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GENERAL ENGLISH 3

Speaking-Listening-Reading-Writing-Grammar

Pusat Bahasa Inggris - FKSB Unisma Bekasi open english project sastra inggris


GENERAL ENGLISH 3 Speaking-Listening-Reading-Writing-Grammar

Š2011 open english project sastra inggris


Contents Welcome to the new term!

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Reading & Writing III Meeting I Lesson Plan 9 Restaurant 10 Reading & Writing III Meeting II Lesson Plan 14 All About America 15 Reading & Writing III Meeting III Lesson Plan 19 Natural Disasters 20 Reading & Writing III Meeting IV Lesson Plan 26 Car 27 Reading & Writing III Meeting V Lesson Plan 34 Musical Instrument 35 Grammar III Meeting I Lesson Plan 39 Simple Sentence 40 Grammar III Meeting II Lesson Plan 45 Compound Sentence 46 Grammar III Meeting III Lesson Plan 50 Complex Sentence 51 Grammar III Meeting VI Lesson Plan 55 Joining Ideas 56 Speaking & Listening III Class (1st Meeting) Lesson Plan 61 Starting a Conversation 62 st Speaking & Listening III Lab. (1 Meeting) Lesson Plan 69 Environment 70 Speaking & Listening III Class (2nd Meeting) Lesson Plan 77 Keeping a Conversation Going 78 nd Speaking & Listening III Lab. (2 Meeting) Lesson Plan 86 Healthy Life 87 Speaking & Listening III Lab. (3th Meeting) Lesson Plan 92 Internet 93

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Works Cited

13 18 25 33 38 44 49 54 60 68 76 85 91

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Welcome to the new term!

Welcome to the new term!

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As the fresh term starts, we would like to present you with our newest module. Compiled from various respectable sources, this module is designed to help you build and boost your English skills. In this module, you will experience a different way of learning, as it combines interactive with multimedia learning, in which you are trained to explore digital contents but at the same time boosts your communicative skills to interact with your classmates and lecturers. This module covers the required skills that a person needs to have to master English. It gives you many different opportunities to interact with your classmates, improve your reading techniques, as well as allow you to express yourself in writing. We hope you enjoy this module and wish you every success with your English classes.

Pusat Bahasa Inggris UNISMA run by Open English Project


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Reading & Writing III Meeting I

Reading & Writing III Meeting I


Lesson Plan A.

Lesson Plan

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Learning objectives • Enrich vocabulary by associating words with pictures • Practice reading long Passage • Associate pictures with available words • Respond Like and Dislike questions • Able to write about favorite food in a paragraph

B. Materials • Getting Started (respond Like and Dislike) • Vocabulary building (match the words with the description) • Reading comprehension (British Food Best in The World ) • Grammar for better writing – exercise C. Class activities a. Reading Activity Before reading: Vocabulary building (match the descriptions with the pictures) ▶ Students enrich their vocabulary as they learn about restaurant During reading: Reading comprehension ▶ Students are able to read long passage ▶ Students are able to comprehend the text ▶ Optional: They can also practice reading in right pronunciation After reading ▶ Reading comprehension – students practice scanning as they try to find the answers. ▶ Responding some question in complete sentence – students practice answering questions using complete sentence. b. Writing Activity Before writing: Finding, narrowing, and exploring writing topic ▶ Students explore what they will write based on the topic chosen ▶ For better writing, students can practice grammar exercise During writing: Writing a paragraph ▶ Students write a paragraph about the topic chosen After Writing: Correcting and revising ▶ Students practice revising their friend’s paragraph

In this meeting You will learn how to: ▶ ▶ ▶ ▶

Talk about things at the restaurant Improve vocabularies about things at the restaurant Improve reading through reading long passage Improve writing through paragraph writing


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Restaurant

Restaurant A. Getting started a. How often do you eat out? o Once a week o Every night o Twice or three times a month o Other:

b.What kind of food do you like to order? o Pasta o Steak and fries o Salad o Other:

B. Vocabulary building * Match the pictures with the words in the box

a. Waitress b. Reserved table

c. Chef d. Self-service restaurant

e. Menu f. Table


Restaurant

C. Read the passage carefully

A

British food best in the world

British restaurant that serves bacon and egg ice cream has been voted the best place in the world to eat in Restaurant magazine’s list of The World’s 50 Best Restaurants. The Fat Duck restaurant, which was runner-up last year, claimed the coveted top spot. Owner and head chef Heston Blumenthal opened his restaurant ten years ago and soon developed a reputation for highly experimental and unorthodox dishes. The menu includes leather, oak and tobacco chocolates, sardine on toast sorbet, snail porridge, and mousse dipped in liquid nitrogen. He is self-taught and has pioneered the art of “molecular gastronomy” - experiments with chemistry, physics, food and flavour that result in unique and unusual taste combinations. Nearly 600 international restaurant owners, chefs and journalists participated in the poll to rank the best restaurants worldwide. A further thirteen British restaurants made it onto the elite eateries list, four in the top ten. This gives the home of fish and chips an unusual reputation as a culinary paradise. Britain is infamous for its bland and uninspiring food, which is scoffed at by the more sophisticated palates of its French neighbours. However, it seems the tide is turning: France had only eight restaurants in the top fifty and London was named in March by Gourmet magazine as the Gourmet Capital of the World. Ella Johnston, editor of Restaurant magazine, said British people are now “becoming more adventurous eaters”.

I. 1. 2. 3.

Based the passage above answer these following questions. Answer the following questions using your own words. a. Did Blumenthal go to a cooking school in the past? b. How does Blumenthal get these original tastes? Are the following statements True or False? a. The head chef studied at a French cooking school: _______________ b. All the judges that participated in the poll were British: _______________ Find a word or expression in the text which, in context, is similar in meaning to:

a. Tasteless: _______________ b. Remarkable:_____________ c. Mixture: _______________ 4.

d. Prized: _______________ e. cook: _______________ f. Essence: ______________

Choose a, b, or c in each question below. Only one choice is correct. 1. Last year, the restaurant mentioned in the text was voted a. in the third position. b. in the second position. c. in the first position. 2. Tobacco is important in this restaurant because a. you can smoke it. b. you can eat it. c. you can chew it.

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Restaurant

3. Great Britain has always been famous for a. its bad food. b. its good food. c. its good cuisine. 4. Ella Johnston is a a. journalist. b. cook c. customer.

II.

In the text provided below each item, identify the sentence’s simple subject and simple predicate.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Four young soldiers led the troops into battle. In less than two hours, the entire cake had been eaten. For most of his career, Jim has ridden his bicycle to his office. Two beautiful goldfish in the pond were eating the insects on the top of the water. Until that last telephone call, I was having a wonderful day.

D. Writing exercise Write a short composition (100-150 words) with these questions as the guidance! 1. 2. 3.

Do you like delicious food? Do you have healthy eating habits? Which one do you prefer to consume, delicious or healthy food?

§§End of Meeting 1§§


Reading & Writing III Meeting II

Reading & Writing III Meeting II

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Lesson Plan

Lesson Plan A.

Learning objectives • Enrich vocabulary by associating words with pictures • Practice reading long Passage • Associate pictures with available words • Respond question with complete sentence • Able to write about American custom in a paragraph

B. Materials • Getting Started (respond question with complete sentence) • Vocabulary building (match the words with the description) • Reading comprehension (American Custom ) • Writing - worksheet C.

Class activities a. Reading Activity Before reading: Vocabulary building (match the descriptions with the pictures) ▶ Students enrich their vocabulary as they learn all about America During reading: Reading comprehension ▶ Students are able to read long passage ▶ Students are able to comprehend the text ▶ Optional: They can also practice reading in right pronunciation After reading ▶ Reading comprehension – students practice scanning and skimming as they try to find the answers. ▶ Responding some question by complete sentence – students practice answering questions using complete sentence. b. Writing Activity Before writing: Finding, narrowing, and exploring writing topic ▶ Students explore what will they write based on the topic chosen ▶ For better writing, students can practice grammar exercise During writing: Writing a paragraph ▶ Students write a paragraph about topic chosen After Writing: Correcting and revising ▶ Students practice revising their friend’s paragraph

In this meeting You will learn how to: ▶ ▶ ▶ ▶

Talk about All About America Improve vocabularies about American custom and habit Improve reading through reading long passage Improve writing through paragraph writing


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All About America

All About America A. GETTING STARTED

What do you know about America? Tell to the class!

B. VOCABULARY


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All About America

C.

READ THE PASSAGE CAREFULLY American Customs

A

merica is well-known for its equality, liberty, fraternity. Everyone is very friendly and informal. Children often call their parents by their first names and at work, subordinates do not normally use “Mister” when addressing their supervisors. To those visitors who come from a more rigid and stratified society, such casualness can be confusing, leading to egregious blunders. Conversely, many worldly, sophisticated Americans appear mortified because they feel America is not “civilized,” with a capital “C.” However, we know of terribly embarrassing incidents from mistakes which only an innocent foreigner would have made. Public displays of afection between the sexes are very common, unlike perhaps where you have come from. In many cities, especially San Francisco, homosexuality is an accepted way of life. You may therefore see men being afectionate with men and women with women. If you disapprove of homosexuals because of your religious or cultural beliefs, please keep it to yourself. You might even find yourself a guest in a gay person’s home-and might become shocked to realize that your host is a normal human being like any other and that you are actually enjoying his hospitality. Many couples also live together without being married-and may never marry. But you must realize their bond is probably as strong as the bond of marriage. So don’t think one of them is available for a “date.” America is a notoriously “open” society, and to most foreigners Americans often appear exceptionally and “instantly” friendly. But sometimes such openness can lead to serious misunderstanding, especially between men and women. A casual invitation to have drinks and/or dinner does not mean that your American host also wants to become “intimate” with you afterwards. So be careful not to read too much into a friendly invitation.

D. READING COMPREHENSION EXERCISE 1. Match the following words with the suitable definition or synonym. Blunder

Mortify

Display

Belief

Host

Bond

Misunderstanding

Person who receive other people at home as guests. Show. Stupid careless mistake. State of being joined or together. Failure to understand rightly or correctly. 2. Answer the following questions according to the text. a. How do homosexuals behave in San Francisco? _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ b. Do all couples marry? Give a reason for your answer. _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________


All About America c. What evidence can you find in the text showing that Americans are casual people? ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ d. Why can openness lead to misunderstanding in Americas? ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ 3. Fill in the blanks with simple from of the verbs in brankets. a. He (drink) ___________________________heavily lately. b. He (not drink) __________________________ any alcohol for years. c. Mrs Harris (work) __________________________________hard all for her life. d. I see you (work) __________________________hard all her life. e. He (make) ___________________________a documentary in Somalia for over a month.

4. Composition. writing Write a composition about American habits (100-150 words)

§§End of Meeting 2§§

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Reading & Writing III Meeting III

Reading & Writing III Meeting III


Lesson Plan

Lesson Plan A.

Learning objectives • Enrich vocabulary by associating words with pictures • Practice reading long Passage • Associate pictures with available words • Giving opinion about natural disasters • Able to compose about self-experience in a paragraph

B. Materials • Getting Started (respond Like and Dislike) • Vocabulary building (match the words with the description) • Reading comprehension (Hurricanes and Tornadoes ) • Writing – worksheet C.

Class activities a. Reading Activity Before reading: Vocabulary building (match the descriptions with the pictures) – ▶ Students enrich their vocabulary as they learn all about natural disaster During reading: Reading comprehension ▶ Students are able to read long passage ▶ Students are able to comprehend the text ▶ Optional: They can also practice reading in right pronunciation After reading ▶ Reading comprehension – students practice scanning as they try to find the answers. ▶ Responding some question with complete sentence – students practice answering questions using complete sentence. b. Writing Activity Before writing: Finding, narrowing, and exploring writing topic ▶ Students explore what will they write based on the topic chosen ▶ For better writing, students can practice grammar exercise During writing: Writing a paragraph ▶ Students write a paragraph about topic chosen After Writing: Correcting and revising ▶ Students practice for revising their friend’s paragraph

In this meeting You will learn how to: ▶ ▶ ▶ ▶

Talk about season and natural disasters Improve vocabularies about seasons and satural disasters Improve reading through reading long passage Improve writing through paragraph writing

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Natural Disasters

Natural Disasters

A. GETTING STARTED 1. 2.

How many seasons are there in your country? What is your favorite seasons? Tell to the class!

B. VOCABULARY Seasons

WINTER

SUMMER

DRY SEASON

WET/RAINY SEASON

AUTUMN SPRING


Natural Disasters What do you know about these natural disasters? Tell to the class!

C. Read This Passage Carefully

T

HURRICANES AND TORNADOES

wo of the most dangerous storms which afflict America are hurricanes and tornadoes. They are very much feared by anyone who may live in the path of their destruction and cause millions of dollars worth of damage to life and property every year. Hurricanes which usually develop between July and October are similar to cyclones and originate over the waters in the Caribbean Sea. They move upwards hitting the mainland of America somewhere in the Gulf of Mexico or the Atlantic Ocean. Once they hit land they carry tremendous power with driving rain and wind. These winds can attain speeds of over 75 mph. And cover an area of over 500 miles in diameter. At the center of the storm there is an “eye� with relatively fair weather and warm, dry air aloft. The diameter of the eye is usually about 32 kilometers. When the eye passes the relief is only temporary but soon the wind and rain will suddenly reappear from the opposite direction. Every year homes are destroyed by their fury and often lives are lost. Most people who live near the coast are forced to evacuate their homes and to move to safer areas until the storm passes. Floods are caused along the coasts by both the heavy rain and a storm tide that is considerably above normal water level. The high winds, coastal flooding and torrential rains associated with a hurricane cause enormous damage. People living in the wake of a storm are given ample warning to protect their homes. Flashlights or candles are be prepared in case of electric-power failures and plenty of fresh water should be saved as precautions against the pollution of water supplies by flooding. If one should travel inland across the Great Plains and the prairie states of America, one will most likely not encounter a hurricane, but there is another kind of storm in the Midwest which is equally feared. It is called a tornado. Tornadoes are violent low-pressured storms with an intense updraft near their center which is capable of lifting quite heavy objects from the ground. A tornado, therefore, is a dark, funnel-shaped cloud containing violently rotating air. It can pick up trees and cars right into the air and even uplift heavier objects such as homes and railway cars. Like a vacuum cleaner across a rug, it sucks up into the air anything which may lie in its path. These storms occur most often during the summer months and are noticeable by their strong wind and lack of rain. The sky turns black as dust is sucked up into the air. Tornadoes travel normally at around 60 kilometers per hour and the winds can reach 800

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Natural Disasters

kilometers per hours in the most violent storms. Tornadoes are most frequent in the United States east of the Rocky Mountains and especially in the central plains area of the Mississippi basin where about 150 occur each year. Tornadoes may also strike the southern states in winter and have even been known to develop in the northeast. Both hurricanes and tornadoes cause millions of dollars worth of damage each year. Today they can be predicted more easily than in the past, but they cannot be stopped or ignored. When they come they must be endured with the hope that one survives their fury and wrath.

D. Choose the correct answer 1.

What two most dangerous storms wich aflict America?

2.

At which part of the years hurricanes usually develop?

a. Thunderstorms and hurricanes. b. Typhoons and thunderstorms. c Thunderstorms and typhoons. d. Hurricanes and tornadoes. e. Hurricanes and typhoons.

a. July and August only. b. Between July and October. c. From seventh to the ninth month. d. They develop throughout the year. e. During hot summer months.

3.

Where do hurricanes usually develop?

4.

What is the center of a hurricane called?

5. 6.

a. In the southwest of America. b. In the Carribean Sea. c. In the Atlantic Ocean of Bermuda. d. Over the mainland near the water. e. Usually in the Gulf of Mexico.

a. The eye. b. The middle. c. The center. d. The interior. e. The fury. How wide is diameter of the eye? a. 75 kilometers. b. 500 miles. c. Exactly 32 kilometers d. Approximately 32 kilometers e. 32 kilometers. Where can one encounter tornadoes in America? a. Along the southern coast. b. Near the Gulf of Mexico. c. Near coastal areas. d. Across the great plains. e. Near the mountains.


Natural Disasters 7.

What is the major difference between a hurricane and tornado?

a. Hurricanes cover a larger area. b. A tornado has more wind and speed. c. A tornado is not accompanied by rain. d. Hurricans can cause great dammage. e. They occur at different seasons.

8.

Which is not true of tornadoes?

a. They occur only during the summer. b. They cause millions of dollars worth of damage. c. They can be found not only in the Midwest but also in the northeast. d. The sky turns black as dust is forced up into the air. e. They can be more easily predicted today that in the past.

9.

Which of the following is true of tornadoes and hurricanes?

a. They can not be predicted with accuracy. b. They are easier to control today than in the past. c. Tornadoes are more dangerous than hurricanes. d. Tornadoes are more dangerous than hurricanes. e. They can be predicted today with greater accuracy.

10. Which of the following was not mentioned in the article?

a. b. c. d. e.

The damage caused by Hurricanes and tornadoes. The tremendous power of these storms. The number of people killed each your by these storms. The time of year when they are most likely to strike. The speeds at which they travel.

E. Writing 1.

What is a Paragraph?

A paragraph is a group of sentences that convey an idea. Each sentence works together as part of a unit to create an overall thought or impression. A paragraph is the smallest unit or cluster of sentences in which one idea can be developed adequately. Paragraphs can stand alone or function as part of an essay, but each paragraph covers only one main idea. The most important sentence in your paragraph is the topic sentence, which clearly states the subject of the whole paragraph. The topic sentence is usually the first sentence of the paragraph because it gives an overview of the sentences to follow. The supporting sentences after the topic sentence help to develop the main idea. These sentences give specific details related to the topic sentence. A final or concluding sentence often restates or summarizes the main idea of the topic sentence. A good paragraph has:

o o

A topic sentence stating the main point of the paragraph, Supporting sentences with details and specific examples as proof of your point.

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Natural Disasters

2. Structure of Paragraph.

Topic sentence

Let me tell you what I know about apples different colors and they grow on trees. You can eat a fresh apple, but I like to eat them in homemade apple pie. There are Supporting sentences few things you should know about apples. Let me tell you what I know about apples. Apples come in different colors and they grow on the branch. You can eat a fresh apple, but I like to eat them in homemade pie. Sometimes a worm is living in the apple. These are just a few things you should know about apple. http://www.tuskin.k12.ca.us/cyberseminar/parhttp://www.tuskin. Concluding Sentence k12.ca.us/cyberseminar/paragraph.html

Topic Sentence

Let me tell you what I know about apples.

Detail Sentence

Detail Sentence

Apples come in different colors and they grow on trees. You can eat a fresh apple, but I like to eat them in homemade apple pie. Sometimes a worm is living in the apple.

Conclusion or Closing Sentence

They are just a few things you should know about apples.

Detail Sentence

Write a paragraph about natural disaster in your country by considering Topic Sentence, Supporting details, and Concluding Sentence.

§§End of Meeting 3§§


Reading & Writing III Meeting IV

Reading & Writing III Meeting IV

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Lesson Plan a.

Lesson Plan

Learning objectives • Enrich vocabulary by associating words with pictures • Practice reading long Passage • Associate pictures with available words • Respond How-to questions • Able to write about favorite food in a paragraph

b. Materials • Getting Started (respond How-to question) • Vocabulary building (match the words with the description) • Reading comprehension (Death Car ) • Writing – exercise c.

Class activities a. Reading Activity Before reading: Vocabulary building (match the descriptions with the pictures) ▶ Students enrich their vocabulary as they learn all about car. During reading: Reading comprehension ▶ Students are able to read long passage ▶ Students are able to comprehend the text ▶ Optional: They can also practice reading in right pronunciation After reading ▶ Reading comprehension – students practice scanning as they try to find the answers. ▶ Responding some question with complete sentence – students practice answering questions using complete sentence. b. Writing Activity Before writing: Finding, narrowing, and exploring writing topic ▶ Students explore what will they write based on the topic chosen ▶ For better writing, students can practice grammar exercise During writing: Writing a paragraph ▶ Students write a paragraph about topic chosen After Writing: Correcting and revising ▶ Students practice for revising their friend’s paragraph

In this meeting You will learn how to: ▶ ▶ ▶ ▶

Talk about driving a car and car auto part Improve vocabularies about car auto part Improve reading through reading long passage Improve writing through paragraph writing


Car

Car A. Getting Started.

1. Do you have a car? 2. Can you drive a car? How? Tell the class?

B. Vocabulary Building.

a. Look at the traffic signs bellow and tell the class about them!

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Car o

Parts of the Car and Maintenace.

1. bumper 2. headlight 3. turn signal 4. parking light 5. fender 6. tire 7. hupcab 8. hood 9. windshield 10. windshield wipers 11. side mirror 12. roof rack

14. antena 15. rear window 16. rear defroster 17. trunk 18. taillight 19. brake light 20. backup light 21. licence plate 22. tailpipe/ exhaust pipe 23. muffler 24. transmission 25. gas tank

26. jack 27. spare tire 28. lug wrench 29. flare 30. jumper cables 31. spark plug 32. air filter 33. engine 34. fuel injection system 35. radiator 36. radiator hose 37. fan belt

38. alternator 39. dipstick 40. battery 41. air pump 42. gas pump 43. nozzle 44. gas cab 45. gas 46. oil 47. coolant 48. air


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Car

49. air bag 50. visor 51. rearviw mirror 52. dashboard/ instrument panel 53. temperature gauge 54. gas gauge / fuel gauge 55. spedometer 56. odometer 57. warning lights

58. turn signal 59. steering wheel 60. horn 61. ignition 62. vent 63. navigation system 64. radio 65. CD player 66. heater 67. air conditioning

68. defroster 69. power outlet 70. glove compartment 71. emergency brake 72. brake (pedal) 73. accelerator / gas pedal 74. automatic transmision 75. gearshift 76. manual transmission

77. stickshift 78. clutch 79. door lock 80. door handle 81. shoulder harness 82. armrest 83. headrest 84. seat 85. seat belt


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Car

C. Before Reading Find suitable meaning for the bold words below!

D. Reading Activity

Read the passage and answer the questions!

I

The Death Car t was a cold night in September. The rain was drumming on the car roof as George and Marie Winston drove through the empty country roads towards the house of their friends, the Harrisons, where they were going to attend a party to celebrate the engagement of the Harrisons’ daughter, Lisa. As they drove, they listened to the local radio station, which was playing classical music. They were about five miles from their destination when the music on the radio was interrupted by a news announcement: “The Cheshire police have issued a serious warning after a man escaped from Colford Mental Hospital earlier this evening. The man, John Downey, is a murderer who killed six people before he was captured two years ago. He is described as large, very strong and extremely dangerous. People in the Cheshire area are warned to keep their doors and windows locked, and to call the police immediately if they see anyone acting strangely.” Marie shivered. “A crazy killer. And he’s out there somewhere. That’s scary.” “Don’t worry about it,” said her husband. “We’re nearly there now. Anyway, we have more important things to worry about. This car is losing power for some reason -- it must be that old problem with the carburetor. If it gets any worse, we’ll have to stay at the Harrisons’ tonight and get it fixed before we travel back tomorrow.” As he spoke, the car began to slow down. George pressed the accelerator, but the engine only coughed. Finally they rolled to a halt, as the engine died completely. Just as they stopped, George pulled the car off the road, and it came to rest under a large tree. “Blast!” said George angrily. “Now we’ll have to walk in the rain.” “But that’ll take us an hour at least,” said Marie. “And I have my high-heeled shoes and my nice clothes on. They’ll be ruined!” “Well, you’ll have to wait while I run to the nearest house and call the Harrisons. Someone can come out and pick us up,” said George. “But George! Have you forgotten what the radio said? There’s a homicidal maniac out there! You can’t leave me alone here!” “You’ll have to hide in the back of the car. Lock all the doors and lie on the floor in the back, under this blanket. No-one will see you. When I come back, I’ll knock three times on the door. Then you can get up and open it. Don’t open it unless you hear three knocks.” George opened the door and slipped out into the rain. He quickly disappeared into the blackness. Marie quickly locked the doors and settled down under the blanket in the back for a long wait. She was frightened and worried, but she was a strong-minded woman. She had not been waiting long, however, when she heard a strange scratching noise. It seemed to be coming from the roof of the car. Marie was terrified. She listened, holding her breath. Then she heard three slow knocks, one after the other, also on the roof of the car. Was it her husband? Should she open the door? Then she heard another knock, and another. This was not her husband. It was somebody -- or something -else. She was shaking with fear, but she forced herself to lie still. The knocking continued -- bump, bump, bump, bump. Many hours later, as the sun rose, she was still lying there. She had not slept for a moment. The knocking had never stopped, all night long. She did not know what to do. Where was George? Why had he not come for her? Suddenly, she heard the sound of three or four vehicles, racing quickly down the road. All of them pulled up around her, their tires screeching on the road. At last! Someone had come! Marie sat up quickly and looked out of the window. The three vehicles were all police cars, and two still had their lights flashing. Several policemen leapt out. One of them rushed towards the car as Marie opened the door. He took her by the hand. “Get out of the car and walk with me to the police vehicle. miss. You’re safe now. Look straight ahead. Keep looking at the police car. Don’t look back. Just don’t look back.” Something in the way he spoke filled Marie with cold horror. She could not help herself. About ten yards from the police car, she stopped, turned and looked back at the empty vehicle. George was hanging from the tree above the car, a rope tied around his neck. As the wind blew his body back and forth, his feet were bumping gently on the roof of the car -- bump, bump, bump, bump.


Car 1. Where were the Winstons going when this incident happened? a) home b) to Colford Mental Hospital c) to a party d) to the police station ________________________________________ 2.

What was the reason for the news announcement on the radio? a) Six people, including John Downey, had been murdered. b) A dangerous prisoner had escaped. c) The police were warning of accidents on the roads in the bad weather. d) Some people had been seen acting strangely in the Cheshire area.

________________________________________ 3. What did George think was causing the trouble with the car? a) the carburetor b) the rain drumming on the roof c) the accelerator d) he had no idea ________________________________________ 4. Why did he pull the car off the road? a) to have a rest b) to go for a walk c) to walk to the nearest house d) it broke down ________________________________________ 5. Why did Marie stay in the car when George left? a) She was afraid to go out in the dark. b) So no-one would steal the car. c) Her clothes weren’t suitable for the rain. d) She wanted to get some sleep. ________________________________________ 6. Where did George set off to walk to? a) the Mental Hospital b) the nearest house c) the Harrisons’ house d) the police station ________________________________________ 7. What made Marie so frightened as she waited in the car? a) There was a strange sound coming from the roof. b) She could see a man acting strangely outside the car. c) Some police cars came racing down the road. d) She was afraid of the rain and the dark. ________________________________________

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Car

8. Why did the policeman tell her not to look back when he brought her out of the car? a) He didn’t want her to see the body of her husband. b) The killer was waiting behind her. c) He wanted her to forget everything that had happened during the night. d) He didn’t want her to see the damage done to the car. ________________________________________ 9. Marie says, “There’s a homicidal maniac out there!” What does “homicidal maniac” mean? a) terrible storm b) busy road c) crazy killer d) policeman ________________________________________ 10. In “Several policemen leapt out,” “leapt” means a) threw b) jumped c) shouted d) drove ________________________________________

E. Writing

Now, tell car accident you have ever seen.

§§End of Meeting 4§§


Reading & Writing III Meeting V

Reading & Writing III Meeting V

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Lesson Plan

Lesson Plan A.

Learning objectives • Enrich vocabulary by associating words with pictures • Practice reading long Passage • Associate pictures with available words • Respond ability/disability question • Able to write about hobby and habit in a paragraph

B. Materials • Getting Started (ability/disability) • Vocabulary building (match the words with the description) • Reading comprehension (Banjos, Harmonicas, and Guitars ) • Writing – exercise C.

Class activities a. Reading Activity Before reading: Vocabulary building (match the descriptions with the pictures) ▶ Students enrich their vocabulary as they learn about musical instrument During reading: Reading comprehension ▶ Students are able to read long passage ▶ Students are able to comprehend the text ▶ Optional: They can also practice reading in right pronunciation After reading ▶ Reading comprehension – students practice scanning as they try to find the answers. ▶ Responding some question with complete sentence – students practice answering questions using complete sentence. b. Writing Activity Before writing: Finding, narrowing, and exploring writing topic ▶ Students explore what will they write based on the topic chosen ▶ For better writing, students can practice grammar exercise During writing: Writing a paragraph ▶ Students write a paragraph about topic chosen After Writing: Correcting and revising ▶ Students practice for revising their friend’s paragraph

In this meeting You will learn how to: ▶ ▶ ▶ ▶

Talk about music and musical Instrument Improve vocabularies about musical instrument Improve reading through reading long passage Improve writing through paragraph writing


Musical Instrument

Musical Instrument

A. Getting started

Ask your partner or classmate about his/her talents or abilities! 1. 2. 3.

Can you play a musical instrument? What kind of musical instrument do you like to play? How well do you play it ?

B. Vocabulary building Unscramble these words about musical instruments 1. uftle________________

7. oseoxahpn________________

2. phra________________

8. prtuetm________________

3. ialodmnn________________

9. nioliv________________

4. rcaamas________________

10. exyhnlopo________________

5. dmru________________

11. oehcnfnrhr________________

6. ureaobtinm________________

12. uigtar________________

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Musical Instrument

C. Before reading Tell the class:

1. 2.

How many musical instruments do you know? Where do they come from?

D. Reading activity Read The Passage Below and Answer The Questions!

E

BANJOS, HARMONICAS AND GUITARS

very country has its native instruments which capture the mood and spirit of its culture. For the Japanese it may be the koto and shamisen, for Indians it may be the sitar and vina. For Americans there are three instruments which reflect the mood of the country and can be called typically American ones although their origins, like most things American, may be elsewhere. The first of these instruments is the banjo a simple four stringed instrument. This stringed musical instrument originally came from Africa and was most probably brought over by the black slaves in the early nineteenth century. After working all day in the cotton fields the black slaves would relax in the evening under the shade of plantation trees and sing simple songs of their native lands. They would accompany themselves on simple banjos evocative of the spirit of their homelands. Later after the Civil War banjos were widely played in minstrel shows throughout the South featuring folk music and jazz ensembles. It has a crude sound when plucked and, although it resembles the guitar, its sound was not as mellow and its range was not as wide. Yet, when played well, it creates a distinct atmosphere which evokes the feeling of life on the early American plantation. The second instrument associated with America is the harmonica. Sometimes called a mouth organ it is a simple reed instrument which can easily be held in one hand. Originally the first harmonicas were made in Germany, but the early pioneers brought this instrument with them from their homeland when they came to America. They would play in the evenings while passing the night under the stars. On the lonely prairie after a long day’s work the sound of the harmonica is especially melancholic. If the banjo has a jittery sound, then the harmonica has a distinctly melancholic one. It is the sound of a sad, nostalgic lament. It is the sound of someone yearning for his home or wanting to return to the lost experiences of happier days. When properly played it captures the mood of the vast frontier especially in the west where the cult of the cowboy dominated the wilderness. The third instrument associated with America is the guitar. Originally it is an instrument of European origin, most likely from Spain. Yet, the guitar also played an important part in the American frontier. After a hard day’s work rounding up and branding cattle, cowboys would sit around an open campfire and sing songs of love and nature while strumming on the guitar. Today the banjo and harmonica may not be as popular as they once were but the guitar is still very much alive. The revival of folk music back in the 1960s brought guitars to college campuses and there is hardly a rock band today which does not feature an electrical guitarist as part of the ensemble.


Musical Instrument 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

From which continent did the banjo originate? Who brought the banjo to America? When was the banjo introduced into America? Where were banjos often played after the civil war? What’s the difference between a banjo and a guitar? What is another name for a harmonica? Where did the harmonica originally come from? Who brought the harmonica to America? How can one describe the sound of a harmonica? What trend brought about a renewed interest in guitars in the 60s on college campuses?

E. Now, write about your favorite musical instrument!

§§End of Meeting 5§§

37


38

Grammar III Meeting I

Grammar III Meeting I


Lesson Plan

39

Lesson Plan A.

Learning objectives • Compose simple sentence with different kinds of pattern • Identify subject and verb in the sentence • Identify mistakes (punctuation, spelling, and irregular verbs) • Unscramble questions

B. Materials • Simple sentence – factsheet • Rules and examples to help you make simple sentence • Identifying subjects and predicates in simple sentence- worksheet • Finding mistakes (punctuation, spelling, irregular verbs) – worksheet • Speaking (pair work) – worksheet C.

Class activities a. Lead in Throw in some questions to the students (Yes-No questions) that helps the students to refresh their mind and to activate their prior knowledge. b. Main exercise Simple sentence – factsheet → Students learn about simple sentence and its variation related to the subject and the predicate. → Students learn to identify the subject and the predicate in each sample sentence. ȧȧRules and examples to help you make simple sentence → Students learn the core function of subject and predicate in composing sentence. ȧȧIdentifying subjects and predicates in simple sentence- worksheet → Students practice to recognize the subject and verb in simple sentences ȧȧFinding mistakes (punctuation, spelling, irregular verbs) – worksheet → Students practice identifying mistakes in a short text, related to punctuation, spelling, and irregular verbs. c. Wrap up (pair work) – worksheet Students practice speaking by maintaining the use of the structure in the conversation.

In this meeting You will learn how to: → → → →

Compose simple sentence with different kinds of pattern Identify subject and verb in the sentence Identify mistakes (punctuation, spelling, and irregular verbs) Unscramble questions


40

Simple Sentence

Simple Sentence

Simple sentence can be very short, consisting of only one word (a noun) for the subject and one word (a verb) for the predicate.

However, a simple sentence can also be very long, consisting a compound subject and a compound predicate.

This sentence is very long, but it is still a simple sentence. We can modify and stretch simple sentence by using compound subjects or compound predicates. Here are some examples:

A.Simple subject and simple predicate

Here the sentence has one simple subject (the boy) and one simple predicate (was staring).

B.Compound subject and simple predicate

Here the sentence has compound subjects (Koala, kangaroo, and emu) and one simple predicate (are).

C.Simple subject and compound predicate

Here the sentence has one simple subject (Henry Lau) and compound predicates (sings, dances, and plays).


Simple Sentence

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D.Compound subject and compound predicates

Here the sentence has compound subjects (Berta, Marta, Lisa, Katie, and Mary) and compound predicates (made, grilled, and baked).

Rules and examples to help you make simple sentences. To make a sentence you need three things: 1. A sentence is a group of words that makes sense on its own. -

Cheese, car, house, table on Tuesday.

This isn’t a sentence - it doesn’t make sense. -

I parked my car next to my house.

This is a sentence. You can understand what it means. It makes sense on its own. 2. When you are writing you need to use the right sentence punctuation. Using punctuation will show the person who is reading your writing where the sentences begin and end.

• A sentence must begin with a capital letter. • A sentence must end with a full-stop (.), a question mark (?), or an exclamation mark (!).

BEWARE! Sometimes people confuse the punctuation to use at the end of a sentence. You can use commas (,), colons (:) or semicolons (;) in your writing, but they should never be used instead of a full-stop. 3. A sentence also needs two kinds of words in it:

• A sentence must have a VERB (a doing word). e.g. like, is, cooking, walked, need. • A sentence must also have a SUBJECT. This is the person, or the thing, that is doing the verb. e.g. I, Beppe, Tuesday, dog, you, table, the weather,.

Here are some examples of sentences that show you the verbs and the subjects: Last week Peggy redecorated the pub. Are you hungry yet? Martin, be quiet. Tuesday was very rainy and cold.


42

Simple Sentence

Other things to know about sentences: Sentences can be very short, or very long. There is no correct number of words that should be in a sentence. The length of the sentence depends on what you want to say and the effect you want to get. BEWARE! If your sentences go on for many lines, make sure that you haven’t really put several sentences together as one sentence. It’s important to remember that you don’t always need to write in sentences. For example, a shopping list doesn’t need sentences, but a job application does.

Exercise 1 Direction : Underline the subjects and circle the verbs in these simple sentences.

Example: Restaurants and banks usually open at 9.

1. Sally likes drinking juice in the morning. 2. Many people change their looks by having plastic surgery. 3. Tony speaks another language very well. 4. Tom and John play in a band called Guns’ and Roses. 5. Even in the middle of summer, Jan and her dog liked to stay outdoors all afternoon long. 6. He didn’t eat anything for dinner and drink anything at all that evening. 7. Danny washes and dries his hair before he goes to his office. 8. In the evening they stayed in the hotel and played cards. 9. James left school and then worked at Suzie’s. 10.Brazilian people are very friendly and love giving presents for their family.

Exercise 2 Directions: Look at the text below. Find 8 mistakes dealing with punctuation (. , ! ?), spelling, and irregular verbs.


Simple Sentence

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Exercise 3 Directions: In pair work, choose your role (Student A or Student B). partner’s part (for example you are Student A: look at Student A part and cover Student B part with a paper). Take turn asking and answering the questions. SPEAKING

Student A SPEAKING Student B

1. Ask your partner these questions. 1. Do you live in a house or a flat? 2. What do you do? 3. How many brothers and sisters do you have? 4. What TV programmes do you like? 5. Do you speak another language ? 6. Do you have children?

1. Answer your partner’s questions. 1. Where do you live? 2. What do you do? 3. What food do you like? 4. How many cousins do you have? 5. Do you work? 6. Do you have a car?

2. Now answer your partner’s questions. 2. You have some information about Christopher, and your partner has some information about Judith. Name : Judith Chappell Ask your partner these questions about Judith. Occupation : Teacher Age : 32 •What / surename? •What languages / speak? Car : No •How old /? •/car? What car/? Smokes : No •What / do ? •What sports / play? Languages : English, Spanish, and Japanese Sports : Tennis 3. Now read the information about Christopher and answer your partner’s qoestions. 3. Now ask your partner these questions about Crishtopher. • What/surname? • /car? What car/? Name : Christopher Underwood • How old / ? • What/ do ? Occupation : Bank manager • What language/speak? • /smoke? Age : 46 Car : Yes, a BMW Smokes : Yes Languages : English and French Sport : Table tennis

Exercise 4 Directions: Unscramble the questions. Then answer the questions with your own information. 1. name / What’s / first / your ? What’s your first name? 2. full-time / a / Do / have / you / job? 3. live / best friend / Does / your / nearby? 4. weekends / What / do / on / you / do? 5. Where / you / for fun / go / do? 6. teacher / your / like / What’s?

§§End of Meeting 1§§


44

Grammar III Meeting II

Grammar III Meeting II


Lesson Plan A.

Lesson Plan

45

Learning objectives • Learn about compound sentence and the conjunctions • Identify subject, verb, and conjunction in compound sentence • Putting simple sentences into compound sentence using conjunction

B. Materials • How to put simple sentences together (Joining simple sentences into compound sentence) – Skillswise Factsheet • Identifying subjects, verbs, and conjunctions in compound sentence – worksheet • Identifying conjunctions in simple and compound sentences and adding punctuation in compound sentence – worksheet • Joining simple sentences into compound sentence using conjunction – worksheet • Putting sentences together (Joining sentences using conjunction)- Skillswise worksheet C.

Class activities a. Lead in • How to put simple sentences together (Joining simple sentences into compound sentence) – Skillswise Factsheet ▶ Related to the previous lesson about simple sentence, students learn how to put simple sentences together using conjunction. ▶ Students learn about conjunctions and how they connect ideas (adding, contrast, etc.) ▶ Students learn how to identify sentences (simple or compound) b. Main exercise • Identifying subjects, verbs, and conjunctions in compound sentence – worksheet ▶ Students identify the subjects, predicates, and conjunction in the sentences. Students then decide if the sentence is compound or simple. • Identifying conjunctions in simple and compound sentences and adding punctuation in compound sentence – worksheet ▶ Students identify conjunctions in sentences ▶ Students decide if the sentences are simple or compound ▶ Students add punctuation (comma) in the compound sentences. • Joining simple sentences into compound sentence using conjunction – worksheet • Putting sentences together (Joining sentences using conjunction)- Skillswise worksheet ▶ Students learn to join simple sentences together using conjunction. ▶ Students pay attention to what conjunction is used to connect the ideas of the sentences. c. Wrap up ▶ Together, students summarize the use of conjunctions and how they connect ideas. ▶ Students differ simple sentences (including those with compound subjects and predicates) from compound sentence (more than one subject-predicate separated by a comma).

In this meeting You will learn how to: ▶ ▶ ▶

Learn about compound sentence and the conjunctions Identify subject, verb, and conjunction in compound sentence Putting simple sentences into compound sentence using conjunction


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Compound Sentence

Compound Sentence

A. How to put simple sentences together Constant use of short sentences can be a bit strange to read. To make your writing more interesting, you can use two other sorts of longer sentences. The simplest of these is the compound sentence.

B. How do I make a compound sentence?

When you have two or more short, independent, simple sentences which are of equal weight you can join them together using special words called conjunctions. e.g. ‘I hate curry.’ is a simple sentence. ‘I like Thai food.’ is also a simple sentence. You can put these together to make one, longer and more interesting compound sentence using a conjunction ‘I hate curry’ + but + ‘I like Thai food’ = ‘I hate curry, but I like Thai food.’

• Junctions join two or more roads together, so we use conjunctions to join two or more short sentences together • Commas are not conjunctions and they should never be used to join short sentences together (commas aren’t sticky, so you can’t use them to stick information together!). • These are the most common conjunctions :

and, as, but, or, so,for, nor, yet • Try to avoid using the same conjunction over and over again. It is much better to ‘mix and match’.

BEWARE! The conjunction that you use may change the meaning of your sentence! Conjunctions don’t just stick sentences together, they show the relationship between the pieces of information. e.g. Note the slightly different meaning in these sentences: I walked home. I was tired. I walked home and I was tired. I walked home as I was tired. I walked home but I was tired. I walked home so I was tired. I walked home or I was tired. The final sentence, using or doesn’t really make sense. You can’t use every conjunction everywhere - so choose wisely!

Exercise 1 Directions: Circle the connectors. Underline the subjects once and the verbs twice in the following sentences.Then decide if the sentence is compound (c) or single (s).

Example : Suzi likes to eat red jello and diced bananas.

1. I want to be rich and smart. 2. Anthony can have new shoes or a haircut. 3. Please help me with this laundry, or we’ll never finish on time. 4. I just put the cookies in the oven, so you’ll just have to wait. 5. We washed our muddy socks, and then we hung them out to dry. 6. Sally and Suzie went to the movies.


Compound Sentence

Exercise 2 Direction: Circle the conjunctions and decide if you need to add punctuation to the following sentences.

Example: Rebecca goes to Art College for she wants to be a dancer.

Rebecca goes to Art College, for she wants to be a dancer.

1. Mark always does his homework so he gets good grades. 2. Frenka loves cooking and gardening at the weekend. 3. I haven’t eaten caviar yet I have eaten lobster. 4. Melissa got an A on the test for she spent several hours studying. 5. You can use spoon or chopsticks to eat the noodles. 6. I like Chicken and I like pie also. 7. Sally went to the movies but Suzie stayed home.

Exercise 3 Directions: In the following exercises, turn the sentence pairs into single compound sentences, each with a coordinating conjunction (for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so). You can arrange or add words in the sentences to make it sound better, but only if it’s necessary.

Example: My mother always brings us breakfast. She doesn’t want us to get sick.

My mother always brings us breakfast, for she doesn’t want us to get sick.

1. The black dog has won many prizes. He doesn’t know many tricks. 2. I wanted to buy a baby Chihuahua. I started to save my money. 3. There was a meteor shower. The crew did not know how to avoid the meteors. 4. Pam liked Wayne. Leena also liked Wayne. 5. Let’s go to the swimming pool. It’s hot inside the house. 6. I don’t do my homework. My parents punished me. 7. I don’t want to eat. I don’t want to drink.

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48

Compound Sentence

C. Exercise Grammar : Putting sentences together worksheet 1 Choose the best cojunction (joining word) from the list below to join together the following short sentences. Try not to use each conjunction more than twice. and, although, as, because, but, if, or 1.

The rug was very expensive. It had been woven by hand.

2.

The concert went ahead. The lead singer was unwell.

3.

He wanted to bake his own bread. He had run out of flour.

4.

She bought a new dress. She bought new shoes to match.

5.

They would have to arrive before 2pm. They might miss the first race.

6.

Never touch your eyes after chopping chillies. They will burn and hurt like fury.

7.

Keep the mask and gloves on. You don’t want the bees to sting you.

8.

I completed my hair styling course. Then I went on to manage a busy salon.

9.

Jack Nicklaus is a great golfer. Tiger Woods may be even better.

10. He had to visit the gym more often. He wanted to improve his stamina. 11. The roof needed six new tiles. They were blown off during the storm. 12. Molly liked Tigger. She loved Pooh Bear the best.

§§End of Meeting 2§§


Grammar III Meeting III

Grammar III Meeting III

49


50

Lesson Plan

Lesson Plan A.

Learning objectives • Learn about complex sentence, clauses, and subordinating conjunction • Learn subordinate conjunction in joining ideas • Put punctuation in complex sentence • Join sentences into complex sentence

B. Materials • Complex Sentences – Skillswise factsheet • Identifying subordinate and main clause – worksheet • Identifying complex and compound sentence • Putting sentences together (joining two short sentences using conjunction) – Skillswise work sheet • Putting sentences together (rewriting sentences using conjunction)- Skillswise worksheet C.

Class activities a. Lead in Complex Sentences – Skillswise factsheet ▶ Students learn about main and subordinate clauses that form a complex sentence, and how subordinate conjunction makes the clauses not equal. ▶ Students learn about the difference of compound from complex sentences. b. Main exercise Identifying subordinate and main clause – worksheet ▶ Students identify subordinate and main clauses in sentences. In this case, they need to pay attention to subordinate conjunctions to find the subordinate clauses. Identifying complex and compound sentence ▶ Students identify and label sentences as either compound or complex sentences. In this case they need to pay attention to what conjunction is used in the sentence. Putting sentences together (joining two short sentences using conjunction) – Skillswise work sheet ▶ Students practice joining short sentences together to form complex sentence by adding subordinate conjunction. Putting sentences together (rewriting sentences using conjunction)- Skillswise worksheet ▶ Students practice rewriting sentences (badly joined with a comma) using conjunction. ▶ Students need to pay attention to the relation of ideas in each sentence to find the most suitable subordinate conjunction. c. Wrap up ▶ Students summarize the types of sentences that they have learned so far (simple, compound, complex) and how each type is different from the other.

In this meeting You will learn how to: ▶ ▶ ▶ ▶

Understand and identify complex sentence, clauses, and subordinating conjunction Understand subordinate conjunction in joining ideas Put punctuation in complex sentence Join sentences into complex sentence


Complex Sentence

Complex Sentence Complex sentences: Constant use of short sentences can be a bit strange to read. To make your writing more interesting, you can use two other sorts of longer sentences. Factsheet 1 looked at ‘compound’ sentences. This factsheet looks at ‘complex’ sentence.

A. How do I make a complex sentence?

When you make a compound sentence you are joining two or more simple sentences together with a conjunction. If you took the conjunction away, the sentences would be complete and they would still make sense. e.g. ‘I hate curry, but I like Thai food.’= ‘I hate curry’ + but + ‘I like Thai food’ This isn’t the same for complex sentences. Complex sentences don’t just divide into neat, complete, simple sentences if you take out the conjunctions. In complex sentences the conjunction is used to join together clauses. A clause is a group of words that contains a subject and a verb. Some of these clauses might be complete short sentences, but in a complex sentence at least one of them will depend on the conjunction for its meaning. In other words, if you take the conjunction away, the sentence won’t divide into complete units that make sense by themselves. e.g. ‘The dinner was burned because she had forgotten it.’ = ‘The dinner was burned’ + ‘because’ + ‘she had forgotten it.’ This is a complex sentence:

•‘The dinner was burned’ = complete, short sentence •‘because’ = conjunction (joining word) •‘she had forgotten it’ = subordinate clause. This doesn’t make sense on its own. What had she forgotten? This is called a ‘subordinate clause’ because without the rest of the sentence it doesn’t really make sense.

‘Although I’m not very good, I really enjoy playing football.’ = ‘Although’ + ‘I’m not very good’ + ‘I really enjoy playing football.’ Again, this is a complex sentence:

•‘Although’ = conjunction (joining word). Yes, sometimes conjunctions can appear at the beginning of a sentence! •‘I’m not very good’ = subordinate clause. This doesn’t make sense on its own. What are you not very good at? This is called a ‘subordinate clause’ because without the rest of the sentence it doesn’t really make sense. •‘I enjoy playing football’ = complete short sentence

BEWARE! As for compound sentences, commas are not conjunctions and they should never be used to join short sentences or clauses together (commas aren’t sticky, so you can’t use them to stick information together!). e.g. ‘The dinner was burned, she had forgotten it.’ = incorrect ‘The dinner was burned because she had forgotten it.’ = correct

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Complex Sentence

B. Subordinating Conjunctions Subordinating conjunctions are used to join a dependent clause (incomplete thought) to an independent clause. Common Subordinating Conjunctions after even if that before even though unless once if until although if only when as in order to whenever as if now that where as long as rather than whereas as though since wherever because so that while still than

Exercise 1 Directions: Circle the connectors in each sentence. Underline the clauses and mark them either as main clause (MC) or subordinate clause (SC). Put a comma before the main clause if the subordinate clause comes at the beginning of the sentence.

Example: When Mary is angry her face turns red.

When Mary is angry , her face turns red. SC MC 1. Before I eat I usually wash my hands. 2. I usually wash my hands before I eat. 3. Even though we come from a large family we are very close to each other. 4. We are very close to each other even though we come from a large family. 5. If I don’t see you at school today, I’ll call you tonight. 6. I’ll call you tonight if I don’t see you at school today.

Exercise 2 Directions: Circle the connectors in each sentence and mark it either as compound (C) or complex (X) sentence.

Example : Byuri usually goes to school after she brushes her teeth. (X)

1. I’m not leaving before you say you’re sorry. 2. Henry got a new job, so he has to move. 3. I know you love me for I have money and perfect teeth. 4. If you finish eating your vegetables, you may eat cake. 5. I have fished in Colorado River but I have never caught a fish there. 6. We will start the work when the sun rises. 7. I’m going to go even though my parents say I can’t


Complex Sentence

53

C. Skillwise Grammar : Putting sentences together worksheet 1 Choose the best conjunction (joining word) from the list below to join together the following short sentences. Only use each conjunction once and watch out for meaning! where, before, after, until, since, when, whenever while, although, though, wether E.g. I like to swim before I eat breakfast. I like to swim before I eat breakfast. 1. It was definitely this shop. I lost my bankcard. 2. He was always very quiet. His sister was the opposite. 3. You set out the parts. I’m trying to work out the instructions. 4. I will not sing tonight. My agent checks the contract. 5. We will still have a picnic. The weather’s good or bad. 6. We go for a lot of walks. The weather is good. Grammar : Putting sentences tohether worksheet 2 It is very bad practice in English to join whole sentences together using commas. This is very common mistake and it’s called ‘comma spilicing’ All the following sentences have used commas in correctly. Re-write each sentences using a conjunction (joining word). Only use each conjunction once. 1. The table soon fell apart, the screws that they had used were far too short! 2. The man had stopped shouting, he was still extremely angry. 3. Three long months passed , still there was no sign of rain. 4. My presentation seemed to go well , I was feeling really nervous. 5. Do you want to use the main oven later, can I switch it off now? 6.I just don’t care , he leaves me and our relationship is over! 7. He looks so old and frail, he has been ill. 8. The beacon mark the spot, the ship sank without warning. 9. James turned red with embarrassment , It was his turn to speak. 10. The have worked on the injured horse, there was little chance of survival.

§§End of Meeting 3§§


54

Grammar III Meeting VI

Grammar III Meeting VI


Lesson Plan

55

Lesson Plan A.

Learning objectives • Talk about 2 actions happened in the past • Understand the importance of joining words • Join sentences with conjunction by considering the connection of the ideas • Identify simple, compound, and complex sentence

B. Materials • Are You Having a Bad Week? (article) • Grammar part- Past Continuous statement • The important joining words- Skillswise Factsheet • Putting Sentences together – Skillswise worksheet • Identifying sentence types in text C.

Class activities a. Lead in Are You Having a Bad Week? (article) ▶ Students tell the class about how they spend their weekend. Encourage other students to give response to their friends’ weekend stories. ▶ Students read an article about some people talking about their bad weekend. b. Main exercise Grammar part- Past Continuous statement ▶ Students learn how to talk about 2 actions happening in the past using while or when. ▶ Students practice joining sentences describing past events using while or when. The important joining words- Skillswise Factsheet ▶ Students learn the function of conjunction and their meaning in relating ideas. ▶ Students learn about ‘mixing’ and ‘matching” conjunctions, instead of using the same conjunction over and over again. Putting Sentences together – Skillswise worksheet ▶ Students practice joining sentences using conjunction by paying attention to the relation of the ideas. Identifying sentence types in text ▶ Students read the passage and identify the types of sentences that are there. At this point, students should be aware on how to differ one type of sentence from another. c. Wrap up ▶ Students write 3 types of sentences (simple, compound, and complex) using their own words.

In this meeting You will learn how to: ▶ ▶ ▶ ▶

Learn about complex sentence, clauses, and subordinating conjunction Learn subordinate conjunction in joining ideas Put punctuation in complex sentence Join sentences into complex sentence


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Joining Ideas

Joining Ideas

A. When things go wrong... Are you having a bad week ? Sean Davis “Actually, yes. I was going to work on the train Monday morning, and I was talking to this woman. I guess i wasn’t paying attention, and I missed my stop. I was half an hour late for a meeting with my new boss. ” Julia Chen “ Oh, definitely! A friend of mine accidentally deleted all my music files yesterday when she was using my computer. I tried for hours to find them, but nothing worked I lost everything! “ Roberto Moreno “ Yeah, kind of . A couple of days ago, a friend and I were trying to look cool in front of some girls at the mall. We weren’t looking, and we walked right into a glass door. I was so embrassed.”

1. Getting Started

A. Listen and read. Why is each person having a bad week?

B. Can you choose the correct verb forms in these sentences? Use the information above to help you. Then compare with a partner.

1. Sean talked / was talking to a woman on the train, and he missed / was missing his stop. 2. Julia’s friend deleted / was deleting her files when she used / was using Julia’s computer. 3. Roberto and his friend tried / were trying to look cool when they walked / were walking into a glass door.


Joining Ideas

2. Grammar

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Past continuous statements

Use the past continuous to set the background for a story or tell about events in progress in the past. Use the simple past for completed actions in the past.

I was talking to a woman, and I missed my stop. I wasn’t paying attention. We were trying to look cool, and we walked into a glass door. We weren’t looking.

A friend of mine deleted all my files when she was using my computer. When my friend was using my computer, she deleted all my files. In conversation . . .

The most common verbs in the past continuous are talk, do, go, say, try, get and tell.

A. Complete the anecdotes with the past continuous or simple past. 1. A few weeks ago, when I was making (make) dinner, my friend (call). I completely (forget) about the food on the stove, and I (burn) everything! 2. I (damage) my parents car last week. I (drive) to work, and I (run) into a stop sign. Now I have to pay for the repairs. 3. Last week, I (hurt) my foot when I (do) aerobics. I don’t know why, but I just (fall). I felt so stupid. 4. I (have) lunch in a restaurant yesterday when the server accidentally (spill) water all over me! It was embarrasing, but then I (get) my lunch for free. 5. My friend and I (talk) in class, and we (not pay) attention. Suddenly we realized the teacher (stand) right beside us. He and the whole class (listen) to us!

B. Pair work Choose one of the anecdotes above, and retell it to a partner. Try not to look at the text.


58

Joining Ideas

B. The important joining words Factsheets 1 and 2 told you about making more interesting sentences by using compound and complex sentences. For both of these, you need a good selection of conjunctions, or joining words. The ‘magnificent seven’ conjunctions (the most commonly used) are: and, although, as, because, but, if, or There are a number of other important conjunctions that you can use. These can be put into categories of time, place, or agreement. TIME = before, after, until, since, when, whenever, while e.g. We all went home before a fight broke out. She went to bed after she put the cat out. There will be no peace until somebody says that they are sorry. It has not been the same around here since our friends moved away. They put the television off when the programme had finished. He washes his new car whenever it gets mucky. The children go to the crèche while Mum goes to work.

PLACE = where

e.g. Remember that restaurant where you ate a huge steak.

AGREEMENT = though, although, whether

e.g. He could play the violin though he was only five years old. I would invite you to come in although the place is a mess. It was a great show whether you wanted to join in or just watch. Remember! • Try to avoid using the same conjunction over and over again. It is much better to ‘mix and match’. • The conjunction you use can change the meaning of the sentence. You can’t use every conjunction everywhere - so choose wisely!

C. Exercise Grammar : Putting sentences together worksheet 2 Choose the best conjunction (joining word) from the list below to join together the following short s sentences. Use a variety of conjunctions and watch out for meaning!

Where, before, after, until, since, when, whenever, while, although, though, whether, as

E.g. I want to go to the cinema. I am quite tired. I want to go to the cinema, although I am quite tired.


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Joining Ideas 1. He checked that the road was clear. He drove away. 2. It was extremely dark. The lights were switched off. 3. I can’t be certain. We may change our plans if the weather is good. 4. The girls were eating burgers. We saw them at lunchtime. 5. I thought that he was the thief. I can’t really be sure. 6. They have been much happier. They won the lottery last year.

Direction: Read the passage below. Underline and identify the type of the sentences either as simple, compound, or complex sentences. Circle the connectors for compound and complex sentences. Example: Roberto Moreno “ Yeah, kind of . A couple of days ago, afriend and I were trying to look cool in front of some girls at the mall. We weren’t looking, and we walked right into a glass door. I was so embrassed.”

Compound sentences

1. Julia Chen 2. Sean Davis “Actually, yes. I was going to “ Oh, definitely! A friend of mine accidentally deleted all work on the train Monday my music files yesterday when morning, and I was talking she wasusing my computer. to this woman. I guess i wasn’t I tried for hours to find them, paying attention, and I missed but nothing worked . I lost my stop. I was half an hour late everything!” for a meeting with my new boss. ”

§§End of Meeting 4§§


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Speaking & Listening III Class (1st Meeting)

Speaking & Listening III st Class (1 Meeting)

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Lesson Plan

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Lesson Plan A.

Learning objectives • Start a conversation with people we meet for the first time • Identify interesting topic for conversation • Improve conversation skills • Give new information with actually

B. Materials • Vocabulary building - Identifying topics to start a conversation • (Do you come here a lot + audio l2t01) • Actually – giving a new or surprising information • Me too! – finding people who have the same taste/preference • Reading - How to improve your conversational skills • Practice – making a friendly conversation C.

Class activities a. Before listening Vocabulary building - Identifying topics to start a conversation ▶ Students learn to identify topics which are suitable to start a conversation (meeting for the first time) b. During listening Do you come here a lot + audio l2t01 ▶ Students learn how to start a conversation when meeting someone for the first time. ▶ Students learn the way people keep on responding to the questions so that they can continue the conversation. Actually – giving a new or surprising information ▶ Students practice using “actually” to mention a surprising fact or new information Me too! – finding people who have the same taste/preference ▶ Students go around and interview their friends to find people with the same preference. Reading - How to improve your conversational skills ▶ Students read an article about how to improve conversation skills. Then they learn to apply the tips mentioned in the article to make a conversation with their friends. c. After listening ▶ Students work in pair and start making a conversation. Both people need to work to keep the conversation going.

In this meeting You will learn how to: ▶ ▶ ▶ ▶

Start a conversation with people we meet for the first time Identify interesting topic for conversation Improve conversation skills Give new information with actually

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Starting a Conversation

Starting a Conversation

A. Getting started Which picture tells you about a topic to start a conversation?

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Starting a Conversation

A. Do you come here a lot? 1. Conversation strategy

Starting a conversation

A. Which topics can you talk about when you meet someone for the first time? Check (✓) the boxes below.

your salary

your family

the weather

someone’s appearance

your health

where you live

your problems

things you see around you

Now listen. What are Eve and Chris talking about?

Eve : Ooh, it’s cold tonight. Chris : Yeah, it is. But actually, I kind of like cold weather. Eve : You do? Really? . . . Boy, there are a lot of people out here tonight. Chris : Yeah, it gets pretty crowded on weekends. Eve : Do you come here a lot? Chris : Yeah, I do, actually. Eve : So are you a big hip-hop fan? Chris : Yeah, I am. Are you? Eve : Actually, no, but my brother’s in the band tonight. Chris : Oh, Really? Cool . . . By the way, my name’s Chris. Eve : Nice to meet you. I’m Eve.

Notice how Eve starts a conversation with a stranger. She talks about the things around them, like the weather and the club, and asks general questions. Find examples in the conversation.

“Ooh, It’s cold tonight.” “Do you come here a lot?”

B. Pair Work Think of a way to start a conversation for each situation. Compare with a partner. Then role-play the situations. Continue each conversation as long as you can. 1. You meet someone new at a party. The food is really good. “This is food is delicious!” 2. It’s a very hot day. You’re just arriving at a new class. 3. You’re in a long line at a movie theater. It’s a cold day. 4. You’re working out at a new gym. The music is very loud. 5. You’re in a new English class. You meet someone during the break. 6. You’re at the bus stop on a beautiful day. Someone arrives and smiles at you.

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Starting a Conversation

2. Strategy Plus

Actually

You can use You can use actually to actually “correct” things people to give new say or think or surprising information. A So, you’re American? B Well, actually, I’m from Canada.

In Conversation . . .

Actually is one of the top 200

words.

A. Match each conversation starter with a response. Then practice with a partner. 1. I like your jacket

d

a. Actually, I feel a bit cold.

2. Do you come here by bus?

b. Yeah. I actually look forward to it.

3. Is that your newspaper?

c. No, I wal, actually. It takes an hour.

4. Do you like this class?

d. Thanks. It’s from Peru, actually

5. Do you live around here? 6. Boys,it’s warm in here.

e. Um... actually, no,it’s not. Go ahead and take it f. Yes, right around the corner, actually.

B. Pair work Start conversations using the ideas above. Use actually in your responses if you need to. “ I like your watch”

3. Free talk 1

“Thanks. It was my grandfather’s, actually.”

Me too!

Class activity First write your answers to these questions. Then ask your classmates the questions. Find people who have things in common with you. Write their names. My answers Classmates with the same answers 1. What’s your favorite color? blue kumiko 2. What food do you hete most? 3. What sport do you play? 4. how many sisters do you have? 5. How many hours a week do you watch TV? 6. What’s your favorite day of the week? 7. How often do you have dinner with your family? 8. What do you usually wear on weekends? 9. What time do you usually get up on Sundays? A B A

What’s your favorite color, Kumiko? Blue. How about you? Me too. All my clothes are blue and . . .

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Starting a Conversation

B. Making conversation 1. Reading A. Which of these are good suggestions for social conversations? Check ( ✓) the boxes. Then tell the class

Don’t look at the other person. Keep quiet when the other person is talking Ask questions that start with what, where,how,or when

Have some good topics to doscuss. Talk about yourself a lot

B. Read the magazine article. What does it say about the suggestions above?Do you agree with all of the ideas in the article?

1

Have some topics ready to start a conversation. Say something about the weather or the place you’re in. Talk about the wekend - we all have something to say about weekends!

2

Make the conversation interesting. About events in the news. Read restaurant and movie reviews. Find out about the current music scene or what’s new in fashion or sports.

3

Be a good listener. Keep eye contact and say “ Yes,” “Hmm” “Uh-huh” “Right,” and “I know”. And say, “Really? That’s interesting”. It encourages people to talk

4 5

Don’t be boring. Don’t you just say, “Yes” or “ No” When you answer a question. Give some interesting information, too.

Don’t talk all the times. Ask, “How about you are interested in the other you?” and show person, too. People love to talk about them selves! GE3-SL-Class Meeting 1


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Starting a Conversation

6

Ask information question. Ask questions like “What do you do in your free time?” or “What kind of food do you like?” Use follow-up questions to keep the conversation going. But don’t ask too many questions - it’s not an interrogation!

7

Be positive. Negative comments can sound rude. And if you don’t want to answer a personal question, simply say, “ Oh, i’m not sure I can answer that”, or “I’d rather not say.”

8

Smile! Everyone loves a smile. Just be relaxed, smile, and be yourself.

C. Look at the article again. Find these things. Then compare with a partner. 1. an interesting topic of conversation 2. an example of an information question 3. a suggestion you would like to try

4. a question to show you’re interested in the other person 5. something you can say to show you’re listening 6. something to say if someone asks you a difficult qustion

2. Speaking and writing

How to improve your . . .

A. Pair work Brainstorm ideas for each topic, and make notes. How toimprove your social life Go out. Be friendly. Take up a sport or hobby.

How to improve your English

How to improve your study skills

B. Choose one of the topics above, and use your ideas to write a short magazine article ilke the example below. Help note Punctuation ∙ Use a CAPITAL letter to start a sentences. ∙ Use a comma (,) before quotation marks (“ ”) and in lists. ∙ Use a period (.) at the end of a statement and a question mark (?) at the end of a question.

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Starting a Conversation

3. Talk about it

Friendly conversation

Group work. Discuss the questions. Find out about your classmates’ conversation style. ▶ Do you ever start conversations with strangers? ▶ Do you think it’s odd when a stranger talks to you? ▶ Are you a talkative person? ▶ Do you think you talk too much? ▶ Are you a good listener? ▶ Are you usually the “talker” or the “listener” in a conversation? ▶ What do you like to talk about? ▶ What topics do you try to avoid?

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Speaking & Listening III Lab. (1st Meeting)

Speaking & Listening III st Lab. (1 Meeting)

GE3-SL-Lab Meeting 1


Lesson Plan A.

Lesson Plan

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Learning objectives • Talk about neighborhood • Improve test taking skills through note taking • Improve reading through reading in chunk • Improve speaking through shadow talking

B. Materials • Before you start (Pdf) – vocabulary building ▶ Match the descriptions with the words ▶ Match the words with the pictures • How do you like your neighborhood?(discussion) – talking about neighborhood • Video (Learning English_ Words_in_the_news_ Hongkong _s_hive_of_ Business) During listening: 1 Note taking 2 Reading in chunk Post listening: ▶ Shadow talking 1 Text completion (Words in the News : Hongkong’s hive of Business) 2 Giving opinion (post listening activities) C.

Class activities a. Before listening Before you start (Pdf) – vocabulary building ▶ Students learn about things related to environment by matching the words to their description How do you like your neighborhood?(discussion) – talking about neighborhood ▶ Students talk about places in their neighborhood and the condition. The discussion also relates to some places that the students wish to have around their neighborhood. b. During listening Video (Learning English_ Words_in_the_news_ Hongkong _s_hive_of_ Business) During listening: 1 Note taking 2 Reading in chunk ▶ Students practice note taking while they are listening to the video. Students then practice summarizing or retell what they have listened to in their own words. Post listening: Shadow talking ▶ Students learn to sound naturally while they are speaking by doing shadow talking (imitating the way the speaker talks, considering the intonation and the pronunciation). Text completion (Words in the News : Hongkong’s hive of Business) ▶ Students learn about how words work out their meaning by completing the text and understanding the meaning of the word related to the context of the sentence. c. After listening Giving opinion (post listening activities) ▶ Students practice expressing their opinion and build up their confidence

In this meeting You will learn how to: ▶ ▶ ▶ ▶

Talk about neighborhood Improve test taking skills through note taking Improve reading through reading in chunk Improve speaking through shadow talking Dear lectures; Please follow the sequence of the exercises according of the content of the server. GE3-SL-Lab Meeting 1


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Environment

Environment

I. Before you start

Match the description bellow with the words 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Sweet liquid made by bee Flying insect that produces honey Very tall building Home for bees Sharp pain caused by bee bite A sweet liquid that flowering plants produce Relating to or belonging to a city

o o o o o o o

Nectar Bee Hive Honey Sting Skyscraper Urban

II. Vocabulary • • • • •

concrete jungle a phrase to describe a city with many large buildings and skyscrspers and few green areas storeys different levels of a building beehives structures where bees live together conurbations large urban areas where different town have grown and joined together to pollinate to enable plants to produce seeds and therefore reproduce. Pollination happens when bees, other insects or the wind carry pollen from one plant to another.

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Environment A. Match the words below with the pictures

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Environment

“ “Well, parkview is convenient. There’s a big supermarket and some nice stores, but there’s no mall . We need a mall “ -Janed Carson, 47, medical researcher

III. Getting Started

A. Figure B. it out

“Um, it’s nice. There are two nice outdoor cafe’s and a couple of movie theathers. There’s a new swimming poll in the park - we have a beautiful little park. Yeah, it’s good.” Rick Martinez, 33, stocbroker

“ Parkview is boring! There’s no place to go. I mean , there’s no mall, no fast-food places - just a lot of expensive restaurants. Oh, and a small park Megan Novak, 15, high school student

Listen and read. Which people like Parkview? Why? What’s in your neighborhood? circle the words to make true sentences. Compare with a partner 1. There’s a / no mall 2. There are no / some / a lot of cheap restaurants. 3. There are no / a couple of / some movie theaters.

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Environment

A. B. A.

There’s a big park in Wilcox Hill There park in Benson Valley, but it’s small. OK. That’s one difference.

Differences 1. There ‘s a big park in Wllcox Hill, but there’s a small park in Benson Valley

BBC Learning English Words in the News 20th July 2011 Hongkong’s hive businnes Transcript It may be concrete jungle but Hong Kong has more similarities with great outdoors than you might think. 14 storeys up a skyscraper, you can find one of the 11 urban beehives around the city. Like many conurbations, Hong Kong has enough flora for bees to pollinate and harvest nectar from. Following Chinese tradition beekeepers in Hong Kong don’t wear any protective gear.

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Environment

Vocabulary concrete jungle a phrase to describe a city with many large buildings and skyscrapers and few green areas storeys different levels of a building beehives structures where bees live together conurbations large urban areas where different towns have grown and joined together to pollinate to enable plants to produce seeds and therefore reproduce. Pollination happens when bees, other insects or the wind carry pollen from one plant to another. More on this story: Meet Hong kong’s urban beekeepers Watch this video online: Hong kong’s hive business

http://bbc.in/oAgF9y http://bbc.in/neA3oq

Exercise Use one of the words or phrases below to complete each of these sentences from a BBC news report. Note that you may have to change the form of a word to complete the sentence correctly. concrete jungle / storeys / beehives / conurbations / to pollinate 1. The biggest city close to the epicentre is Concepcion, which forms part of the second largest ______________________ in the country with a population of about one million. 2. The Magnolia genus is an ancient group of more than 100 plants, and is considered to be among the first flowering plants to have evolved. Their arrival on the planet pre-dated the emergence of bees, so the early species of magnolia were believed to have been __________________ by beetles. 3. A toddler who fell 10 ________________ and survived after being caught by a passer-by has been making headlines around the world. But what is the best way to catch a falling child? 4. In popular culture, New York is the city that never sleeps, the ____________________ in which dreams are made, a place to walk on the wild side. 5. A Toronto museum is investigating the sudden death of thousands of bees in a glass-enclosed ___________________ exhibit. GE3-SL-Lab Meeting 1


Environment

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Post Listening activities a) Improve test taking skills As you listen, practice note taking sumarizing. listen to the videos and take notes of what speaker said. Then try to summarize what they said and then check your summary with the full transcript. b) Improve your reading As you watch the video, read the transcript of the video. Practice reading in chunks rather than word by word. c) Improve your speaking Turn down or mute the audio volume and try to shadow the speaker. Try to say their words at the same speed the speaker does, This is a great way to increase fluency and speaking speed. d) Give your opinion about the video What do you think about beekeepers? Do you think it safe to take honey from beehive without wearing any protective gear?

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Speaking & Listening III Class (2nd Meeting)

Speaking & Listening III nd Class (2 Meeting)

GE3-SL-Class Meeting 2


Lesson Plan

Lesson Plan A.

Learning objectives • Keep a conversation going • Show surprise in informal conversations • Give response with short questions • Say “no” in a friendly way

B. Materials • How come you are tired – encouraging people to talk • Showing surprise • Keeping the conversation going – responding by giving short question • Saying no in a friendly way – Responding more than just “No” to be friendly and polite • The game of like and dislike C.

Class activities a. Before listening ▶ How come you are tired – encouraging people to talk ▶ Students identify the way people encourage their partner to talk by using follow-up questions. b. During listening Showing surprise ▶ Students learn some expression for showing surprise in informal conversation. ▶ In pair, students practice showing surprise in informal conversation. Keeping the conversation going – responding by giving short question ▶ Students learn some ways to keep the conversation going by giving short questions. ▶ Students listen to the audio as they read the dialog. ▶ In pair, students practice with friends by giving a shirt questions to continue the conversation. Saying no in a friendly way – Responding more than just “No” to be friendly and polite ▶ Students learn how people give more details to their “no” answers to be friendly and polite. ▶ In pair, students practice this way of extending the conversation and being friendly and polite. c. After listening The game of like and dislike ▶ Students complete the charts in three minutes and compare their answers to their friends.

In this meeting You will learn how to: ▶ ▶ ▶ ▶

Keep a conversation going Show surprise in informal conversations Give response with short questions Say “no” in a friendly way

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Keeping a Conversation Going

Keeping a Conversation Going

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Keeping a Conversation Going

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A. How come you’re tired? 1. Conversation strategy ==> Encouraging people to talk

A. Which are the best responses to keep the conversation going? Check (√) the boxes.

A I’m tired.

B

☐Yeah, I know. ☐Yeah. Me too. ☐Really? How come?

☐Oh! Why is that? ☐Oh, I’m sorry. ☐You look tired. Are you busy at work?

Now listen. Why is Adam tired?

Adam : I’m so tired. Yuki : Really? How come? Adam : Well, I’m working two jobs this semster, so I’m getting up at, like, 5:30 to study. Yuki : Are you kidding! Two jobs? Wow. Adam : Yeah, Just for a couple of months. I’m working in a supermarket after class, and then I have my regular job at the restaurant till 11:00. Yuki : Oh, that’s late. So, what time do you go to bed? Adam : About 1:00 . . . 1:30. Yuki : Gosh. So you’re only getting about four hours’ sleep? That’s not much.

Notice how Yuki encourages Adam to continue talking. She comments on what Adam says and asks follow-up questions. Find examples in the conversation.

“I’m so tired.” “Really? How come?”

B. Match each sentence with an appropriate reply. Then practice with a partner. 1. I need a lot of sleep. d 2. I can’t sleep if there’s light in my room. 3. I usually go to bed early during the week 4. If I can’t fall asleep, I usually read. 5. I often take a nap after lunch. 6. I only sleep about five hours a night.

a. I can’t either. Do your windows have blinds? b. That’s not much. Are you getting enough sleep? c. At the office? How long do you sleep? d. Really? How much sleep do you need? e. That’s good. Do you wake up early,too? f. That’s a good idea. What do you read?

C. Pair work. Student A: Tell your partner about your sleep habits. Use the ideas above. Student B: Reaspond with comments and questions. Then change roles. A I don’t really need a lot of sleep. B Really? Me neither. How much sleep do you need? A About five hours a night. GE3-SL-Class Meeting 2


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Keeping a Conversation Going

2. Strategy plus ==> Showing surprise

Use expressions like these to show surprise in informal conversations :

Oh! Gosh! Really? Oh, my gosh! Wow! You’re kidding! Oh, wow! Are you serious? No way! No!

In formal conversations, use Oh! or Really?

A. Listen and write the expressions you hear. Then practice and continue the conversations with a partner.

In Conversation . . . Oh and Really are in the top 50 words. Wow and Gosh are in the top 500.

1. A. I love sleeping late on the weekends. I get up around 2.30 on Saturdays. B. ? ! What time do you go to bed? 2. A. This magazine says too much sleep is a bad for you. B. ? I sleep ten hours a night. Is that bad? 3.

A. I have same dream every night. B. every night? ! what do you dream about?

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Keeping a Conversation Going

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B. I’ve heard it’s good

1. Conversation strategy ==> Keeping the conversation going A. How can you show interest and keep this conversation going? Choose the best answer.

A Have you seen the new Nicole Kidman movie? B ☐ No, I haven’t. ☐ No, but I’ve heard about it. have you seen it? ☐ No, I don’t like comedies. Now listen. What do Hal and Debran have in common?

Debra : Have you seen any good movies lately? Hal : Well, I just saw that new Jim Carrey movie. Have you seen it? Debra : No, but I’ve heard it’s good. Did you like it? Hal : Yeah, it was invredibly funny. Do you like comedies? Debra : Yeah. I have to go see it. I love Jim arrey. C

Hal

: Do you? Uh, are you a Will Smith fan?

Debra : Umm . . . I’ve heard of him. Is he good? Hal : Yeah, I’ve seen most of his movies. Debra : Have you? Oh look, here’s a Will Smith film. Hal : Oh, I haven’t seee that one. Do you want to go? Debra : Yeah. I’m kind of in the mood for a comedy. Notice how Debra and Hal keep the conversation going. “Have you seen it?” They say things like I’ve heard it’s good to show interest and then ask a question. Find other examples in the “No, but I’ve heard it’s good. conversation. Did you like it” B. Match each statement with a response. Then practice with apartner. 1. My favorite movie is Spirited Away. Have you ever seen it? 2. Have you ever eaten a durian? 3. Do you know that new band called Sunset? They’re really great. 4. One of my favorite restaurants is Silk Road Have you ever eaten there?

a. It’s a fruit,right? I’ve never tried it. What does it taste like? b. No, but I’ve walked by it. What kind of food do they serve? c. No, but I’ve heard good things about them. Do you have any of thei CDs? d. I’ve heard of it. What’s it about?

C. Pair work Practice the conversations above using your own ideas. Change the underlined words. GE3-SL-Class Meeting 2


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Keeping a Conversation Going

2. Strategy Plus ==> Response questions

You can show interest by responding with short questions like Do you? and Have you? Use the same tense as the other person.

In Conversation . . . to show surprise, you can respond with questions like You do? and You have? This is more informal.

Complete the conversations with response questions like Do you?, Are you?, Did you?, or Have you? Then practice with a partner. 1. A Have you ever gone up in a hot-air balloon? B No. I’m scared of heigts. A ? Me too. And I get sick on airplanes, too. B ? I’m the same way. I hate flying. 2. A Have you ever performed in front of an audience? B Yes, I have. Actually, I do it all the time A ? Wow. B Yeah. I’m a drummer in a jazz band. A ? I’m impressed! 3. A Have you been to any good restaurant lately? B Well, I tried that new Turkish restaurant last week. A ? I’ve been there a couple of times, too. B ? Did you like it?

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Keeping a Conversation Going

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C. Really like making things.

1. Conversation strategy ==> Saying no in a friendly way

A. What can you add to this answer to make it sound friendly?

A Do you have any hobbies? B No. .

Now listen. What hobbies do Sarah and Matt have?

Matt :What are you knitting, Sarah? Sarah :A sweater. It’s for my brother. Matt :Nice. Do you make a lot of things. Sarah :Yeah. I really enjoy knitting.I guess it’s my main hobby. Do you have any hobbies? Matt : Um, no. I don’t really have much time for hobbies. but I like to take photos. Do you do any photography? Sarah : No, not really, um . . . i’m not relly into photography. I prefer knitting sewing. . . . i really like making things. but I’d love to see your pictures sometime. Matt : Oh, well, I have some on my computer. Stop by my desk after lunch, and I can show them to you.

Notice how Sarah and Matt say more than just no when they answer questions. They want to be friendly or polite, so they say more. find examples in the conversation.

“ Um, no. I don’t really have much time for hobbies. But I like to . . . “

B. Match the questions and answers. Then practice with a partner. 1. Do you have a lot of hobbies? e 2. Do you like making things? 3. Are you interested in cooking? 4. Are you into photography? 5. Can you knit or crochet? 6. Do you collect anything? 7. Are you good at fixing cars?

a. Um, no. I’m not really good with my hands. b. Not really. I’m not very mechanical. c. No, I don’t. A friend of mine collects coins, though. d. Well, no. I don’t even have a camera. e. No, not really. I don’t have a lot of free time. f. Not really, but I like to make cakes and things. g. No, but my sister can. She makes her own sweaters.

C. Pair work Ask and answer the questions. Give your own answers.

“Do you have a lot of hobbies?”

“Not really, but I enjoy shopping.”

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Keeping a Conversation Going

D. Free talk 2: The game of likes and dislikes 1. Think of one thing for each section of the chart. You have three minutes to write in your answers. I enjoy watching ( a sport) I think everybody loves

I can’t play .

I’m good at

(a sport) I’d like to play the

. (a type of music) (a musical instrument) I’m interested in reading about I can’t stand talking about

( a topic)

.

( a topic)

.

(an activity) I want to learn (to) .

.

( a hobby) I hate watching

(a type of TV show)

.

.

.

2. Group work Compare your charts. If anyone in the group has the same answer as you, Score one point. Who scores the most points? A B C D

OK, I enjoy watching golf. How about you? I enjoy watching ice-skating. I do too! So we each get one point. Enjoy watching ice-skating, too, so I get a point, too!

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Speaking & Listening III Lab. (2nd Meeting)

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Speaking & Listening III nd Lab. (2 Meeting)

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Lesson Plan

Lesson Plan A.

Learning objectives • Talk about healthy life • Improve test taking skills through note taking • Improve reading through reading in chunk • Improve speaking through shadow talking

B. Materials • Getting started (vocabulary building) • Are you taking care of your health? (discussion) – talking about health care • Video (Learning English_ Words_in_the_news_ Indonesian _track_treatment) • Text completion (Words in the News :Indonesian track treatment) • Giving opinion (post listening activities) C.

Class activities a. Before listening Getting started (vocabulary building) ▶ Students learn about things related to medical treatment by matching the words with their description Are you taking care of your health? (discussion) – talking about health care ▶ Students improve their speaking skills by going around the class and do the questionnaire to their friend about personal health care. b. During listening Video (Learning English_ Words_in_the_news_ Indonesian _track_treatment) During listening 1 Note taking 2 Reading in chunk ▶ Students practice note taking while they are listening to the video. Students then practice summarizing or retell what they have listened to in their own words. Post listening: Shadow talking ▶ Students learn to sound naturally while they are speaking by doing shadow talking (imitating the way the speaker talks, considering the intonation and the pronunciation). Text completion (Words in the News :Indonesian track treatment) ▶ Students learn about how words work out their meaning by completing the text and understanding the meaning of the word related to the context of the sentence c. After listening Giving opinion (post listening activities) ▶ Students practice expressing their opinion and build up their confidence

In this meeting You will learn how to: ▶ ▶ ▶ ▶

Talk about healthy life Improve test taking skills through note taking Improve reading through reading in chunk Improve speaking through shadow talking Dear lectures; Please follow the sequence of the exercises according of the content of the server. GE3-SL-Lab Meeting 2


Healthy Life

Healthy Life

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A. Getting Started Match the descriptions, the words, with the pictures 1 The therapeutic use of physical agents or means, such as massage, exercises, etc. 2 A relaxing way to remove dead skin from your feet as tiny fish gently suck and nibble away the dead skin, leaving your feet smooth and revitalised. 3 A form of treatment used in Traditional Classicla Chinese Medicine

B. Are You Taking Care of Your Health? I. Pair work : change roles.

Read the questions and posibble answers to your partner. Circle your parner’s answers. Then

1.

How much exercise are you getting these days? 6. How often do you get headaches? a. A lot. (4-6 hours a week) a. Never. b. Some. (1-3 hours a week) b. Once or twice a month. c. None at all. c. Once a week.

2

What kinds of food do you generally eat? 7. How often do you get a checkup? a. balanced diet with lots of fruit and vegetables. a. Once a year. b. Some balanced meals and some fast food. b. Once every 2-3 years. c. mostly snacks and fast food. c. never.

3.

How much sleep do you get? 8. What do you do when you are stressed? a. Enaugh. (7-8 hours) a. I take a break and relax or exercise. b. Too much. (9-12 hours) b. I try not to worry about it. c. Too little (4-6 hours) c. I don’t do anything. I’m too busy

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Healthy Life

4.

How many hours do you work or study every week? 9. How often do you get colds? a. 30-40 hours. a. Never. b. 40-50 hours. b. Sometimes. c. 50-60 hours. c. Often.

5.

How much water do you drink? 10. If you are sick or overtired, do you .... a. 8 glasses a day. a. take a day off, stay home, and relax? b. About 4 glasses a day. b. do you usual routine, but go to bed early? c. Very little. c. do your usual routine?

II. Figure out your partner’s score. Give 3 points for each (a) answer, 2 points for each (b) answer, and 1 point for each (c) answer. Add them together for the total. then read the health profile to your partner.

III. Health Profiles. 24 to 30 points

17 to 16 points

10 to 16 points

You are taking very good care of your health. That’s good new’s! if you have any (b) or (c) answers, then you can still improve. See if you can make one improvement each month.

You are taking pretty good care of your health, but you can do better. If you want to fell really good and have a lot of energy. choose two things to improve each month. You can do it!

You are not taking good care of your health. you need to change your diet and your lifestyle. Sleep and exercise are very important, and so is relaxation. Choose three things to improve each month and start today!

BBC Learning English Words in the News 10th August 2011 Indonesian track treatment Transcript People suffering from various ailments in Indonesia’s capital Jakarta have been using an unusual and potentially deadly therapy. They claim lying on train tracks allows an electric current to pass through their bodies curing a variety of illnesses. The trains are in fact powered by overhead lines. Despite this, and the obvious dangers, some people believe it is the best and most affordable remedy. Vocabulary ailments: illnesses, usually not very serious therapy: treatment for a medical problem GE3-SL-Lab Meeting 2


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Healthy Life claim: say that something is true although it has not been proved and many people don’t believe it curing: making better, healing. The related noun is ‘a cure’. remedy: ‘a remedy’ is something which helps a non-serious medical problem get better. It can also used to refer to a solution to a problem or difficult situation. Watch this video online: Indonesian track treatment

http://bbc.in/oqYZJ5

Exercise Use one of the words or phrases below to complete each of these sentences from a BBC news report. Note that you may have to change the form of a word to complete the sentence correctly. ailments / therapy / claim / curing / remedy 1 They _________ to be a variety of different nationalities and speak English with a foreign accent. 2 New European Union rules have come into force banning hundreds of traditional herbal _______________. The EU law aims to protect consumers from possible damaging side-effects of over-the-counter herbal medicines. 3 It also showed that many chose the wrong drugs to tackle common _________. 4 Music __________ can be used to improve treatment of depression, at least in the short term, say researchers in Finland. 5 Church-appointed doctors agreed that there was no medical explanation for the _________ of the nun.

Post listening activities a) Improve test taking skills As you listen, practice note-taking and summarizing. Listen to the videos and take notes of what the speaker said. Then try to summarize what they said and then check your summary with the full transcript. b) Improve your reading As you watch the video, read the transcript of the video. Practice reading in chunks rather than word by word. c) Improve your speaking Turn down or mute the audio volume and try to shadow the speaker. Try to say their words at the same speed the speaker does. This is a great way to increase fluency and speaking speed. GE3-SL-Lab Meeting 2


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Healthy Life

d) Give your opinion - How do you make yourself to stay healthy? - Do you eat healthy food? What kind of healthy food do you eat? - Do you play sport to stay fit? WhPat sport do you play? - What time do you usually go to sleep? Do you think you get enough sleep? - Do you easily get stressed? What do you usually do to relieve your stress? - What do you think about Indonesian people lying on the railway as therapy? What are the risks of doing such a thing? e) Ask the questions to your partner. Compare your answers.

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Speaking & Listening III th Lab. (3 Meeting)

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Lesson Plan

Lesson Plan A.

Learning objectives • Talk about internet and reasons people use the computer for • Improve test taking skills through note taking • Improve reading through reading in chunk • Improve speaking through shadow talking

B. Materials • Getting started (matching the words with the description) • Internet addict (reading) – finding reasons why people use internets • Group discussion – reasons of using the internet • Video (Learning English_ Words_in_the_news_ South Korea’s_ internet_ addict • Text completion (Words in the News: South Korea’s internet addict) • Giving opinion about internet C.

Class activities a. Before listening Getting started (matching the words with the description) ▶ Students learn about things related to medical treatment by matching the words with their description Internet addict (reading) – finding reasons why people use internets ▶ Students improve their speaking skills by going around the class and do the quiz to friend asking about how they use the internet. Group discussion – reasons of using the internet ▶ Students give and gather opinions about how they use the internet. b. During listening Video (Learning English_ Words_in_the_news_ South Korea’s_ internet_ addict During listening 1 Note taking 2 Reading in chunk ▶ Students practice note taking while they are listening to the video. Students then practice summarizing or retell what they have listened to in their own words. Post listening: Shadow talking ▶ Students learn to sound naturally while they are speaking by doing shadow talking (imitating the way the speaker talks, considering the intonation and the pronunciation). Text completion (Words in the News: South Korea’s internet addict) ▶ Students learn about how words work out their meaning by completing the text and understanding the meaning of the word related to the context of the sentence c. After listening Giving opinion about internet ▶ Students practice expressing their opinion and build up their confidence

In this meeting You will learn how to: ▶ ▶ ▶ ▶

Talk about internet and how people use the computer for Improve test taking skills through note taking Improve reading through reading in chunk Improve speaking through shadow talking

Dear lectures; Please follow the sequence of the exercises according of the content of the server. GE3-SL-Lab Meeting 3


Internet

Internet

A. Getting started Match the descriptions below with the words.

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Internet

B.

Are you an

Internet addict? So, you love the Internet. It’s a great place to find information or go shoppiing. it’s fun, but do you spend a lot of time online? Expert say 6% of Internat users are Internet addict - they are always online. “Internet addict are often young people, “ says one expert, “and they usually have problems with family, friend, work, and school.” Take this quiz. If you answer yes to all these questins, maybe you are an Internet addict. 1. Do you spend a lot of time on the Internet? 2. Do you think or talk about the internet all the time? 3. Are all your friends “Internet friends”? 4. Is the Internet your only hobby? 5. Do you ever miss appointments because you are online?

yes yes yes yes yes

no no no no no

So, what do you do if you think you are an addict? Go to a counseling service. Where are they? On the Internet, of course!

C Answer the questions about the article. Compare your answers with a partner. 1. 2. 3. 4.

How many Internet users are “addicts”? What problems do Internet addicts have? Where do Internet addicts go for help? What are some things Internet addicts do?

About Take the quiz in the article. Ask and answer questions. you Is your partner an Internet addict? Are you?

D. Pair work:

E. Listening and speaking

Using computers

I. Why do people use computers? How many different ideas can you think of?

“They whatch DVD’s. They ...”

II. Listen. What do Andrea and Yoshi use their computers for? Check(√) the boxes. Andrea

Yoshi

☐ She watches DVDs. ☐ She plays CDS. ☐ She checks her e-mail. ☐ She has a Web site.

☐ He practices English. ☐ He look at the digital photos. ☐ He buy book online. ☐ He pays bills online.

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Internet About III. Group work: you

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Discuss the questions. Do you use computers for the same things?

▶ How often do you use a computer? ▶ Do you have e-mail? What do you use it for? How often do you send e-mail/ ▶ Do you go on the Internet? ▶ Do you ever shop online? What do you do online? What do you buy?

F. Writing:

A message to a Web site

I. Write a message to the web site about yourself. complete the sentences.

E-Pals in English Are you an English student? Do you want a pen pal or an e-pal? Write about yourself below. We’ll find you an e-pal in another cuntry. Hello. My name is ......., and I live in ......., I go to an English class ....... a week. In my free time , I ....... and ....... . I like ......., but I don’t like ............. . I ......................... .

II. Class activity:

Help note

Linking ideas with and and but.

My name is Sombat, and I live in Bangkok. I take English and Chinnese. I love movies, but I don’t like cartoons

Read your classmates messages. Choose an e-pal and tell the class about him or her.

BBC Learning English Words in the News 3rd August 2011 South Korea’s internet addicts Transcript Internet addiction in South Korea’s got so bad the government’s banned teens from going online after midnight. Web junkies have been going without food, drink and sleep for days because they’re hooked on computer games. The authorities have been hedging their bets by putting money into a variety of solutions. One scheme monitors people’s brainwaves, while another tries to get youngsters involved in more traditional forms of entertainment. GE3-SL-Lab Meeting 3


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Internet

Vocabulary addiction: the medical and or psychological condition of being unable to stop doing something harmful. Generally we talk about addictions to substances like alcohol and drugs but in this story it’s used to describe being obsessed with the internet and online gaming. The related verb is: to be addicted (to something). junkies: ‘a junkie’ is an informal word for someone who is addicted to drugs. In this story it’s also used to refer to people who are addicted to playing computer games. hooked on: an informal way of saying ‘addicted to’. hedging their bets: ‘to hedge your bets’ is an expression which means to reduce your chances of making a mistake by investing in more than one possible option. brainwaves: electrical signals produced in the brain Watch this video online: South Korea’s internet addicts

http://bbc.in/oUshfm

Exercise Use one of the words or phrases below to complete each of these sentences from a BBC news report. Note that you may have to change the form of a word to complete the sentence correctly. addiction / junkies / to be hooked on (something) / to hedge your bets / brainwaves 1 On my last visit to the city, Kandaharis spoke of their constant fear of attack, by either Taliban or US led forces. They ____________________, backing both sides until it was clear who would prevail. 2 Scientists believe they are a step closer to being able to read people’s minds after decoding human ________ . 3 The death of Amy Winehouse has once again highlighted the danger of drink and drug ______________ . 4 There were claims that the damage had been caused by a hard-core of violent protest ________________ who had deliberately come for trouble. 5 He became _________________ the tournament after watching Bjorn Borg play in 1977, and has returned every year since, seeing all the greats of the game.

Post listening activities a) Improve test taking skills As you listen, practice note-taking and summarizing. Listen to the videos and take notes of what the speaker said. Then try to summarize what they said and then check your summary with the full transcript. b) Improve your reading As you watch the video, read the transcript of the video. Practice reading in chunks rather than word by word.

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c) Improve your speaking Turn down or mute the audio volume and try to shadow the speaker. Try to say their words at the same speed the speaker does. This is a great way to increase fluency and speaking speed. d) Give your opinion - Are you familiar with the internet? - What sites do you mainly visit? - How often do you spend your time browsing the internet? - What do you usually do when you surf the internet? Do you look for and play games? Do you go to chat rooms? Do you update your status in social network sites like facebook, twitter, myspace, friendster? Do you write on your personal blog? - What do you think about game addict? How about professional gamer (a gamer who looks for sponsorship, joins competition, and earns money from the competition? e) Ask the questions to your partner. Compare your answers.

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Works Cited

Works Cited

Grenall, Simon. Reward Student’s book Elementary. Macmillan Heinemann.pdf Jones, Peter Watcyn. Pair Work I Elementary to Pre- Intermediate. Penguin Books, 1997.pdf Mc Charty, Jeanne, and Helen Sandiford. Touchstone 1 Workbook. Cambridge University Press.pdf Mc Charty, Jeanne, and Helen Sandiford. ---- .Touchstone 1 Student’s book . Cambridge University Press.pdf ---- .Touchstone 2 Student’s book. Cambridge University Press.pdf Nettle, Mark and Diana Hopkins. Developing Grammar in Context Intermediate . Cambridge University Press. pdf Oxenden, Koenig and Paul Seligson. New English File Elementary. Oxford University Press, 1997.pdf Quintana, Jenny. New English File Elementary- Test Booklet. Oxford University Press, 2004.pdf Richards, Jack S., Jonathan Hull & Susan Proctor. Interchange 2. Cambridge University Press.pdf River, Susan & Georgiana Farnoaga. Touchstone 2 Workbook. Cambridge University Press.pdf Sargeant, Howard. Basic English Grammar. Saddleback Educational Publishing. 2007.pdf Soars, Liz and John. New Headway Student’s book Elementary. Oxford University Press. pdf BBC learning English websites @ http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/learningenglish/language/ Randall’s ESL Cyber Learning Lab @ http://esl-lab.com/ Other related websites

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