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Spring 2009 • Vol. 1 • Issue 1

www.alltech.com/EquineInternational

EQUINE I N T E R N AT I O N A L

ALLTECH GAMES • YOUNG RIDER • GREEN FEEDS • NUTRIGENOMICS • THE LIPIZZANER


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EQUINE INTERNATIONAL 3: Speaking of Sponsorship

10: Organic Advantage

20: The Lipizzaner

Dr. Pearse Lyons, President of Alltech, title sponsor of the Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games 2010, welcomes our readers.

German dressage and event trainer Carin Bannos gives her sales horses the organic advantage and finds they look as good as they feel.

The noble Lipizzaner, among the breeds vying for a spot in the equestrian demonstrations at the Alltech Games, has landed in Lexington.

4: Horse Park News

12: Green Feeds

22: Feeding the Gene

A sneak preview of the new indoor arena, outdoor stadium and high-tech footing as the Kentucky Horse Park gallops toward the Alltech Games.

The environmental movement is taking the equine feed industry by storm, from a new “green” horse feed to potentially recyclable bags.

For researchers at Alltech’s Nutrigenomics Center, the goal is to “build” a healthy horse through prenatal nutrition.

8: Young Rider on the Rise

14: Partnership in Passion

23: Kentucky Corner

College student Lyndsey Jordan, a champion reining competitor, is gearing for a berth on the U.S. Reining Team for the Alltech Games.

The days of passive sports sponsorship are gone, thanks to active collaboration among Alltech and its Global Partners for the Alltech Games.

A salute to athletic legend and native son Muhammad Ali, whose Ali Center in Louisville is a must-see for Alltech Games attendees.

9: Dance of the Disciplines

16: Skelton’s Success

A look at reining, one of the most recent equestrian sports to become an FEIapproved discipline.

Gain Feeds customer Nick Skelton, an odds-on favorite for the Alltech Games, shares his insights about life on the show jumping circuit.

EQUINE INTERNATIONAL Alltech Global Headquarters 3031 Catnip Hill Pike Nicholasville, KY 40356 USA Telephone: 859.885.9613 Facsimile: 859. 885.6736 Email: EquineInternational@alltech.com

Publisher ............................Dr. Pearse Lyons G.A.M.E.S. Director ..............Kelly Welker Executive Editor ..................Darlene Ricker Graphics Director .................. Ashley Davis

To see our stories come alive, view our free digital edition at www.alltech.com/EquineInternational

You will see this icon throughout the magazine. This indicates stories that contain video content exclusively in our digital edition. Graphic Designer ..................... David Jones Rich Media Director ..........Kirk Robinson Website Author ................Alan Henthorne Website Analyst ..........................David Carr

EQUINE INTERNATIONAL is published bimonthly, with occasional special editions. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without express permission of Alltech.


Speaking of Sponsorship

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Dr. Pearse Lyons President, Alltech

here are certain milestones in one’s life. Most arise from opportunities of a magnitude that may come but once, if one is so blessed, in a lifetime. The opportunity to be the title sponsor of the world’s greatest equestrian event— the Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games 2010TM—would be ranked among them. So too is our sponsorship of the Alltech European Championships. This comes at a critical time in our industry and presents a unique opportunity to showcase what is wonderful about equestrian sports and illustrate their true breadth. That, my friends, is why Alltech is delighted to also be a sponsor of such world-class equestrian competitions as the Rolex Kentucky Three-Day Event (April 23-26) and the Royal Windsor Horse Show (May 13-17). The primary purpose of this new magazine, EQUINE INTERNATIONAL, is to share our excitement about the pinnacle of international equestrian competition—the Alltech Games—which grace us only once every four years. Each of our bimonthly issues will include key developments as the clock counts down to September 25, 2010. Here in Lexington, Kentucky, and indeed around the world, the Alltech Games have in a very real sense already begun. Across the globe, hopefuls are in training. Those who succeed will compete at the Kentucky Horse Park in a magnificent new stadium with amazing footing, which is being inaugurated this month at Rolex. You can read about it and the new indoor arena nearing completion here. In our next issue, we’ll bring you an insider’s view of the state-of-the-art stabling being built to house equine athletes at the Alltech Games. Each issue will feature an FEI discipline and a sport horse breed. We’ll bring you up close and personal with legends of the sport and future champions gearing for the Alltech Games. To watch the excitement in action, you can view videos on our digital site (www.alltech.com/equineinternational). Our intention with this magazine is to bring you stories not just about the Alltech Games, but about everything that is good for the horse, from health and nutrition to cutting-edge developments, such as the science of nutrigenomics and “green” feeds. These are the cornerstones of the industry that bring equine athletes to peak performance. At Alltech, as in your stable, horses are our heroes. EQUINE INTERNATIONAL salutes them and our Global Animal Health and Nutrition Partners for the Alltech Games. It is our intention to be heard and be responsive. We look forward to hearing from you at: equineinternational@alltech.com. Please join us as we count down to September 25, 2010.

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Galloping Toward The Alltech Games Kentucky Horse Park: All Dressed Up and Ready to Wow the World The Kentucky Horse Park was inaugurated three decades ago, when the newly opened 1,200-acre facility hosted the 1978 Three-Day Event World Championships. That marked the first time the event had ever been held in the United States. Next year, history will repeat itself—and then some—when the Park hosts the Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games 2010™. Once again, it will be the first time the event has been held outside Europe and on U.S. soil. This time, though, eight disciplines instead of one will be center stage before the world. And so will the Kentucky Horse Park.

Renderings depict the Park’s new indoor arena (facing page) and new outdoor Stadium (below). The Stadium comes to life in a composite image that incorporates a photograph of the construction in February.

IMAGES COURTESY OF THE KENTUCKY HORSE PARK

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In the view of KHP Executive Director John Nicholson, “The Kentucky Horse Park is being reborn.” His apt pronouncement came in an interview with EQUINE INTERNATIONAL on a February day when new high-tech footing was being installed in the Park’s magnificent new outdoor stadium, which witnesses its inaugural run this April with the Rolex Kentucky Three-Day Event. The German company OTTO Sport-und Reitplatz GMBH also installed its state-of-the-art riding surface on the new warm-up area attached to the stadium. The footing is especially valued for its safety properties and outstanding drainage features. “OTTO Sport footing is secure yet forgiving,” said Hugh Kincannon, manager of Kentucky Horse Shows LLC. Because the normal sources of funding for projects at the Kentucky Horse Park were already committed to improving the Park’s infrastructure for the Alltech Games and beyond, Kincannon and his partners elected to fund these footing improvements themselves. “The mats provide a significant cushioning effect as horses gallop and jump, and the drainage system makes wet weather a non-issue. Their design absorbs concussion, prevents horses from slipping and retains water to minimize dust,” he said. Nicholson said the Park has received “unanimous acclaim” on the footing. No surprise there. It is considered the absolute top footing on today’s market. The surface isn’t new to the Horse Park or to riders who competed in the 2006 FEI World Equestrian Games in Aachen, Germany, for which it was also installed. The same surface was installed in 2008 in the Horse Park’s Walnut Ring and used extensively, to wide accolades, for jumper classes in several hunter/jumper shows. This year the two new additional arenas will be completed.

Climate-controlled Indoor Arena The footing in the new indoor arena is being designed by Bob Kaiser, who Nicholson describes as “the leading guru in natural footing.” The indoor arena footing is being chosen “with a particular eye toward reining and Western [riding] events,” said Nicholson, noting that those disciplines require a different type of surface than that in the outdoor arena. “You can’t do a sliding stop on a synthetic surface.”

The new indoor arena will be the tangible legacy of the Alltech Games, but it will also be the intangible legacy for equestrian sports and for the Park.

— John Nicholson Executive Director / Kentucky Horse Park

The indoor arena will be ready this July. Heated and air-conditioned, it will provide the ultimate in comfort for competitors and spectators. “It will be the tangible legacy of the Alltech Games, but it will also be the intangible legacy for equestrian sports and for the Park,” said Nicholson. “For decades now, we have needed a new indoor arena to stay competitive with the country’s growing demand for equestrian competition facilities and to enhance our ability to attract large events to the Commonwealth of Kentucky. Our expectations were very high for this arena, so I am especially happy that months before completion, those expectations have already been exceeded by the number of large events which have contracted with us and by a number of others which are pending.” Located on former soccer fields in the northwest quadrant of the Park, the $40-million-plus indoor arena will have 6,000 seats. The project will also have approximately 21,000 square feet of commercial exhibition space.

New Outdoor Stadium The arena where the dressage and jumping phases for Rolex Kentucky were previously held has been totally rebuilt to create a new Stadium. In the same location as the previous arena, it will offer a whole new experience for spectators and competitors. “We have developed a clever design where more than 7,000 permanent seats will be built on a template that allows for an expansion of 30,000-plus seats that will not only answer the needs of the WEG, but also give the Kentucky Continued on next page EQUINE INTERNATIONAL

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Continued from previous page Horse Park flexibility to grow the quality and quantity of other events,” Nicholson said in an article in the 2008 issue of Discover Horses, the Park’s magazine. Before the start of construction, the Lake Grandstand— constructed from funds donated by Equestrian Events, Inc., the Kentucky Horse Park Foundation and legions of supporters of the Rolex Kentucky Three-Day Event—was carefully and painstakingly dismantled. Located on the south side of the arena with the Park’s picturesque lake behind it, each piece of the

grandstand was numbered and coded and is being stored for reassembly at one of the Park’s other outdoor arenas. It has 2,325 bench seats, 1,883 of them covered and 24 spaces for disabled seating.

New Permanent Grandstand A new permanent grandstand, with 7,289 chair seats, 4,630 of which will be covered, plus 102 spaces for disabled seating, is being constructed on the north side of the Stadium, where the Patron Club and Equestrian Club tents and their temporary grandstand seating were located. The Park Grandstand also houses restrooms and concession areas. There will be three entrances. Due to its size, the Park Grandstand utilizes all the ground from the edge of the original arena back to Nina Bonnie Boulevard, ground where the Patron Club and Equestrian Club tents and uncovered grandstand seating were previously located during Rolex. For this April’s event, those tents are being relocated across Nina Bonnie Boulevard to the fence line surrounding the High Hope Steeplechase Course. The tents overlook the infield of the course, where several major obstacles on the Rolex cross-country course are

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located. Grandstand seating for Patron Club and Equestrian Club subscribers will be an additional charge, allowing these event attendees to choose which grandstand seating they prefer and to sit with friends who are not subscribers to these two ticket options. Video screens will be located in each tent.

Other New Construction During the Alltech Games, the dressage and cones phases of the driving competition will take place in a temporary stadium being constructed on the Secretariat polo field. It will be dismantled after the Alltech Games. Another temporary stadium, located in the center of the track on the lower portion of the Park near the Visitor Information Center, is being built for the Alltech Games para-equestrian event. Alltech Games attendees will be swept into the Park by a magnificent new roundabout that will also welcome attendees at this April’s Rolex Kentucky Three-Day Event. At the Park’s main entrance, the roundabout is “compelling and beautiful,” said Nicholson. As he predicted in a 2008 interview with Nancy Jaffer in Discover Horses, the new roundabout has turned out to be “almost an iconic place . . . not only aesthetically pleasing, but offering logistical advantages in trying to distribute people throughout the Park.” The roundabout was part of Phase A of the Park’s facelift, made possible by $2.4 million in state funding from the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet. Recently the Park moved into Phase B, which focuses on a total renovation of main thoroughfares through the Park that connect key locales (riding and warmup arenas, the cross-country course and stabling among them), along with other major road improvements. Upon completion of that, the Park will be ready to say: Let the Games begin!


Continued from previous page Horse Park flexibility to grow the quality and quantity of other events,” Nicholson said in an article in the 2008 issue of Discover Horses, the Park’s magazine. Before the start of construction, the Lake Grandstand— constructed from funds donated by Equestrian Events, Inc., the Kentucky Horse Park Foundation and legions of supporters of the Rolex Kentucky Three-Day Event—was carefully and painstakingly dismantled. Located on the south side of the arena with the Park’s picturesque lake behind it, each piece of the

grandstand was numbered and coded and is being stored for reassembly at one of the Park’s other outdoor arenas. It has 2,325 bench seats, 1,883 of them covered and 24 spaces for disabled seating.

New Permanent Grandstand A new permanent grandstand, with 7,289 chair seats, 4,630 of which will be covered, plus 102 spaces for disabled seating, is being constructed on the north side of the Stadium, where the Patron Club and Equestrian Club tents and their temporary grandstand seating were located. The Park Grandstand also houses restrooms and concession areas. There will be three entrances. Due to its size, the Park Grandstand utilizes all the ground from the edge of the original arena back to Nina Bonnie Boulevard, ground where the Patron Club and Equestrian Club tents and uncovered grandstand seating were previously located during Rolex. For this April’s event, those tents are being relocated across Nina Bonnie Boulevard to the fence line surrounding the High Hope Steeplechase Course. The tents overlook the infield of the course, where several major obstacles on the Rolex cross-country course are located. Grandstand seating for Patron Club and Equestrian Club subscribers will be an additional charge, allowing these event

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attendees to choose which grandstand seating they prefer and to sit with friends who are not subscribers to these two ticket options. Video screens will be located in each tent.

Other New Construction During the Alltech Games, the dressage and cones phases of the driving competition will take place in a temporary stadium being constructed on the Secretariat polo field. It will be dismantled after the Alltech Games. Another temporary stadium, located in the center of the track on the lower portion of the Park near the Visitor Information Center, is being built for the Alltech Games para-equestrian event. Alltech Games attendees will be swept into the Park by a magnificent new roundabout that will also welcome attendees at this April’s Rolex Kentucky Three-Day Event. At the Park’s main entrance, the roundabout is “compelling and beautiful,” said Nicholson. As he predicted in a 2008 interview with Nancy Jaffer in Discover Horses, the new roundabout has turned out to be “almost an iconic place . . . not only aesthetically pleasing, but offering logistical advantages in trying to distribute people throughout the Park.” The roundabout was part of Phase A of the Park’s facelift, made possible by $2.4 million in state funding from the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet. Recently the Park moved into Phase B, which focuses on a total renovation of main thoroughfares through the Park that connect key locales (riding and warmup arenas, the cross-country course and stabling among them), along with other major road improvements. Upon completion of that, the Park will be ready to say: Let the Games begin!


FOR FUTURE CHAMPIONS

My Horse & Me 2

AN INTERNATIONAL WINNER

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n an exciting sequel to its popular FEI-approved video game, Atari has launched “My Horse & Me 2,” an equestrian sports and lifestyle game experience. Suitable for ages 3 and up, the game has been especially popular with players aged 7 to 18. The “My Horse & Me” series presents a realistic depiction of equestrian sports and comprises the only games in the world to earn a license from the FEI. HRH Princess Haya, president of the FEI, said the organization is proud to be associated with the game. “This is a great series of video games to introduce budding athletes and non-riders to horse sports,” she said. “Youth plays an important role at the FEI, as it represents the future for equestrian sports. We look forward to ‘My Horse & Me 2’ bringing even more exciting aspects of horse riding and competing to players.” Some of the game’s features include: • Creating a bond between horse and rider: Impressive new features and animations mean that a strong bond can be created between horse and rider through proper grooming and caring. The strength of the bond created will increase your chances of reaching the top. • Care, prepare, win: Care for your horse by cleaning and feeding, prepare for competition by training for jumping, cross country and dressage, and win in official competitions. • Extended grooming: The grooming feature includes a unique feature of a full vet check to make sure your horse is fit and ready to compete.

• Customized riding team: The horse and rider can be fully customized, including riding equipment, accessories and the rider’s outfit. • Exciting course rides: Official and exclusive FEI tracks in the game include some of the world’s most prestigious equestrian events. • True-to-life experience: The FEI advised on features such as cinematics, environments and tracks for the most accurate equestrian game experience. The PAL version for Europe and other markets was launched in late 2008, followed by the North American NTSC version this April. For more information (available in 10 languages) about “My Horse & Me 2,” go to: www.atari.com/ myhorseandme. For more information about the FEI, go to: www.fei.org.

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REINING IN THE REWARDS Champion reiner and college junior Lyndsey Jordan lives 10 minutes away from the Kentucky Horse Park. She’s hoping for a home-court advantage as she gears to compete for a berth on the U.S. Reining Team in the Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games 2010™.

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yndsey Jordan grew up on the back of a horse and two decades later is exactly where she wants to be: still astride and looking straight ahead. A Division One athlete with a four-year reining scholarship, she is studying communications and marketing at Auburn University in Alabama. During the academic year, she leaves her mounts with her trainer while she rides horses from the university’s string. She enjoys competing on weekends for her school’s equestrian team. Before entering the arena, competitors have only four minutes to warm up horses they have never ridden. Of necessity, Lyndsey has had to “learn how to get onto any horse and ride it the best I can.” This spring she plans to hone her skills with former Games team members Dell Hendricks and Shawn Flarida. In the summer she’ll be back home in Georgetown, Kentucky, working her own horses and doing an internship with Alltech. With $40,000 to her credit in lifetime equestrian earnings, Lyndsey worked her way up through the ranks. Aboard her former competition horse Flip My Nick, Lyndsey won a gold medal in the 14-to-18-year-old division of the 2005 USEF Youth Reining Championships and finished 2006 as reserve champion. Unfortunately, “Flipper” died unexpectedly several months ago. Lyndsey is heartbroken but forging a partnership with a new horse she put in training with million-dollar trainer Brent Wright of Kansas. Only four, the horse won’t be old enough under FEI rules to compete in the Alltech Games, so Lyndsey is searching for an FEI partner. If she doesn’t find her match and make the Team, she hopes to be invited to ride her young horse in a

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special invitational reining freestyle to be held during the Alltech Games, which is open to younger horses. A former U.S. Pony Club member, she originally rode English. After she saw how much fun a friend was having riding reining horses, Lyndsey began working with a western pleasure trainer. When he took her to watch a reining competition, she decided that reining was for her. That was when she was in junior high, and she hasn’t looked back since. She is grateful for the support of her parents, who bought her an experienced reining horse when she was 12. Aboard High Enterprise, a Quarter Horse gelding, Lyndsey galloped to her first world championship title, in the youths 13 and under division. Now 25, the horse enjoys bareback hacks with Lyndsey. She says she could never sell him. “He’s the one who taught me how to show a horse well and how to be competitive. He’s the best horse I’ve ever had.”


When Lyndsey was 15, another champion-to-be mount came to be hers: SR Kokanee Gold. They won the 2003 Limited Non-Pro World Championships in competition against adult riders. Since then, she has continued to be an ambassador for the sport. On a Playboy’s Justice, a striking palomino that was her mother’s show horse, Lyndsey wowed the crowds in a reining demonstration during the Rolex Kentucky Three-Day Event. She has also given bridle-less riding exhibitions at the Kentucky Horse Park.

One of her greatest rewards and a continuing motivator, says Lyndsey, are the young girls who cheer her on at horse shows. Many assemble at the out-gate, looking up and hoisting a pen and paper in hopes of an autograph. Lyndsey is always happy to accommodate them. “I was one of them,” she says, thinking back to not so many years ago. “If I can encourage more girls and young women to aspire to the sport, that kind of reward is priceless to me.” And if she makes it to the Alltech Games in 2010, all that experience giving autographs and dealing with an admiring public will come in handy.

DANCE OF THE DISCIPLINES: WHAT IS REINING?

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mong the newest of the eight types of competition in the Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games 2010™, reining was approved by the FEI in 2000 as its seventh discipline. It is a western-style riding event designed to demonstrate the athletic ability of a ranch-type horse age 6 or older. Competitors in western saddles guide their mounts through one of 10 approved patterns, with movements performed in the lope (a slow canter) or gallop. The patterns include various challenges from a series of: small circles ridden slowly; large circles ridden at speed; flying lead changes; rollbacks (in which the horse halts but with no stop in motion makes a 180-degree change of direction); 360-degree spins with a hind leg remaining in place; and, of course, the signature “sliding stop,” in which the horse gallops at full speed and comes to a halt, planting his hind feet and allowing them to slide as his front hooves continue to “walk” forward. The rein-back is also judged; the horse must back up rapidly for at least 10 feet in a straight line. These athletic demands require the horse to be extremely responsive to nearly imperceptible aids from the rider, a curious parallel to the far more reserved discipline of dressage. And, as in dressage, reining competitors are judged individually in the show ring. But despite the appearance of relaxation in reining horses and riders, most marked in the slackness of the reins, reining demands extreme focus and riding expertise. Some aficionados even consider it the western form of dressage, an English-style discipline that requires consummate concentration and precision. In fact, a world champion dressage rider from

Europe recently became an avowed reining enthusiast and is reportedly considering competing for a spot on both her country’s dressage and reining teams for the Alltech Games. Europe and South America have exponentially embraced reining, with tremendous recent growth in reining competitors from those locales. The first World Reining Championship took place at the 2002 FEI World Equestrian Games in Jerez, Spain. Four years later at the 2006 Games in Aachen, Germany, 74 reiners from 22 nations competed before an enthralled crowd of approximately 8,000 spectators. The FEI European Reining Championships are held every two years, most recently this March in Germany. Reining’s genesis, however, was rooted long ago on the other side of the Atlantic. Ranchers in Mexico and the Southwestern United States developed the form of riding as an effective way to work their herds of cattle. Because they had no fences to contain their livestock, ranchers of yore had to find a means to move, brand and care for their herds across vast stretches of open land. Paniolos or cowboys needed nimble horses that could turn, stop, spin and change directions in a sudden burst of speed to gain control of an errant cow or steer. Their horses, most of which were Quarter Horses, Appaloosas, mustangs or mixed breeds, had to respond to subtle leg aids and be able to be ridden with a single hand. Horse-and-rider pairs became so adept at performing these tasks that they began to put on informal demonstrations, which eventually developed into the formal sport of reining. To learn more about reining and the National Reining Horse Association, watch the exciting video, “Common Ground/About NRHA,” at: http://nrha.com/#aboutnrha.

PHOTOGRAPHS OF LYNDSEY JORDAN IN ACTION BY WALTENBERRY©

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Feeding the Equine Athlete:

The Organic Advantage When people come to try her imported sales horses at Stone Ranch in suburban Los Angeles, whether they buy one or not, German national Carin Bannos always hears the same question: “How do you make your horses look so good?” Their coats gleam, says the trainer, “like they’re plugged into an electric light socket.”

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er secret to a shiny coat? No coat conditioners, cream rinses or other grooming products. She showers them in water, period. Bannos’ FEI dressage and event horses get their luster from the inside out. Feeding them organic nutrients gives their performance the same edge it gives their appearance, she says. Call it the organic advantage. Like people, horses gain health benefits from organic food. But just as humans and horses speak their own languages, “organic” means different things in the twofooted and four-footed worlds. In human nutrition, organic means food grown without the use of pesticides. With

PHOTOGRAPHS BY MAGGIE BROEKMAN

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horses, it refers to a nutrient’s chemical structure and to minerals derived from live sources. Why do live sources matter to a horse? Horses in the wild eat live grasses and plants; their systems are designed to digest and absorb them. Because they are more “bioavailable” than inorganic forms, horses retain organic nutrients longer and utilize them more efficiently. A horse owner will “see” more of the nutrient in the horse’s coat, hooves, attitude and performance.


When it comes to selenium, a key equine nutrient, the organic factor is powerful. A potent tool in antioxidant defense, selenium is vital to every cell in the body. Seleniumsupplemented foals are known to grow better than seleniumdeficient foals, and selenium is needed for reproductive function in stallions and broodmares. “We hear that selenium is important. That is not [saying] enough—it is essential,” Professor Gerhard Schrauzer of the University of California at San Diego told attendees at Alltech’s annual European Selenium Conference (“Selenium in Animal and Human Health – Nutrition Inspired by Nature”) last summer in Prague. He and other experts emphasized the detrimental effects of selenium deficiency on horses. It predisposes young horses to a debilitating condition known as white muscle disease, which has symptoms similar to EPM. Affected foals develop gait abnormalities and cannot swallow normally. Lack of selenium also contributes to a degenerative muscle condition known as rhabdomyolysis (known as “tying-up”), which causes severe muscle cramps that result in stiffness, sweating and an increased pulse rate. Speakers at the Prague conference concurred that supplementation with inorganic selenium is not the solution due to its low bioavailability

and sustainability in the equine body. Horses excrete up to 40 percent of inorganic selenium within 24 hours of ingesting it. Research has shown that Alltech’s Sel-Plex (organic selenium from yeast), which horses metabolize as a protein rather than a mineral, is three times more bioavailable than inorganic forms. Horse owners should follow recommended dosages to guard against overfeeding selenium, which is toxic in high amounts. That is a major concern with inorganic selenium, while toxicity is much lower in organic sources such as Sel-Plex. Additionally, horse populations tend to be concentrated in regions that are selenium-deficient, such as Europe. (Selenium levels are lowest in Spain, Greece, Eastern Europe and parts of China, and are generally lower in Europe than the U.S.) Organic trace minerals (also called chelated minerals) such as zinc, copper and manganese are required in far smaller amounts than selenium but have crucial functions. Trace mineral deficiencies can disrupt the body’s internal functions and can reduce a horse’s ability to perform at an optimum level. Proper levels enhance skin, coat, bone strength and hoof health. When Alltech’s Sel-Plex and Bioplex (organic trace minerals) became available in the European Union, horseowners like Bannos—who has sales horses in Germany and in the U.S. —were quick to incorporate them into their feeding programs. As a result, she says, her horses look as good as they feel. (To see them shine online: www.cbsporthorses.com.)

Carin Bannos sails cross-country aboard Garfield (by Grand Cru), an imported Hanoverian powered by organic nutritionals. Her FEI dressage horse, Lanciero (headshot), gleams from the same fuel.

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In the 1970s, The Greening of America topped the bestseller lists. Fast-forward 30 years, and now the horse feed industry finds itself in its own greening process. The term “green horses” has taken on a different meaning than untrained or young stock, and it carries far more panache with today’s consumers. The question of the day is: Should the horse industry “go green?”

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hat issue was front and center at the 2008 Summer Olympics, which touted itself as the first “Green Olympics.” From environmentally friendly horse feeds to arena footing to 100 percent recycling of stable waste, the equestrian venue was a model of green awareness. Clearly, greenness has firmly planted itself as an issue the equine industry cannot ignore. In the view of Triple Crown Nutrition CEO Rob Daugherty, the concept of “green” feeds is logical. “What’s healthy for the animal is also healthy for the environment. The two go hand-in-hand,” he said. The topic was among the most widely attended sessions at Alltech’s 2008 International Animal Health and Nutrition Symposium in Lexington, Ky. Speaker Steven Duren of Performance Horse Nutrition addressed whether horse feeds

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should be made “green.” Duren observed that horses and their feed have two major impacts on the environment: on the down side, contaminated surface and ground water from manure; on the up side, recycling the packaging used to sell horse feed. Most recyclable grain bags are made of paper, but the fat content of many horse feeds causes them to soak through paper. That can damage artwork on the front of the bag, creating the appearance of an inferior product. In December 2008, representatives from Alltech Games Animal Health and Nutrition Partners Cavalor, Gain, iWest, Heemskerk, Tribute, Triple Crown, Lakeland, O.H. Kruse, Hygain, Masterfeeds, Otter Co-op and Ritchie Feed & Seed gathered in Lexington for an intensive two-day think tank sponsored by Alltech. They listened as Alltech’s Steve Elliott addressed the concept of green feeds. “It’s not just a matter of paper bags or other packaging materials, but what goes into them,” said Elliott, pointing to over-supplementation as yet another environmental issue. The question, then, is: How can we achieve “greenness?” The key steps for the horse feed industry, said Elliott, are: • Believe the research • Understand nutrient content of forage and availability • Decrease nutrient content of manure • Formulate feeds properly with available nutrients


O.H. Kruse, Alltech Developing Line of ‘Green’ Horse Feeds O.H. Kruse, an Animal Health and Nutrition Partner for the Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games 2010™, has joined hands with Alltech to develop a line of environmentally friendly—or “green”—horse feeds. “We’re excited to do this because it’s the right and diligent thing to do,” said Dave Spaulding, manager of O.H. Kruse. His concept is to launch “a worldwide effort for green.” Consumers appear equally eager to embrace green feeds. Spaulding noted that a display featuring his company’s prototype green feed bag drew interest among attendees at the popular Equine Affaire trade show this February in California. “Being green is in vogue, for good reason,” he said. That is particularly so for his company’s main customer base in the West Coast of the United States, a region that has long been extremely environmentally aware. O.H. Kruse’s target market for green feeds includes horse owners who are “several generations removed from the farm.” For them, said Spaulding, “The horse is not a farm animal. It is part of the family. These people look at horses differently and are likely to look at horse feeds differently, as well.” In bringing green feeds to the horse world, O.H. Kruse hopes to convey the message that animal feeds should not compete with human food. By way of example, Spaulding pointed to the renewable fuels industry, which transforms grains that can also feed humans into vehicle fuel. Rather than using corn in its green feeds, he said, O.H. Kruse will use ingredients

such as rice bran, soy hulls and beet pulp shreds, which are byproducts of human food, thus benefiting all species and contributing to the sustainability of the planet. Other environmentally friendly measures will include using vegetable-based inks such as soy on a totally recyclable bag that will leave the smallest carbon footprint in the industry, said Spaulding. In addition, the manufacturing process will significantly reduce the amount of metals in the environment. After its initial green feeds are produced, he said, the next level of pursuit for the company will be to produce weedfree horse feeds. That is important because in order for horses to utilize trails in the U.S. National Parks system, requirements with regard to equine consumption of certified weed-free products are increasing. As Spaulding explained, national parks cannot allow non-indigenous plants to be introduced to their terrain. When horses that consume products containing weeds are ridden on their trails, noxious weeds are deposited into the soil through manure. O.H. Kruse expects to introduce its new green feed to the market this summer. While it may cost slightly more than traditional feeds, Spaulding said he expects his company’s green feed to be competitively priced with what is currently on the market. For more information about O.H. Kruse’s green feeds, go to www.ohkruse.com or call (800) 729-5787.

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Olympic three-day event rider Darren Chiacchia joined Dr. Pearse Lyons (far right) and Lakeland Animal Nutrition President Lee Jackson (center) to announce Lakeland’s 2008 signing as an Alltech Global Animal Health and Nutrition Partner.

The Next Generation of Equestrian Sports Sponsorship With an estimated television audience of four billion for the 2008 Summer Olympics, major corporate sponsors hoped to cash in with sportsminded consumers in a big way. But the burgers, soft drinks and television sets they were peddling had little to do with whether a runner could beat the four-minute mile.

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oes that matter? McDonald’s, Coca-Cola, Panasonic, Visa, and Johnson & Johnson – among other top sponsors of the 2008 Summer Olympics – bet huge chunks of their corporate coffers that it wouldn’t. But it was a risky and long-term leap of faith for them, as it was for the 11 companies that paid a combined $850 million for global sponsorships of the 2004 and 2008 Olympics. For the current Olympic cycle (the 2006 Torino Winter Olympics and the 2008 Beijing Summer Olympics), key sponsors reportedly each paid $70 million to $80 million for sponsorship rights. The return on their investments won’t be known for years, if ever.

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Those corporate giants may have something to learn from an animal nutrition company that is unwilling to dispatch its sponsorship dollars into the ether. Alltech has adopted a proactive approach that may revolutionize sports sponsorship. Through an innovative partnership program with selected customers, the company has improved its odds of leveraging the $10 million it paid to be the first-ever title sponsor of the FEI World Equestrian Games. Eschewing the standard tack of selling sub-sponsorships to a lower tier of corporate participants in order to recoup a portion of its sponsorship outlay, Alltech has opted to share its Games


A PARTNERSHIP IN PASSION mantle with kindred spirits (albeit corporate geists) in the horse feed business. Rather than paying a fee for sponsorship affiliation with the Alltech Games, the partners agree to utilize Alltech products in their horse feeds. That bestows upon them the title of “Official Animal Health and Nutrition Partner” of the Alltech Games — a valuable asset, given that equestrians consider the Alltech Games as prestigious, or even moreso, than the Olympics. “Alltech’s business philosophy has always been to add value for our customers. This goes deeper than a cash transaction,” said Alltech Global Marketing Director Catherine Keogh. “It’s about aligning our business goals to maximize the return on our investment. After all, our business won’t grow unless our customers’ business grows.” Alltech’s arrangement provides its partners with ongoing support and marketing assistance from the title sponsor, which in turn benefits from a stream of revenue through product sales to the partners. The exposure to consumers who purchase from the partners raises the sponsor’s profile and may help expand its customer base. Both stand to benefit from a unique aspect of the Alltech Games: While the Olympics are limited to three riding disciplines, the Alltech Games offer a smorgasbord of equestrian thrills in eight disciplines, which should attract a broader audience of horse-product consumers. Moreover, the direct tie-in for Alltech and its partners — horse product manufacturers sponsoring a horse event — makes it more likely that competitors and spectators appreciative of their support of equestrian sports will buy their products. Alltech’s recruitment of like-minded companies as partners has resulted in agreements with more than 50 horse feed partners. As Triple Crown Nutrition CEO Robert Daugherty recalls, Alltech President Dr. Pearse Lyons “came walking through our front door about six months after our company was formed, suggesting that adding Yea-Sacc1026 [Alltech’s organic yeast] may prove beneficial to our equine diets.” That proved

correct; 20 years later, Alltech products are integral to all Triple Crown horse feeds. The level of support his company has received from Alltech, says Daugherty, “helped create a mutually positive business relationship that transcends the norm. So becoming a platinum feed partner of the Alltech Games 2010 was just another fantastic step forward for us.” By partnering with prominent feed companies, Alltech has ensured that numerous equine competitors in the Alltech Games will be galloping advertisements for the potency of its nutritional products. In that way, the company has introduced the concepts of relevance (to the sport) and responsibility (to its partners) to corporate sponsorship.

Champion competitors from the FEI disciplines of dressage, eventing and show jumping turn out to support Games Partnership announcements by their nations’ top feed companies. Alltech President Pearse Lyons welcomes Partners at signings with Destrier in France (below), Masterfeeds in Canada (lower left) and Tjørnehøj Mølle in Denmark (above).

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Champion Nick Skelton Skelto Leading the U.K. Charge to the Alltech Games

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ain customer Nick Skelton is a world-renowned show jumping rider whose career has lasted over 30 years. He has won nearly 1,500 classes and well over ÂŁ4m in prize money. A near-fatal injury forced

Skelton to retire in 2001, but he made an amazing recovery and he is once again at the very top of the prestigious sport of show jumping.

PHOTOGRAPHS BY TONY PARKES

Nick Skelton sails aboard Russel (left) and Arko (opposite page).

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Skelton’s brilliant horsemanship is proven by the fact that no other rider has won so many major prizes on so many different horses, and he is as well known and popular at Olympia and Hickstead as he is at Dublin or Paris. He holds the British equestrian high jump record, when he jumped over 7’7” on Lastic in London in 1978 and has competed at five Olympic Games. Skelton has won 10 European Championship medals, six World Championship medals, a World Cup title and more than 60 major Grand Prix titles. He has twice won the Du Maurier in Spruce Meadows, Calgary, a class that awards the highest prize money in show jumping history. His famous horses Maybe, If Ever, Apollo and St. James took him to the pinnacle of his profession and brought him numerous top prizes back in the 1980’s, including winning the Hickstead Derby three times. Those successes were followed by a host of victories with other horses who all kept him in the spotlight: Major Wager, Top Gun, Grand Slam, Phoenix Park, Dollar Girl, Limited Edition, Showtime, Tinka’s Boy and Hopes are High. Skelton’s successes continued until autumn 2000, when he was seriously injured at the Park Gate horse show in Cheshire. Early in 2001, after enduring months in a metal neck brace, Nick was told by leading surgeons that he must give up riding permanently or risk fatal injury. “The ligament that supports the bones snapped and tore a piece of bone away; I was told another fall could prove fatal,” explained Skelton. But time proved to be a great healer. The piece of bone reattached and surgeons passed Skelton as fit to ride and compete.

“ “At the time, I already knew Arko would be a fantastic horse,” said Skelton, “and my initial motivation was really to be able to compete with such a good horse. I have Russel as well, another very talented horse. I am very lucky having such loyal owners in John, Pat and Lisa Hales of Golden Bear Toys.” Arko III has continued to win all over the world with Skelton, and the horse is already a legend in his own lifetime. Russel has also turned out to be absolutely top class, having won the Puissance at the Dublin Horse Show as well as major Grand Prix events all over the world. Skelton has been a great ambassador for Gain Horse Feeds, and his successes speak for themselves.

LIFE IN THE FAST LANE WITH NICK SKELTON Hywel Davies, the Gain UK representative, met up with Nick in the buildup to the 2008 Dublin Horse Show and put the following questions to him: Q: What has been your career highlight to date? A: Winning the World Cup with Dollar Girl in 1995. Q: What is your best memory from any of the Dublin Horse Shows? A: Dublin is a good show for me. I have won the Grand Prix a total of five times. Q: What is the best horse you have ever ridden? A: I have ridden so many good horses, it is impossible to pick out the best! Q: What are your best memories from previous World Equestrian Games? A: Winning the Individual Bronze medal with Apollo in 1987.

Q: Are you targeting the Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games 2010™? A: Yes. Q: What do you look for when buying a show jumper? A: They need to be careful over a fence and rideable. Q: What is your “Recipe for Success”? A: Try and find good horses to keep you at the top. Q: Have you any tips for up and coming riders? A: Work hard and don’t give up! Q: Who do you admire in the show jumping world and why? A: Hugo Simon. He is still competing at the age of 60. Continued on next page EQUINE INTERNATIONAL

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Continued from previous page

Q: Who do you admire in other equine disciplines and why? A: Tony McCoy in National Hunt Racing. He is an outstanding competitor. Q: What is your favorite thing about being on the circuit? A: Winning a Grand Prix. Q: What is your least favorite thing about being on the circuit? A: Airports.

Q: What do you think are the positives for young people coming into a career in the equestrian industry now, compared to when you started? A: There is more prize money about to be won, but there are fewer good horses. Q: What do you find good about feeding Gain Horse Feeds? A: Gain Horse Feeds keep my horses looking and feeling in absolutely top form.

EQUINE ATHLETES HAVE A LOT TO GAIN

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ain Feeds recently released Gain Prep ‘N’ Condition Mix. It enhances a horse’s overall performance and is designed for the rigors of exercise, which can place horses under oxidative stress leading to muscle soreness and fatigue. Gain Prep ‘N’ Condition includes elevated levels of vitamin E and Sel-Plex, Alltech’s selenium yeast, which minimizes damage caused by free-radicals produced during exercise. A high energy level is achieved through a combination of cooked cereals, oils and “super fibers,” while protein requirements are met using a combination of full fat soya and sunflower meal. This provides amino acids essential in muscle building and maintenance of a horse’s topline. For horses at leisure or in medium work, Gain Cool ‘N’ Easy Mix provides essential energy, protein, trace minerals and vitamins. Cool ‘N’ Easy Mix is free from whole oats, making it suitable for more excitable horses and ponies or for animals that require a controlled release of energy. (For more information on the Gain Horse Feed range, contact the LoCall Helpline on 1890 321 321 / +353 56 8836600 or agricsc@glanbia.ie.)

CAVALOR Inc. Launched in North America Nutriquine NV announces the creation and launch of CAVALOR Inc., a company dedicated to promoting CAVALOR products and the CAVALOR brand in the North American market. With more than 45 distributors around the world, its product line includes supplements, care products and feeds used by many top international riders, including the reigning show jumping World Champion ( Jos Lansink of The Netherlands), the 2008 show jumping Olympic Champion (Eric Lamaze of

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THE FEED BIN

Canada) and the 2008 dressage Olympic Champion (Anky van Grunsven of The Netherlands). Initially, all the products (supplements, care products and feeds) will be imported from Europe. Over time, however, it is the goal of CAVALOR Inc. to find partners to manufacture the products locally, while maintaining the brand’s high quality standards. (For more information: call (877) 775-7507 or email: cavaloramerica@cavalor.com.)

Triple Crown Introduces New Training Formula In development for over a year, Triple Crown Training FormulaTM, veterinarian recommended and field tested, recently became available in the U.S. It is a high fat, high calorie diet for any horse in intense work, requiring an elevated level of calories. Training Formula is also high in digestible fiber, helping to lower soluble carbohydrates to a moderate level of 22.4 percent. It is the first Triple Crown feed to contain fish oil and flaxseed to dramatically increase the level of Omega-3 fatty acids. Research has found that feeding a diet higher in Omega-3 fatty acids decreases inflammatory responses following exercise. Triple Crown Training Formula also contains digestive aids and other beneficial Alltech products provided by the Triple Crown EquiMixTM package, which is included in all the Triple Crown feeds. For more information: www.triplecrownfeed.com or call (800) 451-9916.


FEEDING THE FUTURE

THE LIFEFORCE FORMULA:

GIVING YOUR HORSE EVERY ADVANTAGE

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he equestrian world has come to rely on Alltech for top nutrition in our horses’ daily ration. Now the world’s most proven and trusted animal health company brings the ultimate in daily sustenance for your entire stable: Lifeforce Formula. Lifeforce is the cornerstone of the new Alltech Advantage Series for horses. Powering your horse on a daily basis with Lifeforce will fuel internal systems to work at peak level. With this boost, your best friend will be capable of withstanding the stresses of life, from first steps as a foal, through the rigors of competition, and well on into retirement. The Alltech Advantage Series benefits all horses at every stage of life, whether they are breeding stock, pleasure or performance animals. It enables your horse to extract the maximum nutrients from all feed sources.

Lifeforce Formula is designed to: • Create an ideal digestive environment • Strengthen your horse’s immune system • Naturally maintain hydration • Improve body condition and promote healthy growth • Maximize beneficial bacteria and reduce acid in the stomach to diminish digestive upset • Maintain peak body and muscular condition The Alltech Advantage Series boosts overall health before, during and after activity, times when your horse is vulnerable to a variety of ailments or injuries. Lifeforce Formula is also formulated to fortify horses preparing for or recovering from surgery or other stressful medical treatments. Broodmares and stallions alike benefit from special Lifeforce Formula ingredients that increase the likelihood of a successful mating, a smooth gestation and a safe delivery. The antioxidantrich formula is also ideal for sucklings, weanlings and young stock, which often face immunity challenges. At Alltech, horses are our heroes. Give your champions— past, present and future—the “Advantage” they deserve with the Lifeforce Formula’s ingredients, which have been rigorously tested and scientifically proven. For more information on the Alltech Advantage Series, go to www.alltechadvantage.com.

Visit Alltech’s booth at the Rolex Kentucky Three-Day Event or Royal Windsor for a special discount.

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Banner on

The Lipizzaner: ‘Dancing’ White Stallions Spin Magic for Spectators

PHOTOGRAPH BY FIRE & EARTH

the Breeds

By Felice Vincelette

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iglavy Kapriola, Pluto Fantasca, Maestoso Erga, Conversano Strana, Neapolitano Gratia, Favory Pola: dancers from a foreign ballet troupe, diplomats from a European country, Olympic-level gymnasts? If you answered yes to any of the foregoing, you are partially correct. These are the bloodline titles of some of the most well known horses in the world, the Lipizzaner. Famed throughout the globe, bred for and by European royalty, these elegant dancers are truly the equine diplomats of the world. Long recognized in Europe from their base at the Spanish Riding School in Vienna, Lipizzans were introduced to the general public in the 1963 movie, Miracle of the White Stallions. (A curious feature of Lipizzans is that they are born black; all but a tiny percentage turn snow-white as they mature.) The Walt Disney film provided theatergoers an opportunity to experience a type of training and riding practiced during the high artistic time known as the Baroque period, when art, literature, music and riding were practiced in their highest and most elegant form.

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The noble Lipizzaner was bred by royalty to not only execute precise military battle movements, but to perform in all sorts of grand riding and driving exhibitions. While most still think of the Lipizzaner in those terms, in Europe the breed was used as an all-around sport horse, much like the Morgan horse in America. Not only did Lipizzaners fight in combat and pull carriages, but they were expected to be tractable and sensible riding horses. This quality has made for an extremely versatile breed that is intelligent and quick to understand what its rider or trainer wants. Throughout the centuries the Lipizzaner has performed with not only athletic ability but style, grace and elegance, and most importantly with a generosity of nature and kindliness found in very few breeds today. The Lipizzaners’ devotion to their human companions has always been quite extraordinary, and it has been this very devotion that has saved the breed from certain extinction many times throughout history. During World War II, the Lipizzaner breed was under mortal threat. With the aid of U.S. Army General George


S. Patton and the 7th Cavalry Division, many Lipizzaner mares were rescued in Eastern Europe from invading troops. Although that enabled the breed to survive, its numbers were severely decreased. There are presently fewer than 4,000 Lipizzaners in the world, with not more than 500 mares available for breeding. A global band of devotees remain dedicated to keeping the Lipizzaner legacy alive. For information on the breed’s international governing body, the Lipizzan International Federation (LIF), go to: www.lipizzaninternationalfederation. eu.com. These spectacular white horses, steeped in antiquity, are among the breeds vying for an opportunity to perform in exhibitions at the Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games 2010™. The next issue of EQUINE INTERNATIONAL will spotlight another such breed, with a news report on which breeds have earned a spot to perform in the Games breed demonstrations.

The Lipizzaner was formally introduced to the United States in the late 1950s by Tempel Smith, founder of Tempel Farms in Wadsworth, Illinois. There haute ecole and airs above the ground, centuries-old movements for which the Lipizzaner has come to be known, are still practiced. Under Tempel’s chief trainer, Jochen Hippenstiel (World Equestrian Games national coach for Luxembourg, pictured here and on facing page), the Tempel Lipizzans remain ambassadors for the breed, performing public demonstrations in formal attire. For more information: www.tempelfarms.com.

About the Author Felice Vincelette, a longtime breeder and trainer of Lipizzaners, writes widely for equine magazines. Induced by Kentucky’s longer training season and the prospect of showcasing her Lipizzaners at the Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games 2010™ in Lexington, she moved her operation, FireHeart Lipizzans, from New Hampshire to Kentucky in the summer of 2008. Her farm includes stallions, mares and geldings from three of the six major Lipizzan bloodlines. Inventor of the Creating Freedom ™ method, Vincelette is an ecuyere (trainer) who employs the French classical school of training, which she has found effective in mentally and physically preparing horses of all breeds for any discipline. She is completing a book on her methodology, entitled Creating the Horse You Want to Ride. A popular clinician, Vincelette gives mounted clinics and long-lining demonstrations in North America and abroad. For more information, call (502) 8396805 or (603) 289-8600. Vincelette will discuss Lipizzaners and the draw of Lexington, Kentucky, for sporthorse breeders at the April meeting of “Equine News & Brews,” a monthly series sponsored by Alltech. Reports of the meetings will be published in future issues of EQUINE INTERNATIONAL. (For more information email: equinenewsandbrews@alltech.com). PHOTOGRAPH BY SUSAN SEXTON

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THE

21st CENTURY

HORSE

FEEDING THE GENE: CAN WE ‘BUILD’ A HEALTHY HORSE?

Your classically trained dressage horse knows the movements, but when you ask for them, something doesn’t compute. He’s late behind in his flying changes. His rhythm in the extended trot is irregular, and the height of his steps in piaffe and passage is uneven. A training problem? Physical injury? Attitude issue? Could be all or none. Before you try to assign “blame” to something going on now, consider looking backward. What has your horse been eating, and before that, what was his mother fed? That’s what Alltech is doing. Last year the company opened its new Center for Animal Nutrigenomics and Applied Animal Nutrition in suburban Lexington, Kentucky. The first facility of its kind in the world, the center is dedicated to the study of the effect of nutrition on gene expression. “The field of nutrigenomics, or the effect of diet on health, is one of the most exciting in science today,” said Dr. Karl Dawson, Alltech’s director for worldwide research. “Feeding the gene is the way forward.” Alltech is studying the hidden components of nutritional processes, not by simply looking at long-term animal performance, and not by carrying out numerous trials—but instead by looking at short-term changes in short-term studies. In the future, understanding of nutritional manipulations will no longer be “hit or miss,” said Dr. Dawson. Nutrigenomics, Major strides in equine health are being achieved at Alltech’s Center for Animal Nutrigenomics and Applied Animal Nutrition (below).

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he said, will more accurately allow competition horses of all disciplines to reach their genetic potential. Alltech’s goal is to build the ultimate equine athlete from the inside out. Just as in humans, proper nutrition is a key component for strong bones in horses. Therefore, nutritional intervention may be the key to making injuries that sideline sporthorses a thing of the past. For equine scientists, the order of the day is: How can nutrition be used to “create” equine athletes with a stronger skeletal system? The answer is on the horizon, said Richard Murphy, a research scientist at the European Biosciences Centre in Ireland who is performing nutrigenomics research in Europe for Alltech. In theory, he said, mares and stallions raised on carefully managed diets are more likely to produce offspring able to withstand the demands of high-intensity training. Effectively, then, nutrition can have far-reaching consequences, even beyond of the health of the offspring. If nutrition can be used to selectively influence gene transcription in a breeding pair, the result could be an equine athlete that remains healthy and sound as he progresses to FEI-level competition.


Muhammad Ali Museum Honors Greatest Human Athlete of All Time While international equine stars take center stage at the Kentucky Horse Park in Lexington, only a 90-minute drive away offers visitors a journey into the heart and soul of a human champion and boxing legend: Muhammad Ali. The three-time World Heavyweight Champion was honored in 1999 as “sportsman of the century” by Sports Illustrated and the BBC. This May Kentucky’s native son will grace Alltech’s 25th Annual International Animal Health and Nutrition Symposium in Lexington by attending the opening session, as guest of honor. (For more information, go to www.alltech.com/symposium.) At the Muhammad Ali Center, an award-winning nonprofit museum that opened in 2005, two-and-a-half levels of amazing exhibits and galleries in Louisville showcase its namesake’s legendary life. At the same time, it invites visitors to walk in Ali’s path by reflecting on their own values, inner strength and character—qualities Ali believes can carry each of us into our own greatness. A series of interactive pavilions and captivating multimedia presentations tell Ali’s story through the six core values of his life, each of which no doubt has formed the foundation of many world champion equestrians: • Respect • Confidence • Conviction • Dedication • Spirituality • Giving

To strengthen the mind, visitors can identify their character strengths through the Walk With Ali exhibit, which uses Ali’s life as an example by which to gain encouragement to explore one’s senses of self, others and purpose—all integral steps to achieving personal greatness. An innovative five-screen Orientation Theater film takes arriving visitors on an inspiring journey through Ali’s iconic life. Other exhibits and galleries offer a historical context of the civil rights struggle, the challenging era in U.S. history during which Ali reached his pinnacle of greatness against a setting of national turmoil. The Hope and Dream wall features a global collection of children’s artwork, while other areas display Ali’s own poetry and sketches. And of course, one can watch the Champ “float like a butterfly and sting like a bee,” as a popular song portrayed him, at video stations that play Ali’s 15 most famous fights. For more information: www.alicenter.org.

Ali’s global humanitarian efforts are featured, along with insights into how his values and hard work shaped him into the best athlete he could be (and as a result, the greatest boxer of all time). Visitors can get in the ring through the hands-on Train With Ali exhibit, a recreation of his Deer Lake Training Camp.

IMAGES COURTESY OF THE MUHAMMAD ALI CENTER

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Saluting our

partners around the world

PASSION EXCELLENCE PERFORMANCE Alltech, proud sponsor of the Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games 2010TM, salutes its Official Animal Health and Nutrition partners in over fifty countries around the globe. These partners share the values of Alltech and of the Games — passion, excellence and perfomance— and we salute them for their commitment to this, the world’s largest equestrian sporting event.

Performance through nutrition ...naturally www.alltechfeigames.com

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www.alltech.com

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