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Monday LOCAL

SPORTS

Young artist takes home award at county fair

Troy has depth and experience

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August 13, 2012 It’s Where You Live! Volume 104, No. 193

www.troydailynews.com an award-winning Ohio Community Media newspaper

ONLINE

Miami County Fair 2012

Trojan Football Daily Blog Troy Daily News exectutive editor David Fong has been covering the Troy High School football team for 15 years. Read daily updates on not only the 2012 team, but great players, teams and moments in Troy football history on his Trojan Football Daily blog. See the blog at www.troydailynews.com

INSIDE

Bounces help drop ounces Don’t run. Bounce. You’ll get fit faster, with far less risk of injury, say enthusiasts. “Rebound exercise is the most efficient, effective form of exercise yet devised by man,” claimed Albert E. Carter, a former professional wrestler who wrote a book about it in 1979. A NASA study a year later essentially confirmed his claim. See

HIGH POINT, N.C. (AP) — In Paul Ryan’s highdebut as energy Republican vice presidential candidate, Mitt Romney made one thing clear: His ideas rule, not his running mate’s. “I have my budget plan,” he said, “And that’s the budget plan we’re going to run on.” Romney put gentle but unmistakable distance between his agenda and Ryan’s hot-potato budget proposals on Sunday as the new team soaked up excitement from partisans in North Carolina and Ryan’s home state of Wisconsin. He walked a careful line as he campaigned with Ryan by his side in North Carolina, singling out his running mate’s work “to make sure we can save Medicare.” But the presidential candidate never STAFF PHOTO/ANTHONY WEBER said whether he embraced A heat of 4-year old and under children chase chickens in front of the grandstand Sunday during the Miami Ryan’s austere plan himCounty Fair Pig and Calf Scramble. self, and he addressed the matter more directly in a “60 Minutes” interview, with Ryan still with him, Sunday night. Democrats weren’t about to let them off that hook. President Barack Record crowds show up Saturday at fair Obama, attending campaign fundraisers Sunday BY MELODY VALLIEU in Chicago, tagged Ryan as Staff Writer the “ideological leader” of vallieu@tdnpublishing.com the Republican Party. It would be hard to find a board member walking around the Miami “He is a decent man, he County Fair without a smile on his or her face after Saturday. BY NATALIE KNOTH is a family man, he is an On only the second day of the annual event, an attendance record Staff Writer articulate spokesman for was broken. More than 33,000 passed through the gates at the fair nknoth@tdnpublishing.com Gov. Romney’s vision but it Saturday, breaking a record held since 1997, according to Miami County is a vision that I fundaAgriculture Society board member Diana Thompson. For 3- and 4-year-olds kids in the mentally disagree with,” She said moving the yearly concert — which included up-andscramble, it was a game of tag like no Obama said in his first coming country music star Hunter Hayes — from Sunday to Saturday other, with each little one running public comments about night for the first time in recent history definitely helped the numbers. after their feathered friends in a ring Ryan’s selection. Thompson said more than 3,200 people alone attended the Saturday while their parents shouted, “Catch evening musical performance. one and put ’em in the box!” • See ROMNEY on Page 2 But she said the weather certainly was a factor, too. The annual chicken, pig, goat and “I think the concert had a lot to do with it, plus the weather was percalf scrambles kicked off at 7 p.m. fect,” Thompson said. Sunday in front of the grandstand, She said Hayes, who performed for approximately an hour and a half, drawing a sea of young people wearalso stuck around after the show to meet and take photos with more ing bright orange fair shirts. Open to than 150 fans. all junior fair exhibitors, the scram“That was great of him,” she said. “The fans really appreciated him bles were divided by animal and sticking around and meeting with them.” open to particular ages: calf (14 and Thompson said the vendors that sold the Hunter Hayes T-shirts and older), pig (11-13), goat (8-10), and other memorabilia couldn’t have been happier either. chicken (7 and younger). Each cateShe said vendors said they sold almost $15,000 in merchandise at the gory was further divided into sepaconcert — more than any other stop in the country. rate heats by age, and there was “That was good news for them,” Thompson said. another division for ages 19 and LONDON (AP) — With The fair continues daily through Thursday and despite a few chances older, not in 4-H. a little British pomp and a for showers, the weather will continue in the low- to mid-80s. lot of British pop, London • See SCRAMBLE on Page 2 brought the curtain down on a glorious Olympic Games on Sunday in a spectacular, technicolor pageant of landmarks, lightshows and lots of fun. The closing ceremony offered a BY SUSAN HARTLEY sensory Ohio Community Media For more b l a s t 2012 Miami shartley@dailycall.com coverage of i n c l u d County Fair the 2012 ing rock A former Miami County ‘n’ roll Summer 4-H member and adviser r i c k Olympics, was named the 2012 shaws, Homemaker of the Year See Page B4 dustbin during Sunday’s Art Hall p e r c u sawards ceremony. sionists, an exploding yelJudy Butts of Tipp City, low car and a marching said she began entering band in red tunics and items three years ago as a bearskin hats. way to “challenge” herself The Spice Girls staged a following retirement. “I show-stopping reunion, For more Miami was an RN for 44 years,” and Monty Python’s Eric County Fair results, Butts said, retiring from Idle sauntered through Hyatt Family Care in Tipp photos and stories, “Always Look on the Bright City four years ago. See pages A3, B1, Side of Life” accompanied Butts said she wanted to B2, B7 and B8 by Roman centurions, feel a part of the county fair Scottish bagpipers and a once again, so she decided human cannonball. entering art hall projects belonged at the fair again,” It all made for a psychewould help her meet that Butts said. OHIO COMMUNITY MEDIA PHOTO/MIKE ULLERY delic mashup that had goal of challenging herself. Butts, who grew up in “Entering the art hall Union Township as one of Tipp City’s Judy Butts won the Miami County Fair’s 80,000 fans at Olympic • See OLYMPICS on Page 2 made me feel like I • See BUTTS on Page 2 Homemaker of the Year award Sunday.

Scramble fun for all involved at county fair

Cueto leads Reds to win

Olympics close in rocking fashion

Johnny Cueto pitched threehit ball for eight innings, Jay Bruce and Ryan Ludwick homered and the Cincinnati Reds beat the Chicago Cubs 3-0 Sunday. With the win, Cueto improved to 15-6. See Page B3.

INSIDE TODAY Advice ..........................A7 Calendar ......................A3 Classified ...................A10 Comics.........................A8 Deaths .........................A5 James T. “Jim” Hill Shirley A. Moler Dorothy M. Alyea Earl R. Curtner Betty J. Hemmert Horoscopes..................A7 Opinion ........................A4 Sports ..........................B3 TV ................................A7

Tipp’s Butts wins Homemaker award

OUTLOOK Today Partly sunny High: 83° Low: 60° Tuesday Partly sunny High: 80° Low: 64°

Complete weather information on Page A9. Home Delivery: 335-5634 Classified Advertising: (877) 844-8385

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Romney has own ideas for budget

A game of chicken

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LOCAL

Monday, August 13, 2012

CLEVELAND (AP) — Here are the winning numbers drawn Sunday by the Ohio Lottery: • Pick 3 Evening: 4-9-9 • Pick 3 Midday: 6-4-9 • Pick 4 Evening: 5-4-2-2 • Pick 4 Midday: 4-2-2-3 • Rolling Cash 5: 16-23-24-29-33

BUSINESS ROUNDUP • The Troy Elevator The grain prices listed below are the closing prices of Friday.

Corn Month Bid July 8.1000 N/C 12 7.8900 J/F/M 13 7.9700 Soybeans July 15.9900 N/C 12 15.9900 J/F/M 13 16.0550 Wheat 8.8000 July N/C 13 8.1200

Change -0.1825 -0.1450 -0.1175 +0.1250 +0.1250 +0.1875 -0.2775 -0.0550

You can find more information online at www.troyelevator.com. • Stocks of local interest Values reflect closing prices from Friday.

AA CAG CSCO EMR F FITB FLS GM ITW JCP KMB KO KR LLTC MCD MSFG PEP SYX TUP USB VZ WEN WMT

8.98 24.83 17.54 51.25 9.35 14.29 128.03 20.54 57.31 23.40 82.82 78.79 22.50 33.13 88.20 11.79 72.13 11.01 53.75 33.16 44.60 4.45 73.68

+0.12 +0.07 -0.16 +0.95 +0.01 -0.03 +0.27 -0.11 +0.51 +1.30 -0.03 -0.45 -0.01 +0.11 +1.05 +0.02 -0.01 -0.05 +0.25 +0.13 +0.26 -0.13 -0.17

— Staff and wire reports

Romney

Butts • CONTINUED FROM A1 nine children, was a member of the Start to Finish 4H Club, and later served as a 4-H adviser when her children were in 4-H. “I credit my mom as my cooking inspiration. With so many children we were always baking and cooking. We packed all our lunches and she sewed our clothing. I learned a lot from her,” Butts said. On Sunday, Butts earned seven ribbons for her art hall entries, which included cookies, coffee cake, yeast rolls, a child’s pillowcase dress, a fall wreath, a purse, and a collection of sewing items she named “Sewing Treasures.” The Homemaker of the Year is awarded the Richard and Betty Minnich Memorial trophy. Points are awarded for each placing and the person with the highest number of points is declared the Homemaker of the Year.

Entries must be made is each of four categories — needlework, crafts, hobbies, and baked goods. Sewing is an art Butts said she picked up from her mother — who made clothing for her large family — and also a talent she has passed on to her daughter, Susan, who works as a home economics teacher in Cincinnati. “We made 64 pillowcase dresses and 18 pairs of britches for children in Africa this summer,” Butts said of her and her daughter. “I just had to make one more.” The Butts family is active in service, planning a major service project each year. This year, Butts and her daughter made the clothing for children in Africa. Another year, her entire family got involved in a special project at Thanksgiving. “We ate our Thanksgiving meal, cleared up the table and them made pillowcases for

Conquer Cancer,” Butts said, noting that nearly 100 pillowcases were donated to the organization. Butts said she loves to bake and remembers doing a lot of baking in her grandmother’s kitchen. “I love to bake cookies and share them with neighbors, with our Bible study group, whatever comes up,” she said. Butts wasn’t the only art hall winner in her family on Sunday. Her husband, Paul also won a Best of Show for his woodworking project, a Noah’s Ark carving. Butts graduated from Milton-Union in 1961, then attended the Miami Valley Hospital School of nursing, graduating in 1964, also the year she married her husband Paul. The couple has two children, Susan, and her brother, Jeff, who works as an IT specialist for the Hancock County Public Library in Greenfield, Ind.

Scramble • CONTINUED FROM A1 Emily Mann-Walters, 26, cheered on her son Alex, 5, as he competed in the chicken event. “He heard about it and was super excited that he can get out and chase chickens,” Mann-Walters said. Watching atop her shoulders was her other son Robert, 9, who chimed in, “I’m gonna catch a pig. I love catching pigs. I’m not sure how I’m going to catch him, but I’m going to chase him first.” Ashley and Corey McCarroll, 29, entered their daughter Caley, 4, in the chicken scramble. “She caught the first one

Prizes awarded for the first and second fastest in the category and heat Calf Scramble 1st Place — $200 2nd Place — $100 1st Place Heat — $50

2nd Place Heat — $25 Pig Scramble 1st Place — $150 2nd Place — $75 1st Place Heat — $40 2nd Place Heat — $20 Goat Scramble 1st Place — $100 2nd Place — $50 1st Place Heat — $30 2nd Place Heat — $15

but it got away and then she got the second one, which was the last one in,” said Corey, who lives in West Milton. Kodi Paulus, 17, and his girlfriend Shelby Roach, 16, both had gone to the fair several years but were competing in the scramble for

the first time. Prior to the start of the event, Paulus shared his simple reason for entering: to win big money. His strategy? “I’m just gonna tackle.” Roach intended to employ a different method: “I’m just gonna pair up with someone and tag team.”

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• CONTINUED FROM A1 Senior Obama adviser David Axelrod and other aides spent Sunday trying to brand Ryan’s budget “the Ryan-Romney plan.” During the Republican primary, Romney had called Ryan’s budget a “bold and exciting effort” that was “very much needed.” Ryan proposed to reshape the long-standing entitlement by setting up a voucher-like system to let future retirees shop for private health coverage or choose the traditional program a plan that independent budget analysts say would probably mean smaller increases in benefits than current law would provide. Romney and Ryan, in their first joint television interview Sunday, were clearly mindful that some of Ryan’s proposals don’t sit well with key constituencies, among them seniors in critical states like Florida and Ohio. Each man sought to reassure older voters they wouldn’t take away their benefits, with Ryan saying his mother is “a Medicare senior in Florida” and Romney vowing there would be “no changes” for seniors currently counting on the popular federal program. “In America, the nature of this country has been giving people more freedom, more choices,” Romney said. “That’s how we make Medicare work down the road.” Romney praised his running mate for his policy depth and analytical skills and said if they should win the election, Ryan will surely be consulted in big decisions “along with other individuals.” He added: “Obviously I have to make the final call in important decisions.” The presumptive presidential nominee said Ryan, “if it were necessary, could become president.” And Romney extolled his run-

Olympics • CONTINUED FROM A1 Stadium stomping, cheering and singing along. Organizers estimated 300 million or more were watching around the world. What a way to end a games far more successful than many Londoners expected. Security woes were overcome, and traffic nightmares never materialized. The weather held up, more or less, and British athletes overachieved. It all came with a price tag of $14 billion three times the original estimate. But nobody wanted to spoil the fun with such mundane concerns, at least not on this night. “We lit the flame, and we lit up the world,” said London organizing committee chief Sebastian Coe. “When our time came, Britain, we did it right.” International Olympic Committee President Jacques Rogge declared the Olympics over with praise for the athletes. “Through your commit-

ment to fair play, your respect for opponents, and your grace in defeat as well as in victory, you have earned the right to be called Olympians,” he said, adding: “These were happy and glorious games.” But the night was about splash more than speeches. Festive and fast-moving, the ceremony opened with pop bands Madness, Pet Shop Boys and One Direction, a shout-out to Winston Churchill and a tribute to the Union Jack the floor of Olympic Stadium floor arranged to resemble the British flag. Monochrome recreations of London landmarks were covered in newsprint, from Big Ben’s clock tower and Tower Bridge to the London Eye ferris wheel and the chubby highrise known as the Gherkin. Street percussion group Stomp built the noise into a frenzy, and dancers brandished brooms, in a nod to the spontaneous popular movement to clean up

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London after riots shook neighborhoods not far from Olympic Stadium just a year ago. Liam Gallagher performed “Wonderwall,” a 1990s hit by his former band, Oasis, Muse rocked the house with the hardedged Olympic anthem “Survival,” and Queen guitarist Brian May was joined by singer Jessie J for a crowd-pleasing “We Will Rock You.” The headline performers were each paid a pound, a little more than $1.50. The night ended with the extinguishing of the multi-petaled Olympic cauldron and a supercharged rendition of “My Generation” and other classics by The Who that had the crowd dancing in the aisles. Confetti rained down, and fireworks lit up the sky. Prince William’s wife, Kate, and Prince Harry took seats next to Rogge. They sang along to “God Save the Queen.” There was no sign of the queen herself, who made a memorable mock parachute entrance at the July 27 Olympics opening ceremony.

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ning mate’s Washington experience, despite having criticized primary rivals Newt Gingrich and Rick Santorum for their years in the nation’s capital. Ryan said he planned to release two years of personal tax returns to the public. The wealthy Romney is also releasing two years of returns, despite pressure from Democrats and some Republicans to provide more information about how he manages his millions. Romney’s selection of Ryan has jolted the presidential contest, until now one that had done little to draw the public’s attention, and set the contours for the fall campaign: Romney as a proponent of a friendlier business climate seeking to revitalize the economy and rein in federal spending and Obama casting himself as a defender of middleclass families and federal spending on health care, retirement pensions and education. The running mate pick also shifted the campaign debate, at least temporarily, to the pressing economic challenges facing the country a debate both Romney and Obama have said they wanted to have even as the dialogue had spiraled into nasty, personal attacks. Sunday was a marked departure from the previous week, when the race for the White House devolved into name-calling and accusations of lying from both campaigns. Three months from Election Day, polls find Obama with a narrow lead over Romney, though the race remains tight in key battleground states. And while Ryan’s selection raised the role of government spending and Medicare in the election, the fundamentals of the campaign remained unchanged: a race defined by a weak economy and high unemployment, measured most recently at 8.3 percent in July.

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TODAY

FYI

from Piqua Central High School will meet for their monthly luncheon at 12:30 p.m. at Heck Yeah Grill, County Road 25-A in Piqua. • EMPLOYEE REUNION: The first reunion of Elder Beerman Piqua store employees will be at Kathy Hilgefort’s home in Fort Loramie. A covered dish luncheon will be offered. Call Robert Locke for more information at (937) 7736581. • DISCOVERY WALK: A morning discovery walk for adults will be from 8-9:30 a.m. at Aullwood Audubon Center, 1000 Aullwood Road, Dayton. Tom Hissong, education coordinator, will lead walkers as they experience the wonderful seasonal changes taking place. Bring binoculars.

• APPRAISAL FAIR: An antiques appraisal fair will be offered from noon to 4 Community p.m. at the Miami County Calendar Fair, Entertainment Tent. Local auctioneers Bob Honeyman, Scott Pence CONTACT US and Jerry Stichter will appraise items. Customers will receive a verbal Call Melody appraisal of up to two items for $5 each. If time permits, Vallieu at more items may be 440-5265 to entered. list your free • NOON OPTIMIST: The calendar Troy Noon Optimist will items.You meet at noon at the Tin Roof restaurant, 439 N. can send Elm St., Troy. The speaker your news by e-mail to will be a special guest. vallieu@tdnpublishing.com. • WILD JOURNEYS: A Wild Journeys, “Where Eagles Live” program will THURSDAY be offered at 7 p.m. at Brukner Nature Center. Join Troy resident Larrell Walters as he takes participants Civic agenda through, “Where Eagles Live! Dayton, Ohio,” • The Newton Local School Board of his self-published pictographic account of Education will meet at 7:30 p.m. in the media two eaglets born in April 2011 to a nesting center at the school. pair of bald eagles at Eastwood Lake MetroPark. Free for members, $2 for all oth- AUG. 17-18 ers. • POET’S CORNER: Do you enjoy • DOLLAR SALE: Anna’s Closet will have reading or writing poetry? Join the Troya $1 an item end-of-the-season sale from 10 Miami County Pubic Library’s poetry workshop at 6:30 p.m. to share and discuss any a.m. to 4 p.m. Proceeds will benefit New Path poems that you have written. The workshop Ministries, an outreach arm of Ginghamsburg Church. For more information, call 875-2909. serves to stimulate creativity and improve your technique as a poet. Participants will AUG. 17 examine the various forms, styles, structures and elements of different poems and • CHEESEBURGER DINNER: The use creative writing exercises to explore Pleasant Hill VFW Post No. 6557, 7578 W. new ways to approach the art of poetry. Fenner Road, Ludlow Falls, will offer a one• CHOIR PRACTICE: The Troy third pound hamburger made on the grill to Strawberry Festival Choir will practice at 7 your liking, with a side, for $7 from 6-7:30 p.m. p.m. at First Lutheran Church. Tickets for the Wednesday performance will be passed Choose your cheese and toppings. Turkey burgers also will be available. out then. For information about the choir • FRIDAY DINNER: The Covington VFW performing, or if you would like to join, call Post No. 4235, 173 N. High St., Covington, will 335-5767. offer dinner from 5-8 p.m. For more informa• HISTORICAL SOCIETY: The tion, call 753-1108. Covington Newberry Historical Society will • BLOOD DRIVE: A blood drive will be meet at 7 p.m. at the Fort Rowdy Museum, offered from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at One Call 101 Pearl St. For more information, call Now, 726 Grant St., Troy. Anyone who regis473-2270. ters to give will receive an “Blood Donors Save Civic agendas Lives” license plate frame and be registered to • The Tipp City Parks Advisory win a Ford Focus. Individuals with eligibility Committee will meet at 7 p.m. at the Tipp questions are invited to email City Government Center. • Covington Village Council will meet at 7 canidonate@cbccts.org or call (800) 388GIVE or make an appointment at p.m. at Town Hall. www.DonorTime.com. • The Police and Fire Committee of Village Council will meet at 6 p.m. prior to the council meeting. SATURDAY • Laura Village Council will meet at 7 p.m. in the Municipal building. • FARMERS MARKET: Downtown Troy • Brown Township Board of Trustees will Farmers Market will be from 9 a.m. to noon meet at 8 p.m. in the Township Building in on South Cherry Street, just off West Main Conover. Street. The market will include fresh produce, • The Union Township Trustees will meet artisan cheeses, baked goods, eggs, organic at 1:30 p.m. in the Township Building, 9497 milk, maple syrup, flowers, crafts, prepared Markley Road, P.O. Box E, Laura. Call 698food and entertainment. For free parking, 4480 for more information. enter off West Franklin Street. Contact Troy Main Street at 339-5455 for information or TUESDAY visit www.troymainstreet.org. • FARMERS MARKET: The Miami County Farmers Market will be open from 9 a.m. to 2 • PUMPKIN SHOW: The Bradford p.m. in Friendly’s parking lot. Food, including Community Festival Association will hold its locally grown fruits and vegetables, baked next meeting at 7 p.m. at the Bradford Fire goods, honey, Indiana melons and more. Station. There is plenty of parking. Civic agendas • PORK CHOPS: A pork chop dinner will • The village of West Milton Council will be from 5-7 p.m. at the Pleasant Hill VFW meet at 7:30 p.m. in council chambers. Post No. 6557, 7578 W. Fenner Road, Ludlow Falls, will offer a marinated (non-marinated WEDNESDAY upon request) pork chop dinner with baked potato and green bean casserole for $9 from • KIWANIS MEETING: The Kiwanis Club 5-7 p.m. of Troy will meet from noon to 1 p.m. at the • NIGHT HIKE: A forest night hike, “Night Troy Country Club. Kate Feltman from the Flyers,” will be at 9 p.m. at Brukner Nature Boy Scouts of America will be the speaker. Center. Come dressed for a family-friendly For more information, contact Kim Riber, adventure as participants hike the trails on a vice president, at 339-8935. guided discovery of nocturnal creatures, sounds of the night and wildlife signs. Free and THURSDAY open to the public. • STAR GAZE: Join the Stillwater • MANAGING STRESS: Are you curious Stargazers as they explore the starry night sky about how stress affects your daily life? Join above Brukner Nature Center at 10 p.m. Upper Valley Medical Center expert Melinda Members will have their telescopes set up and Schultz at 3 p.m. at the Troy-Miami County will be available to answer questions.This proLibrary for an informative presentation about gram is free and open to the public. Meet in the stress and stress management. She will talk parking lot following the night hike. about the basics of stress, how to recognize • AMAZING RACE: Enjoy the Tipp City signs of stress and how to manage your Public Library’s version of “The Amazing Race,” stress for a healthier lifestyle. Call 339-0502 to by traveling by car around Tipp City and following the clues provided. Official teams will conregister in advance. • CHESS CLUB: Whether you are a chess sist of an adult and a teen or tween ages 8-18, but the whole family is invited to join in the fun. master or an amateur, all types of players at • ICE CREAM SOCIAL: The Alcony Grace invited to attend at 6:30 p.m. at the Troy-Miami Church annual ice cream social will be from 4County Library. Play against your friends and family or sit back and watch others capture the 7 p.m. at the church, 1045 S. Alcony Conover Road, Troy. The event will include ice cream, pieces. Learn new strategies to controlling the sandwiches, chips, homemade pies and board and defeating your opponent. drinks. All proceeds will go toward the pur• MEETING CHANGED: The Elizabeth chase of a chair lift for the church. Township Board of Trustess will now meet at 8 • NATURES PRESCHOOL: The Miami p.m. at the township building on Walnut Grove County Park District will hold its Mother Road. Nature’s Pre-school “Meandering in the • BLOOD DRIVE: A blood drive will be offered from 3-7 p.m. at Piqua Baptist Church, Meadow” program from 10–11 a.m. at 1402 W. High St., Piqua. Anyone who registers Stillwater Prairie Reserve Rangeline Road access, 7790 Rangeline Road, north of to give will receive an “Blood Donors Save Lives” license plate frame and be registered to Covington. Children 2-4 years old and an adult companion are invited to attend. There win a Ford Focus. Individuals with eligibility will be a story, playtime and a toddler-sized questions are invited to email hike. Dress for the weather. Pre-register for canidonate@cbccts.org or call (800) 388the program online at www.miamicountyGIVE or make an appointment at parks, email to register@miamicountywww.DonorTime.com. • MONTHLY LUNCHEON: The 1956 class parks.com or call (937) 335-6273, Ext. 104.

3-year-old artist takes home wins BY MELODY VALLIEU Staff Writer vallieu@tdnpublishing.com The Snyder family apparently has a budding artist in their midst. Chet Snyder, 3, took home the first place ribbon for Watercolor — Ages 4 and Under and Best of Show for Artwork — Ages 4 and Under on Sunday during an awards ceremony at the Art Hall at the Miami County Fair. Chet, the son of Kurt and Amita Snyder of Troy,

TROY isn’t a first time winner, either. At the 2011 fair, Chet also took home a first place for a painting he made. This year’s win came from a Mother’s Day card he created at Overfield Early Childhood Development, where he attends preschool, according to his mom. “He loves to do art, read books and play soccer,” Amita said. Chet, a T-ball player with the YMCA, enjoys working with colors, according to Amita. “Actually, his favorite color is brown,” she said,

STAFF PHOTO/JIM DAVIS

Chet Snyder, 3, won a first place and a best of show. laughing. “But when he comes home from school, he uses purple a lot, cause Mom likes purple.” Chet, who has two brothers and a sister, and a new brother on the way, is not the only child in the family to bring home a win. Amita said his sister, a Girl Scout, also won sev-

eral awards, and a brother also received an award. Amita said they found out last year that those outside of Girl Scouts and 4-H can participate in the fair, and plan for the children to continue to bring entries. “Probably every year,” she said.

Netzley scholarship established MIAMI COUNTY — MIAMI COUNTY criteria. Applications are availChildren of the late Robert able online at www.miamiand Marjorie Netzley scholarships. countyfoundation.org or recently donated scholarThere is no age limita- phone the foundation ship funds with the Miami office at 773-9012. County Foundation to ben- tion. The scholarships can be The pplication deadline efit Darke and Miami County residents pursuing renewed based on certain is Nov. 1. a post-high school education. “Our parents recognized the value of education in today’s world. Our family wanted to honor them and continue their TM tradition of helping others HOMES THAT NEED ROOFING by establishing scholarA select number of homeowners in Troy ships in their names,” said Carol Netzley Coate. “We and the surrounding areas will be given the recognized the benefit of opportunity to have a lifetime Erie Metal having the foundation 5RR¿QJ 6\VWHP installed on their home at a manage these scholarship programs for us.” reasonable cost. The Robert E. Netzley Call today to see if you qualify. Not only will Scholarship is available to individuals whose career you receive the best price possible, but we goal is to work in public will give you access to no money down bank service, ideally a career in ¿QDQFLQJ ZLWK YHU\ DWWUDFWLYH UDWHV DQG WHUPV government, politics, public service, health and An Erie Metal Roof will keep your home cooler safety and church service. Applicants eligible to in the summer and warmer in the winter. apply for the Marjorie Lyons Netzley Scholarship An (ULH 0HWDO 5RR¿QJ 6\VWHP will provide must pursue a health/medyour home with unsurpassed ³%HDXW\ DQG ical related degree. /DVWLQJ 3URWHFWLRQ´ Both Darke and Miami County residents who are DON’T MISS THIS OPPORTUNITY TO SAVE. pursuing a post-high&DOO 1RZ school education in any accredited college/university, trade/vocational, nursing/health facility are eli2306610 www.ErieMetalRoofs.com gible to apply for these

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OPINION

Contact us David Fong is the executive editor of the Troy Daily News. You can reach him at 440-5228 or send him e-mail at fong@tdn publishing.com.

XXXday, 2010 Monday, August 13,XX, 2012 •4

TROY DAILY NEWS • WWW.TROYDAILYNEWS.COM

In Our View Troy Daily News Editorial Board FRANK BEESON / Group Publisher DAVID FONG / Executive Editor

ONLINE POLL

(WWW.TROYDAILYNEWS.COM)

Question: Are you going to the Miami County Fair this week?

Watch for final poll results in Sunday’s Miami Valley Sunday News.

Watch for a new poll question in Sunday’s Miami Valley Sunday News.

PERSPECTIVE “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.” — First Amendment, U.S. Constitution

AS I SEE IT

Tom Dunn Troy Daily News Guest Columnist

The secret to success is no real secret at all Just because school hasn’t been in session for the last couple of months doesn’t mean that the folks in Columbus have stopped interfering in the world of education to the detriment of us all. In fact, in recent days I have attended multiple workshops that are dominated with presentations by legislators, members of the Ohio Department of Education, and lawyers, all of whom were describing new mandates that cannot possibly be successfully implemented. It is sad how much time is spent on this foolishness and how little is left to spend on how to better teach the young people we serve. I’ve made no secret of my frustration with what I believe is this excessive and misguided politicization of education. The fact is, we currently live in a system where people who have no idea what they are talking about are making the rules and who apparently believe that schools are designed to not only educate, but to raise children without outside assistance. Sadly, this means that little that has been implemented in recent years has benefited students, and there is no indication that the intrusions are going to abate anytime soon. There are times when it’s tempting to just throw up one’s hands and accept the constant barrage of mandates and criticism as tsunamis that cannot be stopped and just quit fighting the good fight. But it seems that every time the breaking point seems near, something wonderful happens: I get to spend time celebrating the accomplishments of students whose standards of excellence refute the oft-repeated claim that public schools are havens of mediocrity (or worse). I was blessed to have had two such opportunities near the end of last school year that were re-energizing beyond belief. I was fortunate enough to attend two separate banquets honoring high-achieving students from public school districts around Ohio. Dozens upon dozens of incredibly talented young adults who were attending universities like Stanford, Cornell, Northwestern and Penn and majoring in subjects like electrical and chemical engineering, pre-med, pre-optometry, and biochemistry strode to the microphone to share their successes and their dreams. Their academic achievements, their community service experiences, the poise with which they carried themselves, and the focus with which they were already shaping their futures were above reproach. It was wonderful. As I sat through these banquets, I couldn’t help but wonder how politicians who cannot say enough bad things about public schools would explain the phenomenon unfolding before me. How in the world can so many students who have achieved so much success and who have so many plans for the future have come from a public school system that is so irretrievably broken, as our leaders would suggest it is? The obvious answer is that it is not as broken as they like to pretend and that the secret for their success is not much of a secret at all. In fact, the reasons are very obvious to anyone who will take just a moment to think about it or have the courage to discuss it, both of which the folks in Columbus refuse to do. These were intelligent, committed young adults who were raised in families with high expectations, who were attending outstanding public schools that were supported by communities that value education. In other words, as with any successful effort, the superior results occurred because many people pulled together for a common goal. Imagine that.

LETTERS

Glad to see Tipp levy fail

another school tax. I think it’s funny how those of us in the working world have to make sacrifices when the To the Editor: economy is bad, but the schools The good folks running the seem to think they can just go Tipp City Schools are so out of on spending money without a touch it’s scary. care in the world. I’m not sure what types of I’ve had my salary cut three jobs they hold when they are not times over the past five years. running our schools, but here in How many pay cuts have the the real world, the economy teachers and administrators at stinks! Things are not going well Tipp City taken in the past five and the last thing an average years? person can afford to do is pay They can just keep on spend-

ing all that money on teachers who work nine months out of the year and get Christmas breaks and spring breaks and snow days. Go ahead and put another levy on the ballot and see what happens, folks. If you thought the last one failed in a landslide, just wait and see what happens the next time! — John Martin Tipp City

WRITETO US: The Troy Daily News welcomes signed letters to the editor. Letters must contain your home address and a telephone number where you can be reached during the day. Letters must be shorter than 500 words as a courtesy to other writers. We reserve the right to edit for length and clarity. MAIL: 224 S. Market, Troy, Ohio, 45373; E-MAIL: editorial@tdnpublishing.com; FAX (937) 440-5286; ONLINE: www.troydailynews.com (“Letters To The Editor” link on left side).

DOONESBURY

Tom Dunn is superintendent of the Miami County Educational Services Center.

If you read this column, you need a life I was looking at some Olympic results the other day on the Internet when I ran across a story that had a bajillion comments attached to it. I’m not sure what the big debate was about — either a gymnast’s hair style or people mad at Americans for celebrating a win or Americans mad at Brazilians for celebrating a win or some other insignificant piece of information. I started glancing down through the comments just to see who in the world spends their time posting opinions no one cares about on the Internet. I mean, these people need to get a life! Then I realized I actually was reading comments by people I don’t know about something I don’t care about, and I said to myself, “I need to get a life!” There’s a lot of this going on now. Take, for instance, Twitter. I was looking at USA Today that same day and saw a story that was made up entirely of tweets from Hollywood types about Mitt Romney’s decision to make Paul Ryan his running mate. I

David Lindeman Troy Daily News Columnist had to think for a minute about who exactly Ryan was: at first, I thought he was a quarterback for the Atlanta Falcons, but that’s Matt Ryan. Then I thought he was the hero in all those Tom Clancy books. I thought that was a pretty good choice until I realized that guy was Jack Ryan. I finally remembered Paul Ryan is the guy from Wisconsin who made a bunch of people mad with his financial theories. I was a little surprised by the choice, but I was more surprised by the story. I mean, who cares what a handful of actors, who live in a fantasy world most of the time, care about politics? They are the

last people I would listen to on that subject. But since they tweeted about it, somehow their opinions became important. It really bugs me to see stories written about people’s tweets. It seems to me the laziest form of journalism. Call someone who might actually know about the subject? Nope, just rehash the tweets of some actor or athlete or other selfpromoter. It seems to me the only people who care what these people are tweeting are the twerps who have signed up to get the tweets when they are twittered. Or something like that. Just out of curiosity, I looked up to see how many people followed LeBron James on Twitter. I found out there are 5,777,836 people who follow LeBron on Twitter. I wonder if they care what LeBron thinks of Paul Ryan. Barack Obama is even on Twitter (18,473,204 followers), although I assume he doesn’t actually put anything up there himself. At least, I hope not. He has staff people who take

care of that for him. Alas, even though Obama is president of the U.S. and leader of the free world, he is only No. 6 on the list of most followed twits. No. 1 is Lady Gaga, with 28,253,305 followers. This tells us something about the world we live in. Maybe Romney should have picked Lady Gaga for his running mate. That sure would have shaken things up. It might have forced Obama to dump Joe Biden and go with the No. 2 person on the Twitter list, Justin Bieber, or the No. 3 person, Katy Perry. Except the last time I looked, you had to be 35 years old to be vice president, so Obama would have had to go all the way down to No. 12 on the list to find someone old enough for the job. That would be Oprah Winfrey. But wait! Here I am writing a story about Internet comments and Twitter. You know what? I need to get a life.

Troy Troy Daily News

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Tool lets Ohio voters update address online COLUMBUS (AP) — A new tool unveiled Thursday in the presidential battleground of Ohio allows registered voters to update their addresses online, an option that was included in a contentious election law but later stripped. The option available through Secretary of State Jon Husted’s website should improve registration accuracy and security, save money by reducing the workload at elections offices and help voters meet the requirement of being registered at their current addresses 30 days before an election, Husted said. It also could help voters cast regular ballots instead of provisional ballots, which must be verified for eligibility, because outdated addresses are the most common reason people use provisional ballots, he said. His office estimated 130,000 voters used provisional ballots in the 2008 presidential election because of address problems. About 660 voters used the website to update their addresses in the first five hours after

Husted’s announcement, his office said. The Ohio Association of Election Officials, a bipartisan group representing county elections board members and directors, praised the online option. “It is something numerous voters have expressed an interest in, and I’m pleased to see it in place,” Llyn McCoy, the association’s president, said in a statement. “While not full-blown online registration, announcement today’s moves us farther down the path to complete automation.” Husted said he considers the online process, developed internally by his office, to be more secure and more accurate than the existing changeof-address paper process. “People will still have the same ability to do this as they always have through the paper system, but this, we believe, will be a much more convenient process,” he said. Ten other states have similar provisions, Husted said. Some lawmakers want Ohio to take it a step further by allowing not just

updates but full voter registration to be completed online. “I applaud the Secretary of State’s attempt to make it easier for registered voters to update their registration information, hopefully resulting in fewer provisional ballots,” Democratic state Rep. Tracy Maxwell Heard of Columbus. Ohio voters seeking to change an address online will have to provide four pieces of information last name, driver’s license number, date of birth and final four digits of their Social Security number that match the information shared in the state voter registration database and records for the Ohio Bureau of Motor Vehicles. Voters who can’t meet that requirement can use the website to print a registration or change-ofaddress form to submit by mail. Oct. 9 is the voter registration deadline for Ohio’s next major election. Residents will cast ballots Nov. 6 in one of the country’s most contested U.S. Senate races and help choose the president.

Monday, August 13, 2012

5

OBITUARIES

JAMES T. ‘JIM’ HILL TROY — James T. “Jim” Hill, 70, of Troy, passed away at 2:50 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 11, 2012, at Hospice of Dayton. Jim was born Feb. 2, 1942, in Williamsburg, Ky., to James E. and Mary E. (Powell) Hill. Jim was married to Judi Cohagan Hill on Feb. 17, 1978 and she survives along with his son, Robert Hill of Dayton; two stepdaughters, Debbie (Jeff) Strachan and Beckie (Roger) Jones of Troy; two stepsons, Eric (Kim) Taylor and Chris Taylor of Troy. He also is survived by his mother, Mary E. Hill of Tipp City; one brother and sister-in-law, Dick and Cynthia Hill of Troy; four sisters and brothers-in-law, Lou Goosman of Cumberland, Kentucky; Jean and Russ Bennett of Vandalia; Carol and Tom Francis of Waynesville; Fran Hill of Tipp City; one sister-in-law, Mary K. Hill of Dayton; 16 grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren; six nieces

and four nephews and many other relatives. He was preceded in death by his father, James E. Hill, one stepson, Matt Taylor; and one brother, Ed Hill. Jim was an aircraft painter for more than 40 years and retired from Stevens’ Aviation, formerly Ohio Aviation, of Vandalia. He enjoyed woodworking, riding his motorcycle, and working in his yard. He was a former member of the Moose Lodge of Troy and the Eagles Lodge of Tipp City. Visitation will be from 6-8 p.m., Wednesday at Fisher-Cheney Funeral Home, 1124 W. Main St., Troy. Interment will be in Riverside Cemetery, Troy, at a later date. Contributions may be made in Jim’s name to Hospice of Dayton, 324 Wilmington Avenue, Dayton, OH 45420. Condolences may be left for the family at www.fisher-cheneyfuneralhome.com.

Dorothy M. Alyea COVINGTON — Dorothy M. Alyea, 102, lifetime resident of Covington, died Saturday, Aug. 11, 2012, at Koester Pavilion, Troy. She was born in Covington on Aug. 1, 1910, to the late Charles and Mabel (Boehringer) Miller; a graduate of Covington High School, Class of 1928, worked as a clerk at Lambs 5&10 for many years, a member of the Eastern Star, Chapter 275 where she was a past Matron and past Deputy Matron and loved to bake and make afghans and other crafts. Preceded in death by her parents; husband of 58 years, Bob Alyea; infant brother, Theron Miller; brother and sisterin-law, Norman and Betty Miller; sister and brotherin-law, Norma and Jim Brunton; son-in-law, Doyle

Shearer; and great granddaughter, Robin Kiser. Dorothy is survived by two sons and daughtersin-law, Richard and Maxine Alyea of Dayton and Dave and Mary Alyea of Covington; one daughter, Gloria Shearer of Covington; nine grandchildren and their spouses, Terri and William Henne of Covington, Bobette and Jim Subler of CO., Robin and Tim Zumbaugh of Ft. Wayne, Ind., Julie and Tom Shutts of Dayton, Jeff and Cheryl Alyea of Miamisburg, Lorri Whitehead of Fla., Lisa and Chuck Wehrman of Union, Jeremy Alyea of Garrett, Ind., and Sonya “Sunnie” Alyea of Atlanta, GA.; 25 great grandchildren; 13 great great grandchildren; special friends, Marilyn and Danny McPhearson and

their therapy dog, Kaila, and number nieces, nephews, relatives and friends. Funeral services will be held at 1 p.m. Wednesday at Bridges-Stocker-Fraley Funeral Home, Covington, with Pastor Dan Hathaway officiating. Interment will be in Miami Memorial Park Cemetery, Covington. The family will receive friends on Wednesday from 11 a.m. until the time of service. If desired, contributions may be made to The Covington Special Fire Dept. Inc. 801 E. Broadway, Covington, OH 45318 or The United Church of Christ Organ Fund, 115 N. Pearl St., Covington, OH 45318. Condolences may be sent to the family at www.stockerfraley.com.

Shirley A. Moler

AP PHOTO

In this May 3, 2006, photo, a student purchases a brown sugar Pop-Tart from a vending machine in the hallway outside the school cafeteria, in Wichita, Kan.

Study: Junk food laws may help curb kids’ obesity enced kids’ weight. But the results raised optimism among obesity researchers and public health experts who generally applaud strong laws to get junk food out of schools. “This is the first real evidence that the laws are likely to have an impact,” said Dr. Virginia Stallings, director of the nutrition center at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. Stallings chaired an Institute of Medicine panel that urged standards for making snack foods and drinks sold in schools more healthful but was not involved in the new research. The authors of the study, released online Monday in the journal Pediatrics, analyzed data on 6,300 students in 40 states. Their heights and weights were measured in spring 2004, when they were finishing fifth grade and soon to enter middle school, and in 2007, during the spring of eighth grade. The researchers also examined several databases of state laws on school nutrition during the same time. The states were not identified in the study because of database license restrictions that protect the students’ confidentiality, the authors said. The laws governed food and drinks sold in public school vending machines and school stores, outside of mealtime. Laws were considered strong if they included specific nutrition requirements, such as limits on sugar and fats. Laws were rated weak if the requirements were vague and merely urged sales of “healthy” food without specifics. The results show that

for these laws to be effective, they need to be consistently strong in all grades, said lead author Daniel Taber, a health policy researcher at the University of Illinois at Chicago. In late 2003, 27 of the states studied had no relevant laws affecting middleschoolers, seven had weak laws and six had strong laws. Several states and school districts enacted tougher laws affecting middle-schoolers and younger kids during the next few years as national concern rose over obesity rates. Recent data suggest that almost 20 percent of elementary school children nationwide are obese, and the rate among teens is only slightly lower. In states with consistently strong laws in elementary and middle school, almost 39 percent of fifthgraders were overweight when the study began. That fell to 34 percent in eighth grade. Also, almost 21 percent of fifth-graders were obese, declining to about 18 percent in the eighth grade. In states with no relevant laws, almost 37 percent of fifth-graders were overweight and 21 percent were obese, and those numbers barely budged by eighth grade.

Moler of Troy; 13 grandchildren; 13 great-grandchildren; two sisters, Patricia Myers of Troy, Jerri (William) Kiesler of Vandalia; a brother-in-law, James Hartzell of Piqua; a special niece, Pam Moler Hanis; a special cousin, Frances Shaeffer; and many nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by a sister, Beverly Jean Hartzell. Mrs. Moler was a 1949 graduate of Troy High School and was a lifelong homemaker and mother to many. She was a member of St. Patrick Catholic Church and enjoyed crocheting, bird watching,

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corresponding with friends and family, and her trips to Gatlinburg and K’s with her many good friends. A Mass of Christian Burial will be conducted at 10 a.m. Thursday at St. Patrick Catholic Church with the Rev. Fr. James Duell as Celebrant. Burial will follow in Riverside Cemetery. Visitation will be from 4-8 p.m. Wednesday at Jamieson & Yannucci Funeral Home, Piqua. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the St. Patrick’s Soup Kitchen, 419 E. Main St., Troy, OH 45373; or St. Mary’s Catholic Church, 304 Historic Nature Trail Rd., Gatlinburg, TN 37738. Condolences to the family may also be expressed through jamiesonandyannucci.com.

FUNERAL DIRECTORY • Earl R. Curtner PIQUA — Earl R. “Bump” Curtner, 58, died Friday, Aug. 10, 2012, at his residence. His funeral arrangements are pending

through the Jamieson & Yannucci Funeral Home. • Betty J. Hemmert PIQUA — Betty J. Hemmert, 89, formerly of Piqua, passed away at

10:50 a.m. Sunday, Aug. 12, 2012, in Cincinnati. Funeral arrangements are pending through the Jamieson & Yannucci Funeral Home.

DEATHS OF NATIONAL INTEREST • Albert Freeman Jr. LOS ANGELES (AP) — Albert Freeman Jr., the veteran actor who played Elijah Muhammad in Spike Lee’s epic film, “Malcolm X,” has died. He was 78. Howard University in Washington, D.C., confirmed his death Friday night but details weren’t immediately available. Freeman taught acting there for years and served as chairman and artistic director of its theater arts department. “He was a brilliant professor, a renowned actor and a master director who made his mark in the

classroom as well as on stage, screen and television. … He has mentored and taught scores of outstanding actors. He was a resounding voice of Howard and will be missed,” university spokeswoman Kerry-Ann Hamilton said in a statement. Freeman earned an NAACP Image Award for playing Malcolm X’s mentor in Lee’s 1992 biography. He also received an Emmy nomination for his role as Malcolm X in the 1979 miniseries “Roots: The Next Generations.” He won a best-actor

2302966

CHICAGO (AP) — Laws strictly curbing school sales of junk food and sweetened drinks may play a role in slowing childhood obesity, according to a study that seems to offer the first evidence such efforts could pay off. The results come from the first large national look at the effectiveness of the state laws over time. They are not a slam-dunk, and even obesity experts who praised the study acknowledge the measures are a political hot potato, smacking of a “nanny state” and opposed by industry and cash-strapped schools relying on food processors’ money. But if the laws have even a tiny effect, “what are the downsides of improving the food environment for children today?” asked Dr. David Ludwig, an obesity specialist at Harvard Medical School and Boston Children’s Hospital. “You can’t get much worse than it already is.” Children in the study gained less weight from fifth through eighth grades if they lived in states with strong, consistent laws versus no laws governing snacks available in schools. For example, kids who were 5 feet tall and 100 pounds gained on average 2.2 fewer pounds if they lived in states with strong laws in the three years studied. Also, children who were overweight or obese in fifth grade were more likely to reach a healthy weight by eighth grade if they lived in states with the strongest laws. The effects weren’t huge, and the study isn’t proof that the laws influ-

TROY — Shirley A. Moler, 81, of Troy, died at 6:50 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 11, 2012, at her residence. She was born April 30, 1931, in Troy, to the late Wilbur Franklin and Mary Margaret (Baumann) Siler. She married Floyd R. Moler on Oct. 25, 1949, in MOLER Winchester, Ind.; he preceded her in death on Feb. 11, 1997. Survivors include five daughters, Mary Sue Mills of Troy, Karen (Don) Church of Troy, Robin (Steve) Coleman of Bradford, Teresa (Eric) Duncan of Troy, Kelly (Tim) Larger of Piqua; a son, Thomas (Tammy)

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Daytime Emmy that year for his work as Capt. Ed Hall on the soap opera “One Life to Live.” • David Rakof NEW YORK — David Rakoff, an award-winning humorist whose cynical outlook on life and culture developed a loyal following of readers and radio listeners, has died after a long illness. He was 47. Rakoff died Thursday after a long illness, Doubleday and Anchor Books announced. The statement did not detail a cause of death, but Rakoff had been open about his battles with cancer.


HEALTH

6 August 13, 2012

TROY DAILY NEWS • WWW..TDN-NET. TROYDAILYNEWS COM .COM

Iced tea linked to kidney stones LEE BOWMAN Scripps Howard News Service

SHNS PHOTO COURTESY OF PITTSBURGH POST-GAZETTE

Kangoo Jumps are used in rebound exercise.

Bounces drop ounces Rebound exercise the new craze JACK KELLY Pittsburgh Post-Gazette Don’t run. Bounce. You’ll get fit faster, with far less risk of injury, say enthusiasts. “Rebound exercise is the most efficient, effective form of exercise yet devised by man,” claimed Albert E. Carter, a former professional wrestler who wrote a book about it in 1979. A NASA study a year later essentially confirmed his claim. The NASA scientists took measurements of eight young men as they walked, jogged and ran on a treadmill, then had them jump on a trampoline. “The external work output at equivalent levels of oxygen uptake were significantly greater while trampolining than while running,” the NASA scientists said. “The ratio of oxygen consumption was sometimes more than twice as efficient as treadmill running.” When you jump on a trampoline, the force of

gravity on your ankles, back and forehead is evenly distributed, but when you run on a treadmill, the G-force on the ankles typically is twice as great, the NASA researchers found. This can lead to shin splints and knee problems. Carter and his family were regular users of a trampoline but did little else in the way of exercise. They discovered they were stronger, fitter and better balanced than other people they knew who exercised more. In his book “The Miracle of Rebound Exercise,” Carter referred to the writings of the late C. Samuel West, an Arizona chemist and lymphologist in the field of naturopathic medicine. He wrote that “rebound exercise” uses three powerful forces — gravity, acceleration and deceleration — not available in more conventional forms of cardiovascular exercise. West said it proves the body’s lymphatic system gets a boost, as well. At first, rebound exercise just meant jumping on a trampoline. Rebounding shoes expand the exercise options available. A popular brand is Kangoo Jumps

— fitness shoes with a boot-like ankle support attached to a rebounding platform. “They were easy to adjust, stable and very comfortable,” said a reviewer for the American Council on Exercise. “Although they felt clunky and heavy at first, it took only a few minutes before finding balance. During a 30-minute run, the rebounding action provided significant shock absorption compared to mainstream running shoes. Overall, this product is an effective training tool that infuses an ordinary workout with fun and excitement,” the ACE reviewer said. The University of British Columbia studied 25 novice runners — 13 who wore normal running shoes and 12 who wore Kangoo Jumps — for 12 weeks in 2002. The Kangoo runners increased their peak oxygen uptake by 18.2 percent; the regular runners just 3.7 percent. More significantly, 42.8 percent of the control group suffered lower leg injuries during the test period. There were no injuries among the Kangoo Jumpers.

The downside of Kangoo Jumps is their price. The Kangoo Jumps’ website offers four models, ranging in price from $179 to $299. “We like to be on top of group fitness waves,” said Rory Lazear, who with her partner, Lorie Elias, owns the bFit Studio in the Pittsburgh area, and rents the shoes to class participants. “Kangoo Jumps are fun. That’s one of the main things in group exercise.” Lazear and Elias discovered Kangoo Jumps on the Internet and trained with celebrity trainer Mario Godiva Green, who says you’ll burn 25 to 50 percent more calories if you wear them in an exercise class instead of sneakers, but you won’t feel as tired. “People who are larger or overweight will feel light on their feet and experience mega calorie burn without feeling pain in their joints the next day,” Green said. “You definitely can go more anaerobic in Kangoo,” Lazear said, referring to intense, short-burst exercise that builds strength. “It engages your core much more because you are in an unstable surface. You have to engage your core to stay upright.”

Study: Dad’s job can affect baby’s health

IIn Introducing t oducing tr d i on one ne mor more ew way ay we’re pr oviding g quality car e we’re providing care to our communities communities to

KERSTIN NORDSTROM Raleigh News and Observer It's long been known that the behavior and environment of the mother during pregnancy can affect a newborn's health. But new research suggests that a father's behavior is important, too. Scientists at University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill have found that different parental occupations may bring increased risk of birth defects. For example, photographers seem to have a

Meredith Sullivan,, MD Pediatrics

Meredith Meredith Sullilv Sullilvan, an, MD MD,, has h joined the medical staff att Upper Valley stafff a Valle a y Medical Center Center and is now practicing practicing a att the Pediatric Pediatric Group. Group. Dr. Sulliv an received received her medical degr ee fr om Dr. Sullivan degree from Wright State State Univ ersity Boonshoft Boonshof B ft School of Wright University completed d rresidency esidency a Wright Medicine and completed att Wright State Univ ersity In tegrated P ediatrics. State University Integrated Pediatrics.

greater risk of having a child with eye defects. The children of landscapers have a greater risk for gastrointestinal defects. Yet Tania Desrosiers, an epidemiologist at the university's Gillings School of Global Public Health and the lead author of the study, cautioned that the heightened risks are still small. "Dads shouldn't worry or change jobs," she said. Birth defects are rare conditions. For example, only 1 in about 700 births results in a baby with a heart defect. Still, birth defects are the leading cause of infant mortality, and those who live with

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As much of the nation gasps through the last steamy hot days of summer, there’s mixed scientific reviews for some of the season’s pleasures and dangers. First, let’s talk iced tea. People gulp it down this time of year. But researchers at Loyola University of Chicago point out too much of the brew can boost the odds of kidney stones, a urinary tract disorder that affects about 10 percent of Americans at some point. Tea, particularly black tea, contains high concentrations of oxalate, one of the chemicals that combine with calcium to form stones that can painfully lodge in the urinary tract. Dr. John Milner, an assistant professor of urology at Loyola, noted that people are at greater risk for kidney stones if they don’t drink enough fluids or become dehydrated from sweating. But people who drink more iced tea rather than water during the hottest days might be doing themselves more harm than good. Of course, hot tea has the same ingredient, but about 85 percent of the tea consumed in the United States is iced. Milner said people don’t have to give up the beverage entirely, just drink it in moderation along with water and maybe some fresh lemonade — full of citrates that help inhibit kidney stone growth. Men are about four times more likely than women to develop kidney stones, and the risk rises sharply after age 40. Postmenopausal women with low estrogen levels and women who have had their ovaries removed are also at increased risk. Well, surely sitting before a cooling fan is a good way to beat the heat, right? Not always, according to team of British a researchers who reviewed several decades of evidence about fan effectiveness and published their findings recently on the Cochrane Library website. Fans are generally good when they circulate us air that is at least a few degrees below body temperature and not aimed directly at us, but

may actually make us hotter when used at temperatures above 95 degrees Fahrenheit. While the moving air may make a person feel cooler, in fact the warmth just makes them sweat more and lose fluids and electrolytes at a pace that results in heat exhaustion. This is a particular concern for the very old and very young, who have more difficulty sweating and regulating their temperature, making them more vulnerable to heat illness, the researchers said. Still another study published last winter showed that the so-called exercise or couch-potato pill can help mitigate heat stroke. The condition occurs when the body exceeds 104 degrees and can’t effectively cool itself due to dehydration or other factors, such as heavy exercise. Right now, the only emergency treatment for heat stroke is aggressive cooling in an ice bath or with ice packs to bring down body temperature. Although heat strokes get the most attention when an athlete is struck down, children, the elderly and anyone working outdoors in extreme heat also are at risk. A recent study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine noted the number of heat-related injuries treated in emergency departments more than doubled between 1997 and 2006. In that time, an estimated 55,000 people were treated for heat stroke. The experimental drug AICAR debuted in 2008 with findings that it could build muscle and improve endurance in “couch-potato” mice — those that were completely inactive. For the heat-stroke experiment, scientists at the University of Rochester and Baylor College of Medicine in Houston gave the drug to mice genetically predisposed to have a heat-stroke type of response when exposed to very high temperatures or when exercising under warm conditions. The mice experience uncontrolled muscle contractions, resulting in the fatal breakdown of muscle tissue that releases toxic levels of potassium into the bloodstream.

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defects struggle. The causes of about 70 percent of birth defects are still unknown. The scientists looked at more than 60 jobs and 60 defects, using data from 10,000 pregnancies with defects (not all pregnancies made it to term) and 4,000 live births without defects. The paper was published in Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Although the study establishes a correlation between jobs and defects, it does not establish the cause. It could be that DNA in the father's sperm is damaged by chemical or radi-

Entered at the post office in Troy, Ohio 45373 as “Periodical,” postage paid at Troy, Ohio. The Troy Daily News is published Monday-Friday afternoons, and Saturday morning; and Sunday morning as the Miami Valley Sunday News, 224 S. Market St., Troy, OH. USPS 642-080. Postmaster, please send changes to: 224 S. Market St., Troy, OH 45373.

ation exposure. A chemical could be carried on a sperm into the uterus, or there could be "take-home exposure," such as pesticide residue on clothes, Desrosiers said. "If you suspect you work with toxic chemicals, use personal protective equipment, which you should be using anyway," she said. Different occupations have exposure to different chemicals. Janitors are around cleaning products, and photographers are exposed to developing solvents. Drivers are near diesel fumes, while landscapers are around pesticides. But chemical exposure may not be the whole story. Some surprising jobs, such as mathematicians and computer scientists, had elevated risks for certain defects. Desrosiers said the simple act of sitting might raise the temperature in the genitals and cause changes in sperm. No matter what the cause of the defects, the implication of the study is clear. "Dads do play a role in the health of their unborn child," Desrosiers said. "The next set of studies will try to figure out why."


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ANNIE’S MAILBOX

Your brother needs to hit ‘rock bottom’ before he’ll see the light Dear Annie: My brother, "Luke," recently returned to our hometown. Since he's been back, all he has done is drink beer. He has made no effort to find a job. I love him, but it is quite obvious that he's an alcoholic. When Luke lived here 10 years ago, he was constantly intoxicated. When my husband confronted him about his drinking, Luke left town and didn't speak to me for years. Now when I tell him he has had too much to drink, he pushes me away saying he's not a little kid anymore. Maybe not, but he acts like one. Luke needs someone to take care of him, make sure he's eaten and bail him out of jail. He was once stabbed while drunk. I fear that if he continues, he'll be seriously hurt. I don't know what to do. Luke is not my kid, and he's too old to be my responsibility. How can I help? — Completely Lost Dear Lost: We know it will be difficult, but you need to step back and allow Luke to hit bottom. This doesn't mean he will stop drinking. It means you cannot make him stay sober. By bailing him out of jail, making sure he eats and otherwise protecting him, you also enable him to continue drinking. He knows you are there to pick him up when he falls. And until you stop, you will continue to agonize over his drinking. Please contact Al-Anon (al-anon.alateen.org) for support and information. Dear Annie: Is there any accepted etiquette about who plants flowers at a gravesite? My husband died eight years ago. I commissioned a beautiful gravestone to be hand-carved from native stone. I planted perennials at the grave, and I touch up and replant each year. On numerous occasions, his exwife (who has remarried twice) has planted flowers at the grave without consulting me. Most recently, she planted flowers where I had planted early perennials. She built the area up with a mound of soil and mulch so that when her plants grow, they will hide some of the beautiful hand carving on the stone in addition to burying some of my plantings. I feel this is inappropriate. It is my privilege, not hers, to care for my husband's grave. This is especially grating because she did everything she could to exclude me from my stepchildren's lives after their father's death. We have been able to interact in a friendlier manner in recent years, and she did eventually apologize for her past behavior. I don't want to create a new problem, but this just aggravates the heck out of me. Am I off base? — Cranky in Kansas Dear Cranky: While there are no restrictions on who can place flowers at a gravesite, the ex-wife sounds a little passive-aggressive in her approach. Try co- opting her. Call and say you noticed the lovely flowers she left, but trust she didn't intentionally dig up yours and plan to cover the carving so her children couldn't see it. Ask her to come along the next time so the two of you can make it beautiful together and so she will know exactly how you want it to look. If she still digs up your plants, it's OK to remove hers. Dear Annie: "Crying in Ohio" said her husband of 46 years called her "obese." My wife and I also have been married for 46 years. Two years ago, she began telling me that I was a fat slob who never took a bath or brushed my teeth. Of course, it wasn't true. She now has been diagnosed with advanced Alzheimer's and tells me the same awful things at least twice a week. But she can't help it and, 30 minutes later, doesn't remember saying them. Maybe there is more going on than an abusive husband calling his wife fat. He could be a loving husband who needs to see a doctor. — Been There Annie's Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann Landers column. Please email your questions to anniesmailbox@comcast.net, or write to: Annie's Mailbox, c/o Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd Street, Hermosa Beach, CA 90254.

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HOW TO PLAY: Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. Find answers to today’s puzzle in tomorrow’s Troy Daily News. SATURDAY’S SOLUTION:

HINTS FROM HELOISE

Baggy pants more than a drag when doing the laundry Dear Heloise: Many people wear their pants untrimmed and, if baggy enough, allowed to drag on the ground. It is obvious the pant bottom gets frayed and dirty. Most women may not realize this, but here is another thing that happens to men’s pant bottoms: The floor under every urinal in the men’s restroom is wet, and those baggy pants soak it up. It’s bad enough that the pants pick up the dirt from the street. Everyone who does the wash has to handle these soaked pants. — Mike, via email This is certainly a “yuck” for this column! — Heloise

Hints from Heloise Columnist HEATSTROKE Dear Readers: People and pets can be susceptible to heat exhaustion and heatstroke. And for both, it may be lifethreatening! Here are some specific ways to prevent heat exhaustion in pets: If you walk your dog, early morning or late evening is best,

when it is cooler outside. If pets are kept outdoors, they should have plenty of shade to help keep them cool. Always have plenty of fresh water accessible. If you keep your dog in a kennel or pen, make sure there is enough ventilation. And never leave a pet in a parked car. The temperature in a parked car can reach 102 degrees within 10 minutes on an 85-degree day, and 120 degrees after 30 minutes. There are variables such as humidity or dryness (e.g., Florida versus Arizona). Animals with flat noses (like pugs) are especially susceptible,

because their noses make it difficult to pant effectively. Here is some important lifesaving information from the Humane Society of the United States. If you notice extreme panting and salivation, fever, fatigue, rapid heartbeat, failure to respond or your dog collapses, your pet may be suffering from heatstroke. Move your dog into a shaded area, and use cool water to help it cool down. Place cool, wet cloths on your pet’s head and feet, and offer ice cubes to lick. Go to your veterinarian immediately to seek medical attention. “Woof, woof!” — Cabbie and Heloise


A8

COMICS

Monday, August 13, 2012

MUTTS

BIG NATE

HAGAR THE HORRIBLE

DILBERT

BLONDIE

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HI AND LOIS ZITS

BEETLE BAILEY FAMILY CIRCUS

DENNIS the MENACE

ARLO & JANIS

HOROSCOPE BY FRANCES DRAKE For Tuesday, Aug. 14, 2012 ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Today your passionate feelings about something at home, perhaps a redecorating decision, or something that has to do with real estate might put you at odds with the family. And you don’t want to back down! TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) You feel fortunate because you can appreciate your surroundings and those who care for you. However, feelings of jealousy could mar this idyllic moment. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) If shopping today, you might be obsessed. You simply must have something! Keep your receipts, because this feeling might be gone in a few days. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Relations with partners and close friends are intense today. A new relationship could begin that is based on a fascination with someone. (Caution is advised.) LEO (July 23 to Aug. 22) If you feel uncomfortable or annoyed today, you might give someone a piece of your mind. That’s because deep, hidden, childish feelings can easily bubble to the surface. VIRGO (Aug. 23 to Sept. 22) A platonic relationship could turn romantic today. You might be fascinated by someone, and yet the same fascination could cause problems with other friends. LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Some of you might develop a hot and heavy crush on a boss or authority figure today. It’s almost as if you’ve lost your judgment. (That about says it all.) SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) Avoid controversial subjects like politics and religion today, because everyone feels super-passionate about issues. Naturally, this includes you. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) This is an intensely passionate day for romance. But sometimes too much of a good thing isn’t a good thing. Sometimes it confuses and creates jealousy or resentment. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 19) A new relationship might begin today, and you are completely captivated by this person. You might be attracted to someone you know is good for you. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 to Feb. 18) Work-related romance can begin today. Be cautious here, because this is an intense but passing attraction. Who wants to end up with egg on his or her face? PISCES (Feb. 19 to March 20) You can really kid yourself today by falling in love with somebody completely inappropriate. Initially, it all seems to be the stuff of movies — irresistible and all that. Don’t do anything you’ll regret later. YOU BORN TODAY You value your personal integrity, which is why you like to reveal society in its most honest likeness as well. You are observant and not afraid to shock, but you buffer the raw truth with humor so as to make it palatable. Personally, you are emotionally open. In the year ahead, something you’ve been involved with for about nine years will diminish or end in order to make room for something new. Birthdate of: Christopher Gorham, actor; John Galsworthy, author/Nobel laureate; Halle Berry, actress. (c) 2012 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

SNUFFY SMITH

GARFIELD

BABY BLUES

FUNKY WINKERBEAN

CRANKSHAFT

TROY DAILY NEWS • WWW.TDN-NET.COM


WEATHER & WORLD

TROY DAILY NEWS • WWW.TROYDAILYNEWS.COM

Today

Tonight

Partly sunny High: 83°

Mostly clear Low: 60°

SUN AND MOON

Tuesday

Wednesday

Partly sunny High: 80° Low: 64°

Partly cloudy High: 81° Low: 58°

Thursday

Friday

T-storms possible High: 86° Low: 65°

Partly cloudy High: 77° Low: 64°

First

Full

TODAY’S STATEWIDE FORECAST Monday, August 13, 2012 AccuWeather.com forecast for daytime conditions, low/high temperatures

MICH.

NATIONAL FORECAST

Cleveland 82° | 62°

Toledo 81° | 61°

Sunrise Tuesday 6:48 a.m. ........................... Sunset tonight 8:36 p.m. ........................... Moonrise today 2:49 a.m. ........................... Moonset today 5:47 p.m. ........................... New

9

Monday, August 13, 2012

Youngstown 83° | 56°

Mansfield 81° | 57°

Last

TROY •

PA.

83° 60° Aug. 17

Aug. 24

Aug. 31

Sept. 8

ENVIRONMENT Today’s UV factor. 8

Fronts Cold

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10+ Low

Minimal

Moderate

High

Very High

Air Quality Index Good

Moderate

Harmful

Main Pollutant: Particulate

Pollen Summary 4

0

250

500

Peak group: Weeds

Mold Summary 9,386

0

12,500

25,000

Top Mold: Undifferentiated Source: Regional Air Pollution Control Agency

GLOBAL City Athens Berlin Calgary Dublin Hong Kong Jerusalem London Montreal Moscow Paris Tokyo

Lo 73 53 57 53 80 77 58 63 55 53 80

-10s

-0s

0s

10s

20s 30s 40s

Yesterday’s Extremes: High: 121 at Death Valley, Calif.

47

Hi Otlk 87 pc 68 rn 71 pc 67 rn 86 rn 93 clr 75 pc 82 rn 71 rn 80 clr 87 rn

Columbus 82° | 58°

Dayton 82° | 60°

50s 60s

Warm Stationary

70s

80s

Pressure Low

High

90s 100s 110s

Portsmouth 85° | 57°

Low: 29 at Stanley, Idaho

KY.

NATIONAL CITIES Temperatures indicate Sunday’s high and overnight low to 8 p.m. Eastern Time. Hi Lo Prc Otlk Albany,N.Y. 83 65 PCldy Albuquerque 97 69 PCldy 67 54 PCldy Anchorage Atlanta 88 63 PCldy Atlantic City 86 70 PCldy Austin 100 74 PCldy Baltimore 85 68 .34 Cldy Birmingham 85 61 PCldy Bismarck 79 57 .34 Clr Boise 96 62 Cldy Boston 84 72 .01PCldy Buffalo 77 64 .04PCldy Burlington,Vt. 84 67 .01PCldy Charleston,S.C. 90 73 Clr Charleston,W.Va. 82 57 PCldy 87 66 PCldy Charlotte,N.C. Chicago 76 55 Rain Cincinnati 85 55 Cldy Cleveland 79 62 Cldy Columbia,S.C. 91 73 Clr Columbus,Ohio 81 59 .12 Cldy Dallas-Ft Worth 105 76 PCldy Dayton 77 54 Cldy Denver 86 54 .11PCldy Des Moines 73 65 .02 Cldy Detroit 82 60 Rain

Cincinnati 85° | 62°

Greensboro,N.C. Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Jacksonville Kansas City Key West Las Vegas Little Rock Los Angeles Louisville Memphis Miami Beach Milwaukee Nashville New Orleans New York City Oklahoma City Orlando Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh St Louis Salt Lake City San Diego San Francisco Seattle Washington,D.C.

Hi Lo Prc Otlk 85 65 .01PCldy 87 74 PCldy 97 78 Clr 83 58 Rain 89 73 .19 Cldy 95 67 .02PCldy 86 80 PCldy 109 88 PCldy 94 65 Cldy 92 71 Clr 87 58 Cldy 93 63 Cldy 90 76 .65PCldy 78 61 Rain 85 57 Cldy 92 75 Cldy 87 73 PCldy 102 72 Clr 92 74 .65 Rain 85 71 PCldy 115 91 Clr 76 60 .01 Cldy 85 65 Cldy 98 67 PCldy 85 72 PCldy 65 53 Clr 87 60 PCldy 88 72 .03 Cldy

W.VA. © 2012 Wunderground.com

SOURCE: ASSOCIATED PRESS

REGIONAL ALMANAC Temperature High Yesterday .............................77 at 3:04 p.m. Low Yesterday..............................54 at 6:02 a.m. Normal High .....................................................83 Normal Low ......................................................63 Record High ........................................97 in 1918 Record Low.........................................48 in 1967

Precipitation 24 hours ending at 5 p.m................................0.0 Month to date ................................................1.50 Normal month to date ...................................1.12 Year to date .................................................18.80 Normal year to date ....................................26.61 Snowfall yesterday ........................................0.00

TODAY IN HISTORY (AP) — Today is Monday, Aug. 13, the 226th day of 2012. There are 140 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: On Aug. 13, 1942, Walt Disney’s animated feature “Bambi” had its U.S. premiere at Radio City Music Hall in New York, five days after its world premiere in London. On this date: • In 1521, Spanish conqueror Hernando Cortez captured Tenochtitlan, present-day Mexico City, from the Aztecs. • In 1792, French revolutionaries imprisoned the royal family.

• In 1846, the American flag was raised for the first time in Los Angeles. • In 1932, Adolf Hitler rejected the post of vice chancellor of Germany, saying he was prepared to hold out “for all or nothing.” • In 1934, the satirical comic strip “Li’l Abner,” created by Al Capp, made its debut. • In 1960, the first two-way telephone conversation by satellite took place with the help of Echo 1. The Central African Republic became totally independent of French rule.

• Five years ago: President George W. Bush’s political strategist, Karl Rove, announced his resignation. • One year ago: Seven people were killed when a stage collapsed at the Indiana State Fair during a powerful storm just before a concert was to begin. • Today’s Birthdays: Former Cuban President Fidel Castro is 86. Hockey Hall of Famer Bobby Clarke is 63. Golf Hall of Famer Betsy King is 57. Actor Danny Bonaduce is 53. Pop-rock singer James Morrison is 28.

Heat affecting guards, inmates at Okla. prisons

AP

Iranians search the ruins of buildings at the village of Bajebaj near the city of Varzaqan in northwestern Iran, on Sunday, following Saturday’s earthquake. Twin earthquakes in Iran have killed at least 250 people and injured over 2,000, Iranian state television said on Sunday.

Residents describe terror of Iran quake TEHRAN, Iran (AP) — Residents of the zone in northwestern Iran hit by powerful twin earthquakes described moments of terror and panic with birds crowing loudly in warning seconds before the ground shook. As the death toll rose Sunday to more than 250 with entire villages leveled, rescuers called off searches for survivors and turned their attention to caring for the 16,000 people left homeless. At least 20 villages were totally destroyed in the quakes on Saturday that were followed by some 36 aftershocks, state television reported. Ahmad Reza Shajiei, a senior government official in charge of rescue operations, said more than 5,000 tents have been set up to shelter the thousands of displaced who spent the night outdoors. “The moment the earthquake hit, it was like a snake biting from underground. It was the worst experience of my life,” said resident Morteza Javid, 47, from Ahar. “The walls were shaking and moving from side to side. It took about a minute before I could run out of the house,” he said. “Seconds before the earthquake, crows were making a lot

of noise, but I didn’t understand why. It was only after the quake that I learned the crows were warning us.” Javid said he drove more than a dozen injured people to hospitals during the night. State television said at least 250 died. The semiofficial Mehr news agency quoted a local official who put the toll at 277. State TV said 44,000 food packages and thousands of blankets have been distributed in the stricken area. In Washington, the White House press secretary sent a message of sympathy for the victims. “Our thoughts are with the families of those who were lost, and we wish the wounded a speedy recovery,” it said.” We stand ready to offer assistance in this difficult time.” The U.S. and Iran are locked in a bitter fight over Tehran’s disputed nuclear program, which the West suspect is aimed at producing weapons. Iran denies the allegation. The U.N. also issued a message of sympathy and offered aid. The U.S. Geological Survey reported that Saturday’s first quake was magnitude 6.4 and struck 60 kilometers (35 miles) northeast of

the city of Tabriz at a depth of 9.9 kilometers (6.2 miles). State TV quoted local Crisis Committee chief Khalil Saei as saying the epicenter was a region between the towns of Ahar and Haris, about 600 kilometers (350 miles) northwest of the capital Tehran. The second quake was a magnitude 6.3 and struck 11 minutes later, the USGS reported. Its epicenter was 50 kilometers (30 miles) northeast of Tabriz at a depth of 9.8 kilometers (6.1 miles). The quakes hit the towns of Ahar, Haris and Varzaqan in East Azerbaijan province, state television reported. In addition to 20 villages destroyed, more than 130 others sustained heavy damage, state TV said. The aftershocks were felt in a wide region near the Caspian Sea, causing panic among the people. Iran is located on seismic fault lines and is prone to earthquakes. It experiences at least one earthquake every day on average, although most are so small they go unnoticed. In 2003, some 26,000 people were killed by a magnitude 6.6 quake that flattened the historic southeastern city of Bam.

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — The record-setting heat is taking a toll on those who work and live in prisons without air conditioning. Correctional officers say elevated temperatures can leave prisoners with shorter fuses. “Obviously, we are not dealing with the best people society has to offer,” said Daniel Vollmer, a correctional officer at Joseph Harp Correctional Center in Lexington. “It is no big surprise Oklahoma summers tend to put people on edge.” Mike Rogers is a unit manager at James Crabtree Correctional Center in Helena. “Things get a little more tense and a whole lot quicker,” he said. Addressing issues that arise among prisoners because of the heat detracts from his regular work duties, he said. “Staff have found themselves handling a whole lot more smaller issues that normally wouldn’t happen simply because of the heat, and being short-handed escalates problems a lot quicker than normal,” Rogers said. Sgt. David Edelman works the midnight shift at Lexington Assessment and Reception Center. “Well, when I go in at midnight to work, it is still in the mid-90s,” Edelman said. “It makes it to where the only thing you can think about is water. You get very lethargic. Unfortunately, when you become lethargic like that, you become complacent.” The problem is compounded for officers working double shifts,

Edelman said. He said most offenders don’t sleep through the night because of the heat. Edelman believes disturbances at the facility are increasing as a result. “Everybody becomes more and more irritated,” he said. “The littlest thing can set one of the inmates off.” Department of Corrections spokesman Jerry Massie said slightly more than half of the housing units in the system have air conditioning. No heat- related deaths have been reported. Inmates are allowed to purchase fans, Massie said. In addition, fans are provided for indigent offenders, he said. Staff pay special attention to those who are older than 55 or who are medically frail, Massie said. Terry Martin is warden at the Dick Conner Correctional Center in Hominy. The facility has put misters in shaded areas and has identified cool zones, such as an air-conditioned hallway, dining hall or visiting room where offenders can go to cool off, Martin said. The facility also is handing out ice, Martin said. The facility can house 960 medium-security and 236 minimum-security offenders. Cathy Sasnett said about 18 offenders have been treated for heatrelated illnesses at Jess Dunn Correctional Center, a 982-bed, minimum-security facility in Taft. A lot of those treated have other ailments that are intensified by the heat, said Sasnett, public information officer.


10 • Troy Daily News • Classifieds That Work • Monday, August 13, 2012

To Advertise In The Classifieds That Work Call 877-844-8385

that work .com JobSourceOhio.com

PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD ONLINE-24/7 www.tdnpublishing.com

125 Lost and Found

FOUND DOG, male, neutered, very friendly, 10 months to 1 year old, on Meyer Road between Covington and Pleasant Hill (937)473-2285

FOUND KITTEN, calico, very loveable, Laura area Pemberton Road, claim or will give to inside home. (937)676-3455 or (937) 417-5272

LOST! Black Lab Mix Answers to Sam. He limps on his back leg. Lost in north Piqua area near river. Needs medication. REWARD! (937)418-1891 (937)418-8997

235 General

280 Transportation

If you have: a Clean MVR/background & a good work history

If you want: Good home time & benefits Then, call today!

Requires- Testing, background check, drug screen

(866) 485-2882

Apply on-line:

*6 Months Recent Driving Experience is Required*

www.spherion.appone.com

Select: St. Mary's, Industrial, then choose MCP application ✰ ✰ ✰✰✰✰✰ ✰ ✰ ✰✰ ✰✰

www.falcontransport.com

that work .com

240 Healthcare

that work .com 200 - Employment

235 General AQUATIC ASSISTANT

for children & adults of all abilities. Aquatic Background Required. Must love water and people! No evenings, weekends, or holidays! E-mail resume to: carla-bertke@ woh.rr.com

GENERAL LABOR

Deliver the AT&T telephone directories in the Piqua and surrounding area. Call (800)733-9675 now for an appt. Applicants must be 18 years or older with a valid driver's license and proof of insurance.

JANITOR/ FLOOR TECH

Must have janitorial and floor care exp. including waxing, stripping, scrubbing, buffing and carpet extraction. Mon-Fri 5pm-1:30pm. $9.00 per hour. Apply online lacostaservices.com and click on employment. LaCosta Facility Support Services. elorant@cms4.com. (847)487-3179.

MASON TENDERS/ HOD CARRIERS

Local Commercial Masonry company looking for Mason Tenders/ Hod Carriers. Experience required, (strongly preferred). Must have reliable transportation, be dependable, and be able to pass a back ground check. We are an EOE and drug free workplace. Call (937)726-6909 or Fax to (866)936-8021 ✮✮✮✮✮✮✮✮✮✮✮

NOW HIRING: Companies desperately need employees to assemble products at home. No selling, any hours. $500 weekly potential. Info: (985)646-1700 Dept. OH-6011.

Part time OFFICE HELP

Approximately 15-20 hours per week. Customer service skills needed, must have computer experience, and be detail oriented. Accounting experience a plus. Fax resume to: 937-773-1010 or mail to: Piqua Country Club, 9812 Country Club Rd Piqua.

Part time & PRN STNAs (all shifts)

Part time & PRN RNs (all shifts)

WHERE

BUYERS MEET

DRIVERS

Home Daily

Excellent Equipment

• • • •

Congratulations! 60 Staffmark Employees

already hired

this year at F&P America!!!

*****************************

Assembly Spot Welding Forklift Machine Operation (All Shifts)

Opportunity Knocks...

• • •

CDLA & 1 yr recent OTR experience for solo. If less than 1 yr can possibly team. Call Dave on the weekend or evenings at 937-726-3994 or 800-497-2100 during the week or apply at www.ceioh.com

300 - Real Estate

For Rent

1, 2 & 3 Bedroom, Houses & Apts. SEIPEL PROPERTIES Piqua Area Only Metro Approved (937)773-9941 9am-5pm Monday-Friday

All No Touch Loads

1, 2 & 3 bedrooms Call for availability attached garages Easy access to I-75 (937)335-6690

$500/WK- Minimum (call for details) Medical Insurance plus Eye & Dental

www.hawkapartments.net

401K Retirement

1,2 & 3 BEDROOM APARTMENTS Troy ranches and townhomes. Different floor plans to choose from. Garages, fireplaces, appliances including washer and dryers. Corporate apartments available. Visit www.1troy.com Call us first! (937)335-5223

Paid Holidays Shutdown Days Safety Bonus Paid Weekly

Meal per Diem Reimbursement

Class "A" CDL

New Wages at F&P

(based on your attendance) ************************* Staffmark is hiring to support the needs of F&P America with IMMEDIATE OPENINGS. Apply day of event or call Staffmark Onsite Office at F&P America 937-339-0212 ext. 1152

EVERS REALTY

Good MVR & References

TROY, 2 bedroom townhomes, $695, 3 Bedroom double $675, 1 bedroom apartment $450

Chambers Leasing 1-800-526-6435

(937)216-5806 EversRealty.net

DRIVERS WANTED

• • • • •

$.40/mile 4 weeks vacation/ year $.02/mile annual bonuses Well maintained equipment 401K with company match Weekly Per Diem Health, Dental, Vision

305 Apartment

Requirements:

*****************************

WELDING MACHINE OPERATORS ASSEMBLY STARTING PAY $10/HR with potential to $12/HR

Benefits:

245 Manufacturing/Trade

2101 Corporate Dr. Troy, 0H *************************

• •

Semi/Tractor Trailer

75 Mote Drive Covington, OH 45318.

F&P America! MON, AUGUST 13th 4PM TO 7PM

Continental Express in Sidney, seeks professional drivers for hauling refrigerated freight.

SELLERS

Please apply in person at

OPEN INTERVIEWS

REGIONAL DRIVERS

&

Part time Laundry & Housekeeping (1st & 2nd shifts)

Starting pay now $10.00/HR With potential to $12.00/HR after 6 months (based on your attendance) ***************************** Staffmark is hiring to support the needs of F&P America. Apply in person: 1600 W. Main St., Troy, online at www.staffmark.com or call 937-335-0118.

Transportation-

Falcon Transport is growing & we need qualified drivers!

Full-time, Pay starting at $11.45/$12.35 with raises, Attendance bonus

Office Hours: Monday-Friday 8-5

280 Transportation

CLASS A CDL DRIVERS

Positions available for Manufacturing Plant in Anna, OH

GENERAL INFORMATION

All Display Ads: 2 Days Prior Liners For: Mon - Fri @ 5pm Weds - Tues @ 5pm Thurs - Weds @ 5pm Fri - Thurs @ 5pm Sat - Thurs @ 5pm Miami Valley Sunday News liners- Fri @ Noon

HOME DAILY, ACT FAST!

2 BEDROOM townhouse with garage & a/c. (877)272-8179

$2,000 sign on bonus Great Pay Local Runs Off 2 days per week Health + 401K Must live within 50 miles of Tipp City, OH. Class A CDL w/Hazmat required.

(866)475-3621

2-3 BEDROOMS in Troy

Spacious apartments, appliances, w/d hookups, a/c and more Pets welcome $525-$650

POLICY: Please Check Your Ad The 1st Day. It Is The Advertiser’s Responsibility To Report Errors Immediately. Publisher Will Not Be Responsible for More Than One Incorrect Insertion. We Reserve The Right To Correctly Classify, Edit, Cancel Or Decline Any Advertisement Without Notice.

305 Apartment

3 BEDROOM house, $750. 3 bedroom double a/c, $595. Appliances, garage, no pets. (937)681-9867 DODD RENTALS Tipp-Troy: 2 bedroom AC, appliances $500/$450 plus deposit No pets (937)667-4349 for appt.

NEWLY DECORATED Troy 2 bedroom, and Tipp City 1 bedroom. No pets. (937)238-2560 (937)778-1993

TROY, 1 & 2 Bedroom & PIQUA, 3 Bedroom, Metro accepted (937)214-0699, (937)214-0676

TROY, 2 Bedrooms, appliances, CA, water, trash paid, $535 month. $200 Deposit Special! (937)673-1821

TROY: 2 bedroom, 1.5 bath, NEW everything! SUPER clean! No pets, No prior evictions. $540 (937)545-4513. TROY, Nice 3 bedroom duplex. Appliances, washer/ dryer hook-up. $700 plus deposit. No pets. (937)845-2039 TROY, PIQUA, Clean quiet safe, 1 bedroom, $459 includes water No pets! (937)778-0524 WEST MILTON Townhouse. 2 Bedroom 1.5 bath. $475 monthly, (937)216-4233

320 Houses for Rent

PIQUA, 2935 Delaware Circle, 3 Bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car garage, all appliances, No pets, $880 monthly, 1 year lease, (937)778-0524

PIQUA AREA, Candlewood, 908 Marlboro. 3 bedroom, $750 + deposit. Call (937)778-9303 days, (937)604-5417 evenings. TROY, lease to own, 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath, 2000 sq. ft., newer, excellent west side location, $1050 month plus equity deposit (937)469-5301

330 Office Space

OFFICE SPACE: 320 West Water, Piqua, 2700 sqft, high visibility, ground floor, parking. Reception, 6 offices, conference room. (937)773-3161.

400 - Real Estate For Sale 425 Houses for Sale

TROY, nice home on Forrest Lane, priced for quick sale (937)552-9351

500 - Merchandise

Call for details and income restrictions (937)335-3500

CDL Drivers: $11.50/HR

We are seeking motivated individuals who will be able to provide exceptional customer service to our customers in a variety of marketable areas including the manufacturing, healthcare, transportation, educational and employment staffing industries. The ideal candidate will manage inbound and outbound classified advertising calls by demonstrating expert product knowledge and developing and maintaining relationships with existing clients as well as cultivating new. As an Inside Classified Sales Specialist, you will sell a variety of classified advertising packages including employment, promotions and private party advertising. An established account base is provided and will be expected to be maximized to full potential.

EOE

(937)667-6772

JobSourceOhio.com

545 Firewood/Fuel

FIREWOOD, All hardwood, $150 per cord delivered or $120 you pick up, (937)726-2780.

FIREWOOD, cut, split & seasoned. Good clean, hard wood. $145 per ton D E L I V E R E D . (937)903-2594.

560 Home Furnishings

MATTRESS, premium Natura brand, 8 inch firm latex, Cal. king size, zip off cotton/wool cover, never slept on, excellent condition, paid $1700 new, $700 OBO (937)339-7936 REFRIGERATORS, full size $225, dorm size $80; 8000BTU window air conditioner $150; stove $150; loveseat $55; Sharp microwave $45 (937)451-0151

TABLE AND CHAIRS (4), Kincaid solid cherry, excellent condition, purchased 2011, $600 OBO; (2) bookcase/hutch, Ethan Allen, maple, $50 each (937)552-7473

577 Miscellaneous

CARDIO GLIDE exercise machine, with adjustable resistance, $25 (937)339-7936

CEMETERY PLOTS (2) with vaults, Miami Memorial Park, Garden of Prayer, Covington, Ohio. Asking $1400 (937)667-6406 leave message

COUCH brown plaid, green and ivory. Old library table. 7 cuft Whirlpool chest freezer. Trombone. Trumpet. 5 folding chairs. Christmas tree (6ft and table top), Nordic Track treadmill. (937)295-3072

CRIB, changing table, highchair, cradle, guardrail, pack-n-play, car seat, gate, tub, blankets, clothes, Disney animated phones, baby walker, doll chairs, doorway swing. (937)339-4233 PROJECTION TV, large! System from 72" to 144" for theater room. Comes with screen, used. $550. (419)584-8794

SEATS WITH BACKS, (2) Miami East, can be used in stadium or gym for sale call (937)667-6526 WALKER adult, tub/ shower benches, commode chair, toilet riser, grab bars, canes, entertainment center, 4 bar stools 24" (937)339-4233

800 - Transportation

CEMETERY PLOT, Two person, lawn crypt. Forrest Hill, Garden of Love section. Valued at $6000, $1200 OBO. Must sell. (937)335-9034

1998 CHEVY Malibu, dark green, 179,500 miles. Runs good. (937)418-9274

925 Legal Notices

925 Legal Notices

805 Auto

Public Hearing

Miami Metropolitan Housing Authority Housing Plan

The one-year Housing plans and policies and the five-year goals for the Miami Metropolitan Housing Authority are on file and open to review and comment by interested parties between the hours of 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at the Miami Metropolitan Housing Authority Office (1695 Troy-Sidney Road, Troy, Ohio). The plans did not change from the previous year.

There will be a Public Hearing regarding the plans and policies on August 29, 2012, at 8:00 a.m. at the Authority Office, 1695 Troy-Sidney Road, Troy, Ohio. 8/13, 8/20-2012

2307469

NOTICE OF INTRODUCTION OF ORDINANCE CM-12-23

AN ORDINANCE AMENDING SECTIONS 33.18, 33.19, 33.20, 33.21, AND 33.22 OF CHAPTER 33, TITLED THE ADMINISTRATIVE CODE.

The above Ordinance was introduced to the West Milton Council on July 10, 2012. The public hearing for Ordinance CM-12-23 will be held on August 14, 2012, at 7:30 p.m., at the Municipal Building, in Council Chambers. Copies are on file in the Municipal Office for inspection daily from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Linda L. Cantrell CAP-OM Clerk of Council 8/13/2012

Bids will only be received from parties that have obtained recorded bid sets of drawings and specifications. All bids shall include a BID GUARANTY as a guarantee that the successful bidder will enter into a contract with the City. The BID GUARANTY shall be a certified check, cashierʼs check, or letter of credit in the amount equal to 10% of the bid.

The successful candidate should have familiarity of order entry software. Knowledge of Microsoft Word and Excel is required. Excellent written and verbal communication skills and the ability to multi-task are also required. Inside advertising sales or telemarketing experience is preferred.

No phone calls will be accepted regarding this position.

REFRIGERATOR, Like new Whirlpool 14.4 cu ft top freezer refrigerator. Moving, must sell. $200 (937)638-4815.

577 Miscellaneous

The Bidding Documents, which include specifications may be examined and obtained at the office of Director of Utilities, located within the Tipp City Government Center, 260 S. Garber Drive, Tipp City, OH 45371 and at the consulting Engineerʼs Office of MK Power Solutions, Inc., 1900 Manor Hill Rd., Findlay, OH 45840. Cost for bid packet is $50; checks made payable to MK Power Solutions, Inc.

No BIDDER shall withdraw his Bid within ninety (90) days after actual opening thereof.

myagle@classifiedsthatwork.com

APPLY: 15 Industry Park Ct., Tipp City

510 Appliances

Sealed Bids for furnishing the following electric equipment; 15kV Overhead Vacuum Reclosers, 12.47kV Pad-Mounted Metering Enclosures, and other Various Electric Materials will be received at the Tipp City Government Center, 260 S. Garber Drive, Tipp City, Ohio 45371 until 10:00 a.m. local time on Monday, August 27, 2012, at which time they will be publicly opened and read.

Inside Classified Sales Specialist

If you are looking to experience growth with a local, reputable organization, please send a cover letter, resume and references to:

LABORS: $9.50/HR

877-844-8385 We Accept

NOTICE TO BIDDERS

This position is full time with salary, commission and benefits.

◆◆◆◆◆◆◆ NOW HIRING! ◆◆◆◆◆◆◆◆◆◆◆◆◆

Troy Daily News

2308327

2306981

100 - Announcement

DEADLINES/CORRECTIONS:

The City of Tipp City reserves the right to reject any or all bids, waive any irregularities in the bids, and to accept any bid which is deemed by the City to be in their best interest. Jon Crusey, City Manager 8/13, 8/20-2012

2308103


To Advertise In The Classifieds That Work Call 877-844-8385 805 Auto

DODGE Grand 1999 Caravan. Runs great! New tires and battery. $2000 OBO. ( 9 3 7 ) 2 7 2 - 4 2 7 7 (937)671-9794 2000 OLDSMOBILE Bravada, all power, new brakes, leather seats, sun roof, cold A/C, 6 CD player in console, asking $2975, call (937)332-0856 for info or to see

2001 LINCOLN Town car, excellent condition mechanical and body, 102,000 miles $4500. will consider reasonable offers. call (937)658-2764 anytime!

2003 GMC Envoy LST, 4 WD, 4.2 V6, Loaded, clean, excellent condition, 3rd row seating, seats 7 $7500 negotiable (937)726-1758. 2008 FORD F250 super duty, diesel, air lift, bedliner, new high pressure fuel $17,900 pump, (937) 654-5505

925 Legal Notices

Troy Daily News • Classifieds That Work • Monday, August 13, 2012 • 11

925 Legal Notices

925 Legal Notices

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

925 Legal Notices

925 Legal Notices

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

925 Legal Notices

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

The Miami County Commissioners will hold a public hearing on August 23, 2012, at 1:40 pm in the Commissionerʼs Hearing Room, 201 West Main Street, Safety Building, Troy, Ohio for a zoning map amendment, filed by:

The Miami County Commissioners will hold a public hearing on August 23, 2012, at 1:40 pm in the Commissionerʼs Hearing Room, 201 West Main Street, Safety Building, Troy, Ohio for a zoning map amendment, filed by:

The Miami County Commissioners will hold a public hearing on August 23, 2012, at 1:40 pm in the Commissionerʼs Hearing Room, 201 West Main Street, Safety Building, Troy, Ohio for a zoning map amendment, filed by:

The above application and related information are on file and available for examination between the hours of 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Monday through Friday in the Miami County Department of Development Office, 510 W. Water Street, Suite 120, Troy, Ohio. Should you have any questions, our office can be reached at 4408121.

The above application and related information are on file and available for examination between the hours of 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Monday through Friday in the Miami County Department of Development Office, 510 W. Water Street, Suite 120, Troy, Ohio. Should you have any questions, our office can be reached at 4408121.

The above application and related information are on file and available for examination between the hours of 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Monday through Friday in the Miami County Department of Development Office, 510 W. Water Street, Suite 120, Troy, Ohio. Should you have any questions, our office can be reached at 4408121.

Interpreters for hearing-impaired individuals are available upon request, with sufficient advance notice (usually one week).

Interpreters for hearing-impaired individuals are available upon request, with sufficient advance notice (usually one week).

Jack Thomas, 7230 W. Union-Church Road, Covington, Ohio 45318 as per Amendment #1650-06-12. To: rezone a 3.326 acre tract from A-2, General Agriculture to R-1AAA, Single Family Residential zoning district. For the following tract of land: being a 68.458 acre tract located at 7230 W. Union-Church Road, Covington, Ohio, Section 8, Town 8, Range 5 of Newberry Township.

John W. OʼBrien Miami County Commissioners Leigh Williams, Clerk

8/13/2012 2306843

Jonifer Hobart, 1645 State Route 55, Troy, Ohio 45373 as per Amendment #1649-06-12. To: rezone a 2.547 acre tract from B-1, Highway Business to A-2, General Agriculture zoning district. For the following tract of land: being a 2.547 acre tract located at 1645 State Route 55, Troy, Ohio, Section 11, Town 1, Range 10 of Staunton Township.

Patricia Obara, 3070 Ziegler Road, Piqua, Ohio 45356 as per Amendment #1646-06-12. To: rezone a 2.0 acre tract from A-1, Domestic Agriculture to R-1AAA, Single Family Residential zoning district. For the following tract of land: being a 7.968 acre tract located at 3070 Ziegler Road, Piqua, Ohio, Section 12, Town 8, Range 5 of Washington Township.

John W. OʼBrien Miami County Commissioners Leigh Williams, Clerk

John W. OʼBrien Miami County Commissioners Leigh Williams, Clerk

Interpreters for hearing-impaired individuals are available upon request, with sufficient advance notice (usually one week).

8/13/2012

8/13/2012

2306838

2306842

Service&Business DIRECTORY

To advertise in the Classifieds That Work Service & Business Directory please call: 877-844-8385 660 Home Services

660 Home Services

BEWARE OF STORM CHASERS!!!

HERITAGE GOODHEW

Affordable Roofing & Home Improvements

Painting - Interior - Exterior Pressure Washing Homes and Decks Cleaning Gutters Commercial, Industrial, Residential

ALL YOUR ROOFING NEEDS: Seamless Gutters • Re-roofs • Siding• Tear Offs New Construction • Call for your FREE estimate

FULLY INSURED FREE ESTIMATES

• Metal Roofing • Sales & Service • Standing Seam Snap Lock Panels

BILL’S HOME REMODELING & REPAIR

classifieds

Pole Barns-

Need new kitchen cabinets, new bathroom fixtures, basement turned into a rec room? Give me a call for any of your home remodeling & repair needs, even if it’s just hanging some curtains or blinds. Call Bill Niswonger

Erected Prices:

2307262

•30x40x12 with 2 doors, $9,900 •40x64x14 with 2 doors, $16,000 ANY SIZE AVAILABLE!

Any type of Construction: Roofing, remodeling, siding, add-ons, interior remodeling and cabintets, re-do old barns, new home construction, etc.

that work .com

2292710

(419) 203-9409

625 Construction

335-6321

Small #Basements #Siding #Doors #Barns

660 Home Services

Residential Commercial New Construction Bonded & Insured

We Care!

Call Richard FREE Alexander ESTIMATES 937-623-5704

Bankruptcy Attorney Emily M. Greer, Esq.

2303721

WE KILL BED BUGS!

Concentration on Chapter 7 Bankruptcy Law for over 15 years

KNOCKDOWN SERVICES

Free Consultation ~ Affordable Rates

starting at $

(937)778-8093

• Mowing • Edging • Trimming Bushes • Mulching • Hauling • Brush Removal • BobCat Work • Storm Damage Cleanup

in

2301473

I am a debt relief agency. I help people file for bankruptcy relief under the United States Bankruptcy Code. 2288138

Berry Roofing Service

645 Hauling

COOPER’S GRAVEL

MINIMUM CHARGES APPLY

655 Home Repair & Remodel

Total Home Improvement Baths

Windows Painting Drywall Roofing Flooring

2300430

937-339-6646

• Roofing • Windows • Kitchens • Sunrooms

• Spouting • Metal Roofing • Siding • Doors

Free Inspections

that work .com

Richard Pierce

Gutter & Service

Call today for FREE estimate Fully Insured Repairs • Cleaning • Gutter Guard

2306850

2301551

All signs lead to you finding or selling what you want...

665 Lawn, Garden, Landscaping

Providing Quality Service Since 1989 • Professional Tree Planting • Professional Tree Injection • Tree Removal • Stump Removal • Dead Wooding • Snow Removal • Tree Cabling • Landscaping • Shrubs • Mulching • Hauling • Land Clearing • Roofing Specialist

FREE ESTIMATES

Roofing • Drywall • Painting Plumbing • Remodels • Flooring

GLYNN FELTNER, OWNER • LICENSED • BONDED • FULLY INSURED

Cell: 937-308-6334 • Office: 937-719-3237

Eric Jones, Owner

by using that work .com

Don’t delay... call TODAY!

Insurance jobs welcome • FREE Estimates

670 Miscellaneous

715 Blacktop/Cement

TERRY’S

2306822

For your home improvement needs

•Refrigerators •Stoves •Washers & Dryers •Dishwashers • Repair & Install Air Conditioning

Residential Commercial Industrial

Stone

TICON PAVING

$10 OFF Service Call until August 31, 2012 with this coupon

937-773-4552

FREE ESTIMATES

that work .com 2304757

• Painting • Drywall • Decks • Carpentry • Home Repair • Kitchen/Bath

937-974-0987

715 Blacktop/Cement

APPLIANCE REPAIR

937.492.8003 • 937.726.2868

Continental Contractors

419.501.2323 or 888.313.9990

Place an ad in the Service Directory

New or Existing Install - Grade Compact

Free Estimates

Asphalt

Piqua, Ohio 937-773-0637

Install - Repair Replace - Crack Fill Seal Coat

FREE Estimates Bonded & Insured

937-489-8558

Personal • Comfort ~ Flexible Hourly Care ~ ~ Respite Care for Families ~

YEAR ROUND TREE WORK

660 Home Services

Licensed Bonded-Insured

that work .com

Senior Homecare

TREE & LAWN CARE & ROOFING & SIDING SPECIALIST

aandehomeservicesllc.com

Appliances, Brush, Rental Clean-outs, Furniture & Tires

725 Eldercare

A-1 Affordable

STORM DAMAGE?

We haul it all!

1002 N. Main St. Sidney, Ohio 45365

937-875-0153 937-698-6135

www.visitingangels.com/midwestohio

• Baths • Awnings • Concrete • Additions

CALL TODAY FOR FREE ESTIMATE

Roofing and siding, mention this ad and get 10% off your storm damage claim.

BIG jobs, SMALL jobs

DC SEAMLESS

1-937-492-8897

937-573-4702

A simple, affordable, solution to all your home needs.

10 Year Warranty on Labor FREE Estimates

335-9508

that work .com

www.buckeyehomeservices.com

A&E Home Services LLC

2300346

2300298

New Roofs Repairs Re-roofs Tear-offs Chimney Flashing

875-0153 698-6135

710 Roofing/Gutters/Siding

FIND & SEEK

PAVING, REPAIR & SEALCOATING DRIVEWAYS PARKING LOTS

00

332-1992

“All Our Patients Die”

COOPER’S BLACKTOP

LICENSED • INSURED

TOTAL HOME REMODELING Call Jim at 937-694-2454

GET THE WORD OUT!

For 75 Years

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715 Blacktop/Cement

• Interior/Exterior • Drywall • Texturing • Kitchens • Baths • Decks • Doors • Windows

660 Home Services

(See Us For Do-It-Yourself Products)

Call to find out what your options are today!

2306536

Residential/Commercial Licensed & Insured

937-418-8027 937-606-0202

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Floors Siding Decks Doors Additions

(937) 232-7816 (260) 273-6223

Serving the Miami Valley for 27 YEARS Driveways, Sidewalks, Patios, Steps, Curbs and Slabs

or (937) 238-HOME Free Estimates • Fully Insured • 17 Years of Home Excellence

Kitchens

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Sullenberger Pest Control

2300260

2306758

(937) 339-1902

Gravel Hauled, Laid & Leveled Driveways & Parking Lots

ANY TYPE OF REMODELING

Smitty’s Lawn Care

665 Lawn, Garden, Landscaping

Alexander's Concrete

Ask about our Friends & Neighbors discounts

640 Financial

AMISH CREW

Wants roofing, siding, windows, doors, repair old floors, just foundation porches, decks, garages, room additions.

Sparkle Clean

Tammy Welty (937)857-4222

J.T.’s Painting & Drywall

765-857-2623 765-509-0069

20 YEARS IN BUSINESS

Free Estimates / Insured

2306108

#Repairs Large and #Room Additions #Kitchens/Baths #Windows #Garages

25 Year Experience - Licensed & Bonded Wind & Hail Damage - Insurance Approved

Amos Schwartz Construction

Cleaning Service

2298234

(937) 418-7361 • (937) 773-1213

2302727

Amish Crew

everybody’s talking about what’s in our

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2302172

(937) 473-2847 Pat Kaiser (937) 216-9332

937-335-6080

“WE REPAIR METAL ROOFS”

CALL RICK

2277916

All Types of Interior/Exterior Construction & Maintenance

2302255

2304750

Roofing, Windows, Siding, Fire & Water Restoration

2298425

• New Roof & Roof Repair • Painting • Concrete • Hauling • Demo Work • New Rubber Roofs

2305160

937-492-ROOF

Commercial / Residential

2287210

AK Construction

2263290

MAKE YOUR HOME LOOK NEW AGAIN

Shop Locally

625 Construction

710 Roofing/Gutters/Siding

700 Painting

2306877

655 Home Repair & Remodel

2304657

655 Home Repair & Remodel

2307608

600 - Services

2299164

675 Pet Care

Email: UncleAlyen@aol.com

Roofing • Siding • Windows Voted #1 in Shelby County by Sidney Daily News Readers

937-492-5150

2302217

FREE ES AT T ES IM

To Advertise In the Classifieds that Work

2300295

Gutters • Doors • Remodel

Call 877-844-8385

Amy E. Walker, D.V.M. 937-418-5992 Mobile Veterinary Service Treating Dogs, Cats & Exotics

Classifieds that work


12 • Troy Daily News • Classifieds That Work • Monday, August 13, 2012 925 Legal Notices

925 Legal Notices

925 Legal Notices

SPECIAL NOTICE

To Advertise In The Classifieds That Work Call 877-844-8385

925 Legal Notices

805 Auto

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BY TROY CITY COUNCIL ON PROPOSED ZONING CHANGE INLOT 10353 LOCATED AT 722 GRANT STREET

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Charter of the Municipality of Tipp City, Ohio, that the following legislation was adopted by the City Council of the Municipality of Tipp City, Ohio on August 6, 2012. The full texts of the following legislation is on file in the Government Center, 260 South Garber Drive, Tipp City, Ohio.

On Monday, September 17, 2012, at 7:00 p.m. in Council Chambers, City Hall (100 S. Market Street), Troy City Council will hold a public hearing on the proposed rezoning of Inlot 10353, which is the address of 722 Grant Street, from the current zoning of M-2, Light Industrial District, to OC-1, Office-Commercial District. Inlot 10353 is owned by Grant Street Enterprises LLC. The applicant for the rezoning is Stephen J. Kalmar. This proposed rezoning has been recommended for approval by the Troy Planning Commission.

Resolution 43-12 By: Mayor Gillis A resolution declaring the intent and resolve of the City Council of Tipp City, Ohio to enact uniform provisions in the City of Tipp City Tax Ordinances upon revision of Chapter 718 of the Ohio Revised Code and declaring an emergency.

Sue G. Knight Clerk of the Council of the City of Troy, Ohio

Resolution 44-12 By: President Kessler A resolution authorizing the City Manager to enter into an agreement with EMH&T for the Water Master Plan in the amount of $36,510.

1997 FORD COACHMAN CATALINA RV 460 gas engine, slideout, 34 feet, dual air, generator, 26K original miles, newer tires. Asking $22,000. (937)773-9526

2004 HONDA Accord LX, one owner, very nice, approx 94,800k, 4 cyl., auto, great gas mileage, PW, PL, power mirrors, keyless entry, Michelin tires, ABS brakes, black, $9675 (937) 216-0453

2003 BUICK CENTURY

Cloth interior, good gas mileage, new tires, A/C, only 92,000 miles, asking $5200.

830 Boats/Motor/Equipment

2007 BASS Tracker Pro Team 170TX, powered by 2007 50hp Mercury, Trail Star trailer, Custom cover, superb condition $9100 (937)394-8531

Call (937)684-0555

8-13-2012 2307862

835 Campers/Motor Homes

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

Resolution 45-12 By: Mr. Hale A resolution authorizing the City Manager to enter into an agreement with Arcadis US, Inc. for the Sanitary Sewer Master Plan in the amount of $59,000.

The Miami County Commissioners will hold a public hearing on August 23, 2012, at 1:40 pm in the Commissionerʼs Hearing Room, 201 West Main Street, Safety Building, Troy, Ohio for a zoning map amendment, filed by:

Resolution 46-12 By: Mr. Gibson A resolution authorizing the City Manager to enter into an agreement with Korda/Nemeth Engineering, Inc. for the water and sanitary sewer projects in the amount of $72,850.

Up North Homes INC, 5246 County Road 25-A, Tipp City, OH 45371 as per Amendment #1647-06-12. To: rezone a 2.1 acre tract from A-2, General Agriculture to R-1AAA, Single Family Residential zoning district. For the following tract of land: being a 17.658 acre tract located along Evanston Road, Parcel ID# G12-045560, Tipp City, Ohio, Section 29, Town 4, Range 6 of Monroe Township.

Resolution 47-12 By: Mr. McDermott A resolution authorizing the City Manager to enter into an agreement with Choice One Engineering Corporation for the engineering design for the W. Dow Street Reconstruction project in the amount of $45,230.

The above application and related information are on file and available for examination between the hours of 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Monday through Friday in the Miami County Department of Development Office, 510 W. Water Street, Suite 120, Troy, Ohio. Should you have any questions, our office can be reached at 440-8121.

Resolution 48-12 By: President Kessler A resolution authorizing the City Manager to enter into an agreement with Choice One Engineering Corporation for the engineering design of the Westedge Avenue Waterline Replacement Project in the amount of $32,880.

John W. OʼBrien Miami County Commissioners Leigh Williams, Clerk

Interpreters for hearing-impaired individuals are available upon request, with sufficient advance notice (usually one week).

Resolution 49-12 By: Mr. Gibson A resolution authorizing the purchase of road deicing salt from North American Salt Company of Overland Park, Kansas at a rate of $65.44 per ton dumped or $68.44 per ton using a piler for an amount up to 800 tons.

8/13/2012

2306845

Dated at Tipp City, Miami County, Ohio this 7th day of August, 2012.

2000 COACHMAN CATALINA 27 FOOTER Awning 1yr old, refrigerator 2yrs old, everything comes with camper: Hitch, Tote tank, Patio lights, 3 sets of shades, VERY CLEAN!, $7000, (937)596-6028 OR (937)726-1732

1996 TERRY fifth wheel, 32.5' camping trailer, 2 slides, nice clean! Comes with 8x8 shed, woodbox, picnic bench and other miscellaneous, Cozy Campground, Grand Lake but can be moved, (937)773-6209, (937)418-2504.

2008 FORD EXPLORER XLT 4 wheel drive. Leather, back-up system. Exceptional mechanical condition. 123,000 highway miles. $8500. (937)726-3333

850 Motorcycles/Mopeds

1999 KAWASAKI Vulcan 800A, Not to big. Not too small - Just right! Perfect condition, $2500, (937)394-7364, (937)658-0392

2002 DODGE 3500

1 ton dually, regular cab, 5 5.9 liter engine, speed, 5th wheel trailer hitch, extra clean, white, stainless steel simulators, 122,000 miles $7500. Call (937)684-0555

2005 HONDA ST1300. Loaded with acessories. 27,600 loving miles. Excellent condition. $8900. (937)405-6051

aMAZEing finds in

880 SUV’s

2006 HONDA Element Exp, 39,000 miles Automatic, 4x4, Metallic orange exterior, gray/ black interior, fog lights, 4 cylinder, very good condition, $15,995, (937)778-8671 or (937)570-8101

that work .com

To Advertise In the Classifieds that Work

Janice Bates Clerk of Council

Call 877-844-8385

8/13/2012

2307473

that work .com

MIAMI VALLEY

In The Market For A New Or Used Vehicle?

AUTO DEALER D

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Visit One Of These Area New Or Pre-Owned Auto Dealers Today!

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INFINITI

4

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Infiniti of Dayton

Chrysler Jeep Dodge

Chrysler Dodge Jeep

7124 Poe Ave. Exit 59 off I-75 Dayton, Ohio

8645 N. Co. Rd. 25-A Piqua, Ohio 45356 I-75 North to Exit 83

2775 S. County Rd 25-A Exit 69 off I-75 N. Troy, OH 45373

937-890-6200

1-800-678-4188

www.evansmotorworks.com

www.paulsherry.com

CHEVROLET 1

8675 N. Co. Rd. 25-A Piqua, Ohio 45356 I-75 North to Exit 83

800-947-1413

217 N. Broad St. Fairborn, OH 45324

937-878-2171 www.wagner.subaru.com

PRE-OWNED

VOLKWAGEN

5

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575 Arlington Rd. Brookville, OH 45309

JEEP 4

9

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866-504-0972

937-335-5696

FORD

SUBARU 11

Remember...Customer pick-up and delivery with FREE loaner. www.infinitiofdayton.com

www.erwinchrysler.com

CREDIT RE-ESTABLISHMENT

Chevrolet

Ford Lincoln 2343 W. Michigan Ave. Sidney, Ohio 45365

Chrysler Dodge Jeep 2775 S. County Rd 25-A Exit 69 off I-75 N. Troy, OH 45373

Auto Sales 1280 South Market St. (CR 25A) Troy, OH 45373

Evans Volkswagen 7124 Poe Ave. Exit 59 off I-75. Dayton, OH

1-800-866-3995

866-470-9610

937-335-5696

www.boosechevrolet.com

(866)816-7555 or (937)335-4878

www.carncredit.com

www.buckeyeford.com

www.erwinchrysler.com

www.independentautosales.com

www.evansmotorworks.com

CHRYSLER

CREDIT RE-ESTABLISHMENT

FORD

LINCOLN

PRE-OWNED

VOLVO

7

4

Quick Chrysler Credit Dodge Jeep Auto Sales 2775 S. County Rd 25-A Exit 69 off I-75 N. Troy, OH 45373

1099 N. Co. Rd. 25-A Troy, Ohio 45373

937-335-5696

937-339-6000

www.erwinchrysler.com

www.QuickCreditOhio.com

12

9

8

ERWIN

2302806

DODGE

CHRYSLER

Jim Taylor’s Troy Ford Exit 69 Off I-75 Troy, OH 45373

Ford Lincoln

339-2687

2343 W. Michigan Ave. Sidney, Ohio 45365

www.troyford.com www.fordaccessories.com

866-470-9610 www.buckeyeford.com

937-890-6200

6

One Stop Volvo of Auto Sales Dayton 8750 N. Co. Rd. 25A Piqua, OH 45356

937-606-2400 www.1stopautonow.com

7124 Poe Ave. Exit 59 off I-75 Dayton, Ohio

937-890-6200 www.evansmotorworks.com


NIE

TROY DAILY NEWS • WWW.TROYDAILYNEWS.COM

Monday, August 13, 2012

A13

Newspapers In Education Visit NIE online at www.sidneydailynews.com, www.troydailynews.com or www.dailycall.com

NIE Coordinator: Dana Wolfe / Graphic Designer: Scarlett E. Smith

any animals live in the ocean. The most common are fish. Fish live in the water their whole lives. They have fins to swim and gills to breathe under water. Fish come in all shapes and sizes. Some are flat, and some can blow themselves up like balloons.

Fish come in all colors, too. The variety of fish that live in the ocean make it one of the most interesting places on Earth. • Color the fish on this page. Remember that fish have stripes, circles, and all the colors of the rainbow. Use your imagination!

Many people like to catch fish for sport. Others like to keep fish as pets. • Look up “fish” in an encyclopedia to see the many types of fish that live in the ocean. If you could pick one for a pet, which one would it be? Draw your pet fish in the fish bowl below. Then cut and paste letters from the newspaper to spell your pet fish’s name.

Fish are very important to human beings. They provide food for us to eat. Plus, big fish eat little fish, and little fish eat plants. This is called a food chain, and it helps keep nature in balance. • The four parts of this sea-food chain are pictured below. Number the panels in the correct order from one to four.

Now, look through your newspaper’s grocery and restaurant ads and cut out pictures of the types of fish people eat. Make a seafood collage.

My fish’s name is

Sell us your Gold and Diamonds!

2343 W Main St, Troy when you bring in this ad! bonnie@harrisjeweler.com

Earn 10% more

The Newest Place to Hang Out! Monday - Trivia Wednesday - Whiskey Wednesday, Ladies Night, & karaoke Thursday - Bike Night/Live Music

Miami Soil & Water Conservation District 1330 N.Cty Rd. 25A; Ste C; Troy, Ohio 45373 335-7645 or 335-7666 Fax 335-7465 www.miamiswcd.org Piqua: N. Wayne St. Covington Ave E. Ash St.-Wal-Mart

615-1042 778-4617 773-9000

Troy: W. Main St. W. Main St.-Wal-Mart

339-6626 332-6820

Tipp City: W. Main St

UnityNationalBk.com

667-4888 MEMBER FDIC

Local Leaders, Local Lenders

625 Olympic Dr. Troy, Ohio 45373

Friday - Live Music Saturday - Live Music Sunday - Blues jam

RANDY HARVEY Lawncare Manager

(937) 335-6418 (Ohio) 1-800-237-5296 Fax (937) 339-7952

STOP SMOKING in just ONE sesson! Before your session learn about hypnosis: • How it lowers stress • How hypnosis is 100% safe • How you are always in control • How you feel under hypnosis • Weight Control included in session! • www.miamivalleyhypnosis.com

Present this coupon for

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MIAMI VALLEY HYPNOSIS 332-8700

937-335-0055

"Your Diamond Jeweler Since 1946"

2331 W. Market St., Troy 937.339.4800 Visit us online to learn more.

Present this ad and receive 10% www.thefillingstationsportsbar.com OFF your bill! A Division of Dayton Outpatient Center

The North Central Ohio Solid Waste District "Promoting Greater Participation in Recycling"

www.ncowaste.org

Call (937) 339-2911 or visit www.hobartarena.com

MIAMI COUNTY SANITARY ENGINEERING DEPT. WATER-WASTEWATER SOLID WASTE

937-440-5653 Fax 937-335-4208 N. Co. Rd 25A, Troy, OH 45373-1342

Answers — Ronald Wants To Know: fair, rides, animals, tickets, barns, ice cream

________________________________


A14

NIE

Monday, August 13, 2012

TROY DAILY NEWS • WWW.TDN-NET.COM

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Word of the Week fair — A fair (archaic: fayre) is a gathering of people to display or trade produce or other goods, to parade or display animals and often to enjoy associated carnival or funfair entertainment. It is normally of the essence of a fair that it is temporary; some last only an afternoon while others may last as long as ten weeks. Activities at fairs vary widely. Some trade fairs are important regular business events where either products are traded between businesspeople, as at the Frankfurt Book Fair, where publishers sell book rights in other markets to other publishers, or where products are showcased to largely consumer attendees, as for example in agricultural districts where they present opportunities to display and demonstrate the latest machinery on the market to farmers. Fairs are also known by many different names around the world, such as agricultural show, fête, county fair, exhibition or state fair, festival, market and show. Flea markets and auto shows are sometimes incorporated into a fair.

Fair Fun Facts Carnivals consist of games, rides, shows, feasting, and overall merriment, which developed from the traditional outdoor festivals of Europe in honor of seasonal changes or religious holidays that date back hundreds of years ago. Fairs are large theme based events held to promote and present agricultural, commercial, industrial, and artistic exhibits to fairgoers while also providing the fun and amusement of carnivals. The traveling carnival began in America in the late 1800’s as a result of improved transportation and technology. A famous American carnival is the Mardi Gras, which is held in late winter in New Orleans, Louisiana. It was introduced to America on March 3, 1699 by French explorer, Iberville.

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All about the fair!

Page sponsored by Miami County Recycling

The fair is an ancient tradition, and many communities have long had dedicated fairgrounds; others hold them in a variety of public places, including streets and town squares, or even in large private gardens. Fairs are often held in conjunction with a significant event, such as the anniversary of a local historical event, a seasonal event such as harvest time, or with a holiday such as Christmas. In Roman times, fairs were holidays on which there was an intermission of labor and pleadings. In the Middle Ages many fairs developed as temporary markets, and were especially important for long-distance and international trade, as wholesale traders traveled, sometimes for many days, for pre-arranged fairs where they could be sure to meet those they needed to buy from or sell to. They were usually tied to a special Christian religious occasion (particularly the anniversary dedication of a church). Tradesmen would bring and sell their wares, even in the churchyards. Such fairs might then continue annually, usually on the feast day of the patron saint to whom the church was dedicated. This custom was kept up until the reign of Henry VI, by which time there were a great many fairs kept on these patronal festivals, The Horse Exhibit Hall at The Great for example at Westminster on St. Peter's day, at Pennsylvania, in the early 1900s. Smithfield on St. Bartholomew's (the famous Bartholomew Fair, celebrated The first annual fair in the The Ferris wheel was inventin Ben Jonson's play of the American colonies was held ed by George W. Ferris for same name) and at Durham on in 1641 in New Amsterdam the 1893 World’s Fair, which St. Cuthbert's day. The Kumbh (now New York City) to was held in Chicago to comMela, held every 12 years, at showcase farm products of memorate the 400th anniverAllahabad, Haridwar, Nashik the local area. sary of Columbus’s landing and Ujjain is one of the largest in America. fairs in India, where more than The USA’s first state fair was 60 million people gathered in held in Syracuse, New York The first time that fairgoers in September of 1841. ate hot dogs and ice cream January 2001, making it the as they walked along the largest gathering anywhere in midway was during the Saint the world. In the United States, The first World’s Fair was held in 1851 in England at Louis World’s Fair in 1904, fairs draw in as many as 150 London’s Crystal Palace. thus coining these two foods million people each summer. The fair exhibited American as the world’s first “fast One example of the American machinery of the Industrial foods”. county fair being featured in a Revolution. famous piece of literature is in What we call “Cotton Candy” E. B. White's Charlotte's Web. The Eiffel Tower was built by was originally called “Fairy Children's competitions at an Gustave Eiffel for the Paris Floss” and was invented in American fair range from World’s Fair of 1889, which 1897 by candy makers honored the 100th anniverWilliam Morris and John C. breeding small animals to Wharton of Nashville, robotics, while the organization sary of the French Revolution. Tennessee. It was introduced 4-H has become a traditional association.

Allentown Fair, Allentown,

at the St. Louis World’s Fair in 1904. It has also been called “Spun Sugar” and in the United Kingdom it is called “Candy Floss.” The Midway is the main path or street that fairgoers walk along to find sideshows, concession stands, and other amusements. Games you play at a fair or carnival also go by the slang name, “joints.” Midnight Madness is when the fair stays open past midnight and into the early morning hours.

See if you can find and circle the words listed. They are hidden in the puzzle vertically, horizontally, and diagonally — some are even spelled backwards.

Hey Kids! Remember not to litter at the fair! There will be trash cans everywhere. Let’s see if we can fill them up! The Green Gals will be at the Miami County Fair this year on Monday from 12:00-1:00 pm and Tuesday from 5:00-6:00 pm in the conservation barn. We would love to meet you, and like always we will have fun things to do! Wednesday is Kids’ Day at the Miami County Fair starting at 10:00 am. See you there!

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Monday, August 13, 2012

2012 Miami County

At the Fair Monday Aug. 13: Sponsored by ConAgra 8:30 a.m. Junior Fair Western Horse Show — Horse Arena 9 a.m. Junior Fair Market Lamb Show followed by Junior Fair Sheep Breeding Show — Sheep Arena Junior Fair Swine Showmanship Swine Arena Junior Fair Market Rabbit Show — Immediately followed by Junior Fair Market Rabbit Pen of Three — Immediately followed by Junior Fair Rabbit Breeding — Immediately followed by Junior Fair Rabbit Showmanship — Rabbit/Poultry Barn 10 a.m. Duke Lundgard Bldg. opens FFA Shop/Crop opens Art Hall opens Horticulture Hall opens Merchants Bldg. opens Vendor Displays opens 12 p.m. Specialty Desserts Premiums available — Secretary’s Office 12-4 p.m. Antique Appraisal — Entertainment Tent 2-7 p.m. Election of Fair Board Directors — Secretary’s Office 2:30 p.m. 4-H Cloverbud Fun Time — Duke Lundgard Bldg. 3 p.m. Miami County Hog Fun Day (approx.) — West of horse barn #9 Rides/Games Open - $15 bracelets good all day and night 4 p.m. Junior Fair Dairy Steer Show followed by Junior Fair Beef Feeder Calf Show — followed by Miami County Born and Raised Feeder Calf Show — Goat Barn 6:30 p.m. Harness Racing — Grandstand, Free Art on the Spot — Art Hall 7 p.m. Junior Fair Market Steer/Heifer Show — Goat Barn Junior Fair Beef Feeder Calf dismissed at conclusion of Market Steer/Heifer Show Girl Scouts Award Ceremony — Duke Lundgard Bldg. Melody Men — Entertainment Tent 7:30 p.m. Freestyle Riding Horse Show — Horse Arena 10 p.m. Duke Lundgard closes FFA Shop/Crop closes Art Hall closes Horticulture Hall closes Merchants Bldg. closes Vendor Displays closes 11 p.m. Rides, Games and Concessions closes • Tuesday, Aug. 14 7:30-10:15 a.m. Flower Show Entries Accepted — Horticulture Bldg. 8:30 a.m. Junior Fair Single Run Horse Show — Horse Arena 9 a.m. Miami County Born & Raised Market Lamb Show followed by Junior Fair Sheep Showmanship followed by Adult and Kiddie Showmanship — Sheep Arena 10 a.m. Duke Lundgard Bldg. opens FFA Shop/Crop opens Art Hall opens Horticulture Hall opens Merchants Bldg. opens Vendor Displays opens 10:30 a.m. Junior Fair Dairy Show followed by Open Class Dairy Show followed by Junior Fair Dairy Showmanship followed by Future Showman Show — Goat Barn — Milking Cows dismissed after Future Showman Show Flower Show Judging — Horticulture Bldg. 12 p.m. Junior Fair Barrow Show — Swine Arena Voting for People’s Choice award ends — Art Hall 2:30 p.m. 4-H Cloverbud Fun Time — Duke Lundgard Bldg. 3 p.m. Rides/Games Open — $15 bracelets good all day and night 6:30 p.m. Harness Racing — Grandstand, Free 7 p.m. Rock Island Plow Co. — Entertainment Tent 10 p.m. Duke Lundgard Bldg. closes FFA Shop/Crop closes Art Hall closes Horticulture Hall closes Merchants Bldg. closes Vendor Displays closes 11 p.m. Rides, Games and Concessions closes • Wednesday, Aug. 15 — Sponsored by Upper Valley Medical Center Kids Day — 1 Parent FREE per Child under age 10 until 1 p.m. Armed Forces Day — Veterans and spouse FREE with proper I.D. Senior Citizens Day — 65 years old and over FREE 8 a.m. Registration for Junior Fair General Livestock Judging Contest — Sheep Arena 8:30 a.m. Junior Fair Livestock

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Fair

B1 www.troydailynews.com

Keeping their eyes on the stake Horseshoe pitchers compete at the fair BY NATALIE KNOTH Staff Writer nknoth@tdnpublishing.com roy Horseshoe Club President Tom Kirk, 71, saw his first horseshoe pitching tournament at the Miami County Fair in 1983, and he knew he had to be a part of it. “We used to pitch at home, and I’d come out and watch the pitchers at the fair, just like this,” Kirk said Sunday afternoon, gesturing to three courts set up with two players each. Five games were played Sunday beginning at 4 p.m. and were slated to last until about 7. When Kirk joined the club almost 30 years ago, the Casstown resident said the Troy Horseshoe Club was significantly larger, with 40 pitchers instead of today’s 12. The fair tournament, comprised of four different rounds, attracted about 50 people from the area. “It’s a dwindling sport, but a lot of older people pick it up,” Kirk said. “Younger people, not really, though.” A few people from the 1978 founding team still participate. The league meets Tuesday nights to compete, and most practice one other day, either in their yards or at the fairgrounds. “I like the camaraderie with the guys and the competition — that’s what’s fun,” Kirk said. According to the National Horseshoe Pitchers Association, the sport can be varied in a number of ways, depending on the method of play (cancellation or count-all), the number of shoes and the number of points that must be garnered to win. Troy Horseshoe Club member Dave Shellhaas played in a round over the weekend and admitted that he was slightly disappointed with his two-win, three-loss record.

T

STAFF PHOTO/ANTHONY WEBER

Rodger Niday of Piqua throws against Leon Impson of Fairborn (not pictured) during a Horse Pitching Tournament Sunday at the Miami County Fair. While helping to keep score Sunday afternoon, he commented that horseshoe pitching can be played in several ways. “It varies a lot of times — we have a 50-shot limit. Now it’s the first one to 40 points,” said Shellhaas. In one method of playing, scoring a “ringer” — a horseshoe on the stake — is worth three points, while a closed shoe within a certain distance — typically five inches — earns

one point. Pitchers keep a measuring instrument with them to keep track. For some tournaments, a handicap is added to level the playing field. “It’s just like golf, ” Kirk said. “Better pitchers get a lower number added and notas-good pitchers get a higher number,” he said. The fair tournament was divided into four classes, as determined by the National

Horseshoe Pitchers Association. Class A, comprised of the best pitchers, will compete at 4 p.m. Tuesday to round out the tournament. “There are two pitchers in that class that average 70 percent — that’s seven out of 10 ringers,” Kirk explained, referring to Loren Coy of St. Mary’s and Ralph Adrian of Xenia. For more information on the sport, visit horseshoepitching.com.

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No snow required:

Christmas tree decorating contest adds holiday spirit to county fair

their cowboy theme decor. Yingst has participated in the contest every year, save the first, with last year’s pirate theme earning her fourth place. Creativity was the name of “This is the most we’ve ever the game at the fifth Christmas had,” said fair director Paula tree decorating contest held Wheaton, with assistant Cindy inside the Merchants building at Park, who were also joined by the Miami County fair. returning judge Catherine Along with thinking well outBlackwood of Columbus and newside the box for the off-season comer Karen Maxson of decor, the two-person teams had Englewood. a bit more competition this year A big draw for the judges this compared to last with seven trees year was handmade ornaments. total, making for 14 individuals They also look for even distribuwho had one hour to decorate. tion of ornaments, color and Those decorations included especially teamwork. numerous handmade ornaments, “It’s fun, and I really like it traditional to primitive colors and the effort they put into it,” and design, Buckeye inspired said Blackwood, who has not only pieces, snowmen, cowboy themes STAFF PHOTO/BETHANY ROYER and the movies. “Button Up,” decorated by Carol Battson and Denise Burkett, took judged trees every year at the Miami County fair but also at Tree toppers were everything first place in the Christ tree decorating contest. the state fair. She emphasized it from a traditional cross to a popcorn tub full of goodies, an overbuckeyes. The team was made up gets harder each year, both “Christmas at the Movies” was judges taking their time with sized button, an Ohio State of Piqua Manor staff members, inspired by a family tradition of each tree, meticulously taking University logo Santa hat, and appropriately dressed OSU mother-daughter teammates notes, even touching ornaments Frosty’s top hat, a primitive star Sarah and Dean Schneider, the fans, Tammy Niesely of and a festive cactus. Skirts like- family going to the movies to Covington and Carol Bordelon of or stepping back to get a good view so as to see what catches wise were homemade, traditional watch a Christmas-related film Piqua. their eyes. and unique to the tree’s general Their OSU fan’s dream come the day after Thanksgiving. This year, it was teamwork layout. This was their fifth year com- true tree was originally created that won out in the end. Tree team number one, decopeting at the fair contest, having at the Manor as part of their “Because they worked rated by the residents of Piqua annual tree decorating contest. won three out of four previous Manor, consisted of approximate- competitions. Team five were also first time extremely well together,” said Blackwood of tree team number ly 300 handmade ornaments for competitors, with Annette Mote Team three was first-time three receiving first place at this the theme “A Twirly-kind of and Marcia Shuman, both of competitors Carol Battson and Christmas.” Staff members Kim Denise Burkett, both of Tipp City, Piqua, and their snowmen-relat- year’s event. Not only were they awarded for their homemade decFair and Cathy Abbott joined res- who also used homemade ornaed theme, followed by the mothorations, but their spirit that idents Nancy McClurg, Nellie ments made by their Tipp City 4- er-son duo Logan and Brenda even went so far to sacrifice some Hammons, Joyce Brown, and vol- H group to decorate their “Button Eshelman of Covington as team up” theme tree. While team four’s six with a primitive tree theme. of their supplies by donating a unteers Harry Neller, Liz Brunson and Lance Reaves in the tree theme was obvious from the And team seven the collaborative strand of lights to another team. start with Ohio State University effort of Amanda Yingst and “This one shared,” said decorating. eye-popping red decorations and Kayla Ward, of Fletcher, with The second tree theme of Blackwood. BY BETHANY J. ROYER Staff writer broyer@dailycall.com


B2

2012 MIAMI COUNTY FAIR

Monday, August 13, 2012

TROY DAILY NEWS • WWW.TDN-NET.COM

MIAMI COUNTY FAIR RESULTS Art Hall - Dept. 100 Davis, Jim Piqua 1 01 People or Person Amateur Photography Adult Koerner, Marrissa Piqua 2 01 - People or Person Amateur Photography Adult Hanning, Kayla Piqua 3 01 - People or Person Amateur Photography Adult Hanning, Kayla Piqua 1 02 - Places or Landscapes Amateur Photography Adult Ankeney, Tim Xenia 2 02 - Places or Landscapes Amateur Photography Adult Kaplan, Steve Troy 3 02 - Places or Landscapes Amateur Photography Adult Meiners, Donald Cincinnati 3 02 - Places or Landscapes Amateur Photography Adult Ankeney, Tim Xenia 1 03 - Architecture Amateur Photography Adult Hedges, Barb x Tipp City 2 03 - Architecture Amateur Photography Adult Kaplan, Steve Troy 2 03 - Architecture Amateur Photography Adult Koerner, Marrissa Piqua 3 03 - Architecture Amateur Photography Adult Carsey, Casandra Troy 1 04 - Domestic Animals Amateur Photography Adult Brown, Brittini Piqua 2 04 - Domestic Animals Amateur Photography Adult Sorauf, Ed Troy 1 05 - Wildlife Amateur Photography Adult Davis, Jim Piqua 2 05 Wildlife Amateur Photography Adult Schellhouse, Kelly Tipp City 3 05 - Wildlife Amateur Photography Adult Sorauf, Ed Troy 1 Best of Show 06 - Flowers Amateur Photography Adult Pleiman, Brenda Tipp City 2 06 - Flowers Amateur Photography Adult McMaken, Kelly Piqua 3 06 - Flowers Amateur Photography - Adult Kaplan, Steve Troy 1 07 - Miami County Landscapes Amateur Photography - Adult Sorauf, Ed Troy 2 07 Miami County Landscapes Amateur Photography Adult Davis, Jim Piqua 1 08 Black and White Amateur Photography - Adult Koerner, Marrissa Piqua 2 08 - Black and White Amateur Photography - Adult Karadak, Kyle Troy 3 08 - Black and White Amateur Photography Adult Ross, Rhonda Troy 1 09 - Misc Amateur Photography - Adult Koerner, Marrissa Piqua 2 09 - Misc Amateur Photography - Adult Norman, Susie Troy 3 09 - Misc Amateur Photography - Adult Chinn, Kayleigh Alcony 1 01 - People or Person Amateur Photography Youth 13 & Under

Grube, Megan Troy 2 01 - People or Person Amateur Photography Youth 13 & Under Carpenter, Hannah Piqua 3 01 - People or Person Amateur Photography - Youth 13 & Under Grube, Megan Troy 1 02 - Places or Landscapes Amateur Photography Youth 13 & Under Sutherly, Samuel Troy 2 02 - Places or Landscapes Amateur Photography Youth 13 & Under McMaken, Lainee Piqua 3 02 - Places or Landscapes Amateur Photography - Youth 13 & Under Carpenter, Hannah Piqua 1 Best of Show 03 Domestic Animals Amateur Photography Youth 13 & Under Mahaffy, Kaitlyn Tipp City 2 03 - Domestic Animals Amateur Photography - Youth 13 & Under Elliott, Kaitlynn Medway 3 03 - Domestic Animals Amateur Photography - Youth 13 & Under Grube, Megan Troy 1 04 - Wildlife Amateur Photography - Youth 13 & Under Herron, Matthew Piqua 2 04 - Wildlife Amateur Photography - Youth 13 & Under Kern, Kendra Troy 3 04 - Wildlife Amateur Photography - Youth 13 & Under McMaken, Lainee Piqua 1 05 - Flowers Amateur Photography Youth 13 & Under Mahaffy, Kaitlyn Tipp City 2 05 - Flowers Amateur Photography Youth 13 & Under Carpenter, Hannah Piqua 3 05 - Flowers Amateur Photography Youth 13 & Under Grube, Megan Troy 1 06 - Miami County Fair Amateur Photography Youth 13 & Under Herron, Matthew Piqua 1 07 - Misc. Amateur Photography - Youth 13 & Under Carpenter, Hannah Piqua 2 07 - Misc. Amateur Photography Youth 13 & Under Mahaffy, Kaitlyn Tipp City 3 07 - Misc. Amateur Photography - Youth 13 & Under Mahaffy, Ian Tipp City 1 02 - Places or Landscapes Amateur Photography Youth 14 to 18 McKitrick, Nathan Covington 1 03 - Domestic Animals Amateur Photography Youth 14 to 18 Mahaffy, Ian Tipp City 1 05 - Flowers Amateur Photography Youth 14 to 18 McKitrick, Nathan Covington 1 Best of Show 07 - Misc. Amateur Photography Youth 14 to 18 Mahaffy, Ian Tipp City 2 07 - Misc. Amateur Photography Youth 14 to 18 Jones, Sally Casstown 1 Best of Show 01 - Oil

Painting Art Work - Adults Sloan, Ann Piqua 1 02 Pencil Drawing Art Work Adults Smith, Virginia Piqua 1 03 - Water Colors Art Work - Adults Livesay, Tori Tipp City 1 04 - Pastels Art Work Adults Fosnight, Alyssa Troy 1 05 - Acrylic Art Work Adults Carpenter, Pat New Carlise 2 05 - Acrylic Art Work - Adults Daniel, Laura Troy 1 06 - Mixed Media Art Work Adults Carpenter, Pat New Carlise 1 07 - Other Art Work - Adults Sloan, Ann Piqua 2 07 Other Art Work - Adults Daniel, Laura Troy 3 07 - Other Art Work - Adults King, Victoria Piqua 1 01 - Oil Painting Art Work - Youth ages 14 to 18 Tulanko, Kyleigh Fletcher 1 02 - Pencil or Color Pencil Drawing Art Work - Youth ages 14 to 18 DeWeese, Emma Troy 2 02 - Pencil or Color Pencil Drawing Art Work - Youth ages 14 to 18 Shell, Jese Covington 3 02 - Pencil or Color Pencil Drawing Art Work - Youth ages 14 to 18 Augustus, Erin Troy 1 03 - Water Colors Art Work - Youth ages 14 to 18 Covault, Ashley Piqua 2 03 - Water Colors Art Work - Youth ages 14 to 18 Thompson, Kasey Covington 1 04 - Pastels Art Work - Youth ages 14 to 18 Curtis, Jackie Tipp City 1 Best of Show 05 - Acrylic Art Work - Youth ages 14 to 18 Thompson, Kasey Covington 2 05 - Acrylic Art Work - Youth ages 14 to 18 King, Victoria Piqua 3 05 - Acrylic Art Work Youth ages 14 to 18 King, Victoria Piqua 1 06 - Mixed Media Art Work - Youth ages 14 to 18 Pettit, Megan Fletcher 2 06 - Mixed Media Art Work - Youth ages 14 to 18 Snyder, Emily Troy 3 06 - Mixed Media Art Work Youth ages 14 to 18 Clagett, Holly Troy 1 08 - Other Art Work - Youth ages 14 to 18 Karadak, Kley Troy 2 08 - Other Art Work Youth ages 14 to 18 Thompson, Kasey Covington 3 08 - Other Art Work - Youth ages 14 to 18 Snyder, Chet Troy 1 Best of Show 02 - Water Color Art Work - Youth ages 4 and Under Lilly, Jordyn Troy 2 02 Water Color Art Work Youth ages 4 and Under Snyder, Heath Troy 1 03 - Collage 11 x 14 or less Art Work - Youth ages 4 and Under Mertz, Ellexis Troy 2 03 - Collage 11 x 14 or less Art Work - Youth ages 4 and Under Snyder, Chet Troy 3 03 - Collage 11 x 14 or less Art Work - Youth ages 4 and Under Norman, Charlotte Casstown 1 04 - Marker or Crayon Coloring Art Work

- Youth ages 4 and Under Snyder, Chet Troy 1 05 - Mixed Media Art Work Youth ages 4 and Under Hild, Emilia Pleasant Hill 2 05 - Mixed Media Art Work - Youth ages 4 and Under Snyder, Heath Troy 3 05 - Mixed Media Art Work - Youth ages 4 and Under Lohnes, Ryan Troy 1 06 - Color the Fair Art Work Youth ages 4 and Under Hild, Emilia Pleasant Hill 2 06 - Color the Fair Art Work - Youth ages 4 and Under Hershberger, Emma Casstown 3 06 - Color the Fair Art Work - Youth ages 4 and Under Clagett, Audrey Troy 1 01 - Pencil or Color Pencil Drawing Art Work - Youth Ages 5 to 8 Vannus, Arianna Pleasant Hill 2 01 - Pencil or Color Pencil Drawing Art Work - Youth Ages 5 to 8 Larck, Brooklyn Piqua 3 01 - Pencil or Color Pencil Drawing Art Work Youth Ages 5 to 8 Eversman, Ciara Troy 1 02 - Crayon Drawing Art Work - Youth Ages 5 to 8 Vannus, Arianna Pleasant Hill 2 02 Crayon Drawing Art Work - Youth Ages 5 to 8 Hild, Alexander Pleasant Hill 1 03 - Water Color Art Work - Youth Ages 5 to 8 Plantz, Sable Troy 2 03 - Water Color Art Work Youth Ages 5 to 8 Clagett, Audrey Troy 3 03 - Water Color Art Work - Youth Ages 5 to 8 Larck, Brooklyn Piqua 1 04 - Collage 11 x 14 or less Art Work - Youth Ages 5 to 8 Norman, Elisabeth Casstown 1 05 - Marker or Crayon Coloring Art Work - Youth Ages 5 to 8 Grube, Alyxandria Troy 2 05 - Marker or Crayon Coloring Art Work - Youth Ages 5 to 8 Vannus, Arianna Pleasant Hill 3 05 Marker or Crayon Coloring Art Work - Youth Ages 5 to 8 Vannus, Arianna Pleasant Hill 1 Best of Show 06 - Mixed Media Art Work - Youth Ages 5 to 8 Lilly, Brooklynn Troy 2 06 - Mixed Media Art Work - Youth Ages 5 to 8 Plantz, Sable Troy 3 06 - Mixed Media Art Work Youth Ages 5 to 8 Vannus, Arianna Pleasant Hill 1 07 - Color the Fair Art Work - Youth Ages 5 to 8 Hild, Alexander Pleasant Hill 2 07 - Color the Fair Art Work - Youth Ages 5 to 8 Warner, Rylie Ludlow Falls 3 07 - Color the Fair Art Work - Youth Ages 5 to 8 Roan, Hannah New Castle 1 01 - Oil Painting Art Work - Youth ages 9 to 13 Schmelzer, Joey Covington 1 02 - Pencil or Color Pencil Drawing Art Work - Youth ages 9 to 13 Livesay, Tori Tipp City

2 02 - Pencil or Color Pencil Drawing Art Work Youth ages 9 to 13 Mergler, Lane Casstown 3 02 - Pencil or Color Pencil Drawing Art Work Youth ages 9 to 13 Herron, Matthew Piqua 1 03 - Water Colors Art Work - Youth ages 9 to 13 Roan, Hannah New Castle 2 03 - Water Colors Art Work - Youth ages 9 to 13 Tackett, Kacie Pleasant Hill 3 03 - Water Colors Art Work - Youth ages 9 to 13 Chinn, Kayleigh Alcony 1 04 - Collage 11 x 14 or less Art Work - Youth ages 9 to 13 Eversman, Emily Troy 2 04 - Collage 11 x 14 or less Art Work - Youth ages 9 to 13 Vannus, Luke Pleasant Hill 3 04 - Collage 11 x 14 or less Art Work - Youth ages 9 to 13 Demmitt, Haley Casstown 1 05 - Marker or Crayon Coloring Art Work - Youth ages 9 to 13 Livesay, Tori Tipp City 2 05 - Marker or Crayon Coloring Art Work - Youth ages 9 to 13 Tackett, Colin Pleasant Hill 3 05 - Marker or Crayon Coloring Art Work - Youth ages 9 to 13 Herron, Matthew Piqua 1 06 - Charcoal Drawing Art Work - Youth ages 9 to 13 Livesay, Tori Tipp City 1 Best of Show 07 - Mixed Media Art Work - Youth ages 9 to 13 Tackett, Kacie Pleasant Hill 2 07 - Mixed Media Art Work - Youth ages 9 to 13 Mahaffy, Kaitlyn Tipp City 3 07 - Mixed Media Art Work - Youth ages 9 to 13 Yingst, Amanda Piqua 1 Best of Show 01 - Glazed Ceramics Ceramics & Pottery - Adult Butts, Judy Tipp City 2 01 - Glazed Ceramics Ceramics & Pottery Adult Ingle, Allison Covington 3 01 - Glazed Ceramics Ceramics & Pottery Adult Yingst, Amanda Piqua 1 02 - Other Ceramics Ceramics & Pottery Adult Weldy, Amber Troy 2 02 - Other Ceramics Ceramics & Pottery Adult Ingle, Allison Covington 3 02 - Other Ceramics Ceramics & Pottery Adult Burns, Laura Piqua 1 03 - Pottery or Clay Ceramics & Pottery Adult Daniel, Laura Troy 2 03 - Pottery or Clay Ceramics & Pottery - Adult Ingle, Allison Covington 3 03 - Pottery or Clay Ceramics & Pottery Adult Huber, Adam Troy 1 01 - Glazed Ceramics Ceramics & Pottery 8 and under Schmackers, Gabrielle Pleasant Hill 1 Best of Show 03 - Pottery or Clay Ceramics & Pottery 8 and under Snyder, Chet Troy 2

03 - Pottery or Clay Ceramics & Pottery 8 and under Vannus, Arianna Pleasant Hill 3 03 - Pottery or Clay Ceramics & Pottery 8 and under Vannus, Luke Pleasant Hill 1 01 - Glazed Ceramics Ceramics & Pottery - Youth Ages 9 to 13 Roan, Hannah New Castle 2 01 - Glazed Ceramics Ceramics & Pottery - Youth Ages 9 to 13 Roan, Hannah New Castle 1 Best of Show 03 Pottery or Clay Ceramics & Pottery - Youth Ages 9 to 13 Vannus, Luke Pleasant Hill 2 03 - Pottery or Clay Ceramics & Pottery Youth Ages 9 to 13 King, Victoria Piqua 1 Best of Show 01 - Glazed Ceramics Ceramics & Pottery Youth ages 14 to 18 Potter, Felicia Troy 1 Best of Show 01 - Baby Item Crocheting Dickensheets, Jennifer New Carlise 2 01 - Baby Item Crocheting Young, Candy Covington 3 01 - Baby Item Crocheting Ryman, Cindy Troy 1 02 - Sweater, Shrug, Vest or Poncho (any size) Crocheting Dickensheets, Jennifer New Carlise 2 02 Sweater, Shrug, Vest or Poncho (any size) Crocheting Young, Candy Covington 1 04 - Hats Crocheting Ludwick, Barbara Medway 1 05 - Afghan Crocheting Trissell, Judy Troy 2 05 - Afghan Crocheting Potter, Felicia Troy 3 05 - Afghan Crocheting Dickensheets, Jennifer New Carlise 1 06 - Kitchen Item Crocheting Dickensheets, Jennifer New Carlise 1 07 - Other Crocheting Ryman, Cindy Troy 2 07 - Other Crocheting Eversman, Anita Troy 3 07 - Other Crocheting Otte, Madison Covington 1 01 - Gift wrapping (any occasion) Gift Wrapping/Baskets Furlong, Marilyn Troy 2 01 - Gift wrapping (any occasion) Gift Wrapping/Baskets Wolfe, Dana Troy 3 01 Gift wrapping (any occasion) Gift Wrapping/Baskets Brazel, Alysia Vandalia 1 Best of Show 02 - Gift Basket (any occasion) Gift Wrapping/Baskets Parke, Kristen Covington 2 02 - Gift Basket (any occasion) Gift Wrapping/Baskets Covington, Care Center Covington 3 02 - Gift Basket (any occasion) Gift Wrapping/Baskets Friend, Jeannine Tipp City 1 01 - Needlepoint Plastic canvas Hand Needlework Smallenbarger, Doris Troy 2 01 - Needlepoint Plastic canvas Hand Needlework • See Results on B7

At the Fair 10-1 p.m. Kids Day Games — East Pen of Market Rabbits Side of Merchants Bldg., free Single Market Rabbit 11 a.m. Golden Anniversary Photo west Market Kid Goat Judging Contest — Sheep Arena side of Horticulture Hall Pen of Two Market Lambs Junior Fair English Horse Show — 12 p.m. Ticket booths for rides open Single Market Lamb Horse Arena Golden Anniversary Lunch — Market Barrow 10 a.m. Miami County Born and Raised Entertainment Tent, free Dairy Steer Barrow Show — Swine Arena 1 p.m. Rides/Games open — $12 Market Steer/Market Heifer 4-H Cloverbud Show and Tell Program The Kate Hasting Band — followed by Cloverbud Graduation — Duke bracelet good all day and night Kiddie Pedal Power Tractor Pull — Entertainment Tent Lundgard Bldg. Grandstand, Free 7:30 p.m. Band Spectacular — Ronald McDonald — Entertainment Beef Fun Day — Cattle Show Ring Grandstands, Free Tent 1:30 p.m. Mike Hemmelgarn Dusk Balloon Glow — Infield of Born and Raised Barrow Show — Entertainment Tent Grandstands, Free Swine Barn 4 p.m. The Classics Entertainment Tent 8 p.m. Junior Fair Dance — Pence Bldg People’s Choice Awards winners post5:30 p.m. Sweepstake/Scholarship 10 p.m. Duke Lundgard Bldg. closes ed — Art Hall Awards Presentation — Sheep Barn FFA Shop/Crop closes Duke Lundgard Bldg. opens Salute to Veterans Grandstand, Free Art Hall closes FFA Shop/Crop opens 7 p.m. Sale of Champions — Sale Horticulture Hall closes Art Hall opens Arena (Swine Barn) Merchant Bldg. closes Horticulture Hall opens Pen of Market Chickens Vendor Displays closes Merchants Bldg. opens Single Market Tom Turkey 11 p.m. Rides, Games and Vendor Displays opens

• CONTINUED FROM B1

Concessions closes • Thursday, Aug. 16 9:a.m. Market Barrow Sale 9:30 a.m. Miami County Horse Fun Day — Horse Arena, ending at 6 p.m. 10 a.m. Duke Lundgard Bldg. opens FFA Shop/Crop opens Art Hall opens Horticulture Hall opens Merchants Bldg. opens Vendor Displays opens 1 p.m. Single Market Rabbit Sale — Immediately followed by Pen of Market Rabbits Sale — Immediately followed by Pen of Market Chickens Sale — Immediately followed by Single Market Tom Turkey Sale — Immediately followed by Single Market Lamb Sale — Immediately followed by Market Goat Sale — Immediately followed by Dairy Steer Sale — Immediately followed by Market Steer/Market Heifer Sale

Congratulations to All the

Fair Exhibitors and Champions!! a tradition of caring

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CONTACT US

SPORTS

■ Sports Editor Josh Brown (937) 440-5251, (937) 440-5232 jbrown@tdnpublishing.com

JOSH BROWN

TROY DAILY NEWS • WWW.TROYDAILYNEWS.COM

B3 August 13, 2012

TODAY’S TIPS

■ Major League Baseball

• SOCCER: The Troy boys soccer team will host an alumni soccer match at 6 p.m. Thursday at Troy Memorial Stadium. All alumni that have played for Troy High School in the past are invited to participate. • BASEBALL: Tryouts for the 2013 Troy Post 43 legion baseball and Troy Bombers teams will be held at noon Aug. 18-19 at Legion Field at Duke Park in Troy. For more information, contact coach Frosty Brown by e-mail at ibrown@woh.rr.com. • SOFTBALL: The Troy Fastpitch Fall Ball League, including doubleheaders for five weeks, begins Sept. 9 at Duke Park. The cost is $50 and the signup deadline is Monday. Travel teams are welcome. For more info and registration, see www.miamicountyblaze.com or call Curt at (937) 8750492. • SOFTBALL: The Milton-Union Fall Ball League, including doubleheaders for five weeks, begins Sept. 9 at the Lowry Complex. The cost is $50 and the signup deadline is Monday. Travel teams are welcome. For more info and registration, see www.miamicountyblaze.com or call Curt at (937) 8750492. • HOCKEY: Registrations are now being accepted for the Troy Recreation Department Youth Hockey Initiation Program held at Hobart Arena. The program is for youth ages 5–10 and begins in mid-September and runs through mid-March. The program includes approximately one practice each week for 50 minutes. An equipment rental program is available. For more information and to register online, visit www.hobartarena.com on the “Registrations” page or contact the Recreation Department at 339-5145. • COACHING SEARCH: Bethel Schools are looking for a seventh and eighth grade volleyball coach and an assistant/JV boys soccer coach. If interested or is in need of more information, please contact Bob Hamlin at (937) 845-9430 or bethelathdept@bethel.k12.oh.us.

Cueto blanks Cubs Reds’ ace hurls eight innings of three-hit ball CHICAGO (AP) — Brooks Raley showed that he might be part of the Cubs’ future. Too bad he was matched up Sunday against a pitcher who is a star for the Reds now. Johnny Cueto pitched threehit ball for eight innings, Jay Bruce and Ryan Ludwick homered and the Cincinnati Reds beat the Chicago Cubs 3-0 Sunday. Cueto (15-6) moved into a tie AP PHOTO with New York’s R.A. Dickey for Cincinnati Reds’ Johnny Cueto (47) pitches against the the NL lead in victories. He Chicago Cubs during baseball game on Sunday in Chicago. retired the Cubs in order in four

of the first five innings. “Tough to get things going, especially today against Cueto, one of the best starters in the game,” Cubs manager Dale Sveum said. Back in the lineup after sitting for two games because of a recent slump, Bruce hit a tworun shot into the right-field bleachers in the fifth off Raley (0-2), the Cubs’ rookie lefty. Ludwick connected with a drive to left in the sixth.

■ Tennis

■ Golf

McIlroy wins PGA in record fashion Blows field away by eight strokes

STAFF PHOTOS/ANTHONY WEBER

Troy’s Amber Smith hits a return shot during a match last season. Smith will be the second singles player for the Trojans this year.

UPCOMING Sport ....................Start Date Girls Tennis...................Today Boys Soccer ..............Aug. 18 Girls Soccer...............Aug. 18 Cross Country ...........Aug. 20 Football ......................Aug. 20 Volleyball....................Aug. 25

The Goldner standard Experience, depth expected to carry Trojans BY JOSH BROWN Associate Sports Editor jbrown@tdnpublishing.com

WHAT’S INSIDE Olympics ..............................B4 Scoreboard ...........................B5 Television Schedule .............B5 Major League Baseball ........B6 Local Sports .........................B6 Auto Racing .........................B6

SPORTS CALENDAR TODAY Boys Golf Troy, Tippecanoe, Milton-Union, Miami East, Covington, Invitational (at Piqua CC) (10:30 a.m.) Ansonia at Bethel (10 a.m.) Girls Golf Troy, Tippecanoe, Miami East at Covington Invitational (at Echo Hills) (8 a.m.) Tennis Chaminade Julienne at Lehman (4 p.m.)

U.S. men top Spain for 2nd straight gold This was no Dream Team. This was reality. The gold medal was in doubt for the U.S. men’s basketball team. See Page 18.

Dragons Lair DAYTON — The Dayton Dragons won another tight game on Sunday afternoon, holding on for a 5-4 victory over Fort Wayne.

2313 W. Main St. Troy 440-9016

■ See REDS on B6

The way this season’s schedule worked out, area tennis teams got only one week of practice to look at their prospective players before the season starts Monday. Luckily for the Troy Trojans, they have five players that have been through it all already.

TROY Five returning seniors will bolster the Trojan ranks this season, with coach Mark Goldner — in his 42nd year at Troy and fifth coaching the girls — hopes that their previous experience will cancel out the lack of a lengthy preseason. “We’ve got plenty of experience, and then probably five players that we’re looking at for the other two spots,” Goldner said. “With only one week of practice, it’s hard to tell how it will shake out yet. But it’ll work itself out.” Ivy Smith will be back at first singles, while Amber Smith will make the jump from third to second singles.

Troy’s Meredith Orozco competes during a match last ■ See TENNIS on B6 year.

KIAWAH ISLAND, S.C. (AP) — Right down to his red shirt, Rory McIlroy looked every bit the part of golf’s next star in another command performance at the PGA Championship. McIlroy validated his recordsetting U.S. Open win last year by blowing away the field Sunday at Kiawah Island. One last birdie from 25 feet on the 18th hole gave him a 6-under 66 for an eight-shot victory, breaking the PGA Championship record for margin of victory that Jack Nicklaus set in 1980. The 23-year-old from Northern Ireland returned to No. 1 in the world, and he became the youngest player since Seve Ballesteros to win two majors. Tiger Woods was about four months older than McIlroy when he won his second major. Just like the U.S. Open, this one was never seriously in doubt. McIlroy seized control with back-to-back birdies Sunday morning to complete the stormdelayed third round with a 67 and build a three-shot lead. No one got closer than two shots the rest of the way, and McIlroy closed out a remarkable week by playing bogey-free over the final 23 holes of a demanding Ocean Course. David Lynn, a 38-year-old from England who was playing in America for the first time, won the B-flight. He closed with a 68 and was the runner-up. Woods, who shared the 36hole lead for the second time this year in a major, was never a serious factor. He tossed away his chances Saturday before the storm blew in and never could get closer than four shots. He closed with a 72, failing to break par on the weekend in any of the four majors for the first time in his career. If there was a signature shot for McIlroy at Kiawah Island, it might have been Saturday when his tee shot lodged into a tree on

■ See PGA on B6

■ National Football League

Preseason opener hurts Cleveland bad BEREA, Ohio (AP) — The Cleveland Browns’ preseasonopening win in Detroit came at a significant cost. Wide receivers Mohamed Massaquoi and Travis Benjamin, linebacker Scott Fujita, cornerback Dimitri Patterson, tight end Jordan Cameron and defensive tackle Scott Paxson did not practice Sunday as the Browns

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(No. 30 in the AP Pro32) resumed their training camp schedule. All six were injured Friday during Cleveland’s 19-17 victory, and all are either starters or second-teamers on the depth chart. “It’s hard to tell when they’ll be back,” coach Pat Shurmur said, declining to offer specifics. “They were nicked up in the

game, so we’ll see when they can come back.” Fourth-year starter Massaquoi (concussion), Patterson (right ankle), Cameron (back), and Paxson (right knee) each required help from Cleveland’s training staff after on-field collisions. Shurmur would not reveal the injuries that Benjamin and Fujita suf-

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fered. Though Patterson and Paxson appeared to be in tremendous pain when they were hurt, Massaquoi’s status is the most troubling. The 6-foot-2, 207pounder was hit by Detroit safety Erik Coleman after making a 12-yard reception on the Browns’ initial offensive snap and did not return.

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OLYMPICS

B4 August 13, 2012

TROY DAILY NEWS • WWW..TDN-NET. TROYDAILYNEWS COM .COM

U.S. earns most medals at Olympics

■ Basketball MEDAL COUNT At London Sunday, Aug. 12 Final 302 total medal events Nation G S B Total 104 United States 46 29 29 38 27 22 87 China 24 25 33 82 Russia 29 17 19 65 Britain 11 19 14 44 Germany Japan 7 14 17 38 Australia 7 16 12 35 France 11 11 12 34 13 8 7 28 South Korea 8 9 11 28 Italy 6 6 8 20 Netherlands 6 5 9 20 Ukraine Canada 1 5 12 18 Hungary 8 4 5 17 Spain 3 10 4 17 3 5 9 17 Brazil 5 3 6 14 Cuba 7 1 5 13 Kazakhstan 5 3 5 13 New Zealand Belarus 3 5 5 13 Iran 4 5 3 12 Jamaica 4 4 4 12 Kenya 2 4 5 11 10 Czech Republic 4 3 3 2 2 6 10 Azerbaijan 2 2 6 10 Poland 2 5 2 9 Romania Denmark 2 4 3 9 Sweden 1 4 3 8 Colombia 1 3 4 8 Ethiopia 3 1 3 7 1 3 3 7 Georgia 1 3 3 7 Mexico 4 0 2 6 North Korea South Africa 3 2 1 6 3 1 2 6 Croatia 0 2 4 6 India 2 2 1 5 Turkey Lithuania 2 1 2 5 Ireland 1 1 3 5 Mongolia 0 2 3 5 Switzerland 2 2 0 4 2 1 1 4 Norway 1 1 2 4 Argentina 1 1 2 4 Serbia 1 1 2 4 Slovenia 4 Trinidad & Tobago1 0 3 Uzbekistan 1 0 3 4 0 1 3 4 Slovakia 1 1 1 3 Tunisia 0 2 1 3 Thailand Armenia 0 1 2 3 0 1 2 3 Belgium 0 1 2 3 Finland 1 1 0 2 D. Republic 1 0 1 2 Latvia 0 2 0 2 Egypt 0 1 1 2 Bulgaria Estonia 0 1 1 2 0 1 1 2 Indonesia 0 1 1 2 Malaysia 0 1 1 2 Puerto Rico Taiwan 0 1 1 2 0 0 2 2 Greece 0 0 2 2 Moldova Qatar 0 0 2 2 Singapore 0 0 2 2 1 0 0 1 Algeria 1 0 0 1 Bahamas Grenada 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 Uganda 1 0 0 1 Venezuela 0 1 0 1 Botswana Cyprus 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 Gabon 0 1 0 1 Guatemala Montenegro 0 1 0 1 Portugal 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 Afghanistan 0 0 1 1 Bahrain Hong Kong 0 0 1 1 Kuwait 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 Morocco

■ Wrestling

Americans earn two golds LONDON (AP) — Cael Sanderson spent the past seven years teaching Jake Varner how to be a world champion — and he was there Sunday when Varner joined him as an Olympic gold medalist. With Sanderson watching, Varner defeated Valerie Andriitsev of Ukraine 1-0, 1-0 to win gold in men’s 96-kilogram freestyle. Coupled with Jordan Burroughs’ win in the 74 kilograms Friday night, it gave the American team multiple Olympic gold medalists in men’s wrestling for the first time since 1996. “Still not sure I’m in his league, but it’s awesome to be coached by a guy like that,” Varner said of Sanderson, a gold medalist at the 2004 Athens Olympics. “I owe him a lot. It means a lot to have him with me.” Varner and Sanderson’s relationship began in 2005 at Iowa State, where Sanderson coached before jumping to Penn State. The day after Varner graduated in 2010, he piled up the car and drove 15 hours to Pennsylvania to train full-time with Sanderson. Sanderson said that Varner had pounded on him during training sessions leading up to the Olympics. Varner showed that good form by winning four straight matches for gold.

AP PHOTO

The United States’ Kobe Bryant jumps to score during the men's gold medal basketball game at the 2012 Summer Olympics in London on Sunday.

Mission complete U.S. gets by Spain, 107-100, to capture gold LONDON (AP) — This was no Dream Team. This was reality. The gold medal was in doubt for the U.S. men’s basketball team. The Americans led Spain by only one point after three quarters, a back-and-forth, impossible-toturn-away-from game that almost anyone would hope for in an Olympic final. Especially, it turns out, the U.S. players. “We knew it wasn’t going to be easy. We didn’t want it easy,” LeBron James said. “A lot of teams have won gold easy. We didn’t want it that way. We’re a competitive team, and we love when it gets tight. That’s when our will and determination kind of shows. It was the same way in ‘08.” Same result, too. The Americans defended their title Sunday by fighting off another huge challenge from Spain, pulling away in the final minutes for a 107100 victory and their second straight Olympic championship. And just like 2008, the starstudded Americans had to work for this one. The London 2012 daily magazine proclaimed them “the new Dream Team” in an article, but the real Dream Team never had a game like this 20 years ago in Barcelona. And if that means this group isn’t worthy of the comparisons to Michael Jordan, Magic Johnson, Larry Bird and Co., the players had their own response. “Everybody wants to make that comparison, but at the end of the

AP PHOTO

Kevin Durant (left) and LeBron James celebrate the victory over Spain. day we’re both wearing these,” forward Kevin Love said, pulling on his gold medal. “That’s pretty good.” James capped one of basketball’s most brilliant individual years with a monster dunk and a huge 3-pointer in the final 2:50 that finally ended a Spanish threat few expected after the Americans had been so dominant for so long in London. Yet four years after beating Spain 118-107 in a classic in Beijing, the U.S. found itself in another tight one, unable to ever really slow the Spanish down until the closing minutes. Kevin Durant scored 30 points and James had 19 on a day he joined Jordan as the only players to win the NBA title, regular-season MVP, NBA Finals MVP and Olympic gold in the same year. “It was a good year. It was a

great year for me as an individual,” James said. “But this right here, it means more than myself, it means more than my name on my back. It means everything to the name on the front. I’m happy that I was able to contribute to this great team. It’s one of the best teams ever.” Coach Mike Krzyzewski, who has said he’s retiring as national team coach after restoring the Americans to their place atop world basketball, emptied his bench in the final minute James stood with both arms in the air, then held Durant in a long hug before they came off the court. The Americans, who insisted they were better than their 2008 version and even good enough to take a game from the 1992 Dream Team, may not have been at that level. Still, they were better again than Spain though not by much. When the final horn sounded, Krzyzewski locked James in a tight embrace as Bruce Springsteen’s “Born In The USA” rocked the arena. The Americans hugged at midcourt, guard James Harden holding a doll of the Olympic mascot, and then after being handed flags, this group of NBA players and one kid just out of college who grew into a tight-knit group during their time together, paraded around the floor, the Stars and Stripes flowing off their backs like capes. Yes, they were Olympic superheroes again, but they had to fight until the finish.

LONDON (AP) — By any measure, the 2012 London Games will be considered a booming success for the United States. When the U.S. men’s basketball team won the Olympic title Sunday, it clinched the 46th gold medal for Americans in London, marking the highest total the nation has ever taken home from a “road” Olympics. The U.S. — winners of 104 medals overall in London, easily the most of any nation — won 45 golds at Paris in 1924 and Mexico City in 1968. “It means everything,” U.S. basketball player LeBron James said. The final numbers for the Americans in London won’t go down as record-setting, not coming close to the 83 gold medals at the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics, and the 239 total from St. Louis in 1904, when U.S. athletes won roughly seven out of every eight medals awarded. Different eras, different dynamics. Many thought this would be the Olympics where the Chinese went home with more medals than the Americans, and that didn’t come close to happening. China won 38 golds, its most ever on foreign soil, but finished 17 medals behind the U.S. overall and took a major step back from when it served as the host team four years ago. “We are immensely proud of the success that our athletes had in London,” U.S. Olympic Committee CEO Scott Blackmun said Sunday. Host country Britain also had plenty of celebrate at these games: 29 gold medals, 65 medals overall, riding the wave of home-field energy for its best Olympic showing in more than a century to deliver on a promise of greatness in 2012 — and possibly set the stage for continued emergence down the road. “What I’ve witnessed in the last couple of weeks has been both uplifting and energizing,” London Games chief Sebastian Coe said. “I don’t think any country that has staged the games or any city that staged the games is ever the same afterwards.” Celebrations weren’t limited to the big nations — Grenada won its first Olympic gold, with Kirani James winning the men’s 400-meter dash. And six other countries hit the Olympic podium for the first time.

The top 10 memorable moments in London LONDON (AP) — The top 10 memorable moments from the London Olympics: 1. Crowning The Best Michael Phelps ended his remarkable swimming career by winning four gold and two silver medals in London. He is now the most decorated Olympian ever, with a career total of 22 medals, 18 of them gold. In his final swim, he helped the U.S. reclaim the lead in the 4x100-meter relay, and afterward he got a special trophy from swimming officials that said: "To Michael Phelps, the greatest Olympic athlete of all time." 2. Britains Golden Night Three British athletes won gold medals in Olympic Stadium in 44 minutes on Saturday, Aug. 4, to produce the signature night of the London Games: Jessica Ennis won the heptathlon, Greg Rutherford won the long jump, and Mo Farah won the 10,000 meters. (The Somali-born Farah also won the 5,000 meters on the final Saturday.) Counting two golds from the rowers and another from women's track

cycling, Britain's total for the day was six. 3. Gabby Leads The Fierce Five Gabby Douglas rocked the O2 Arena with her electric floor routine, her vaults, her leaps high above the balance beam. The 16-year-old won two gold medals, including the all-around, and the rest of the Fierce Five — Jordyn Wieber, McKayla Maroney, Kyla Ross and Aly Raisman — gave the United States its first Olympic team title in women's gymnastics since 1996. 4. Adding To The Legend The speed. The medals. The poses. It could only be Usain Bolt, who electrified the London Games by becoming the first man to win the 100, 200 and 4x100 relay golds in back-to-back Olympics. Even IOC President Jacques Rogge, who initially balked at giving him "living legend" status, conceded that the sixtime gold medalist "is the best sprinter of all time." 5. The Bad In Badminton They played to lose. The

top-seeded women's badminton pair from China, two pairs from South Korea and one from Indonesia were disqualified from the Olympics after they intentionally lost their matches in order to secure a more favorable draw in the quarterfinals. Olympic officials wanted team coaches, trainers or officials of the four doubles pairs to be punished if they encouraged or ordered the eight players to lose intentionally. 6. The Blade Runner Oscar Pistorius described his journey from South Africa to the London Olympics as "amazing," and it was. The double-amputee known as the "Blade Runner" because he runs on carbon-fiber blades had the 80,000-strong crowd roaring as he anchored the South African team in the 4x400meter relay final. It didn't matter that he finished eighth. He can add "Olympic finalist" to his long list of unprecedented achievements. 7. Women’s Boxing A Big Success Women's boxing was a

big hit in its first Olympics, and it produced three memorable champions: Claressa Shields, the 17-year-old middleweight with the vicious right hand who established herself as the future of the sport; lightweight Katie Taylor of Ireland, the Bray Brawler whose bouts had thousands cheering with Irish pride; and Nicola Adams, the British flyweight who won the first gold medal. 8. Running On A Broken Leg American Manteo Mitchell heard a pop in his left leg with 200 meters to go in his segment of the 4x400 relay preliminaries, and the sprinter knew it was not good. If he stopped, he would lose the race, so he finished the lap, then limped to the side to watch his teammates complete the relay. The United States eventually made it into the finals and won the silver behind the Bahamas. 9. Historic Olympics For Women It lasted only 82 seconds, but it will be long remembered: Young judo fighter

Wojdan Ali Seraj Abdulrahim Shahrkhani became the first Saudi woman to compete at an Olympics. Wearing a modified hijab, Shahrkhani drew roars from the crowd as she stepped on the mat against Puerto Rico's Melissa Mojica, who quickly defeated her. Saudi resident Alaa AlMizyen said afterward: "Wojdan remains a winner to me and millions of men AND women around the world." Qatar and Brunei also sent female Olympians for the first time. 10. Her Majesty’s A Pretty Good Actress The Olympics kicked off with a royal command performance. At the opening ceremony, a short film on the stadium's big screen showed actor Daniel Craig as James Bond driving to Buckingham Palace and meeting Queen Elizabeth II, who played herself. "Good evening, Mr. Bond," she said. Next they were shown flying in a helicopter over Olympic Stadium, where stunt doubles parachuted in.


SCOREBOARD

TROY DAILY NEWS • WWW.TROYDAILYNEWS.COM

BASEBALL Baseball Expanded Standings All Times EDT AMERICAN LEAGUE East Division W L Pct New York 67 47 .588 62 52 .544 Tampa Bay 62 53 .539 Baltimore 57 59 .491 Boston 54 60 .474 Toronto Central Division W L Pct Chicago 62 51 .549 61 54 .530 Detroit 53 62 .461 Cleveland 49 65 .430 Kansas City 49 65 .430 Minnesota West Division W L Pct Texas 67 46 .593 Oakland 61 53 .535 60 55 .522 Los Angeles 53 63 .457 Seattle NATIONAL LEAGUE East Division W L Pct Washington 71 44 .617 Atlanta 66 48 .579 55 60 .478 New York 52 62 .456 Philadelphia 52 63 .452 Miami Central Division W L Pct Cincinnati 69 46 .600 Pittsburgh 64 50 .561 St. Louis 62 53 .539 52 61 .460 Milwaukee 44 69 .389 Chicago 38 78 .328 Houston West Division W L Pct San Francisco 63 52 .548 Los Angeles 62 53 .539 58 57 .504 Arizona 51 65 .440 San Diego 41 71 .366 Colorado

Monday, August 13, 2012

Scores GB WCGB — — 5 — 5½ — 11 5½ 13 7½

L10 6-4 8-2 7-3 4-6 3-7

Str L-1 W-6 W-1 W-1 W-1

Home 34-22 32-27 30-28 29-34 29-25

Away 33-25 30-25 32-25 28-25 25-35

GB WCGB — — 2 1 10 9 13½ 12½ 13½ 12½

L10 6-4 6-4 3-7 5-5 5-5

Str W-1 L-2 L-1 L-1 L-4

Home 32-26 33-23 30-29 21-32 23-35

Away 30-25 28-31 23-33 28-33 26-30

GB WCGB — — 6½ ½ 8 2 15½ 9½

L10 7-3 5-5 3-7 4-6

Str W-2 L-1 L-2 W-2

Home 36-22 34-26 31-24 25-29

Away 31-24 27-27 29-31 28-34

GB WCGB — — 4½ — 16 9½ 18½ 12 19 12½

L10 8-2 7-3 4-6 5-5 4-6

Str L-1 L-1 W-1 W-1 L-1

Home 32-22 32-26 28-30 26-33 28-29

Away 39-22 34-22 27-30 26-29 24-34

GB WCGB — — 4½ — 7 2½ 16 11½ 24 19½ 31½ 27

L10 5-5 4-6 6-4 5-5 1-9 3-7

Str W-3 W-1 L-1 W-1 L-3 L-1

Home 36-20 36-20 34-23 33-26 28-27 27-32

Away 33-26 28-30 28-30 19-35 16-42 11-46

GB WCGB — — 1 2½ 5 6½ 12½ 14 20½ 22

L10 7-3 6-4 4-6 7-3 4-6

Str W-2 W-1 W-1 L-1 L-2

Home 34-24 33-25 31-26 27-30 21-37

Away 29-28 29-28 27-31 24-35 20-34

AND SCHEDULES

SPORTS ON TV TODAY MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 7 p.m. ESPN2 — Texas at N.Y. Yankees NFL FOOTBALL 8 p.m. ESPN — Preseason, Dallas at Oakland TENNIS 10 p.m. ESPN2 — WTA, Rogers Cup, championship match, at Montreal (same-day tape)

TUESDAY

AMERICAN LEAGUE Saturday's Games N.Y. Yankees 5, Toronto 2 Cleveland 5, Boston 2 Kansas City 7, Baltimore 3 Oakland 9, Chicago White Sox 7 Tampa Bay 4, Minnesota 2 Texas 2, Detroit 1 Seattle 7, L.A. Angels 4 Sunday's Games Boston 14, Cleveland 1 Toronto 10, N.Y. Yankees 7 Baltimore 5, Kansas City 3 Chicago White Sox 7, Oakland 3 Tampa Bay 7, Minnesota 3, 10 innings Texas 8, Detroit 3 Seattle 4, L.A. Angels 1 Monday's Games Texas (Dempster 1-0) at N.Y.Yankees (Phelps 2-3), 7:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Peavy 9-8) at Toronto (Villanueva 6-2), 7:07 p.m. Detroit (A.Sanchez 1-2) at Minnesota (Deduno 3-0), 8:10 p.m. Cleveland (Masterson 8-10) at L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 9-8), 10:05 p.m. Tampa Bay (Cobb 6-8) at Seattle (Beavan 7-6), 10:10 p.m. Tuesday's Games Boston at Baltimore, 7:05 p.m. Texas at N.Y. Yankees, 7:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Toronto, 7:07 p.m. Detroit at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m. Oakland at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m. Cleveland at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m. Tampa Bay at Seattle, 10:10 p.m. NATIONAL LEAGUE Saturday's Games Cincinnati 4, Chicago Cubs 2 San Francisco 9, Colorado 3 Houston 6, Milwaukee 5, 10 innings San Diego 5, Pittsburgh 0 St. Louis 4, Philadelphia 1 Atlanta 9, N.Y. Mets 3 Miami 7, L.A. Dodgers 3 Washington 6, Arizona 5 Sunday's Games L.A. Dodgers 5, Miami 0 Pittsburgh 11, San Diego 5 Philadelphia 8, St. Louis 7, 11 innings Milwaukee 5, Houston 3 Cincinnati 3, Chicago Cubs 0 San Francisco 9, Colorado 6 Arizona 7, Washington 4 N.Y. Mets 6, Atlanta 5 Monday's Games L.A. Dodgers (Harang 7-7) at Pittsburgh (Karstens 4-2), 7:05 p.m. Philadelphia (Hamels 12-6) at Miami (Eovaldi 3-7), 7:10 p.m. San Diego (Stults 2-2) at Atlanta (Minor 6-8), 7:10 p.m. Houston (Galarraga 0-2) at Chicago Cubs (Samardzija 7-10), 8:05 p.m. Milwaukee (Fiers 6-4) at Colorado (Francis 3-4), 8:40 p.m. Washington (G.Gonzalez 14-6) at San Francisco (Vogelsong 10-5), 10:15 p.m. Tuesday's Games L.A. Dodgers at Pittsburgh, 7:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets at Cincinnati, 7:10 p.m. Philadelphia at Miami, 7:10 p.m. San Diego at Atlanta, 7:10 p.m. Houston at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m. Arizona at St. Louis, 8:15 p.m. Milwaukee at Colorado, 8:40 p.m. Washington at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m. Red Sox 14, Indians 1 Boston Cleveland ab r h bi ab r h bi Ellsbury cf 5 2 2 2 Donald 2b 4 1 1 0 Mortensen p 1 0 0 0 As.Cabrera dh4 0 1 0 Aceves p 0 0 0 0 Choo rf 2 0 0 0 C.Crawford lf 4 2 3 3 Kotchman 1b 2 0 0 0 Podsednik lf 1 0 0 0 C.Santana 1b-lf2 0 1 1 Pedroia 2b 3 3 2 1 Duncan lf-rf 3 0 0 0 Ciriaco 2b-cf 2 0 1 0 Lillibridge ss 4 0 0 0 Gonzalez 1b 3 2 2 4 Marson c 4 0 1 0 Punto 1b-2b 1 0 0 0 Hannahan 3b 4 0 0 0 C.Ross rf 4 1 1 1 Carrera cf 2 0 1 0 Saltalamacchia dh-1b5 1 1 1 Aviles ss 3 3 3 0 Valencia 3b 4 0 0 1 Shoppach c 4 0 1 1 Lavarnway c 1 0 0 0 Totals 41 14 16 14 Totals 31 1 5 1 Boston.......................320 180 000—14 Cleveland..................100 000 000—1 E_Donald (4). DP_Cleveland 1. LOB_Boston 7, Cleveland 7. 2B_Ellsbury (13), C.Crawford 3 (8), Pedroia (23), Ad.Gonzalez (36), Aviles (25), Carrera (1). HR_Ad.Gonzalez (13). SB_Aviles (11). SF_Valencia, C.Santana. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .IP H R ER BB SO Boston Lester W,6-10 . . . . . .6 3 1 1 2 12 Tazawa . . . . . . . . . . . .1 2 0 0 0 1 Mortensen . . . . . . . . .1 0 0 0 1 0 Aceves . . . . . . . . . . . .1 0 0 0 0 1 Cleveland Kluber L,0-1 . . . .3 1-3 7 6 6 0 4 Tomlin . . . . . . . . .1 1-3 5 7 7 2 1 Herrmann . . . . . .2 1-3 3 1 1 2 1 C.Allen . . . . . . . . . . . .1 1 0 0 0 0

J.Smith . . . . . . . . . . . .1 0 0 0 1 2 HBP_by Kluber (Aviles). PB_Marson. Umpires_Home, Marty Foster; First, Tim Timmons; Second, Eric Cooper; Third, Jeff Kellogg. T_3:20. A_27,488 (43,429). Reds 3, Cubs 0 i Cincinnat ab r h bi Cozart ss 4 0 0 0 Stubbs cf 4 0 0 0 B.Phillips 2b 4 0 0 0 Ludwick lf 4 1 1 1 Frazier 3b 4 1 2 0 4 1 1 2 Bruce rf Cairo 1b 4 0 1 0 Hanigan c 1 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 Cueto p 1 0 0 0 Paul ph Chapman p 0 0 0 0

Chicago

ab r h bi DeJesus rf 4 0 1 0 Barney 2b 4 0 1 0 Rizzo 1b 4 0 0 0 A.Soriano lf 3 0 0 0 S.Castro ss 4 0 0 0 Valbuena 3b 3 0 0 0 B.Jackson cf 3 0 1 0 Clevenger c 2 0 0 0 Raley p 1 0 0 0 Cardenas ph 1 0 1 0 Corpas p 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Camp p LaHair ph 1 0 0 0 Marmol p 0 0 0 0 Totals 32 3 6 3 Totals 30 0 4 0 Cincinnati .................000 021 000—3 Chicago.....................000 000 000—0 DP_Cincinnati 1. LOB_Cincinnati 6, Chicago 5. 2B_Cairo (5). HR_Ludwick (21), Bruce (22). SB_Cairo (3). S_Cueto. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .IP H R ER BB SO Cincinnati Cueto W,15-6 . . . . . . .8 3 0 0 2 3 Chapman S,28-32 . . .1 1 0 0 0 1 Chicago Raley L,0-2 . . . . . . . .6 5 3 3 1 2 Corpas . . . . . . . . . . . .1 1 0 0 0 1 Camp . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 0 0 0 0 1 Marmol . . . . . . . . . . . .1 0 0 0 1 1 HBP_by Corpas (Hanigan). Umpires_Home, Ron Kulpa; First, Jeff Nelson; Second, Alan Porter; Third, Jim Wolf. T_2:36. A_35,461 (41,009). Sunday's Major League Linescores AMERICAN LEAGUE NewYork . . . .000 013 300—7 11 0 Toronto . . . . .100 63000x—10 14 0 P.Hughes, Igarashi (5), Eppley (7), Rapada (8), Chamberlain (8) and R.Martin; Happ, Lincoln (6), Oliver (7), Janssen (9) and Mathis. W_Happ 1-1. L_P.Hughes 11-10. Sv_Janssen (15). HRs_New York, Jeter (9), Cano (25). Toronto, Encarnacion (30). Kansas City .000 210 000—3 8 0 Baltimore . . .020 011 01x—5 6 0 B.Chen, L.Coleman (6), Bueno (7), Crow (8) and B.Pena; Tom.Hunter, Ayala (6), Patton (7), Strop (8), Ji.Johnson (9) and Teagarden. W_Ayala 4-3. L_B.Chen 8-10. Sv_Ji.Johnson (34). HRs_Kansas City, Moustakas (18). Baltimore, Machado (3), Markakis (13). Oakland . . . .000 001 101—3 8 3 Chicago . . . .001 005 10x—7 11 0 B.Colon, Blevins (6), Scribner (7) and D.Norris; Sale, N.Jones (7), A.Reed (9) and Pierzynski. W_Sale 14-3. L_B.Colon 9-9. HRs_Oakland, J.Gomes (14), Rosales (2), D.Norris (5). Chicago, Pierzynski (23). Tampa Bay . .110 010 000 4—712 3 Minnesota . . .021 000 000 0—3 7 0 (10 innings) Shields, Jo.Peralta (8), Farnsworth (9), Howell (10), Rodney (10) and Lobaton; Diamond, Burton (8), Perkins (9), Al.Burnett (10), T.Robertson (10), Fien (10) and Mauer. W_Farnsworth 13. L_Al.Burnett 4-4. Sv_Rodney (36). HRs_Tampa Bay, De.Jennings (9), Keppinger (5). Minnesota, Morneau (16). Detroit . . . . . .000 030 000—3 6 3 Texas . . . . . . .203 100 20x—8 11 0 Porcello, Villarreal (7), D.Downs (7) and Avila; Darvish, R.Ross (7), Kirkman (8), Scheppers (9) and Soto. W_Darvish 12-8. L_Porcello 9-7. HRs_Texas, Hamilton (32). Seattle . . . . . .010 002 001—4 5 0 Los Angeles .010 000 000—1 7 0 Vargas, Wilhelmsen (9) and J.Montero; Weaver, Takahashi (8), Frieri (9) and Bo.Wilson. W_Vargas 13-8. L_Weaver 15-2. Sv_Wilhelmsen (16). HRs_Seattle, J.Montero 2 (12). NATIONAL LEAGUE Los Angeles .001 000 040—5 12 0 Miami . . . . . . .000 000 000—0 2 0 Capuano, J.Wright (9) and Treanor; LeBlanc, H.Bell (8), Hatcher (8), Gaudin (9) and Hayes. W_Capuano 118. L_LeBlanc 1-2. San Diego . . .410 000 000—5 6 1 Pittsburgh . . .001 90010x—11 14 2 Ohlendorf, Burns (4), Mikolas (5), Boxberger (7), Hinshaw (8) and Hundley; Bedard, Resop (6), Qualls (7), J.Cruz (8), Hanrahan (9) and McKenry. W_Bedard 7-12. L_Ohlendorf 4-3. HRs_San Diego, Denorfia (4). Pittsburgh, Barmes (6), Walker (14). Milwaukee . .010 021 010—5 9 1 Houston . . . .100 010 010—3 10 1 Gallardo, Veras (8), Loe (9) and M.Maldonado; Lyles, Storey (8) and C.Snyder. W_Gallardo 11-8. L_Lyles 2-

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 7 p.m. FSN — N.Y. Mets at Cincinnati MLB — Regional coverage, Texas at N.Y. Yankees or Boston at Baltimore SOFTBALL 7 p.m. ESPN2 — Little League World Series, semifinal, teams TBD, at Portland, Ore. 9:30 p.m. ESPN2 — Little League World Series, semifinal, teams TBD, at Portland, Ore.

WEDNESDAY GOLF 4 p.m. TGC — USGA, U.S. Amateur Championship, first round matches, at Cherry Hills Village, Colo. MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 2:10 p.m. WGN — Houston at Chicago Cubs 3:30 p.m. MLB — Regional coverage, Washington at San Francisco or Tampa Bay at Seattle 7 p.m. ESPN — Texas at N.Y. Yankees FSN — N.Y. Mets at Cincinnati SOCCER 2:30 p.m. ESPN2 — Men's national teams, exhibition, Germany vs. Argentina, at Frankfurt, Germany (same-day tape) 7 p.m. NBCSN — MLS, Los Angeles at Columbus 7:30 p.m. ESPN2 — Men's national teams, exhibition, Mexico vs. United States, at Mexico City SOFTBALL 10 p.m. ESPN2 — Little League World Series, championship game, teams TBD, at Portland, Ore.

THURSDAY GOLF 3 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, Wyndham Championship, first round, at Greensboro, N.C. 6:30 p.m. TGC — USGA, U.S. Amateur Championship, second round matches, at Cherry Hills Village, Colo. (same-day tape) LITTLE LEAGUE BASEBALL 1 p.m. ESPN — World Series, opening round, teams TBD, at South Williamsport, Pa. 3 p.m. ESPN — World Series, opening round, teams TBD, at South Williamsport, Pa. 5 p.m. ESPN2 — World Series, opening round, teams TBD, at South Williamsport, Pa. 8 p.m. ESPN — World Series, opening round, teams TBD, at South Williamsport, Pa. MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 1 p.m. MLB — Texas at N.Y. Yankees 7 p.m. FSN — N.Y. Mets at Cincinnati MLB — Regional coverage, N.Y. Mets at Cincinnati or Boston at Baltimore NFL FOOTBALL 8 p.m. FOX — Preseason, Cincinnati at Atlanta TENNIS 1 p.m. ESPN2 — ATP World Tour, Western & Southern Open, round of 16, at Mason, Ohio 7 p.m. ESPN2 — ATP World Tour, Western & Southern Open, round of 16, at Mason, Ohio 9. Sv_Loe (1). HRs_Milwaukee, Hart (22). Colorado . . . .002 102 100—6 13 0 San Francisco300 010 05x—9 14 1 White, C.Torres (5), Belisle (7), R.Betancourt (8), Ekstrom (8) and W.Rosario; Zito, Kontos (6), Hensley (7), Ja.Lopez (9), Romo (9) and Posey. W_Hensley 4-3. L_Belisle 3-4. HRs_San Francisco, Pence (18). Washington .000 000 202—4 7 2 Arizona . . . . .012 040 00x—7 6 1 Detwiler, Stammen (5), Storen (8) and K.Suzuki; Corbin, Albers (8), Saito (9), Putz (9) and M.Montero. W_Corbin 4-4. L_Detwiler 6-5. Sv_Putz (22). Atlanta . . . . . .010 000 004—5 7 1 NewYork . . . .210 011 01x—6 10 0 Sheets, Venters (7), C.Martinez (8) and McCann; Niese, Edgin (9), F.Francisco (9), Rauch (9) and Ro.Johnson. W_Niese 9-6. L_Sheets 42. Sv_Rauch (2). HRs_Atlanta, F.Freeman (15). New York, Valdespin (8). Midwest League Eastern Division Bowling Green (Rays) Lansing (Blue Jays) Fort Wayne (Padres) Lake County (Indians) South Bend (D-backs) West Michigan (Tigers) Dayton (Reds) Great Lakes (Dodgers) Western Division

W 29 27 28 26 25 24 21 21

L 20 20 21 22 24 25 26 27

Pct. .592 .574 .571 .542 .510 .490 .447 .438

GB — 1 1 2½ 4 5 7 7½

W L Pct. GB Clinton (Mariners) 30 19 .612 — Beloit (Twins) 26 23 .531 4 Burlington (Athletics) 26 23 .531 4 Kane County (Royals) 26 23 .531 4 Wisconsin (Brewers) 24 25 .490 6 Quad Cities (Cardinals) 23 26 .469 7 Peoria (Cubs) 19 30 .388 11 Cedar Rapids (Angels) 14 35 .286 16 Saturday's Games Kane County 4, Cedar Rapids 3 Bowling Green 2, West Michigan 1, 15 innings Dayton 4, Fort Wayne 3 Lansing 4, Great Lakes 3, 12 innings South Bend 7, Lake County 2 Wisconsin 9, Clinton 8, 13 innings Peoria 5, Beloit 3 Quad Cities 9, Burlington 8 Sunday's Games West Michigan 3, Bowling Green 2 Lansing 10, Great Lakes 6 Clinton 9, Wisconsin 4 Lake County 10, South Bend 6 Beloit 6, Peoria 5 Kane County 9, Cedar Rapids 5 Dayton 5, Fort Wayne 4 Burlington 4, Quad Cities 3 Monday's Games Bowling Green at West Michigan, 12

p.m. Fort Wayne at Dayton, 7 p.m. Lake County at South Bend, 7:05 p.m. Lansing at Great Lakes, 7:05 p.m. Kane County at Cedar Rapids, 7:35 p.m. Peoria at Beloit, 8 p.m. Burlington at Quad Cities, 8 p.m. Clinton at Wisconsin, 8:05 p.m. Tuesday's Games No games scheduled

FOOTBALL National Football League Preseason Glance All Times EDT AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct New England 1 0 0 1.000 Buffalo 0 1 0 .000 Miami 0 1 0 .000 N.Y. Jets 0 1 0 .000 South W L T Pct Houston 1 0 0 1.000 Jacksonville 1 0 0 1.000 Indianapolis 1 0 0 1.000 Tennessee 0 1 0 .000 North W L T Pct Baltimore 1 0 0 1.000 Cincinnati 1 0 0 1.000 Cleveland 1 0 0 1.000 Pittsburgh 0 1 0 .000 West W L T Pct Denver 1 0 0 1.000 Kansas City 1 0 0 1.000 San Diego 1 0 0 1.000 Oakland 0 0 0 .000 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct Philadelphia 1 0 0 1.000 Washington 1 0 0 1.000 Dallas 0 0 0 .000 N.Y. Giants 0 1 0 .000 South W L T Pct Tampa Bay 1 0 0 1.000 New Orleans 1 1 0 .500 Atlanta 0 1 0 .000 Carolina 0 1 0 .000 North W L T Pct Chicago 0 1 0 .000 Detroit 0 1 0 .000 Green Bay 0 1 0 .000 Minnesota 0 1 0 .000 West W L T Pct San Francisco 1 0 0 1.000 Seattle 1 0 0 1.000 St. Louis 0 1 0 .000 Arizona 0 2 0 .000

PF PA 7 6 6 7 7 20 6 17 PF 26 32 38 17

PA 13 31 3 27

PF 31 17 19 23

PA 17 6 17 24

PF PA 31 3 27 17 21 13 0 0

PF PA 24 23 7 6 0 0 31 32 PF 20 23 17 13

PA 7 17 31 26

PF 3 17 13 6

PA 31 19 21 17

PF 17 27 3 27

PA 6 17 38 44

Saturday's Games Houston 26, Carolina 13 Seattle 27, Tennessee 17 Sunday's Game Indianapolis 38, St. Louis 3 Monday, Aug. 13 Dallas at Oakland, 8 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 16 Cleveland at Green Bay, 8 p.m. Cincinnati at Atlanta, 8 p.m. Friday, Aug. 17 Tennessee at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m. Buffalo at Minnesota, 8 p.m. Jacksonville at New Orleans, 8 p.m. Detroit at Baltimore, 8 p.m. Miami at Carolina, 8 p.m. Oakland at Arizona, 10 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 18 N.Y. Giants at N.Y. Jets, 7 p.m. San Francisco at Houston, 8 p.m. Kansas City at St. Louis, 8 p.m. Washington at Chicago, 8 p.m. Dallas at San Diego, 9 p.m. Seattle at Denver, 9 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 19 Indianapolis at Pittsburgh, 8 p.m. Monday, Aug. 20 Philadelphia at New England, 8 p.m.

GOLF PGA Championship Scores Sunday At Kiawah Island Golf Resort (Ocean Course) Kiawah Island, S.C. Purse: $8 million Yardage: 7,676; Par: 72 Final Rory McIlroy, $1,445,000.....67-75-67-66—275 David Lynn, $865,000..........73-74-68-68—283 Justin Rose, $384,500.........69-79-70-66—284 Keegan Bradley, $384,500...68-77-71-68—284 Ian Poulter, $384,500...........70-71-74-69—284 Carl Pettersson, $384,500...66-74-72-72—284 Blake Adams, $226,000 ......71-72-75-67—285 Jamie Donaldson, $226,00069-73-73-70—285 Peter Hanson, $226,000......69-75-70-71—285 Steve Stricker, $226,000......74-73-67-71—285 Ben Curtis, $143,286...........69-76-73-67—286 Bubba Watson, $143,286....73-75-70-68—286 Tim Clark, $143,286 ............71-73-73-69—286 Geoff Ogilvy, $143,286 ........68-78-70-70—286 G. McDowell, $143,286........68-76-71-71—286 Tiger Woods, $143,286........69-71-74-72—286 Adam Scott, $143,286.........68-75-70-73—286 John Daly, $99,667 ..............68-77-73-69—287 Padraig Harrington, $99,66770-76-69-72—287 Bo Van Pelt, $99,667............73-73-67-74—287 Seung-yul Noh, $72,667......74-75-74-65—288 Robert Garrigus, $72,667....74-73-74-67—288 Joost Luiten, $72,667...........68-76-75-69—288 Louis Oosthuizen, $72,667..70-79-70-69—288 Pat Perez, $72,667...............69-76-71-72—288 Jimmy Walker, $72,667........73-75-67-73—288 Thorbjorn Olesen, $51,900 .75-74-71-69—289 Jason Dufner, $51,900.........74-76-68-71—289 Miguel A. Jimenez, $51,90069-77-72-71—289 Marc Leishman, $51,900.....74-72-71-72—289 Trevor Immelman, $51,900..71-72-70-76—289 Luke Donald, $42,625..........74-76-74-66—290 John Senden, $42,625 ........73-74-72-71—290 Greg Chalmers, $42,625.....70-76-72-72—290 Bill Haas, $42,625................75-73-69-73—290 Y.E.Yang, $34,750................73-74-74-70—291 Rich Beem, $34,750............72-76-72-71—291 Fredrik Jacobson, $34,750..71-75-73-72—291 Phil Mickelson, $34,750.......73-71-73-74—291 Marcel Siem, $34,750..........72-73-71-75—291 Vijay Singh, $34,750............71-69-74-77—291 Martin Laird, $25,750...........71-74-79-68—292 David Toms, $25,750............72-78-72-70—292 Gary Woodland, $25,750.....67-79-75-71—292 J.J. Henry, $25,750...............72-77-70-73—292 Jim Furyk, $25,750 ..............72-77-70-73—292 Aaron Baddeley, $25,750 ....68-75-74-75—292 Scott Piercy, $18,625 ...........68-78-78-69—293 Retief Goosen, $18,625.......73-74-75-70—293 Thomas Bjorn, $18,625.......70-79-74-70—293 Dustin Johnson, $18,625.....71-79-72-71—293 Ernie Els, $18,625................72-75-73-73—293 Paul Lawrie, $18,625 ...........73-75-71-74—293 Sang Moon Bae, $16,810 ...72-78-71-73—294 Brendon de Jonge, $16,81071-78-72-73—294 Darren Clarke, $16,810 .......73-76-72-73—294 K.J. Choi, $16,810................69-77-75-73—294 Francesco Molinari, $16,81070-75-74-75—294 Ryo Ishikawa, $16,100.........69-77-79-70—295 Charl Schwartzel, $16,100..70-77-74-74—295 K.T. Kim, $15,900.................69-77-77-73—296 George McNeill, $15,650.....71-76-80-70—297 Chez Reavie, $15,650 .........74-76-73-74—297 Ken Duke, $15,650 ..............71-78-74-74—297 Fernandez-Cast. $15,650....67-78-75-77—297 Marcus Fraser, $15,350.......74-75-78-71—298 Alex Noren, $15,350 ............67-80-73-78—298 John Huh, $15,150...............72-78-79-70—299 Toru Taniguchi, $15,150.......72-76-78-73—299 Zach Johnson, $15,000.......72-73-76-79—300 Matt Every, $14,900 .............72-76-74-82—304 Cameron Tringale, $14,800 .69-78-77-82—306 PGA Championship Winners 2012 — Rory McIlroy 2011 — Keegan Bradley 2010 — Martin Kaymer 2009 — Y.E. Yang 2008 — Padraig Harrington 2007 — Tiger Woods 2006 — Tiger Woods 2005 — Phil Mickelson 2004 — Vijay Singh 2003 — Shaun Micheel 2002 — Rich Beem 2001 — David Toms 2000 — Tiger Woods 1999 — Tiger Woods 1998 — Vijay Singh 1997 — Davis Love III 1996 — Mark Brooks 1995 — Steve Elkington 1994 — Nick Price 1993 — Paul Azinger 1992 — Nick Price 1991 — John Daly 1990 — Wayne Grady 1989 — Payne Stewart Jamie Farr Toledo Classic Scores Sunday At Highland Meadows Golf Club Sylvania, Ohio Purse: $1.3 million Yardage: 6,428; Par: 71 Final SoYeon Ryu, $195,000 .......67-68-67-62—264 Angela Stanford, $119,765..66-70-69-66—271 Chella Choi, $77,045 ...........66-67-70-69—272 Inbee Park, $77,045.............69-65-69-69—272 Jennie Lee, $49,178 ............69-70-67-67—273 I.K. Kim, $49,178..................69-67-66-71—273 Mika Miyazato, $34,753.......66-68-69-71—274 Jiyai Shin, $34,753...............69-67-66-72—274 Beatriz Recari, $27,868.......70-66-70-69—275 Hee Kyung Seo, $27,868 ....68-66-68-73—275 Stacy Lewis, $22,310...........68-69-73-66—276 Karine Icher, $22,310...........66-69-71-70—276 Jacqui Concolino, $22,310 ..68-68-69-71—276 Hee-Won Han, $22,310.......68-67-70-71—276 Lindsey Wright, $18,010......69-68-73-67—277 Sandra Gal, $18,010............69-71-68-69—277 Jeong Jang, $18,010 ...........68-70-69-70—277 Natalie Gulbis, $15,650 .......69-71-69-69—278 Karin Sjodin, $15,650 ..........73-68-68-69—278 Pernilla Lindberg, $15,650...64-71-70-73—278 NaYeon Choi, $13,770........70-71-70-68—279 Sydnee Michaels, $13,770..69-68-72-70—279 AmyYang, $13,770 ..............67-73-69-70—279 Mo Martin, $13,770..............69-72-67-71—279 Taylor Coutu, $11,387..........71-71-70-68—280 Kristy McPherson, $11,387.72-69-71-68—280

B5

Janice Moodie, $11,387.......68-72-72-68—280 Mi Jung Hur, $11,387...........71-66-74-69—280 Brittany Lang, $11,387.........70-71-70-69—280 N. Gulyanamitta, $11,387....66-72-72-70—280 Jennifer Johnson, $8,119 ....70-68-74-69—281 Candie Kung, $8,119...........69-70-73-69—281 Cindy LaCrosse, $8,119......69-72-71-69—281 Reilley Rankin, $8,119.........72-70-70-69—281 Laura Davies, $8,119...........68-74-69-70—281 Brittany Lincicome, $8,119 ..69-73-69-70—281 Jane Park, $8,119................68-71-72-70—281 Paula Creamer, $8,119........68-71-71-71—281 Jenny Shin, $8,119 ..............67-73-70-71—281 Haeji Kang, $8,119 ..............72-70-67-72—281 JeeYoung Lee, $8,119 ........68-72-69-72—281 Becky Morgan, $6,033.........69-72-70-71—282 Julieta Granada, $6,033 ......70-72-68-72—282 Samantha Richdale, $6,03369-69-70-74—282 Victoria Tanco, $5,180..........72-69-74-68—283 Momoko Ueda, $5,180........69-73-71-70—283 P.K. Kongkraphan, $5,180....69-71-72-71—283 Kathleen Ekey, $5,180.........69-68-74-72—283 Tiffany Joh, $5,180...............71-69-69-74—283 Veronica Felibert, $4,065.....70-71-76-67—284 Leta Lindley, $4,065 .............70-71-74-69—284 Wendy Ward, $4,065 ...........71-69-74-70—284 Sarah Jane Smith, $4,065...71-71-71-71—284 Christine Song, $4,065........69-69-75-71—284 Jimin Kang, $4,065..............70-71-71-72—284 JiYoung Oh, $4,065.............71-70-71-72—284 Irene Cho, $4,065 ................70-70-71-73—284 Brooke Pancake, $4,065 .....68-73-69-74—284 Moira Dunn, $3,301 .............69-73-73-70—285 Belen Mozo, $3,301.............71-69-73-72—285 Meredith Duncan, $3,301....66-72-74-73—285 Nicole Hage, $3,082 ............69-71-74-72—286 Danielle Kang, $3,082 .........68-71-74-73—286 Valentine Derrey, $3,082......69-71-72-74—286 Ayaka Kaneko, $2,918.........67-73-75-72—287 D. Claire Schreefel, $2,918..68-69-74-76—287 Maria Hernandez, $2,754....71-70-74-73—288 Ilhee Lee, $2,754 .................67-74-73-74—288 Jessica Korda, $2,754 .........73-65-74-76—288 Tzu-Chi Lin, $2,590..............70-71-77-71—289 Danah Bordner, $2,590 .......68-73-73-75—289 Gerina Piller, $2,590 ............67-74-71-77—289 Dori Carter, $2,524...............70-70-74-77—291 Jane Rah, $2,492.................68-74-77-74—293

AUTO RACING NASCAR Sprint Cup-Finger Lakes 355 at The Glen Results Sunday At Watkins Glen International Watkins Glen, N.Y. Lap length: 2.45 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (5) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 90 laps, 128.5 rating, 47 points, $259,558. 2. (4) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 90, 129.1, 43, $187,180. 3. (3) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 90, 111.3, 41, $166,821. 4. (8) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 90, 105.6, 40, $142,399. 5. (17) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 90, 94.5, 0, $141,935. 6. (15) Greg Biffle, Ford, 90, 88.9, 38, $109,610. 7. (2) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 90, 133.7, 39, $140,968. 8. (24) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 90, 84.7, 36, $127,771. 9. (13) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 90, 86, 35, $107,568. 10. (9) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 90, 101.8, 34, $108,424. 11. (6) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 90, 79.5, 33, $118,443. 12. (22) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 90, 83.7, 32, $85,610. 13. (20) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 90, 83.3, 31, $83,935. 14. (18) Carl Edwards, Ford, 90, 98, 31, $116,576. 15. (19) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 90, 85.7, 29, $119,821. 16. (30) Casey Mears, Ford, 90, 67.1, 28, $89,093. 17. (21) Scott Speed, Ford, 90, 67, 27, $68,710. 18. (29) Aric Almirola, Ford, 90, 64.8, 26, $109,246. 19. (7) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 90, 89.4, 25, $121,260. 20. (34) David Gilliland, Ford, 90, 58.4, 24, $87,068. 21. (12) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 90, 78.5, 23, $115,721. 22. (32) David Ragan, Ford, 90, 53.6, 22, $82,793. 23. (35) Landon Cassill, Toyota, 90, 44.9, 21, $97,155. 24. (42) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 90, 48.8, 20, $93,082. 25. (25) Boris Said, Ford, 90, 48.2, 19, $78,835. 26. (39) Stephen Leicht, Chevrolet, 90, 39, 18, $79,560. 27. (26) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 90, 48, 17, $77,735. 28. (16) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 89, 73.9, 16, $77,485. 29. (36) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 88, 42.7, 0, $66,310. 30. (28) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 84, 46.4, 14, $108,735. 31. (27) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 81, 62.4, 13, $78,010. 32. (14) Joey Logano, Toyota, 71, 62.5, 12, $76,285. 33. (1) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, accident, 63, 99.8, 12, $101,526. 34. (23) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, engine, 57, 66.5, 10, $110,501. 35. (41) Jason Leffler, Toyota, engine, 42, 32.5, 0, $65,360. 36. (31) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, suspension, 41, 38.8, 8, $65,185. 37. (11) Michael McDowell, Ford, rear gear, 30, 45.4, 7, $65,055. 38. (38) Josh Wise, Ford, electrical, 25, 36.5, 6, $64,853. 39. (10) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, accident, 24, 69.9, 5, $93,008. 40. (37) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, brakes, 15, 33, 4, $61,845. 41. (40) Chris Cook, Toyota, brakes, 5, 31.9, 3, $61,680. 42. (43) Patrick Long, Toyota, brakes, 2, 32.4, 2, $61,555. 43. (33) Brian Vickers, Toyota, engine, 0, 30.8, 1, $61,930. Race Statistics Average Speed of Race Winner: 98.145 mph. Time of Race: 2 hours, 14 minutes, 48 seconds. Margin of Victory: 0.571 seconds. Caution Flags: 4 for 13 laps. Lead Changes: 10 among 5 drivers. Lap Leaders: Ky.Busch 1-26; J.Montoya 27; B.Keselowski 28-38; M.Ambrose 39-45; B.Keselowski 46-56; Ky.Busch 57-58; C.Edwards 59; B.Keselowski 60-74; Ky.Busch 75-89; M.Ambrose 90. Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led): Ky.Busch, 3 times for 43 laps; B.Keselowski, 3 times for 37 laps; M.Ambrose, 2 times for 8 laps; C.Edwards, 1 time for 1 lap; J.Montoya, 1 time for 1 lap. Top 12 in Points: 1. J.Johnson, 777; 2. G.Biffle, 776; 3. M.Kenseth, 775; 4. D.Earnhardt Jr., 760; 5. B.Keselowski, 733; 6. M.Truex Jr., 728; 7. C.Bowyer, 719; 8. T.Stewart, 716; 9. K.Harvick, 710; 10. D.Hamlin, 693; 11. K.Kahne, 653; 12. C.Edwards, 650.


B6

SPORTS

Monday, August 13, 2012

TROY DAILY NEWS â&#x20AC;˘ WWW.TROYDAILYNEWS.COM

â&#x2013; Golf

PGA â&#x2013; CONTINUED FROM B3 the third hole. He only found it with help from the TV crew, took his penalty shot and fired a wedge into 6 feet to save par. He was on his way, and he never let up. McIlroy also won the U.S. Open by eight shots, the kind of dominance that Woods has displayed over so many years. By winning the PGA

Championship, he is halfway home to the career Grand Slam. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was a great round of golf. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m speechless,â&#x20AC;? said McIlroy after hoisting the Wanamaker Trophy, the heaviest of the four majors. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just been incredible. I had a good feeling about it at the start. I never imagined to do this.â&#x20AC;? Winning the final major the year ends what had

been a tumultuous season for McIlroy. Despite winning the Honda Classic in early March, he went into a tail spin by missing four cuts over five tournaments, as questions swirled that his romance with tennis star Caroline Wozniacki was hurting his game. Instead, McIlroy put a big hurt on the strongest field of the year. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very good. We all

know the talent he has,â&#x20AC;? Woods said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He went through a little spell this year, and I think that was good for him. We all go through those spells in our careers. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s got all the talent in the world to do what heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s doing. And this is the way that Rory can play. AP PHOTO When he gets it going, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pretty impressive to watch.â&#x20AC;? Rory McIlroy hits out of the sand along the tenth McIlroy finished on 13- hole during the final round of the PGA Championship Sunday. under 275.

â&#x2013; Auto Racing

â&#x2013; Tennis

Ambrose finishes on top at Watkins Glen STAFF PHOTO/ANTHONY WEBER

Troyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ivy Smith returns this season to her role as the Trojans first singles player.

Tennis â&#x2013; CONTINUED FROM B3 of people back. And Vandalia Also returning is the first doubles team of Meredith Orozco and Holly Riley, and Kelly Fisher â&#x20AC;&#x201D; one-half of last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s second doubles team â&#x20AC;&#x201D; is also back. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I like that experience,â&#x20AC;? Goldner said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Things Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve told them for the last two or three years, they already know and understand. So it makes it easier on me. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ivy played first singles last year, so she knows what to expect from the competition, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s really nice having our first doubles team back. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a big positive. Going from third to second will be a big jump for Amber, and Kelly has a year of experience at second doubles. Right now itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just finding those other two pieces to go along with them.â&#x20AC;? And in the mix for those spots is yet another senior in Mayu Ohtsuka, as well as juniors Shelby Arnett, Aki Foran and Noelle Culp and sophomore Marina Wehrkamp. And one week hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been enough to work out those positions â&#x20AC;&#x201D; but that may not be a bad thing. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It all shakes out,â&#x20AC;? Goldner said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It keeps the competition going on, so they know that they have to perform every day.â&#x20AC;? And with the schedule theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re facing, the Trojans will have to do just that. The team opens with Centerville on Tuesday and Springfield in the first week, as well, a pair of tough matches to start off. And with their sights set on a Greater Western Ohio Conference North Division title, the Trojans know matchups with defending champ Greenville and consistently tough Butler will be key, as well. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A lot of teams in our area are going to be very close,â&#x20AC;? Goldner said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got a pretty tough schedule in our area. And in the North, we were second to Greenville last year, and they have a lot

is going to be tough as always. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to be a pretty good team. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We always have the goal of winning the North and to be in the top 10 in the Division I Dayton area poll. And we want to get someone to the district tournament. Those are always our goals, and hopefully we can achieve a few of them this year.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;˘ Milton-Union The Milton-Union tennis team lost its top two players from last year in Andrea Fetters and Jessie Finfrock. But even with experience lacking, the Bulldogs still hope to put forth great effort in their defense of the Southwestern Buckeye League Buckeye Division title. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This team works hard but is lacking in experience,â&#x20AC;? Milton-Union coach Sharon Paul said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We will have two or three first year varsity players in our line-up every match. Most of the returning players will be at different positions from where they played last season. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We graduated our top two players from last year â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Andrea Fetters and Jessie Finfrock â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and both were excellent players. It will take us a little time to recover from that as it would any team. Our hope is to improve enough to have a winning season and to defend our league title from 2011.â&#x20AC;? Brooke Falb is expected to play at first singles. Falb â&#x20AC;&#x201D; who played third singles last year â&#x20AC;&#x201D; was a league champion at her position and was also a district qualifier in doubles. The No. 2 singles position is up for grabs between Jesica Ferguson and Claire Fetters. The duo played first doubles together last year â&#x20AC;&#x201D;and were named second team all league. Ferguson was also a district qualifier. At first doubles, Kayla Smith will be paired with either Ferguson or Fetters.

WATKINS GLEN, N.Y. (AP) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Slipping and sliding around oil-spattered Watkins Glen International on the last lap and fighting for the lead, Marcos Ambrose and Brad Keselowski didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know what lay around the next turn. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was absolutely chaos at the end,â&#x20AC;? Ambrose said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I had really burned off the brakes. I couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t figure out where it (the oil) was coming from. It was just absolutely crazy at the end.â&#x20AC;? Ambrose finally passed Keselowski heading to the final turn in a stunning fender-banging duel to win the Sprint Cup race at Watkins Glen International for the second straight time. The oil had been spewing from the No. 47 of Bobby Labonte and ruined the day for Kyle Busch, who seemingly held a commanding lead heading to the white flag of the Finger Lakes 355. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In the end, nobody knew what was going on,â&#x20AC;? said Richard Petty, owner of Ambroseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s No. 9 Ford. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They were slipping and sliding off the race track. Marcos might have known a little bit about it, but the rest of us didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t. Marcos stayed with it all day. Everything fell our way.â&#x20AC;? It didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t for Busch, who led 43 laps. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kyle hit the oil,â&#x20AC;? said Dave Rogers, crew chief of

AP PHOTO

Marcos Ambrose competes during the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series auto race at Watkins Glen International Sunday in Watkins Glen, N.Y. Buschâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s No. 18 Toyota. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The 47 broke. You can see him, he just went by smoking. He left oil down all over the track. Kyle hit the oil and it allowed the 2 (Keselowski) to get to us.â&#x20AC;? Desperate for a win to move back into contention for the Chase for the Sprint Cup championship, Busch skidded sideways coming out of the first turn of the

final lap. Keselowskiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s No. 2 Dodge caromed off the side of Busch heading uphill through the high-speed esses and Ambrose followed Keselowski through as Busch spun to the side. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Busch slipped up big in turn one,â&#x20AC;? said Keselowski, who suffered damage to the front of his car. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There was nothing he could do. We all checked up and Marcos was

right on my bumper. We all just about spun out. We got to the inner loop, and again nothing but oil.â&#x20AC;? Skidding around the 11turn, 2.45-mile layout, Ambrose and Keselowski battled side by side nearly all the way around. Both even went into the grass in the inner loop at the top of the esses but kept charging.

hit this series.â&#x20AC;? The Reds have won three straight after snapping a season-worst five-game losing streak on Friday. Cincinnatiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 22-8 record since the All-Star break is best in the majors. Cueto, a leading NL Cy Young candidate, has allowed three runs or fewer in 20 of 24 starts and lowered his ERA to 2.45. Raley said he learned a lot just by watching the Cincinnati ace. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was watching him from the on-deck circle,â&#x20AC;? Raley said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He hides the ball extremely well. He gets ahead in the count with a lot

of different stuff. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He throws a lot of things at you and heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not really predictable at all,â&#x20AC;? Raley added. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s obviously a great pitcher and showed that today.â&#x20AC;? Red Sox 14, Indians 1 CLEVELAND â&#x20AC;&#x201D; A 14-1 loss is hardly the best way to wrap up a homestand. Indians pitchers were knocked all over the ballpark on Sunday in the lopsided loss to the Boston Red Sox. Already trailing 6-1, Cleveland allowed eight runs in the fifth inning to turn this one into a rout.

â&#x2013; Major League Baseball

Reds â&#x2013; CONTINUED FROM B3 â&#x20AC;&#x153;(Raley) did a great job,â&#x20AC;? Sveum said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A couple of flyballs that went out werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even hit that good.â&#x20AC;? Aroldis Chapman earned the save for the third game in a row, his 28th of the season. In his second big league start in place of injured right-hander Matt Garza, Raley retired the first 13 Reds. He allowed five hits and three runs over six innings after giving up eight hits and seven runs in his first outing at San Diego. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Five days between starts, it gives you an opportunity to

see the older guys, see what they do, and try to learn from it,â&#x20AC;? Raley said.â&#x20AC;? The biggest thing I saw from everybody else starting is throwing strike one. Getting ahead in the count. And keeping the ball down.â&#x20AC;? Chicago has lost 11 of 12, with seven of those losses coming by two or fewer runs. The Cubs have been shut out four times since July 31. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re right back in the same bucket we were in the first couple of months, when we just couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get anything going,â&#x20AC;? Sveum said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sorianoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s home run is I think the only home run we

â&#x2013; National Football League Y o u r

H o m e

T o w n

S p o r t s

M e d i c i n e

T e a m

UVMC Center for Sports Medicine

Walk-In Clinic for Athletic Injuries Saturdays Aug. 18-Oct. 27* 9-11 a.m. Last walk-in accepted at 10:30 a.m.

Clinic held at Hyatt Center, 450 N. Hyatt St., Suite 304, Tipp City.

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(*Excluding Sept. 29.)

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Raidersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Pryor excited to play NAPA, Calif. (AP) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Terrelle Pryor has been waiting a long time to play in a football game. After an aborted rookie season with the Oakland Raiders that included no preseason games and a penalty before his only snap in the regular season, Pryor is more than ready for this seasonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s exhibition opener. Pryor will get that chance tonight when the Raiders (tied for No. 23 in the AP Pro32) play at home against the Dallas Cowboys (No. 15, AP Pro32). While Oakland coach Dennis Allen is not even telling his players how much or when they will play, he did say Pryor would get plenty of snaps at quarterback behind starter Carson Palmer and Matt Leinart. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t wait,â&#x20AC;? Pryor said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been a long time for me

to play football. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what I was born to do. God blessed me. He gave me great talent and I just want to try to â&#x20AC;Ś use it again. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been a long time.â&#x20AC;? Pryor got very little out of a rookie season that was doomed from the start. He didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t decide to leave Ohio State until after the NFL draft following an investigation into the teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s memorabilia-for-cash scandal that cost coach Jim Tressel his job. Commissioner Roger Goodell allowed Pryor into the supplemental draft but ruled he must serve the five-game suspension he would have faced in college. The Raiders used a thirdround pick on Aug. 22 to select Pryor and signed him three days later. Pryor got to participate in only three practices and no exhibition games before

his suspension kicked in, limiting him to team meetings and individual drills without coaches. Even when Pryor was activated, he mostly was a scout-team quarterback as the third-stringer behind Palmer and Kyle Boller. Pryor got in once last season on Oct. 23 against Kansas City. He was sent in for a third-and-1 quarterback sneak. Pryor said he was told to call for a quick snap and go for the first down. Instead, he was penalized for a false start for not pausing a second under center before the snap. Boller threw an interception that was returned for a touchdown on the following play and Pryor never saw the field again that season. He figures to get much more time tonight.


2012 MIAMI COUNTY FAIR

TROY DAILY NEWS • WWW.TROYDAILYNEWS.COM

Monday, August 13, 2012

B7

Results • CONTINUED FROM B2 Jones, Sally Casstown 1 02 - Counted Cross Stitch, under 5 inches measure long side of design Hand Needlework Smallenbarger, Doris Troy 2 02 - Counted Cross Stitch, under 5 inches measure long side of design Hand Needlework Butts, Judy Tipp City 3 02 - Counted Cross Stitch, under 5 inches measure long side of design Hand Needlework Smallenbarger, Doris Troy 1 03 - Counted Cross Stitch, 5 inches to 8 inches measure long side of design Hand Needlework Jones, Sally Casstown 2 03 - Counted Cross Stitch, 5 inches to 8 inches measure long side of design Hand Needlework Smallenbarger, Doris Troy 1 04 - Counted Cross Stitch, 8.1 inches to 16 inches measure long side of design Hand Needlework Franz, Elizabeth Troy 2 04 - Counted Cross Stitch, 8.1 inches to 16 inches measure long side of design Hand Needlework Smallenbarger, Doris Troy 1 Best of Show 05 Counted Cross Stitch, 16 inches measure long side of design Hand Needlework Franz, Elizabeth Troy 2 05 - Counted Cross Stitch, 16 inches measure long side of design Hand Needlework Jones, Sally Casstown 3 05 - Counted Cross Stitch, 16 inches measure long side of design Hand Needlework Jones, Sally Casstown 1 06 - Beaded Counted Cross Stitch - any kind Hand Needlework Dickensheets, Jennifer New Carlise 2 07 - Lace Work (all sizes) Hand Needlework Sloan, Ann Piqua 1 08 Other Hand Needlework Franz, Elizabeth Troy 2 08 - Other Hand Needlework Hershberger, Jane Troy 3 08 - Other Hand Needlework Shell, Jese Covington 1 01 - Collections Hobbies Youth ages 14 to 18 Wheaton, Allan Piqua 1 03 - Lego and similar construction toys Hobbies Youth ages 14 to 18 Butts, Judy Tipp City 1 01 - Collections Hobbies Adult 19 and over Agne, Karen Troy 2 01 - Collections Hobbies Adult 19 and over Burns, Laura Piqua 3 01 - Collections Hobbies Adult 19 and over Swartz, Jim Piqua 1 02 - Creative Hobbies - Adult 19 and over Ragan, Abbie Tipp City 1 01 - Collections Hobbies - Youth ages 8 and under Eversman, Ciara Troy 1 Best of Show 03 - Lego and similar construction toys Hobbies - Youth ages 8 and under Demmitt, Tyler Casstown 2 03 - Lego and similar construction toys Hobbies - Youth ages 8 and under Butts, Dustin Pleasant Hill 3 03 - Lego and similar construction toys Hobbies - Youth ages 8 and under Wick, Matthew Troy 1 01 - Collections Hobbies Youth Ages 9 to 13 Herron, Matthew Piqua 2 01 - Collections Hobbies - Youth Ages 9 to 13 Covault, Ashley Piqua 3 01 - Collections Hobbies - Youth Ages 9 to 13

Demmitt, Haley Casstown 1 Best of Show 02 - Creative Hobbies Youth Ages 9 to 13 Eversman, Emily Troy 2 02 - Creative Hobbies Youth Ages 9 to 13 Roan, Hannah New Castle 3 02 - Creative Hobbies - Youth Ages 9 to 13 Stevens, Garrett West Milton 1 03 - Leggo and similar construction toys, limit space 24 in x 24 in Hobbies - Youth Ages 9 to 13 Norris, Luke Tipp City 2 03 - Leggo and similar construction toys, limit space 24 in x 24 in Hobbies - Youth Ages 9 to 13 Tackett, Colin Pleasant Hill 3 03 - Leggo and similar construction toys, limit space 24 in x 24 in Hobbies - Youth Ages 9 to 13 Sutherly, Emma Troy 1 Best of Show 01 Necklace Jewelry Handcrafted Youh ages 18 and under Otte, Madison Covington 201 - Necklace Jewelry - Handcrafted Youh ages 18 and under Otte, Madison Covington 1 02 - Bracelet Jewelry - Handcrafted Youh ages 18 and under Schmackers, Gabrielle Pleasant Hill 2 02 Bracelet Jewelry Handcrafted Youh ages 18 and under Chinn, Kayleigh Alcony 1 03 - Earrings Jewelry Handcrafted Youh ages 18 and under Otte, Madison Covington 2 03 - Earrings Jewelry - Handcrafted Youh ages 18 and under Hafer, Marcia Fletcher 1 Best of Show 01 Necklace Jewelry Handcrafted Adult Snider, Jennifer New Carlise 2 01 - Necklace Jewelry - Handcrafted Adult Schmackers, Teresa Pleasant Hill 3 01 Necklace Jewelry Handcrafted Adult Creager, Freda Piqua 1 02 - Bracelet Jewelry Handcrafted Adult Snider, Jennifer New Carlise 2 02 - Bracelet Jewelry - Handcrafted Adult Snider, Jennifer New Carlise 1 03 - Earrings Jewelry - Handcrafted Adult Buchert, Stephanie Troy 2 03 - Earrings Jewelry - Handcrafted Adult Hafer, Marcia Fletcher 3 03 - Earrings Jewelry Handcrafted Adult Hafer, Marcia Fletcher 1 04 - Other Jewelry Handcrafted Adult Weldy, Amber Troy 1 01 - Baby Item Knitting Warner, Lillie Ludlow Falls 2 01 - Baby Item Knitting Young, Candy Covington 1 Best of Show 02 - Sweater/Shrug/Vest, Poncho (any size) Knitting Duff, Linda Dayton 2 02 - Sweater/Shrug/Vest, Poncho (any size) Knitting Dickensheets, Jennifer New Carlise 3 02 Sweater/Shrug/Vest, Poncho (any size) Knitting Young, Candy Covington 1 03 Scarf/Shawl Knitting Duff, Linda Dayton 2 03 - Scarf/Shawl Knitting Warner, Bailie Ludlow Falls 1 04 - Hat Knitting Young, Candy Covington 1 08 - Tote or Purse Knitting Duff, Linda Dayton 2 08 - Tote or Purse

Knitting Glaser, Cindy Tipp City 3 08 - Tote or Purse Knitting Young, Candy Covington 1 09 - Other Knitting Burns, Laura Piqua 1 01 - Dress Machine Sewing/Adult Butts, Judy Tipp City 2 01 - Dress Machine Sewing/Adult Barbee, Christine Piqua 3 01 - Dress Machine Sewing/Adult Ludwick, Barbara Medway 1 Best of Show 02 - Child’s Halloween Costume Machine Sewing/Adult Burns, Laura Piqua 2 02 - Child’s Halloween Costume Machine Sewing/Adult Wright, Marla West Milton 3 02 - Child’s Halloween Costume Machine Sewing/Adult Butts, Judy Tipp City 1 03 - Other Machine Sewing/Adult Hafer, Marcia Fletcher 2 03 - Other Machine Sewing/Adult Furlong, Marilyn Troy 3 03 - Other Machine Sewing/Adult Thumser, Lydia Tipp City 1 01 - Dress Machine Sewing/Youth 18 and Under Davis, Anna Troy 2 01 Dress Machine Sewing/Youth 18 and Under Covault, Abigail Piqua 1 02 - Childs Halloween Costume Machine Sewing/Youth 18 and Under Ludwick, Mary Medway 1 03 - Other Machine Sewing/Youth 18 and Under Otte, Madison Covington 2 03 - Other Machine Sewing/Youth 18 and Under Warner, Bailie Ludlow Falls 3 03 - Other Machine Sewing/Youth 18 and Under Daniel, Laura Troy 1 01 - Painted/Decorated Eggs non-perishable limit 2 Other Crafts - Adults Covington, Care Center Covington 2 01 Painted/Decorated Eggs non-perishable limit 2 Other Crafts - Adults Kaplan, Patty Troy 1 02 - Hand crafted cards set of 3 Other Crafts Adults Daniel, Laura Troy 2 02 - Hand crafted cards set of 3 Other Crafts Adults Vallieu, Melody Piqua 3 02 - Hand crafted cards set of 3, Other Crafts Adults Daniel, Laura Troy 1 03 - Christmas Tree Ornaments Other Crafts Adults Ryman, Cindy Troy 2 03 - Christmas Tree Ornaments Other Crafts Adults Quinton, Kay Troy 3 03 - Christmas Tree Ornaments Other Crafts Adults Quinton, Kay Troy 1 04 - Christmas decorations Other Crafts - Adults Daniel, Laura Troy 2 04 - Christmas decorations Other Crafts Adults Carpenter, Pat New Carlise 3 04 - Christmas decorations Other Crafts Adults Creager, Freda Piqua 1 06 - Decorated Sweatshirt or T-shirt (on hanger) Other Crafts - Adults Eversman, Anita Troy 2 06 - Decorated Sweatshirt or T-shirt (on hanger) Other Crafts Adults

Butts, Paul Tipp City 1 07 - Holiday Wreath Door Arrangement Other Crafts - Adults Quinton, Kay Troy 2 07 - Holiday Wreath - Door Arrangement Other Crafts - Adults Daniel, Laura Troy 3 07 - Holiday Wreath Door Arrangement Other Crafts - Adults Butts, Judy Tipp City 1 08 - Wreath or Door Arrangement (all occasion) Other Crafts Adults Hafer, Marcia Fletcher 2 08 - Wreath or Door Arrangement (all occasion) Other Crafts Adults Hagemeyer, Tammy Troy 1 09 - Scrap Booking Other Crafts - Adults Wolfe, Dana Troy 2 09 Scrap Booking Other Crafts - Adults Vallieu, Melody Piqua 3 09 - Scrap Booking Other Crafts - Adults Hershberger, Jane Troy 1 10 - Latch Hook (must be able to hang) Other Crafts - Adults Neves, Viola Piqua 2 10 - Latch Hook (must be able to hang) Other Crafts - Adults Wilhelm, Margaret Casstown 1 11 - Other craft made from recycled materials Other Crafts Adults Burns, Laura Piqua 2 11 - Other craft made from recycled materials Other Crafts - Adults Covault, Ashley Piqua 1 Best of Show 03 - Scrap Booking Other Crafts Youth ages 13 and Under Covault, Abigail Piqua 2 03 - Scrap Booking Other Crafts - Youth ages 13 and Under Schmackers, Gabrielle Pleasant Hill 3 03 - Scrap Booking Other Crafts Youth ages 13 and Under Eversman, Emily Troy 1 04 - Decoraged Sweatshirt or tshirt (on hanger) Other Crafts Youth ages 13 and Under Chinn, Kayleigh Alcony 2 04 - Decoraged Sweatshirt or tshirt (on hanger) Other Crafts Youth ages 13 and Under Eversman, Ciara Troy 3 04 - Decoraged Sweatshirt or tshirt (on hanger) Other Crafts - Youth ages 13 and Under Otte, Madison Covington 1 05 Christmas Ornaments (display of 3) Other Crafts - Youth ages 13 and Under Parke, Maddison Troy 2 05 - Christmas Ornaments (display of 3) Other Crafts - Youth ages 13 and Under Sutherly, Samuel Troy 1 08 - Other craft made from Recycled Materials Other Crafts - Youth ages 13 and Under Plantz, Sable Troy 2 08 - Other craft made from Recycled Materials Other Crafts - Youth ages 13 and Under Kinnison, Megan Piqua 1 06 - Paper Mache Other Crafts - Youth Ages 14 to 18 Kirchner, Kelsey Conover 2 06 - Paper Mache Other Crafts Youth Ages 14 to 18 Oiler, Amy E. Pleasant Hill 1 01 - Hand quilted up to 48 inches Quilts King, Cleo St Paris 2 01 - Hand quilted - up to 48 inches Quilts Simpson, Ruth Troy 3 01 - Hand quilted - up to 48 inches Quilts Duff, Linda Dayton 1 Best of Show 02 - Hand quilted - over 48 inches Quilts Oiler, Amy E. Pleasant

Hill 2 02 - Hand quilted over 48 inches Quilts Hershberger, Jane Troy 3 02 - Hand quilted - over 48 inches Quilts Gillott, Mary Union 2 03 - Machine quilted - up to 48 inches Quilts Gillott, Mary Union 1 04 - Machine quilted over 48 inches Quilts Hedrick, Tiffany Troy 2 04 - Machine quilted over 48 inches Quilts Heffner, Marjorie Tipp City 3 04 - Machine quilted - over 48 inches Quilts Daniel, Laura Troy 1 01 - Birthday Table Decorations Eidemiller, Linda Troy 1 03 - Christmas Table Decorations Balser, Jill Piqua 2 04 Patriotic Table Decorations Edminson, Sandy Piqua 1 Best of Show 05 - Other Table Decorations Butts, Paul Tipp City 1 Best of Show 01 - Scroll Work, any kind Woodwork Battson, Robert Tipp City 2 01 - Scroll Work, any kind Woodwork Butts, Paul Tipp City 1 02 - Clock Woodwork Battson, Robert Tipp City 2 02 - Clock Woodwork Butts, Paul Tipp City 1 03 - Toys Woodwork Battson, Robert Tipp City 2 03 - Toys Woodwork Vannus, Luke Pleasant Hill 3 03 - Toys Woodwork Smith, Lloyd Piqua 1 04 - Woodburning Woodwork Battson, Robert Tipp City 1 05 - Other Woodwork FFA Projects Welding Display Board, 5 welds 1 Chris Long, Casstown 2 Rebekah Eidemiller, Fletcher 3 Matt Davis, Conover 4 Alex Brewer, Troy 5 Devin Staley, Alcony 6 Dylan Kinnison, Piqua Boot Bench 1 Sarah Pyers, Troy Household Article 1 Samantha Wimmer, Flecther 2 Amanda Bartel, Troy 3 Lindsay Brookhart, Tipp City 4 Jenifer Slone, Troy 5 Sarah Pyers, Troy 6 Emily Johnson, Casstown Nail Box 1 Davey Wright, Fletcher 2 Riann Kingrey, Fletcher 3 Brittany Taylor, Casstown 4 Danielle Danielson, Troy 5 Marley Roberts, Piqua 6 Amy Hahn, Troy Photo History of Supervised Agricultural Experience Program 1 Chris Teaford, Casstown 2 Riann Kingrey, Fletcher 3 Danielle Danielson, Troy 4 Marley Roberts, Piqua 5 Brady Anderson, Troy 6 Cody Reid, Fletcher Reconditioned, Machinery 1 Brady Anderson, Troy Research Project in Agriculture Science 1 Danielle Danielson, Troy 2 Riann Kingrey, Fletcher 3 Shelby Roach, Casstown 4 Macaleh Thompson, Casstown 5 Andrew Kowalak, Troy 6 Libby Everett, Fletcher

Sawhorse 1 Macaleh Thompson, Casstown 2 Tanner Church, Troy 3 Devin Staley, Alcony 4 Lindsey Roeth, Troy 5 Rebekah Eidemiller, Fletcher 6 Lauren Williams, Tipp City Tool Box 1 Colin Gump, Fletcher 2 Austin Harleman, Fletcher 3 Austin Honeyman, Casstown 4 Kate Jenkins, Fletcher 5 Allyson Supinger, Fletcher 6 Cody Reid Fletcher Welding Project, Medium 1 Nick Woolery Casstown Wood Project, Medium 1 Ryan Miller Conover 2 Heather Skaggs Troy Wood Project, Small 1 Lindsay Brookhart, Tipp City 2 Aliyah Wright, Fletcher 3 Amber Owen, Conover 4 Angelina Henger, Casstown 5 Samantha Wimmer, Flecther Corn, Shelled, 1/2 Gallon, Product of Last Year 1 Grant Hodge, Tipp City Corn, Best Single Stalk, Product of Current Year 1 Colin Hawes, Piqua 2 Amanda Bartel, Troy 3 Cody Reid, Fletcher 4 Grant Hodge, Tipp City Hay, Alfalfa, 6 Inch Section of Bale 1 Kolin Bendickson Troy Hay, Mixed, 6 Inch Section of Bale 1 Libby Everett Fletcher 2 Justin Furrow Casstown 3 Kolin Bendickson Troy Soybeans, 5 Stalks, Product of Current Year 1 Grant Hodge, Tipp City 2 Cody Reid, Fletcher 3 Amanda Bartel, Troy Wheat, 1/2 Gallon, Product of Current Year 1 Emily Johnson, Casstown Other Farm Crop, Not Straw, Current or Last Year 1 Sarah Pyers, Troy Beans, 10 Snap Beans 1 Matt Davis, Conover Brown Eggs, 6 1 Austin Honeyman, Casstown Cucumbers, Used For Slicing, 6 1 Sarah Pyers, Troy Cucumbers, Used For Pickling, 6 1 Chris Teaford, Casstown Onions, White, 5 1 Chris Teaford, Casstown Peppers, Green Bell, 5 1 Sarah Pyers, Troy 2 Chris Teaford Casstown Peppers, Jalapeno, 5 1 Matt Davis Conover Tomatoes, Red, 5 1 Chris Teaford, Casstown 2 Matt Davis, Conover 3 Lauren Williams, Tipp City 4 Amanda Bartel, Troy Tomatoes, Cherry, 5 1 Chris Teaford, Casstown 2 Sarah Pyers, Troy Tomatoes, Yellow, 5 1 Chris Teaford, Casstown Other Horticulture Crop, Current Years Produce 1 Lauren Williams, Tipp City

R & R Training Center • WE

CURRENTLY HAVE 10 X 12 STALLS AVAILABLE FOR RENT

• Riding lessons by Brooke Knecht & Emily Smith with classes including: English, Western Pleasure, Contesting and Jumping • We have two riding arenas - one indoor and one outdoor • Wash Room and Pasture For more information please call Cheryl Reichman at 937-418-6208 2306633

R & R Training Center

4745 Bausman Road Piqua, Ohio 45356 Located outside of Troy Rt 41. West just off of Washington Rd.


B8

Monday, August 13, 2012

MIAMI COUNTY FAIR 2012

TROY DAILY NEWS • WWW.TDN-NET.COM

Faces at the Fair The annual Miami County Fair got under way Friday, bringing a wide variety of activity back to the venerable fairgrounds on County Road 25-A in Troy. At right, fans of country music singer Hunter Hayes capture images of his performance Saturday night at the 2012 Miami County Fairgrounds. More than 3,200 fans turned out for the Saturday evening show.

Above, Lindsey Yingst creates a dish in the Jr. Fair Cook-Off Saturday inside the Lungaard Building at the Miami County Fair.

A chicken gets a drink of water between poultry shows at the Rabbit and Poultry Barn Saturday.

At left, twin brothers Colt and Cody Williams along with Iza Lima from New Carlisle climb around on bedding for animals Saturday at the 2012 Miami County Fair. The bedding was brought in by Rio Lima Tack and Feed out of New Carlisle and Tipp City.

Staff photos by Anthony Weber

Above, Cadets including Savannah Hutchins, Kirsten DeWitt and Trevor Peyton along with Major Justin MacKellar, Squadron Commander, of the Civil Air Patrol U.S. Air Force Auxiliary, Dayton Areo Cadet Squadron 706, center, march in front of the Grandstand Friday during Opening Ceremonies. At right, children watch several pigs run a track at the “Swifty Swine Off the Line” racing pig event Sunday at the Miami County Fair.

08/13/12  

A game of chicken

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