ‘12 ARCHITECTURE Linear Expressions The clean geometry of the Linear House in Bengaluru by CREDA, accentuates grandeur while combining minimal architecture with elemental design concepts.

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INTERIORS Structure, Space & Strategy The interior design of the Reunion Clothing Company by Bengaluru-based Raeshma Kousar transforms the space within an existing structural shell into a rich contemporary ambience with a modest manifestation of a principle of close-packing in planning.

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SPACE FRAMES The power of light This month, Space Frames, curated by Dr. Deepak Mathew revisits Louis Kahn’s IIM Ahmedabad to loiter in its spaces to understand the power of his architecture and his thorough understanding of its relevance.

Printed & Published by Maulik Jasubhai Shah on behalf of Jasubhai Media Pvt. Ltd (JMPL), 26, Maker Chamber VI, Nariman Point, Mumbai 400 021. Printed at M.B.Graphics, B-28, Shri Ram Industrial Estate, ZG.D.Ambekar Marg, Wadala, Mumbai 400031and Published from Mumbai - 3rd Floor, Taj Building, 210, Dr. D. N. Road, Fort, Mumbai 400 001. Editor: Maulik Jasubhai Shah, 26, Maker Chamber VI, Nariman Point, Mumbai 400 021. Indian Architect & Builder: (ISSN 0971-5509), RNI No 46976/87, is a JMPL monthly publication. Reproduction in any manner, in whole or part, in English or any other language is strictly prohibited. We welcome articles, but do not accept responsibility for contributions lost in the mail.

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[CASABLANCA] Sustainable Market Square Category Type Deadline

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International Open to all October 31, 2012

A market square is a public open area where market stalls are traditionally set out for trading, commonly on particular days. Sustainable architecture is a general term that describes environmentally conscious design techniques in the field of architecture. Casablanca is a young and dynamic city in Morocco with a population estimated at approximately four million habitants. Being an important economic centre, its architecture is a combination of different styles which gives it a unique architectural beauty. The aim of this international competition is to design a new sustainable market square in Casablanca (Morocco). The architecture of this new structure should reflect contemporary design tendencies. For further information, log on to: Web: www.ac-ca.org/en/home

tur(i)ntogreen | international student design competition Category Type Deadline

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International Open to all December 21, 2012

tur(i)ntogreen is an international design competition launched by the Research and Documentation Centre in Technology, Architecture and City in Developing Countries (CRDPVS) at the Politecnico di Torino in Italy. The competition is governed by a distinguished jury and is sponsored by UN-HABITAT within the “I’m a City Changer” campaign. The competition is open to all students belonging to universities from around the world. The participants of the competition are invited to apply their creative talents in developing new multidisciplinary solutions for sustainable and inclusive cities reflecting on new forms of urban management. For further information, log on to: Web: www.polito.it/turintogreen

USITT “Ideal Theatre” Student Design Competition Make Industrial Arts Centre Cincinnati Category Type Deadline

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International Open to all November 17, 2012

Category Type Deadline

Architecture and theatre have a history that has been going on for generations. This competition calls participants from both fields, students in particular, to participate in USITT’s Sixth Annual “Ideal Theatre” Student Design Competition. The competition encourages architecture students to work with young theatre artists to explore the emotive power of space, how space can aid storytelling, and how it can be manipulated to achieve a dramatic purpose. The design of the space itself should form the environment of the play, supplemented by costumes, props, lighting, sound, actors, and the audience. For further information, log on to: Web: www.usitt.org

International Architectural Awards Competition

COMPETITIONS

Category Type Deadline

Photography

: International : Open to all : December 14, 2012

This International Architectural Photography Awards Competition is organised by ArchTriumph and witnesses participants who are architects, designers, engineers, students, professional and non-professional photographers who are invited to send a maximum of two photographs that depict Public Realm Intervention Architecture anywhere in the world. ArchTriumph is the first platform of its kind to launch a number of competitions simultaneously including an “Architecture Competition Winners (Winner of Winners)” spanning various topics within a number of categories. It is assumed that architecture and photography go hand in glove and this competition establishes that common ground. The award aims to recognise the role of architecture in shaping; addressing and engaging communities. For further information, log on to: Web: www.archtriumph.com Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012

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International Open to all December 21, 2012

An architectural design competition initiated by the American Institute of Architects, Cincinnati in partnership with Over-the-Rhine Brewery District Community Urban Redevelopment Corporation, it is open to both professionals and students. The competition calls for architectural proposals of a membership-based facility that will feature private residences, maker-in-residence studios, light industrial studios and a community workshop that will help shape a new economic opportunity for the city of Cincinnati. The proposed facility will offer access to a variety of industrial machines and tools for use by artists, designers, engineers or any other constituent to aid in the production of goods and crafts. Design ideas embraces the neighbourhood’s history of innovation and civic engagement in order to inspire the next generation to develop innovative ways of making that will impact the city’s future. For further information, log on to: Web: www.iaccincinnati.com

Revival of the Silo Category Type Deadline

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International Open to all December 31, 2012

This competition offers an opportunity to express vision for the revitalisation and reuse of a silo in the former packaging (canning) factory complex of Redtory, in Guangzhou, China. The competition has an open brief which aims to create the space for young designers and artists. The proposals for this competition vary on a wide range of possible programmes like creative spaces, design studios, workshops, galleries, design schools, machinery spaces for the industrial arts students. The development of such a design will be capable of providing working space for more than a hundred design students and professionals. For further information, log on to: Web: www.homemadedessert.org


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Artists, Architects, Designers to Create Signature Piece Each

Henning Larsen Awarded the Praemium Imperiale 2012

A wide range of artists, architects and designers have come together to create a grid of 100 squares to be laid over the exhibition space with each square allocated to one participant. The most prominent people from the art, architecture and design industry are Lord Norman Foster, David Adjaye, Zaha Hadid, Chris Wilkinson, Ben Johnson, Sir Terrence Conran, Paul Smith and many more. Each piece of this large-scale installation is a part and space within the city with each having different interpretation by each artist. Each piece in this collage defines an individual perspective towards the city of London. Some of them depict the everyday scenery of commuters and for others it depicts the forgotten sights and sounds of the city. The project concept has some of the designers from the city to get back to their roots armed with drawing boards and paint. One of the most loved form of art which is long forgotten due to the digital age existent in the present day designer community.

Danish architect and artist Henning Larsen has been awarded with one of the most prestigious global arts awards, the Praemium Imperiale 2012. A Nobel Prize equivalent, this award in arts has been awarded to a number of distinguished and prominent members of this Industry. Henning Larsen is the first Danish architect to receive the Praemium Imperiale, which was first awarded in the year 1989. The award recognises five categories from which prominent representative are selected from their respective fields like painting, sculpture, architecture, music and theater. In the remaining categories, the 2012 Praemium Imperiale is presented to the Chinese artist Cai Guo-Qiang, the Italian sculptor Cecco Bonanotte, the American composer Philip Glass and the Japanese ballet dancer Yoko Morishita Danish Architect Henning Larsen, known around the world for his innovative, sustainable design is one of five recipients of the Praemium Imperiale arts prize, awarded each year by the Japan Art Association.

RIBA Announces Shortlists for the Manser Medal 2012 The Royal Institute of British Architects has announced the shortlisted firms and projects for the Manser Medal 2012. The five shortlisted candidates and projects are the private House in East Sussex by Dugan Morris Architects; a project that was conceived to achieve a unified form in a contemporary space, the second in the list is the private house in Gloucestershire by Found Associates; a build cushioned on the edge of slant of a hill overlooking a lake, the third project on the list is the Dune house in Thorpeness, Suffolk by Jarmund Vigsnaes Architects & Mole architects, fourth on the list is the passive solar gain houses by Simon Conder Associates; sibling houses one a family and the other an artist studio, the fifth project selected is the Maison L by Christian Pottgiesser from Architecturepossibles.

Anupama Kundoo’s Wall House Reconstructed: 2012 Venice Biennale

NEWS

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Indian Architect Anupama Kundoo’s wall house reconstructed at the 2012 Venice Biennale. This gives the architect the opportunity to continue with incorporating new innovation from the original design which is originally from Auroville, India. This replicated installation was the effort of both Indian craftsmen and Italian builders. The original design absorbed a major part of its characteristics from the surrounding it belonged to, taking in to consideration the building techniques, material usage and location of the site. The reconstruction of this project though absent from its original landscape displays innovative design and evokes cultural collaboration with its Indian counter part. The earthy tones, usage of bricks, terracotta, stone and wood revives ancient building processes. The construction provides a very intimate setting complete with incomplete brick partitions fused with openings for light and ventilation. Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012

Harvard GSD Students Win Competition for National Library of Israel in Jerusalem Two instructors, an alumnus and a current student from the Harvard graduate school of Design won the competition for designing the National Library of Israel in Jerusalem. Out of 81 competition entries architects Rafi Segal (design critic 2011), Yonatan Cohen (MAUD 2010), Matan Meyer (current DDes) and HyperBina Inc., the design firm of Bing Wang (current lecturer and DDes 2004) were selected. These young architects will now have the opportunity to enter in to the second round of four firms selected from 81 entries, together with eight individual architects selected by the committee. The Project Team also includes others with GSD connections, including Will Choi, Nicholas Pajerski, and Xing Xiong. The project selected expresses a sense of dialogue between the structure and its surroundings - an honest building which stays true to the nature of its purpose. Originality and uniqueness were the key elements of the design of this particular build.

Winning Team for Moscow Federal District Expansion Announced Capital Cities planning group, an Anglo-American group along with Gillespies, John Thomspon & Partners and Buro Happold were selected as the winning candidates for the design expansion of the federal district of Moscow. In the beginning of this year the Russian government had announced the expansion plan of the city of Moscow to which they launched a competition to generate the most optimal design so that it can compete with likes of the 21 st century world capitals. In response, Genplan, Moscow’s city planner, earmarked an area of 155sqkm to the south-west of the city for a new Federal Government Centre, aiming to relieve inner-city congestion through the relocation of the capital’s major employer. Ten teams from around the world were selected to design and develop optimal strategies to make a world class metropolitan during a six month three stage competition.


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Asaf Weinbroom Studio, established by industrial designer Asaf Weinbroom, focusses on designing light elements using handmade processes like the WAF Limited. Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012


products

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WAF LIMITED

Text compiled by: Parikshit Vivekanand Images: courtesy Dan Perez

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ndustrial designer Asaf Weinbroom has made an entire range of lighting made purely of wood, from joints and connectors to the body of the lamp. His designs focus on unifying mechanism, joinery and new technologies while using wood as the main material for the new piece. The WAF light series includes table and hanging lamps built from two pieces of ash veneer that are folded in a cylindrical dimension and buttoned together. These handmade lights include floor lamps, stool lamps, table lamps, and a pendant light with wooden clamps as its base so that it can be attached onto flat surfaces. This series of lamps was designed for large spaces where the wooden surface creates that much-needed elegance that a lamp of such nature requires. The light reflected from the surface of this wood creates a sense of nature, a one-of-a-kind look and warmth. The upper veneer panel reflects light at different angles and is adjustable to suit one’s need for specific intensity of light. Each piece consists of two veneer layers pressed together while overlapping each other. This crossing method is achieved by putting together two veneers with opposite fiber-direction. The pieces are so placed that one faces the horizontal direction while the other faces the vertical direction. The final sheet obtained is much more flexible and strong in comparison to the initial stages. This piece of lighting series is completely suitable for creating that perfect mixture of ambient and artificial light that is reflected off the surface of wood which is required for that minimum lighting arrangement. Asaf’s decision to use wood, a renewable resource, in the light elements that he devices, creates a sense of natural unique look, warmth, and most importantly: emphasises high-end handmade craftsmanship. This is what gives the items a unique appearance, feeling and value.

Designer: Asaf Weinbroom Contact: Asaf Weinbroom 8a gutlover St Tel Aviv, Israel Tel: +972 546944321 Email: weinbroom@gmail.com Website: www.weinbroom.com

Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012


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Nuvist, an architectural and design studio based in Istanbul, Turkey shows off their liquid-type free-flowing design with the Volna Table. Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012


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Volna Table Images: courtesy Nuvist

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uvist is an architectural and design studio, that was founded by Kursad Sekercioglu and Emrah Cetinkaya in the year 2006 and is based in Istanbul, Turkey. A studio which follows no protocol in regards to design, their approach and ambition is in exchanging ideas between the fields of architecture, art and design, then integrating them in a unique perspective to create that unique style. The multidirectional approach enables them to transform their vision of design among the traditional and the modernist with the cutting-edge technologies present in the digital and physical worlds. Eventually research, investigation and combination of experiments in the field of design processes led them to create the ‘Volna Table’ which enters new spatial concepts of innovative forms and functional structures. This type of table design creates soft and serene experience in the tangible and the visual sense. Its free-flowing liquid-like form makes it ultra modern in nature. The new technologies and the modern material used are the main ingredients for the creation of the Volna Table. The design of the floor-mounted table is continuous and unbroken with minimum straight-cut edges. Volna Table has met both functionality and a unique elegant look. It has been designed and shaped like a wave and features an incessant flow. This kind of furniture can be considered a sculptural artistic piece which can fit into any modern interiors and can even be arranged with different design styles. Singular flowing design of the Volna Table will instigate the interior to become a dynamic and energising place. It is suitable for different kinds of places such as houses, offices, hotels, stores, exhibitions or luxury spaces.

Designer: Emrah Cetinkaya Contact: Ethmenfendi cd firin sk No: 14/18 erenkoy, Istanbul, Turkey Tel: +90 532 667 55 00 Email: info@nuvist.com Website:www.nuvist.com

Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012


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Ahmedabad Hotel Blending state-of-the-art façade design technology with eco-friendly building practices, a futuristic hotel in Ahmedabad is all set to change its skyline. Text compiled by: Sharmila Chakravorty Images & Drawings: courtesy Studio Symbiosis

D

esigned as an iconic building embodying seamless waves and fluidity in landscape and façade design, the project looks at interweaving the concepts of waves in nature, fold lines as movement trajectories and perception along with programmatic requirements. Based on the idea of creating an entity with soft subtle touches and imbibing a sense of elegance, the design blends together the different functions within the building, translating dramatic key spaces into room grids. Waves emerge effortlessly from the landscape, creating a sense of harmonic relationship with the ground. The profile of the building has been designed with keen emphasis given both to the smooth transition from the horizontal landscape to the vertical building and to the standardisation and repetition of the façade components. The façade is designed as an intricate part of the building. The entire façade system feels the reverberation of the slightest of change in the external skin due to flux in the internal spaces. This interdependent relationship between the skin and structure of the building makes the system a very coherent one.

01 304

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SECTION EE

The seamless façade of the hotel.

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109180 3920

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2455

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2060

2940

5375

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3692

2683

6000

5050

FIRE TRUCK LANE 6000 WIDE FFL +800

X7

X7

FFL +875

FIRE ESCAPE

KITCHEN BANQUET HALL

OFFICE

2735 2005

X3

LOBBY

X2

SHOP 1 WATER

LINEN CHUTE

SEATING

SHOP 3

SEATING

XCLUSIVE GALLERIA

WATER FEATURE

SEATING

FHC

FFL +875

FFL +1025

ENTRANCE

FFL +1325

WATER

DROP-OFF

360 COVERS

SECURITY

FFL +875

2687

MEETING ROOM 2

MEETING ROOM 1

X-4 FFL +875

MALE TOILET

FIRE ESCAPE

FFL +1325 FFL +1025

FFL +875

BAGGAGE HOLDING

FFL +1325

FFL +1175

X-5

2687

BUSINESS CENTER

X-5

5511

JUICE BAR TERRACE BANQUET ENTRANCE

SECURITY

5511

2735

X-3

JUICE BAR

UP

MEETING ROOM 3

BANQUET DROP-OFF

FFL +800

X-2

2005 LIFT LOBBY FFL +1325

FFL +875

01 302 SECTION AA

2735

2005

WATER FEATURE FEMALE TOILET

FFL +875

PRE-FUNCTION

X0 X-1

WATER

BANQUET HALL

X-3

X-4

X1

1135 1135

FHC

FFL +800

2360

1135 1135

X-2

FFL +875

COLD FOOD

SHOP 2

BANQUET SPILL OUT

2360

37640

X-1

X4

DAY STORE

SERVICE LIFT LOBBY

2360

PRE-FUNCTION SERVICE

FFL +875

X0

SERVICE BAR

RECEPTION

37640

2735 2005 2360

X2

X1

DISH WASH AREA

UP

X3

SECTION AA

X5

FFL +1325

X4

01 302

X6

1437

2686

FFL +875

BANQUET SERVICE

2686

X5

EXIT

PARKING IN

BANQUET BUFFET

1437

X6

3500

3500

SERVICE RAMP

FFL +800

1850

X-6 1850

X-6

ENTRANCE

X-7

X-7 3500

3500

WATER FEATURE

PARKING OUT STAFF ENTRANCE

X-8

SECURITY

X-8

PARKING

PARKING

ENTRANCE SERVICE ENTRY

3920

5550

4640

1895

5000

5000

5375

5000

EXIT

5000

5000

5000

2455

2545

5000

5000

5000

4650

2410

2940

5375

5000

3692

2683

6000

5050

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01 304

GROUND FLOOR PLAN Y-8

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01 304

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SECTION FF

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SECTION FF

109180

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Y0

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Y8

60750 5375

5000

5000

5000

2455

2925

4620

X4

SERVICE LIFT LOBBY

2940

5375

5000

X4 2735 GUEST ROOM

ELECTRICAL ROOM

GUEST ROOM

GUEST ROOM

GUEST ROOM

GUEST ROOM

X3

GUEST ROOM

X2 2360

CORRIDOR

UP

X0

2005

X-2

2005

X-2

LIFT LOBBY

X-3

GUEST ROOM

GUEST ROOM

GUEST ROOM

GUEST ROOM

GUEST ROOM

GUEST ROOM

GUEST ROOM

X-3

GUEST ROOM

2735

GUEST ROOM

2735

GUEST ROOM

X-4

X-4

TYPICAL FLOOR PLAN 5375

5000

5000

5000

2455

2545

5000

5000

5000

4650

2410

2940

5375

5000

Y-7

Y-6

Y-5

01 304

Y-8

SECTION FF

60750

Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012

X1

X-1

2360

FHC

2360

16470

1135 1135

LINEN CHUTE

FHC

16470

2360

AHU

1135 1135

X0

2060

UP

X1

X-1

5000

2005

2735

GUEST ROOM

GUEST ROOM

2005

GUEST ROOM

X2

SECTION AA

5000

HOUSE TOILET KEEPING

X3

01 302

5000

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construction brief

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Concrete-work in progress on site. Y-15

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109180 3918

5552

1895

4640

5000

5000

5375

5000

5000

5000

5000

2455

2925

4620

5000

5000

5000

2060

FFL +53950

SSL+53650

5375

5000

3692

2683

6000

5050

SKY LOUNGE

POOL

3400

3400

1198

TERRACE

2940

SSL+29850

CORRIDOR

FFL +33325

CORRIDOR

FFL +29925

CORRIDOR

FFL +26525

CORRIDOR

FFL +23125

CORRIDOR

3400 CORRIDOR

FFL +36725

3400 3400 3400 3400 3400 3400

3400

3400

GUEST ROOMS FLOOR

GUEST ROOMS FLOOR

GUEST ROOMS FLOOR

CORRIDOR

3400

2700

CORRIDOR

FFL +13625

3900

3900

MEP SERVICES

SSL+9650

BACK OF HOUSE

BACK OF HOUSE

FFL +9725

LOUNGE

SSL+5450

FFL +5525

4650

4650

KITCHEN

BANQUET HALL

4200

4200

4200

BACK OF HOUSE

3900

SERVICE FLOOR

MEP SERVICES

SSL +13100

SHOP - 3

SSL+800

ALL DAY DINING

DISPLAY BUFFET

XCLUSIVE GALLERIA

FFL +1325

4200

SSL+13550

FFL +16325

2700

GUEST ROOMS FLOOR

2700

SSL+16250

FFL +19725

3400

3400

SSL+19650

3400

3400

GUEST ROOMS FLOOR

3400

SSL+23050

3400

3400

3400

53650

SSL+26450

CORRIDOR

FFL +40125

3400

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3400

SSL+33250

FFL +43525

3400

GUEST ROOMS FLOOR

3400

SSL+36650

EXECUTIVE LOUNGE

3400

GUEST ROOMS FLOOR

3400

SSL+40050

SPA RECEPTION

CORRIDOR

3400

GUEST ROOMS FLOOR

3400

SSL+43450

CORRIDOR

FFL +46925

3400

EXECUTIVE FLOOR

3400

SSL+46850

FFL +50325

3400

SPA / YOGA / CHANGING

3400

SSL+50250

LOBBY

RECEPTION FFL +1325

DROP OFF

FFL +1025

FFL +875

SERVICE ROAD

MAIN LT PANEL ROOM

PLUMBING/FIRE FIGHTING PLANT ROOM

FIRE WATER TANK

SSL-3400

4650

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BANQUET SPILL-OVER SPACE

BOH SERVICES

PARKING

PARKING

FFL -3325

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4425

7825

FFL -4125

PARKING

FFL -7225

PARKING

PARKING

FFL -7225

SLOPE GRADIENT 1:22

3918

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3692

2683

6000

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109180

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View of the column-less cantilever at the entrance.

X7

37640 3500

1850

5511

2735

2687

2360

2005

1135 1135

2360

2735

2005

2686

1437

3500

make it a seamless system. On the lower three floors the proposal consists of reception lobby, shopping area, banquet hall, meeting rooms, restaurants, lounge space and service areas. All design elements are tied with a coherent design language of natural canyon-like formations; the spaces are carved out using the same design principles with which a wave carves out a canyon. This helps in connecting the various public functions into one space visually which still have the capability of functioning independently. The building uses fly-ash bricks, acting both as a sound insulator and a critical factor in making it a green building. The faรงade system is comprised of double-glazed system complemented with ACP/GRC for the rest of the faรงade. The landscape is comprised of exposed concrete, grass, and grass pavers. The ratio of porous, semi-porous and non-porous materials has been kept in mind, thereby greatly impacting the process of groundwater recharge, another critical factor in making it an eco-friendly building.

+56800LSS

SKY LOUNGE / SERVICES

FFL +53950

SSL+53650

SPA

3400

EXECUTIVE ROOM

BATH

GUEST ROOM

BATH

GUEST ROOM

BATH

GUEST ROOM

BATH

GUEST ROOM

BATH

GUEST ROOM

BATH

GUEST ROOM

BATH

GUEST ROOM

BATH

CORRIDOR

CORRIDOR FFL +26525

53650

3400

SSL+29850

CORRIDOR

FFL +29925

3400

SSL+33250

CORRIDOR

FFL +33325

3400

SSL+36650

CORRIDOR

FFL +36725

3400

SSL+40050

CORRIDOR

FFL +43525

FFL +40125

3400

SSL+43450

CORRIDOR FFL +46925

3400

SSL+46850

GUEST ROOM

BATH

GUEST ROOM

BATH

3400

SSL+23050

3400

SSL+19650

SSL+16250

CORRIDOR FFL +23125

3400

SSL+26450

CORRIDOR FFL +50325

3400

SSL+50250

CORRIDOR

FFL +16325

FFL +13625

2700

SERVICES / ADMIN OFFICES

CORRIDOR

FFL +19725

SSL+13550

SPECIALTY RESTAURANT / BACK OF HOUSE

3900

FFL +9725

SSL+9650

4200

ALL DAY DINING / KITCHEN

FACT FILE:

FFL +5525

SSL+5450

4650

MEETING ROOM BANQUET HALL DROP-OFF

SHOP

XCLUSIVE GALLERIA

FFL +875

WATER FEATURE

SSL+800

4200

PARKING / SERVICES FFL -3325

RAMP

7825

SSL-3400

PARKING

4425

FFL -7225

RAMP

SSL-7825

3500

1850

5511

2735

2687

2360

2005

1135 1135

2360

2735

2005

2686

1437

Project Location Architect Principal Architects Project Team

: : : : :

MEP Structure Facility Manager Faรงade Consultant Site Area Built-up Area Initiation of Project Completion of Project

: : : : : : : :

3500

37640

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X-1 X 0 X 1

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SECTIONS

The entry to the building has been marked with a column-less cantilever that creates a dramatic entrance space. The architecture of the canopy that follows the seamless nature of the design proposal welcomes visitors, emerging from the ground and morphing back into it. The cantilever for the entrance canopy is a lightweight structure which has the faรงade wrapped around it to

Ahmedabad Hotel Ahmedabad Studio Symbiosis Amit Gupta, Britta Knobel Gupta, Vandana Sehgal Dharampal Singh, M. Shaique Uddin, Mayank Ojha, Mariia Nazarenko, Rishi Sapra, Rakesh Mathur, Pancham Pathania, Avishek Das, Arunima Sen Apostel Design Studio Acecon HPG Consultancy Priedemann 6860sqm 24000sqm April 2012 June 2014 Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012


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Vishranthi Commercial Complex Reimagining the traditional ‘jali’ façade, KSM Consultants create the Vishranthi Commercial Complex on a busy stretch of Chennai streetscape. Images: courtesy KSM Consultants

L

ocated on the busy stretch of Lloyds Road in Chennai, the Vishranthi Commercial Complex building nestles itself among a line of old residences, a few apartments and little shops and stores dotting the streetscape. Sited on the corner of the main road and a by-lane, the building faces north towards the main road, east towards the by-lane, and west and south towards two old residences.

View of the brick ‘jali’ from the road.

200MM-WIDE RCC NIB

The main architectural intent, apart from facilitating a clear floor plate for office use, was to work on a passive method of providing a better indoor environment; providing well-distributed natural light, reducing the load on the air-conditioning requirement and ensuring the noise from the street below was kept out, to the best extent possible. This intent manifested itself in the form of a skin wall along the north, east and the western side with a traditional brick ‘jali’ wall using flatter, longer bricks. The lightweight nature of the bricks owing to the air cavity allows for lesser thermal gain. Stretcher courses, staggered at every alternate course, create the play of mass and void. The overall façade of the building is divided and broken down into clear panels, with white aluminium mullions that define the edges. The infill skin space in between the mullions is divided into two distinct types. The panels for light are distributed evenly across the floor plate, allowing for natural light to be distributed through the floor space. This way no distinct bright spots and dark spots are created within the indoor space. The aluminium joinery which spans from beam bottom to floor level, allows the light to bounce and multiply, by

DIRECT SOLAR RADIATION IS CUT, BY THE JALI SKIN WALL

POWDER COATED ALUMINIUM MULLIONS 150X150 200MM CONCRETE BLOCKS WALL WITH 2 SIDES PLASTER. EXTERIOR FACE WITH LATEX BASED PAINT

LIGHT PANEL. ALUMINIUM JOINERY SLOT WINDOWS 600MM WIDE

VENTILATED AIR CAVITY

NOISE POLLUTION FROM THE SURROUNDING AREAS GETS ATTENUATED CONTINUOUS VENTILATION OF THE AIR CAVITY REDUCES HEAT BUILD UP

PERFORMANCE JALI PANEL FLAT BRICK 300/100/50

SKIN WALL DETAIL Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012

THE 50MM HIGH VOIDS OF THE JAIL ARE ROOST RESISTANT


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Construction of the skin in progress.

The building as an insert in the busy streetscape of Chennai.

reflecting off the white coloured floor and ceiling. The performance jali’s edge soaks in the heat and vents it out through the various air cavities. This greatly reduces the heat radiated within the indoor space and in turn will reduced the load on the air-conditioning systems.

FACT FILE:

The hollow bricks of the skin shall help the building to achieve thermal efficiency.

Project Location Architect Client Design Team

: : : : :

Project Area Civil Contractors

: :

Vishranthi Commercial Complex Lloyds Road, Chennai KSM Consultants Pvt Ltd Vishranthi Homes Pvt Ltd Siddarth Money, K.S. Money, Sriram Ganapathi, G Theivanayagee, Mathivanan P 1800sqm Vishranthi Homes Pvt Ltd Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012


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KYOORIUS DESIGNYATRA 2012 India’s biggest communication conference witnessed noted speakers initiating thought towards newer insights and a new era of communication at Kyoorius DesignYatra 2012.

Mansukhbhai R. Prajapati, Mitticool Clay Creation.

Debbie Millman, President, Sterling Brands, USA.

Karl Heiselman, CEO, Wolff Olins, USA.

Josy Paul, Chief Creative Officer & Chairman, BBDO, India.

Masashi Kawamura, ECD, Party, Japan. Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012

I

ncepted in 2006, Kyoorius DesignYatra is an annual design conference that has sucessfully attracted a cumulative audience of around 10000 delegates. This edition of DesignYatra included speakers like Aapo Bovellan, Director - Brand Marketing, Nokia; Ambrish Arora, CEO, Lotus; Michael Gough, Vice-President, Arunachalam Muruganantham, CEO, Jayashree Industries. Adobe; Nic Roope, ECD, Poke; Hanif Qureshi; Marian Bantjes to name a few. Kyoorius has been at the forefront of connecting the creative world within India with the rest of the world through various design activities, including the annual Kyoorius DesignYatra conference and regular publications such as Kyoorius Design Showcase and Kyoorius Magazine. India’s first & biggest visual communications conference, Kyoorius DesignYatra 2012 was opened by Robert Wong, Chief Creative Officer, Google Creative Lab on the Digital Day. Robert, who was born Chinese, grew up Dutch, was Canadian and is now American, started his address by stating the importance of free relationship. The session kick-started with Robert highlighting the


post event

Twitter feed projected on stage.

Audience cheering a good speech by Arunachalam.

Audience comprising of visual and digital communicators.

The Kyoorius DesignYatra organising committee.

57

emotions that unify brands and consumers from a communication standpoint followed by showcasing the strategy and implementation of web-based communication programmes. He surprised the audience by bringing alive Google’s three-pronged approach of technology (power), image (secret & new) and operating procedures. On the other hand, Day II at DesignYatra was a riot of laughter, fun and more learning with Arunachalam Muruganantham, CEO, Jayashree Industries and Bill Lunderman, Vice President, Global Design, Colgate-Palmolive. Arunachalam Muruganantham, uneducated, from South India received a standing ovation from the audience. He is indeed a phenomenal innovator who created the world’s first low-cost machine to produce sanitary towel. He has only studied till the 9 th standard but is a pillar of inspiration to branding & communication professionals today. “Innovation as the solution to a problem than a beautiful product/design,” [sic] says Muruganantham who envisions that every woman shall use sanitary pads in future as opposed to five per cent as of today. Day II also saw Bill, President at the Colgate-Palmolive brands worldwide sharing insights on how Colgate-Palmolive manages speaking to its customers - ‘Sell value & experience and not just the product followed by conveying its ‘it’s got to do it’ attitude.’ DesignYatra is about staying fresh and excited taking the corporates and design fraternity away from usual grind to the beaches of Goa while meeting and exchanging ideas with industry leaders. On those lines, Day III at DesignYatra opened with another phenomenal talent Mansukhbhai R. Prajapati, Entrepreneur & Innovator of Clay Creations. Clay Creations is situated in the Rajkot district that produces handicraft items. Started in 1988 utilising minimal funding and fuelled with a zeal for innovation in the field of clay, Clay Creations created a one-of-its-kind clay refrigerator and is officially recognised by the National Innovation Foundation. Celebrating the success of DesignYatra this year, Rajesh Kejriwal, CEO, Kyoorius said, “We were thrilled to have renowned speakers from different walks of life who have built excellent case studies from across the world. The look, feel, messages and tone of the conference were designed keeping in mind the evolution of communication within India. Kyoorius DesignYatra continued to serve as a valuable meeting point for agencies in India and abroad in the sphere of design, branding and visual communications. It has provided an opportunity to understand, learn and get inspiration from some of the finest minds in the field, delve into their creative process and be inspired by their work.”

Absolut installation at DesignYatra 2012.

Delegates interacting at the conference. Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012


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View of the pavilion from the east wall: the gallery, the box within and the minimal structure.

Deducting Cuboids Carved out of a dense urban fabric, the Leisure Pavilion by Colombo-based Palinda Kannangara surprises with its sudden revelation and obvious simplicity, creating an internal yet open idea of living. Images & Drawings: courtesy Palinda Kannangara Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012


architecture

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Entrance from the street: the house does not reveal itself before one enters.

The pavilion at night.

The pavilion during the day.

“T

he beauty of the design lies in its openness and unrestrained spaces, even after being situated in a much-dense metropolitan, commercial area,� says Palinda Kannangara. Located within urban Colombo, the site represents a quadrilateral with two trees. The site is framed by a bare concrete wall with a fair-face finish. Creating an introvert container, the walls that surround the site have two openings with rough timber finish. The contrast between the gates and the wall is the only noticeable element from the street. Inside, the concrete walls that enclose the site, the scheme is completely mirrored by a liberating open cuboid with just four columns supporting the vast, double-height ceiling. Within this cuboid, there is another orthogonal Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012


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A

C

9

7 3 2 B

B UP

4 5

9 UP

6

1

8

CE

ENTRAN

LEGEND C

A PRI

ROAD VATE

1. ENTRANCE PASSAGE (18”-0 X 6”0) 2. LIVING DINING (41”-6 X 17-3”) 3. PANTRY (17”-0 X 14-0”) 4. BATHROOM (4”-9 X 8-3”) 5. TOILET (8”-9 X 3-0”) 6. CARETAKERS (12”-0 X 5-9”) 7. GARDEN TOOL ROOM (17”-0 X 14-0”) 8. COURT YARD 9. GARDEN

0ft

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GROUND FLOOR PLAN Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012

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10ft


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+20'-9"

+15'-9"

+10'-6"

ISURE PAVILION AT COLOMBO 03

Archt. Palinda Kannangara +2'-0"

±0'-0"

SECTION AA

0ft

5ft

10ft

+20'-9"

LEISURE PAVILION AT COLOMBO 03

+15'-9"

Archt. Palinda Kannangara

+10'-6"

+2'-0"

SECTION BB

0ft

5ft

10ft

+20'-9"

+15'-9"

+10'-6"

+2'-0"

±0'-0"

SECTION CC Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012


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DN

2 10 B

B

11

C

A

LEGEND 10. LOUNGE (16”-9 X 14”0) 11. POND (16”-0 X 15-6”)

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N

UPPER LEVEL PLAN Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012

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10ft


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“The beauty of the design lies in its openness and unrestrained spaces, even after being situated in a much dense metropolitan, commercial area.” – Palinda Kannangara

The narrow passage at the entrance: the house ‘opens up’ to the visitor.

Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012


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The lounge area with the whitewashed concrete wall in the background.

View of the pavilion and the box from the entrance.

Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012


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Ambience at twilight: the lighting accentuates the material nature of architecture.

space with timber wall that acts as an enclosure for private spaces. The living and dining space lies within the continuous roof space and is completely open-to-green on either side. The concrete wall continuing with the roof is intentionally painted white, demarcating the internalised yet extrovert space. The minimal space within acts as a functional container of stark objects. A stairwell connects the braced timber box with a small gallery on the top. A private space, the concrete ledge which acts as a comfortable seat provides a visual and conceptual boundary. A lotus pond and wooden flooring render serenity and warmth, while the reduced scale makes it truly intimate. A titanium-finish concrete floor in the living space creates a warm, seamless plane for all activities to be arranged on. “The pavilion amazingly draws a connection between the inside and the outside that one will not feel a difference at all. The unrestrained spaces and less massing contribute a lot in combining the two extents together in an admirable manner. Still the timber box and the attic space above provide the required privacy and retreat to the user, not spoiling its spaciousness or free quality,� writes Palinda.

The detail of the braced timber door that conceals the private spaces.

The site is a retreat. It is designed to render an alternative and a contrasting space from its context. The design employs minimal architectural gestures to distinguish spaces and ambiences creating a landscape with design interventions. In the process, an austere space with stark architectural elements and simple yet powerful objects is unveiled. Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012


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The site is a retreat. It is designed to render an alternative and a contrasting space from its context.

The wood box that contains private spaces within. Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012


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The intimate space and pond on the first level of the pavilion.

The lotus pond and wooden flooring contributes to the warmth of the intimate space. Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012


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FACT FILE:

A skylight permeates natural light on the staircase reflecting from the whitewashed wall next to it.

Project Location Architect Client Project Area Contractors Project Estimate Initiation of Project Completion of Project

: : : : : : : : :

The Leisure Pavilion Colombo, Sri Lanka Palinda Kannangara (AIA) SL Prabodha Sumanasekara 200sqm K & D Constructions (Pvt) Ltd Approx. 20 million SLR (8 million INR) 2010 2011

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Janakee Sadan evolves as a composition of simple aesthetics and overlay of a contemporary approach on its 150-year-old conserved values. Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012


architecture

Expressions in Ti me

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Characterised by layers of intent and renewed spatial order, the restoration and refurbishment of an urban house – Janakee Sadan in Sangamner, Maharashtra by Pune-based architectural firm Artha Studio reads evocatively of its 150-year-old latent spirit. Text: Maanasi Hattangadi Images & Drawings: courtesy Artha Studio Data: Sushama Jain

OLD

OLD+NEW

NEW FROM OLD

ROAD

60% INTRUSION

GROUND FLOOR PLAN OLD

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LEGEND: <

A. B. C. D. E. F. G. H. I. J. K.

STAIRCASE UP

ART GALLERY ENTRANCE VERANDAH ENTRANCE LOBBY DISCUSSION/RECEPTION ROOM ENTRANCE TO ART GALLERY INTERIOR PUBLIC VERANDAH CENTRAL COURT WELL INTERIOR PRIVATE VERANDAH REAR COURT VISITOR’S TOILET

BASEMENT FLOOR PLAN Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012


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NEW

SECOND FLOOR PLAN OLD

OLD+NEW

NEW FROM OLD

LEGEND: <

STAIRCASE /RAMP UP

L. FRONT BALCONY M. ADMINISTRATION HALL N. SERVER NICHE O. MOBILE BALCONY P. BALCONY Q. LIVING R. SLEEPING R. DINING+KITCHEN T. TOILET U. UTILITY V. STEP GARDEN W. GUEST TOILET X. MULTIPURPOSE HALL Y. CHIMNEY Z. WATERTANK

FIRST FLOOR PLAN

I

n the suburban town of Sangamner in Maharashtra, a busy street pauses in front of a coeval façade. Much like many an Indian construct, a shaded verandah greets one at the entrance. Silently, as if to mark this, typographical frames look down. The building is Janakee Sadan, a 150-year-old house, rediscovered by and repurposed through considerate funding by its owners after two and half decades. Once a family residence-cum-office around 1860-70, the house barrenly stewed in neglect and a part of it had also fallen through. The architecture was simplified and humble and the restoration by Pune-based architectural practice Artha Studio built on it. The architects elaborate on the intent of the restructuring, “The family wanted to restore their ancestral

Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012

property but was not keen on inhabiting the entire space. As a gesture of philanthropy, they gave the house to a local NGO, although they did fund the restoration. This NGO is involved in various activities - providing a platform to upcoming artists; self-employment opportunities to unemployed people; and a recreational space for children as well as the senior citizens of the community. Hence the restoration had to cater to the needs of all these stakeholders.” The rectilinear layout expands into a multifunctional programme consisting of a small studio apartment for the family and the functionality of the NGO; an administrative office, art gallery, multifunctional hall, semi-covered space for informal meetings, a play area for children, as well as a garden.


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LONGITUDINAL SECTION

A. B. C. D. E. F. G. H. I. J. K.

Set in a suburban street, the entrance blends in owing to its elemental design.

Typographical frames flank the name of the building on the faรงade of shaded verandahs at the entrance.

ART GALLERY ENTRANCE VERANDAH ENTRANCE LOBBY DISCUSSION/RECEPTION ROOM ENTRANCE TO ART GALLERY INTERIOR PUBLIC VERANDAH CENTRAL COURT WELL INTERIOR PRIVATE VERANDAH REAR COURT VISITOR'S TOILET

L. FRONT BALCONY M. ADMINISTRATION HALL N. SERVER NICHE O. MOBILE BALCONY P. BALCONY Q. LIVING R. SLEEPING R. DINING+KITCHEN T. TOILET U. UTILITY V. STEP GARDEN W. GUEST TOILET X. MULTIPURPOSE HALL Y. CHIMNEY Z. WATERTANK

The narrative of the architecture recalls and reflects its past in its materiality and expression.

The structure before restoration. Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012


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The discussion-cum-reception area with refurbished furniture reflects the spirit of the earlier structure.

CONCEPTUAL SKETCHES Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012


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Explorations of the inside spaces reveal a quiet meandering – the entrance leads to a discussion/reception derived in an old post and beam wooden structure and thereafter to a descending flight of stairs that lead to the art gallery in the basement. The detailing is reminiscent of the earlier ambience – in the form of refurbished furniture and walls painted in white with skirting of yellow 'Jaisalmer'. Originally delineated for storage of grains, the basement was transformed as a singular galleria after removal of a brick partition wall. Long and vaulted, the gallery is textured in brown hues of stone till the lintel level with customised ‘kadaee’ fitting. The public zone spills out into a loggia that envelops the central courtyard. The sentience of the courtyard is introspective – responding to traces of the historic ethos of the building and the grounded demeanour of the new annex. Assembling as an informal gathering place mediated between the shadowy verge of the buildings, the courtyard is purposed as a playground too. The formalness is broken by a colourful dynamic of a stepped structure inscribed within – an inspired approach that engaged children in its making. Inflections like these bring forth the experiential aspect of the design. The scale is intimate and tactile. The elements of the old and contemporary are in tandem, variably intertwined in the new addition. A sloping roof encloses the two-storeyed studio apartment. On the ground floor, the aesthetic is weighed down by layers of its roots. Tucked in a corner, a salvaged ancestral swing reveals itself. A stone platform is wrapped around a small well. Light shifts in the semi-covered volume, creating a gentle play of shadows with the rhythmic columns and sway of the swing. Beyond this, a portion in the hindermost part of the house is a private garden. On the upper level, an extant staircase redeemed in stone, steel and wood is set comfortably. The environment hereon is as relaxed and contained. A stretch of

The restored space on the first floor integrates the facilities for the administration area. The door leads to upper level staircase and the mobile balcony.

CONCEPTUAL SKETCHES Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012


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The interiority is rendered in white with yellow 'Jaisalmer' stone skirting. Details like painted niches and wall cupboards complement the restoration.

Staircases are connected by a landing lit amply by light streaming in from the windows.

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The central courtyard ties the entire space together - the contemporary with the existing.

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The vaulted art gallery with customised â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;kadaeeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; fitting.

A single file of staircase leads down to the art gallery.

A champa tree acts as a nexus to the courtyard. Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012

The architecture is modest and introspective in moments.


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An ancestral swing is preserved and recovered ‘aad’ well that was closed in the ‘60s.

A vibrant intervention painted by children is thoughtfully placed in the courtyard. Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012


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The studio annexe facing the courtyard.

The material palette is restrained and remniscent of the earlier structure.

functions like a living area, dining area, a kitchenette, a sofa-cum-bed as well as a balcony that overlooks the central courtyard align continually to form the spatiality. Inlaid bamboo ceiling with air cavity is adapted to cut down on the heat. The internal spaces are calibrated to amplify the experience of the outside. The narrative of the architecture recalls and reflects its past in its materiality and expression.

The sofa is made from old teak wood of the house.

Of this, the architects explain, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The house had been constructed with traditional materials such as stone, flat brick, lime, mud and wooden post and beam with wooden joists for slab. The present edifice is a combination of the old and the new: spaces, materials, craft and technology. Traditional details were respected for reuse of materials and aesthetics. Reuse of existing material from the site made the project extremely cost-effective and eco-friendly. This project created awareness in the locality for preservation and for valuing traditional materials and spaces.â&#x20AC;? Owing to its sense of enclosure and gestural ideas, the architecture shapes the timelessness of the house. Despite its compact footprint, the building conveys the ambiguous presence of both an institutional NGO and a residence. The interpretations uncovered through its restoration and sensitivity of the fabric seek to remind us the principle of dialogue in relationship with inherited forms and a place of simplicity in design. Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012

The ambience is domestic and relaxed.


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FACT FILE: Project : Architect : Location : Design Team : Client : Contractor : Carpenter : Images : Project Duration :

Janakee Sadan Artha Studio Sangamner, Maharashtra Saurabh Pradeep Malpani, Deepti Bhadbhade, Vinit Patil Dr. S.N. Lohe Ramdas Shinde, Deepak Joshi Dnyaneshwar, Bharat and Sujit Hemant Patil 2007-2011 Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012


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Architecture of Resistance

Though named the Amateur Architecture Studio, Wang Shuâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s practice demonstrates the makings of a virtuoso, in complete command of the instruments of architecture, form, scale, material, space and light. The 2012 Pritzker Laureate pursues an uncompromising and responsible architecture that arises from sensitivity to culture and place.

Text: Shalmali Wagle Images: courtesy Amateur Architecture Studio

Photo by Lu Wenyu

Photo by Lang Shuilong

Vertical Courtyard Apartments, Hangzhou, China.

Five Scattered Houses, Ningbo, China.

Photo by Lu Wenyu

Library of Wenzheng College, Suzhou, China. Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012

Photo by Lu Wenyu

Ningbo Contemporary Art Museum, Ningbo, China.


“We must not demolish history in order to develop.”

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– Wang Shu

Photo by Zhu Chenzhou

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question was raised in the 1960s by Paul Ricouer’s History and Truth. ‘How does one become modern and yet return to sources; how does one preserve an old, dormant civilisation and yet maintain pace with universal progression?’ Half a century later, the work of 2012 Pritzker Laureate, Wang Shu, discloses that architecture can resist the homogeneity inherent in modernity; that neither prospects in the contradiction require dismissal, and that instead architecture can be mediatory. His philosophy interprets architecture as a medium for conglomeration of dualities that incorporates both influences and evolves as a harmonious dialectic. A somewhat paradoxical proposal, his work emphasises the need for architecture to intervene in the competing elements of, on one hand, the consistency of modern structural forms, and on the other, preservation of vernacular roots, without having to feebly succumb to either of the stereotypical styles. The ‘Amateur’ Spirit A hundred years ago in China, the people who built houses were artisans; there was no theoretical foundation for architecture. Today, an official architectural system has been established. However, Amateur Architecture Studio chooses the ancient ‘amateur spirit’ over this customary system. Having worked with craftsmen for ten years to gain experience at actual building without the responsibility of design, Wang Shu and Lu Wenyu founded their professional practice in Hangzhou in 1997. Their interpretation of the word ‘amateur’ is relatively close to its conventional definition; one that engages in a study, sport or activity for pleasure rather than for benefit or professional reasons. The nomenclature can be assumed as a partial response to their critique of the

“The architecture of the 2012 Pritzker Prize Laureate, Wang Shu opens new horizons while at the same time resonates with place and memory. His buildings have the unique ability to evoke the past, without making direct references to history – Jury Citation

profession in China, which they view as complicit in the callous demolition of vernacular heritage and excessive construction of unfeeling modernity. The studio prides the latent “handicraft” aspect of architecture and upholds it powerfully in retaliation to the prevalent trend of the “professionalised, soulless architecture practiced today”. Wang Shu’s work procedure has three distinct stages. The first is to convince the government and the client; the second is to deal with the design details in relation to construction issues; and the third is the acceptance of the building by its users. His design process is very similar to that of a traditional Chinese painter; he first studies nature and the context. For about a week, without any drawing at all, the design materialises in his mind. The next step involves a discussion about details and materials, the entire process being one of thinking, drawing and discussing. Wang Shu can be seen as a scholar, craftsman and architect, in that order. His architecture resonates a temporary character. Choosing to work hand-in-hand with time, it has the unique ability to be replaced or transformed during its course, so that it remains timeless and yet is of its time. His architecture is open to change and adapts constantly in response to the environment and conditions, even those conditions that arise during construction itself. His work demonstrates that architecture is spontaneous and it is so for the simple reason that architecture is a matter of everyday life, reflecting the spontaneous changes that occur in it. The consequence is an enduring fusion of rational, functional and tectonic logic with an enriching sense of mystery and myth. Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012


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Photo by Lu Wenyu

The Chinese character for â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;encloseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; forms the theme with courtyards being important aspects of each building.

Photo by Lv Hengzhong

Each building is thoughtfully designed based on purpose, with regard to its relationship to the campus.

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Xiangshan Campus, China Academy of Art, Hangzhou, China The Xiangshan Campus, China Academy of Art, located in Hangzhou City in China, imitates the familiarity of a small intimate town. The campus consists of 67,000sqm of built-area including a library, a gallery, a small stadium, a workshop tower, six academic and workshop buildings, two traditional bridges across the river and two hillside art-studios. The Chinese character for ‘enclose’ is the central theme of the series with courtyards and gardens forming a significant focal aspect of each building. Besides modifying the micro-climate of the place, these enclosed spaces serve several other purposes for each building; in terms of provision of space for events, gatherings, study and relaxation. Each building is carefully designed based on its purpose, location and its relationship to the contiguous campus. The base of the handicraft-school is made with stone using local traditional techniques, as a symbolic gesture representing an irrefutable association to its surrounding context. A modern construction that makes use of steel framing, windows, skylights, and other modern amenities, one of its most striking characteristic is that it appears as though built over a hundred years ago, withstanding the ravages of time.

“In spite of his age, young for an architect, he has shown his ability to work successfully at various scales. The Xiangshan Campus of China Academy of Arts in Hangzhou is like a small town, providing a setting for learning and living for students, professors and staff. The exterior and interior connections between buildings and private and public spaces provide a rich environment where an emphasis on liveability prevails. He is also capable of creating buildings on an intimate scale, such as the small exhibition hall or pavilions inserted into the fabric of the historic centre of Hangzhou. As in all great architecture, he does this with a master’s naturalness, making it look as if it were an effortless exercise.” – Jury Citation

Photo by Lv Hengzhong

The use of recycled building materials lends a certain impulsiveness, creating rich tactile collages.

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“Wang Shu’s architecture is exemplary in its strong sense of cultural continuity and re-invigorated tradition. The past is literally given new life as the relationship between past and present is explored. The question of the proper relation of present to past is particularly timely, for the recent process of urbanisation in China invites debate as to whether architecture should be anchored in tradition or should look only toward the future. As with any great architecture, Wang Shu’s work is able to transcend that debate, producing an architecture that is timeless, deeply rooted in its context and yet universal.” – Jury Citation

Photo by Lu Wenyu

The relationship between the buildings and the in-between spaces. Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012


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Photo by Lu Wenyu

The curving sloping roofs and the contained landscaped courts.

Photo by Lu Wenyu

Long traditional bridges allow connectivity within the campus.

Generous protected openings help adapt to spontaneous environmental changes.

Photo by Lu Wenyu

A poised composition of architectural dominance and human scale. Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012


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Photo by Lv Hengzhong

A quality that is timeless, anchored to tradition, culturally sensitive and yet fluent in universal vocabulary.

Photo by Lv Hengzhong

The austerity of material, the relating continuity of the staircases and the semi-randomness of the openings. Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012


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Photo by Lv Hengzhong

Over two million pieces of tiles salvaged from demolished traditional houses are used for roofing.

Arbitrary cut-outs maintain visual connectivity and frame random views. Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012

“Wang Shu knows how to embrace the challenges of construction and employ them to his advantage. His approach to building is both critical and experimental. Using recycled materials, he is able to send several messages on the careful use of resources and respect for tradition and context as well as give a frank appraisal of technology and the quality of construction today, particularly in China. Wang Shu’s works that use recycled building materials, such as roof tiles and bricks from dismantled walls, create rich textural and tactile collages. Working in collaboration with construction workers, the outcome sometimes has an element of unpredictability, which in his case, gives the buildings a freshness and spontaneity.” – Jury Citation


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Sudden intentional moments of oddity lend surprise in the complexity of the overall scheme. Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012


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Photo by Lv Hengzhong

The shallow pool in the south catches the inverted reflection of the house in the water. Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012


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Photo by Lv Hengzhong

The west and east-facing walls are punctured with little holes.

Photo by Lv Hengzhong

The view moves upward along a slope and then disappears in infinity.

Ceramic House, Jinhua City, China The small 100sqm Ceramic House and its cafĂŠ are designed as a container. The design of the cafĂŠ-house is similar to that of an ink stone, a one-storey house with its front facing the south and the rear facing the north. Several trees are planted on the top of the ink stone slope. The view from within moves upward along a slope and then gradually vanishes to infinity. The west and east-facing walls are punctured with little holes, prominently responsible for the flow of air, penetration of light and emphasising the direction of the house. The house has two main entrance doors; one is on the east and the other on the west with a path piercing right through the building. A stair near the west door leads to the roof. Colourful pieces of porcelain are pasted on the inner and outer walls of the house adding a playful touch to the robustness of its architecture; the pieces arranged irregularly to present all colours in Chinese ceramic. On the north is a three-metre-high earth bank to which the house is anchored and which in turn restricts the hustle-bustle from the adjacent road on the north. A shallow pool in the south catches an inverted reflection of the house in the water. Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012


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Ningbo Tengtou Pavilion, Shanghai Expo 2010, Shanghai, China Mimicking a traditional Tengtou folk home, the Ningbo Tengtou Pavilion at the 2010 Shanghai Expo was a 1,500sqm eco-house made entirely from recycled materials salvaged from old ruined buildings. Inspired by a Chinese painting from the Ming Dynasty, the pavilion was designed as a countryside building with punctures and trees. Located in the eco-experience zone of the Expo, it employed wind and solar-powered facilities, water and waste-treatment systems, green plants, roof gardens and other eco-solutions. Designed with spaces flaunting open walls, green hanging walls and roof gardens, the pavilion enabled one to harmonise with nature as the households in the town of Tengtou usually do. The pavilion radiates antique beauty, with traditional folk house elements embodied on the doors, windows, walls and roof structures, flaunting the unique cultural features of a typical Chinese town.

Photo by Fu Xing

The resemblance to the Tengtou folk houses. Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012


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Photo by Lu Wenyu

A pavilion made entirely from recycled materials from ruined old buildings.

“To look at the state of the profession, it would seem that anything is possible, and more often than not, we get anything! Form for its own sake has become a superficial discipline. Wang Shu and Lu Wenyu, however, have avoided the sensational and the novel. In spite of what is still a short period in practice, they have delivered a modern, rational, poetic and mature body of varying-scaled public work. Their work is already a modern cultural asset to the rich history or Chinese architecture and culture.” – Jury Citation

Photo by Lu Wenyu

The open walls, green hanging walls and roof gardens.

Photo by Lu Wenyu

A new countryside building formed by holes and trees. Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012


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Photo by Lv Hengzhong

The architecture appears as though it has been there for centuries, left behind by natural forces.

Photo by Lv Hengzhong

Small and erratic windows scattered across the walls seemingly at random, reveal nothing of the interior.

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Ningbo History Museum, Ningbo, China At first glance, the Ningbo History Museum in Ningbo appears as though it has been there for centuries, left behind by natural forces. The facade constructed of recycled brick from the area is further carved in a geologic form that agrees with the nearby scenery. Though a powerful and moving structure of 40,000sqm, the museum lies low between two tall office buildings, and is barely registered on the skyline from a distance. In a world where towers are erected in days, the Ningbo History Museum is devoted to tradition, history, sense of place, sustainable use of materials, and the people who will inhabit it. The 24-metre-high façade walls are made of concrete on a wood and bamboo frame and clad in an armadillo shell of twenty different types of grey and red bricks and tiles, drawing on the cultural memory of a traditional town. The technique is borrowed from ‘wapan’ tiling, a tradition of emergency construction during post-typhoon periods, frequent in the region. Windows of small and erratic rectangular shapes are scattered across the walls seemingly at random, revealing nothing of the interior. Surrounded by mountains, the site was originally inhabited, but dozens of old villages were razed to rubble to accommodate two new government administration buildings, a vast, empty plaza and a cultural centre. The rural vitality of the site could not be renewed, for it had simply ceased to exist and all that remained of the villages were acres of broken tiles and bricks. Set between the somewhat incongruous ensembles of new buildings, blending effortlessly, the museum is the single vital substance that responds to the natural environment, local history and customs, and brings back the memory of a destroyed past.

Photo by Lv Hengzhong

The form is an outgrowth of the ancient practice of building to reflect natural settings.

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Photo by Lv Hengzhong

The architecture is stripped down to the essentials, dissolving into its surroundings.

Photo by Lv Hengzhong

Thousands of tiles cover the outside wall, drawing the memory of a cultural town. Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012


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Photo by Lv Hengzhong

An intentional association with the space and scale of local traditional Ningbo villages.

Photo by Lv Hengzhong

The building derives from hills and valleys including slight inclined edges. Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012


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Photo by Lv Hengzhong

In spite of its imposing scale, the building encourages visitors to get intimate with its interior. Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012


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Photo by Lv Hengzhong

The interior spatial experience exemplifies might, simplicity and emotion all in one.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wang Shu´s buildings have a very rare attribute - a commanding and even, at times, monumental presence, while functioning superbly and creating a calm environment for life and daily activities. The History Museum at Ningbo is one of those unique buildings that while striking in photos, is even more moving when experienced. The museum is an urban icon, a well-tuned repository for history and a setting where the visitor comes first. The richness of the spatial experience, both in the exterior and interior is remarkable. This building embodies strength, pragmatism and emotion all in one.â&#x20AC;? - Jury Citation Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012


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Recipient of the Pritzker Prize this year, Wang Shu’s hand drawings have a critical contribution to his design process. IMAGINING THE HOUSE by Lars Muller Publishers presents exact reproductions of Wang Shu’s drawings from six projects with a unique insight into the course of design.

Cover Page.

Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012

Writings by Wang Shu – the preface to the drawing.


book review

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A spread from the book.

“In the Amateur Architecture Studio I run with my wife, Lu Wenyu, I am the only one who draws with pencil only,” writes Wang Shu in the introduction of this book. IMAGINING THE HOUSE is a compilation of simply reproduced sheets of drawings and sketches – sequentially bound – that tell stories of six projects. “To me, any type of architecture, no matter what its function, is a house” All architecture of Wang Shu is a process – a continuous, uninterrupted development of thought. This book publishes neat slices from this process, presented in raw form and exact scale; the drawings are reproduced exactly as drawn, making the narrative very intimate. “The things existing in this world, with their concrete and haptic qualities, have no hierarchical differences” With small notes on the development of design by Wang Shu, the introductory set of pages for each project presents an insight into each page. With each page having a reference and sequence in shaping of the architecture of Amateur Architecture Studio, the notes and drawings reveal an intense conceptual framework for each of the six projects.

“On the other hand, freehand drawing tends to produce plainer buildings” The pages of the book range from exploring conceptual ideas of early stages of development to intricate detailing and ideas of scale and dimension in the later stages. As the design progresses, there are drawings that go back and forth, zoom in and out, focus on large and miniscule things, negotiate concerns of structure and form, of scale and proportions. Simply published, the book looks at evolution of some of the most significant works of Wang Shu at the Amateur Architecture Studio. “Besides drawing, drinking green tea helped me to think; I drank more and more tea and the tea tasted increasingly bitter”

FACT FILE: Book : IMAGINING THE HOUSE Author : Emily Waugh Published By : Lars Muller Publishers Language : English ISBN : 978-3-03778-314-6 Reviewed By : Ruturaj Parikh Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012


REPRODUCED SKETCHES IN ACTUAL SIZE FROM THE BOOK

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Embodying innovative engineering and the versatility of steel, the ArcelorMittal Orbit stands tall at 115m. ©ArcelorMittal

The involuted expression of the ArcelorMittal Orbit by world-renowned sculptor Anish Kapoor and award-winning designer Cecil Balmond rises in extraordinary scale and defiance as a single element of an odd asymmetrical notion in steel. Text: Maanasi Hattangadi Images & Drawings: courtesy Balmond Studio

The stage is set. A mellowed red structure twists towards the sky, semi-detached in flight. Around it, London dissolves in a united front. The ArcelorMittal Orbit is a looping lattice of tubular red steel peaking at the height of 115m, standing spectacularly against the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park. Sculpturesque, it is a collision of a force so poetic, as if a synthesis of art and sculpture, engineering and of a notion in flight. The journey of the ArcelorMittal Orbit commenced as an off-chance chat between London Mayor Boris Johnson and Lakshmi Mittal, Chairman and CEO of steel company ArcelorMittal in 2009 about his vision for an iconic landmark to commemorate the London 2012 Olympic & Paralympic Games. A competition was formed in January 2010 by the Mayor’s office to invite a design for a structure that would elevate Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012

View of ArcelorMittal Orbit from below. ©Cecil Balmond


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The design of the structure was the winning entry in a competition - a search for an engaging sculpture in the vibrant setting of the London Olympics Park 2012. ŠAndrew Meredith

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“It was not setting out to be asymmetric or symmetric, or anything. It was compiling itself around certain points in space which it orbited around. And an orbit is highly stable.” - Cecil Balmond

the vibrant setting of the London Olympics 2012. In search of an artistic object that the public could interact with, the advisory panel chose a joint entry; the ArcelorMittal Orbit by world-renowned sculptor Anish Kapoor and award-winning designer Cecil Balmond. “The word Orbit came to mind; just the word as a metaphor. We started sketching, the hand went round this way first, then it gradually became more complex and I was thinking of an electron cloud moving. As you look up you will feel as if it’s compiling itself in space.” - Cecil Balmond (CB) The structure defied the possibilities inherent in a pyramidal structure. The creation is an enigmatic narrative of a harmonising balance of stability and instability. Imprinting the sky in red tendrils, the inert volume is a cocooned exploration. It comes together in curated moments and pauses.

ArcelorMIttal Orbit at night. ©ArcelorMittal

Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012

Red tubular sections of steel form the framework of the structure. ©Cecil Balmond


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“It’s this notion of a journey that takes you upwards. Anish and I have debated over the years about nonlinearity, which is using instabilities as stabilities. It’s a new way of thinking, a radical new piece of structure and architecture and art, and London is the place to do it.” - CB A rustic, massive steel horn frames the entry to the volume. The architectural dimension in the collaborative effort is brought by Ushida Findlay Architects. A statuesque staircase of 1,150 feet with 455 steps spirals around the

revolution in a momentary sweep ascending gradually. Porous metal sheets blanket the elevators that compress fractured glimpses of the world beyond on the way upwards. The envelope expands into 300sqm observatory floors that open unto dramatic views of London. Huge concave mirrors amplify this scenic context on the uppermost observatory floor. “When thinking about the Orbit, there were the past references - the Eiffel tower of course, the Tatlin tower, and also the tower of Babel, all of them reaching up

PLANS OF ARCELORMITTAL ORBIT’S VIEWING PLATFORMS Courtesy of Anish Kapoor, Cecil Balmond, Arup AGU

SITE PLAN OF THE OLYMPIC PARK SHOWING THE PROPOSED SITE OF ARCELORMITTAL ORBIT Courtesy of Anish Kapoor, Cecil Balmond, Arup AGU

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ORBIT SKETCH 1 ©Cecil Balmond

ORBIT SKETCH 2 ©Cecil Balmond

SKETCHES SHOWING THE STRUCTURAL STEEL ‘ROPE’ Courtesy of Anish Kapoor, Cecil Balmond, Arup AGU

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Aerial view of the site.

Render of ArcelorMittal Orbit. Courtesy of Anish Kapoor, Cecil Balmond, Arup AGU

Steel sections lifted into place. SKETCHES SHOWING STRUCTURAL FORCES Courtesy of Anish Kapoor, Cecil Balmond, Arup AGU

ŠCecil Balmond

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Model of ArcelorMittal Orbit. Courtesy of Anish Kapoor, Cecil Balmond, Arup AGU

Render of ArcelorMittal Orbit. Courtesy of Anish Kapoor, Cecil Balmond, Arup AGU

Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012

366 star-shaped 4m nodes of steel compose the structural points of rings; each connecting to eight star nodes.


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ELEVATIONS Courtesy of Anish Kapoor, Cecil Balmond, Arup AGU

Option 1:

8 longitudinal main chords and 8 spiralling bracing members

Option 2:

6 longitudinal main chords and 6 spiralling bracing members

Option 3:

10 diagonal main chords

Option 4:

8 diagonal main chords - as a choice for structural steel rope.

into the sky, but these structures go up linearly, in a straight line. We wanted to engage with a new kind of language of a tower, which could be read in many ways and if the language has sufficient complexity, people will read what they want into the form. What we thought would be really different was an ‘orbit’; something that goes around and comes back on itself and connects, remaining stable due to those connections. By turning, looping and connecting-up every time it passes itself, a unique structure is created. It was not setting out to be asymmetric or symmetric, or anything. It was compiling itself around certain points in space which it orbited around. And an orbit is highly stable.” - CB

CROSS SECTION OF ARCELORMITTAL ORBIT Courtesy of Anish Kapoor, Cecil Balmond, Arup AGU

Option 4 Option 3 Option 2 Option 1

Structural steel ‘rope’ options - Option 4 was chosen. Courtesy of Anish Kapoor, Cecil Balmond, Arup AGU

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The construct was shaped without any scaffolding.

The fabric convolutes in an inverted outlook, like a streak of steel in motion; a curved, asymmetrical statement of engineering and art. The dramatic aesthetic relies on the versatility of steel. Stretched out as a singular element, the lattice is about 560m. The bulk of 2000 tonnes of steel arranged by ArcelorMittal draws from 60 per cent recycled scrap metal sources. 366 star-shaped 4m nodes of steel compose the structural points of rings; each connecting to eight star nodes. Its flight is grounded and steadied by a tuned mass damper comprising of two lumps of steel hung as a pendulum from a frame that weighs only 40 tonnes. The exclusiveness of its engineering relied on latest technological prowess for seamless integration of each element. Over eighteen months, the construct took shape without any scaffolding. The potential of its appeal is estimated at around one million people during its first year of operation, based on the capacity to accommodate between 400-600 visitors per hour, including full wheelchair access. Supplementary 250 colour spotlights are being planned that will conjure digital static and animated imagery every evening. “A little-known fact is that the Orbit built itself up - there was no propping, it was pre-fabricated in 4-metre sections and put together by only four people. Over the years, Anish and I have been debating and trying to find the essence of a form that has its own architecture, sculpture and structure. By merging these into one piece of work, we think it has a deeper resonance; more than any single piece of art or architecture. Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012

The bulk of 2000 tonnes of steel arranged by ArcelorMittal draws from 60 per cent recycled scrap metal sources.

Scale is a vital part of this process. We’re talking of something that is 120-metres tall. The spaces in between the structure are cathedral-like; they’re very tall, very big. In between the mass and the jumble of it, there’s the geometry.” - CB Revealing fragmentations of light in its porosity, the exposed red unashamedly takes the stage again. Surprisingly solid and restful in its seeming instability, it moves from being geometrical to structural to befit the perception of public art in the progressive cultural landscape of London. Draped in a drama so intense, the organic form revels in an expression of converging mediums of art, engineering and architecture. “The Orbit is a radical new piece and, like any other new works, is bound to receive comments from people who don’t like the change from what they are used to. Others embrace progress and new ideas and enjoy a new intervention. Also, a three-dimensional object like Orbit is hard to appreciate in two-dimensional pictures - you have to be there to enjoy the three dimensionality. The Eiffel tower and St Paul’s Cathedral were not liked by people initially who were defending a conventional view. New works will always stretch the imagination and it will always take time for people to adjust, but they will. Now that the tower has finally opened to the public, I feel both relief and excitement. It certainly meets my expectations and it is what I imagined it


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Concave mirrors amplify the context on the uppermost observatory floor.

The viewing platforms frame views of the London skyline.

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Its engineering relied on latest technological prowess for seamless integration of each element.

The derivation expression is an amalgamation of art, engineering and architecture.

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Its flight is grounded and steadied by a tuned mass damper comprising of two lumps of steel hung as a pendulum from a frame that weighs only 40 tonnes.

It is an enigmatic narrative of a harmonising balance of stability and instability.

to be - a full three-dimensional invention of space and also an experience you participate in. I can also look back on an interesting adventure of the project. First there was the competition - we had the freedom to think new but there also was the responsibility to create something significant for London, something that could last a long time, beyond the Olympics. I would like people to remember the Orbit long after the Olympics is over as something that compiles space around you, the visitor, as you go up-and-down it.

The starkness surprises – it impacts in its magnitude, in its unexpectedness and most of all, in its radical coherence. In this emphasis of experience, the strange and compelling creative force of the object ties disparate strands of sculpture and structure in an unpredictable response to the humane scale. It simplifies and complicates a space, and surrounds simultaneously, carving in impulsive proportions and profiles as one moves within it.

Public art is important - people can enjoy the imagination of spatial thinkers and inventors of form. Our day-to-day lives are very busy and hectic, dealing with economic matters and basic survival, so, to break out of that and visit art is really important. Public art for me is not just about economic might but about human values to delight in ‘play’. Art does not have to have any function, it is what it is and can be a pure delight to enjoy its surfaces, materiality and shape-making, and it evokes the builder and artist in all of us, to be creative.” - CB Anish Kapoor says that, “The experience will be about winding up and up and in on oneself. It is a long way to walk. And it’s pretty steep. Then of course, at the top we have a truly spectacular view of London. You want to forget the construction and engage with what you’re experiencing. People will make it their own.”

FACT FILE: Project Location Designers Architect

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ArcelorMittal Orbit London Anish Kapoor, Cecil Balmond Ushida Findlay Architects Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012


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ideas to innovate…designers to deliver

Linear Expressions CREDA, BENGALURU

CREDA stands for Creative Design Approach. The firm was started by a few friends from the BMS College of Engineering, Bengaluru in 2003, who felt the need for ideologically sound design, which adhered to a concept and the vagaries of the site.

Combining minimal architecture with elemental design concepts that perhaps lend the structure its name, House Linear in Bengaluru by CREDA celebrates clean geometry to accentuate grandeur. Text: Sharmila Chakravorty Images & Drawings: courtesy CREDA

House Linear in relation to its surrounding.

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ucked away in an enclosure of high white walls, House Linear in Bengaluru is a ground-hugging structure – two-storeys tall – rather inconspicuous amongst other houses in its vicinity. The suburban house draws heavy reference from modern, minimal architectural concepts, with long low lines, cantilevered overhangs, expansive open plan as well as basic geometric composition of the elemental spaces. Stretched out on a north-south axis, the structure has clearly demarcated private and public spaces, generously speckled with semi-private courtyards throughout; the vertical stack of bedrooms to the south overlooking private

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architecture

North

North

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GROUND FLOOR PLAN

FIRST FLOOR PLAN

SOUTH-NORTH SECTION

NORTH ELEVATION

EAST ELEVATION Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012


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CONCEPTUAL DIAGRAMS Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012


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The rectangular shape forms the very basis of the fundamental, underlying design throughout the House Linear; true to its name. gardens, and a north block which houses the dining and living rooms, kitchen and service spaces. The north wing of the structure connects the indoor spaces to the surrounding landscape through a large, uninterrupted glass surface. Inside, the living room is sunk below ground level, and is topped with a skylit cylindrical form; one of the highlights of the design. The sunken space remains cool, devoid of any artificial air conditioning measures, while the skylight provides ample natural light during the day.

From the road, the high walls of the house lend a private, intimate feel.

Subtle features of the design make the house uniquely charming.

Various spaces within the house are broken by patches of interspersed gardens, breaking the monotony brought in by the rectangular elements throughout the plan. Also, these gardens bring in greenery within the house; the built and the unbuilt areas are meant to be one continuous space, interlocking and intermingling with each other. Other exterior elements such as walls made with tamped earth, and grills and trellises made with metal but meant to resemble wood, add visual drama to the otherwise clean geometry of the design.

House Linear experiments with finishes, colours and textures - complementing and contrasting.

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The house has been designed with gardens and courtyards in abundance.

Ceiling-to-floor glass brings in ample natural light, with views of the garden outside.

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The private, semi-private and public spaces within the house are separated by the courtyards in between.

Play of light at House Linear.

The rectangular shape forms the very basis of the fundamental, underlying design throughout the House Linear; true to its name. The site is a rectangle, segregated into private, semi-private and public spaces in rectangles, with rectangular courtyards and landscaped breakout spaces separating them. In sharp contrast, the living room is sky-lit with a cylindrical form cut out from the roof. Yet, these elemental preferences and contrasts seem to happen on an almost invisible, subconscious level. The high walls of the courtyards too come across as upright planes, closely reminiscent of labyrinths. The living room is sunk below ground level, keeping it cool without artificial air conditioning.

House Linear is an elaboration of subtle contrasts that complement - the concrete of the built spaces is offset by the green patches separating them, rustic dark wood against the smooth-finished high walls, unfinished surfaces next to glass partitions, the cylindrical skylight rising up from the sunken living room. The design is a fĂŞte of basic elements that lend a minimalist flavour while accentuating the grandeur of House Linear.

FACT FILE:

The cylindrical skylight adds a quirky edge to the living room, washing it with natural light.

Project Location Architect Design Team Client Built Area Completion Cost

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House Linear Marathahalli, Bengaluru CREDA Sudeep Srinivas, Snehal Panicker Dr. Raja Reddy 3500sqft 2010 `60 lakhs Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012


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ideas to innovateâ&#x20AC;Śdesigners to deliver

Structure, Space & Strategy

RAESHMA KOUSAR, BENGALURU With an eclectic palette of work from luxury homes, boutiques, corporate offices, showrooms, design development studios, boutique hotels and model villas Raeshma Kousarâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bengaluru-based workspace that was started in 2004 as an independent practice, is now a six-member studio.

With a modest manifestation of a principle of close-packing in planning, the interior design of the Reunion Clothing Company by Bengaluru-based Raeshma Kousar transforms the space within an existing structural shell into a rich contemporary ambience. Text: Shalmali Wagle Images & Drawings: courtesy Raeshma Kousar

The main entrance and the new pergola added to the existing structure.

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he designs that occur in nature, in molecules, in crystals, in living cells, in galaxies, are an appropriate source of inspiration for architecture. The lesson to be picked is that a building must device responsive and adaptive approaches that save on material and resources through the use of essential components combined with appropriate strategies. The interior design of the Reunion Clothing Company by Bengaluru-based Raeshma Kousar modifies the space within an existing structural shell with a similar strategy to achieve an efficient, clean and straight-lined ambience. To begin with, the 10,500sqft shell has multiple entry points. The spaces within and the materials employed utilise these sufficiently to allow the

Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012

filtering in of natural light. The entrance lobby with its double-height brings in a sense of formality through its volume and openness. The visual extension of this space into an outdoor pergola further enhances its perception in terms of scale. Diverging from here, entries to areas segregated on the basis of function are planned on two levels. With a conscious effort to impose a meaningful order, both transitory spaces as well as graphic details are kept minimal to prevent physical deviation or visual distraction. The planning packs all function closely to prevent any wastage of space. The lower level predominantly houses the administrative offices. A subtle variation in ceiling height between the managerial bays and the open-office faintly


interiors

The stone steps and water body leading to the main entrance.

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A view of the reception showing entries to the conference room, upper level Studios and lower level administrative areas.

Sheets of clear glass subtly divide the managerial cabins in the administrative area.

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1. WAITING LOUNGE / RECEPTION BELOW 2. MERCHANDISING AND QUALITY CONTROL 3. CASUAL LINE STUDIO 4. DESIGN DEVELOPMENT STUDIO 5. FORMAL LINE STUDIO 6. TERRACE LANDSCAPE

UPPER LEVEL PLAN

defines territories. A glass wall segregates spaces to give an indistinct idea of hierarchy even within the illusion of a single continuous space. With honesty in terms of aesthetics, false ceilings are avoided in most areas, and task-lighting is provided in cement trays hung from the true ceiling with stainless steel supports, lending direct light onto work stations. The spiralling staircase in the lobby allows direct access to the upper level. The level above is designed to camouflage with the existing structure with the introduction of subtle changes, the window openings being enlarged to visually invite the landscaped terrace in. The corridor here diverges into three entities; the merchandising area, the design studios and the showrooms. The design development studio is strategically placed with a cantilever in the studio overlooking the waiting lounge and acting like an intentional display-window.

LOWER LEVEL PLAN

Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012

1. ENTRANCE 2. WAITING LOUNGE 3. RECEPTION AREA 4. CONFERENCE ROOM 5. PRODUCTION PLANNING AND SUPPLY MANAGEMENT 6. MANAGER CABINS 7. COMMUNICATION ROOM 8. ACCOUNTS AREA 9. HUMAN RESOURCE 10. PANTRY 11. REST ROOMS

The selection of white and grey flooring runs as a conscious decision through-out the design, being an extension of architectural elements and creating a background to bring displayed products under focus. The overall design is infused with graphic prints and photography artistically on both levels. Additional architectural gestures entail the stripping down of cement plaster from the stone masonry walls and exposing them to clean original forms. The studios and the administrative areas extend into the manufacturing unit. The concept reflects the feel of showrooms spreading into factory units and these into administrative units in a continuous flow. Keeping the textured stone masonry exposed without panelling and the use of industrial lights in the double-height space contribute significantly to this end. The introduction of glass and steel offsetting the existing wall bring in a balance


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Elevation of the Casual Line Studio wall.

Elevation of the Casual Line Studio wall and its relationship to an opening.

of smooth even surfaces. The material palette juxtaposes local sensibility with existing textures. The floor finishes are dominated by Epoxy & Kotah Stone procured from the surrounding area, both blending as an extension to the existing stone masonry walls. At alternate joints stainless steel rods are inserted into the floor to complement the use of steel in the staircase detailing, ceiling suspensions for lighting trays and furniture bases. Cement sheets and white vitrified tiles are used in cladding. All materials are repeated enveloping one to the other to form a seamless blend rather than individual material emphasis, complimenting each other and the architecture of the building. What fundamentally stands out in the entirety is the interaction between the users, the space and its functional usage. The interior architecture develops as a system more than anything else, one which combines minimum yet sensible inventory, strategically with the available and existing resources to yield efficiency in terms of space utilisation and diversity in terms of character.

FACT FILE:

View of landscaped terrace showing the entry to studios.

Project Location Architect Design Team Project Manager Client Civil Contractor Completion

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Reunion Clothing Company Kalballu Village â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Jigni Industrial Estate Raeshma Kousar Dhira Kulkarni, Nithya Ilangovan Sakina A Bang Overseas Limited Pushpa Engineering December 2009 Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012


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The Power of Light We revisit Louis I Kahnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s IIM Ahmedabad and loiter in it spaces to understand the power of his architecture and his thorough understanding of its relevance in this issue curated by Dr. Deepak Mathew. Text & Images: Ruturaj Parikh, IA&B Curated by: Dr. Deepak J. Mathew

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housands of texts, these photographs, critical discussions, debates, analysis and interpretations will fail to do justice to a walk in the heritage campus of IIM (Indian Institute of Management) Ahmedabad. Immensely complex, painstakingly detailed, and surprisingly full of surprises, the architecture of Louis I Kahn comes alive in light, space and the sense of time. Versatile and multilayered in its forms, the master orchestrates experiences through elements that are fundamental and identifiable to anyone who walks through his building. The beauty of light on a brick wall, the sound of birds that occupy the courts, the hum of a lawn-mover, the rustling of leaves in the courts become intrinsic to the architecture of the campus. The idea of a space is embedded in the elements that do not make the space yet complete it. Architecture dissolves into nothingness.

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space frames

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in loving memory of

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Space Frames investigates issues of architecture and urbanism through the medium of photography. Indian Architect & Builder - Sept 2012


Space Frames Sept 2012: The Power of Light Indian Architect & Builder Magazine


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Space Frames investigates issues of architecture and urbanism through the medium of photography.


IA&B Sept 2012 [Vol: 25(12)]