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and a pick-up and drop-off area that tests operability in airports and multimodal hubs.

By Air and Sea The region’s growth shows no signs of slowing down, which makes new transportation options increasingly important. Area roads are already congested with residents, visitors and freight — and there is more to come.

the changes in people’s habits and the dynamics of transportation because of the changes that could impact our revenue stream if people aren’t parking in our parking garages anymore.” A U.S. Coast Guard licensed captain and a 40-year maritime industry veteran, Murray is keeping an eye on other developments in transportation that could affect port activities, such as the use of electric vehicles. The largest portion of cargo that moves through the port is petroleum for the region’s gas stations.

A new study released in April by the Florida Department of Transportation says Orlando International Airport is the busiest commercial service airport in the state, generating more than $41 billion of direct and indirect "I’M VERY EXCITED economic activity annually. TO SEE THE Miami International comes in TRANSFORMATION a distant second at $33 billion. The new figure represents a 31 percent increase since 2014, when the last study showed Orlando International’s economic impact was about $31 billion. With nearly 48 million passengers a year, the airport is the 10th busiest in the nation.

THE PIECES ARE STARTED, BUT WE DON’T KNOW WHAT TYPE OF TECHNOLOGY IS GOING TO COME IN THE FUTURE, ESPECIALLY IN THE AUTONOMOUS VEHICLE AREA. A LOT OF THE TECHNOLOGY WE HAVE TODAY WE COULDN’T IMAGINE 10 OR 15 YEARS AGO.” — Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer

OF OUR SERVICE AND THE PLANS FOR THE NEXT PHASE OF THE PROJECT TO ORLANDO." — Sir Richard Branson

To the east, Port Canaveral is also growing, with 4.5 million cruise ship passengers and more than 6 million tons of cargo moving through annually as of 2018. The port has added a new Terminal 3 that in 2020 will begin hosting the first cruise vessel in the Western Hemisphere powered by liquified natural gas, a cleaner-burning fuel, said Capt. John Murray, who is port director and CEO of the Canaveral Port Authority. The largest ship in Carnival Cruise Line’s fleet, the Mardi Gras will carry 6,500 passengers. Royal Caribbean recently moved the world’s second-largest cruise ship, Harmony of the Seas, to its new base in Port Canaveral from Fort Lauderdale. The cruise line is also replacing Enchantment of the Seas at Port Canaveral with Mariner of the Seas, which can hold about 1,000 more passengers. All of these changes and others will add to the traffic the port sees from Orlando International as well as drive-in arrivals, Murray said. He has noticed a big difference in recent years in the way people get to the port. “From a cruise perspective, we’re seeing a lot more ride sharing,” he said. “More and more people are jumping into an Uber at Orlando International Airport as opposed to the taxis and even the small limos or the shuttles. We’re paying attention to

However, cruise passengers g e ne r at e t he l a r g e s t transportation challenges for the port, he said. They arrive from all over the world to board seven ships homeported there year-round and two based there seasonally. Port Canaveral also hosts visiting ships from other locations, such as Baltimore and New York, which stop to allow tourists to visit Cocoa Beach, Kennedy Space Center or the theme parks.

“Our cruise ships drive the demand,” Murray said. “We figure our drive-in factor is about 60 percent. Every cruise line is different in how many people drive or take shuttle buses or Ubers. It’s the size of the ship that dictates the traffic flow.”

Putting the Pieces Together No one is certain exactly how multimodal transportation will pan out in Central Florida and when Orlando’s mass transit options might look more like Miami’s, New York’s or London’s. But one thing is certain: People are talking about it. There has been an increase in educational events and community meetings as local leaders engage in conversations about how each will affect the other — and the impact they will have on the quality of life in Central Florida, Orlando’s mayor said. “As a reg ion, we work together collaboratively across jurisdictional boundaries better than any region in the country,” Dyer said. “When we put together a coalition or partnership, like the autonomous vehicle partnership, it’s pretty easy because we’re used to doing that type of thing — whether it’s been the medical school, SunRail or the community venues, we know how to work together.” P i4Biz.com | MAY 2019 | 21

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