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contributors Coco McDermott Ella Viscardi Emilia Schaffer del Valle ZoĂŤ Flood-Tardino Richard Widdington Joshua Boggs Erik Ramberg Adam Sherman Sam Lutzger Devin Choudhury Luke Barnes Kelly Carde Somala Diby Jareline Guerrero Morgan Hughes Kai Johnson Naintara Ramoo-Goodgame Chelsa Thompson Justina Walker Daisy Chaussee Alex Danilov Daphne Chow Alicia Schleifman Rachel Furst Malaya Sadler

Sponsored in part by the Arts Initiative at Columbia University. This funding is made possible through a generous gift from The Gatsby Charitable Foundation.


masthead Editors-in-Chief Krista Anna Lewis Andre’ Fuqua Menswear Editor Whitney Wei Lifestyle Editor Arianna Friedman Features Editor Rachel Furst Beauty Editor Anisa Tavangar Copy Chief Najet Fazai Illsutrations ZoÍ Flood-Tardino Treasurer Eric Wong Blog Director Nancy Chen Design Krista Anna Lewis Photo Editor Esther Jung Womenswear Editor Jackie Luo PR Jenny Mayrock Corinne Teschner


coco


photographed by esther jung styled by ella viscardi


feminism & hollywood

In recent months, a number of important women in Hollywood and the media have come forward in support of a somewhat controversial concept: feminism. While previously viewed (incorrectly) as a radical movement that supported total subversion of the patriarchy, this new dialogue has brought feminism to audiences that might not have encountered it otherwise. Novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, who has become something of a figurehead of the movement, defines a feminist simply as a person who believes in the political, economic, and social equality of the sexes. Adichie’s work became popularized when singer and actress Beyoncé sampled it in her song “Flawless.” Beyoncé herself has become one of the most active self-proclaimed feminists in Hollywood. Beyond publicly declaring her support for the movement in performances and interviews, she penned an essay about the myth of gender equality that calls for abolition of the wage gap and resis-

by alicia schleifman

tance to gender discrimination in the workplace and elsewhere. Beyoncé is far from alone in her advocacy for feminism. Singer Taylor Swift, who has been criticized in the past for including sexist material in her songs, announced her support for feminism in an interview last August, claiming that understanding the movement’s true intent became crucial to her acceptance of the term. She said: “For so long [feminism]’s been made to seem like something where you’d picket against the opposite sex, whereas it’s not about that at all… I’ve been taking a feminist stance without actually saying so.” Similarly, actress Emma Watson has happily labeled herself a feminist and, in September, partnered with the United Nations to promote the all-inclusive gender equality campaign “HeForShe”. Though Swift, Watson, and their fellow feminists do not publicly address some of the more sinister consequences of sexism and inequality, such as


slut-shaming, their involvement in the movement has situated the issue at the forefront of pop culture and given it unprecedented visibility. While numerous female figures in pop culture have come forward to express their support for the feminist movement, others actively campaign against their own skewed perceptions of feminism. In defining views that they claim to be “anti-feminist” or “independent of feminism,” these celebrities often rely on egregiously inaccurate understandings of what feminism actually represents. For example, singer Sinead O’Connor stated, “I don’t think of myself as being a feminist…I’m not interested in anything that is in any way excluding of men.” Comparably, actress Shailene Woodley has frequently discussed her opposition to the feminist movement. Most notably, in a 2014 interview with Time, she claimed: I love men, and I think the idea of ‘raise women to power, take the men away from the power’ is never going to work out because you need balance… And also I think that if men went down and women rose to power, that wouldn’t work either. We have to have a fine balance. Regardless, this statement seems antithetical to Woodley’s past statements in favor of female empowerment. Thus, one can thus assume that Woodley comprehends feminism as its stereotype: a movement of ‘man-haters’ who hope to completely replace the current societal order with an entirely matriarchal social structure. By Adichie’s definition, however, this understanding of feminism remains wholly off base. Clearly, the new focus on feminism in Hollywood and broader pop culture encompasses a number of distinct attitudes towards the movement. This increased attention will likely not result in significant setbacks or advances. Rather, celebrities’ frequent discussion of their opinions about and participation in the movement perpetually brings these topics to new audience, while simultaneously uncovering and spotlighting sexism in the media. However, those celebrities who vocalize their stances against feminism may deter people from the feminist movement. As comedian Jenny Slate told MTV News in 2014, “I think that unfortunately people who are maybe threatened by feminism think that it’s about setting your bra on fire and being aggressive, and I think that’s really wrong and really dangerous.”


playa carrizalillo, puerto escondido, & casa mocha


m e x i c o photographed by whitney wei styled by whitney wei & joshua boggs


form & function

by rachel furst

Architecture is taking over the spotlight on the runway. Not only has Karl Lagerfeld designed his 2015 Spring Collection catwalks to the point of resembling movie sets and exotic dreamlands, but sculptural couture has gradually moved toward the forefront of fashion as well. Whether it be Balenciaga’s geometric-cut skirts or Galliano’s use of billowy round material, subtle and vibrant allusions to structural design have prevailed in 2015. However, on the high-fashion spectrum, this trend operates as a rather subtle form of incorporating sculpture into garments. Larger structural pursuits rarely have famous brand names attributed to them, and it is the trickle down effect of these bolder designers that influences the ready-to-wear clothing. On this more extreme side of structural fashion lies Croatian designer Matija Čop, who is not the first, and certainly not the last, to boldly blend sculpture and conceptual fashion. Čop meticulously creates his garments from small, laser-cut materials and, in this way, builds pieces with a method that one might also use to construct a stone building. Artist Nick Cave serves as another prime example of someone taking fashion and structural design to new heights. Cave’s main claim to fame is his Soundsuits, which mask the skin and force the viewer to form opinions unencumbered by race, class and gender biases. Cave claims that his core aim is to “get us back to that dream state, this place where we imagine and think about now and how we exist and function in the world.”


Cave’s aim is one that is reflected in the larger scope of fashion as art. The border between real human interactions and abstract structure has become increasing blurred through the innovations of Čop, Cave and others. In a sense, sculpture encompasses shapes that already comprise part of the human body, and sculptural fashion allows one to take on a different shape. Without the implications of natural shape, biases diminish. Consequently, sculptural fashion could shape the future in a way that aids the body image and gender-identity movements. But, such things often take time. Čop and Cave may already operate within this visual utopia, but H&M continues to grapple with the concept of geometric t-shirts.


h a r l e m


photographed by krista anna lewis styled by krista anna lewis, zoĂŤ flood tardino, & emilia schaffer del valle


photographed by daisy chaussee styled by alex danilov, alicia schleifman, & daphne chow


malaya


science behind skincare by anisa tavangar Glycolic Acid, the most common alpha hydroxy acid (AHA), works as a chemical exfoliant. It effectively penetrates pores to remove dead cells, thereby smoothing the skin’s texture and evening tone. Glycolic acid is great for all skin types and primarily helps with anti-aging and acne prevention, but is also great for lightening hyperpigmentation marks left over by acne. Be sure to use a sunscreen with this ingredient because it may cause sun sensitivity.

Salicylic Acid is lipid soluble and thus is great for oily skin. Considered a beta hydroxy acid (BHA) chemical exfoliant, it unclogs pores, prevents breakouts, and serves to decrease inflammation. Because it may cause dryness, monitor use of other harsh products and follow application with a moisturizer. Using a product that contains BHA, like The Body Shop’s Tea Tree Oil, before an AHA product can help improve the efficiency of the AHA.

Vitamin C is commonly featured in anti aging products, but also works to reduce hyperpigmentation and retain moisture. It improves the skin’s texture by protecting it against damage. Contrary to popular belief on blogs and Pinterest boards, lemon juice is not a safe alternative for a vitamin C-containing product because it can cause chemical burns and pH imbalance on the skin.


Sunscreen dominates above any other anti aging product for young people. It reduces the degradation of skin cells and can help even skin tone. Wearing sunscreen in addition to the SPF that comes in a foundation ensures that the active ingredients are stable. Wear SPF of at least 30 for guaranteed protection. Hyaluronic Acid rehydrates dry skin and can hold over 1000 times its weight in water. With a light, thin formula, this ingredient feels great on chapped skin. It is best applied to slightly damp skin and followed by a rich moisturizer to lock in the moisture.

Tea Tree Oil is a natural antibacterial and anti-inflammatory ingredient that targets bacteria and wins as an acne spot treatment. Undiluted, this light oil can cause an allergy to the product and dryness.

Mineral Oil was considered bad for the skin, but has since been redeemed. It is noncomedogenic, so it will not clog pores on most people. Great for additional moisture, use mineral oil over normal night moisturizer for an added boost or to gently remove makeup by massaging it into the skin before cleansing. Baby oil is mineral oil with fragrance, but the product can be purchased without fragrance for those with sensitive skin.


b a r e l y


photographed by victoria campa make up by anisa tavangar & sarah chorsi

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Channel Your Inner Diva by arianna friedman

begin

Do you have no summer plans?

yes

When traveling you value... itineraries

Are you a yes senior? no

spontaneity

What is your addiction? love

power

Which is more revenge important? forgiveness

You’re broke and you’re desperate so Do you have any you... archenemies?

yes and I watch them drop like flies

move back home

does it count if they don’t know I hate them?

captivity

I’m really trying to work on...

What scares you most? failure

Celebrate with some w(h)ine... ugh I’m so stressed don’t you don’t understand

apply for a job at Red Lobster or an entry level position of equal or lesser value

opening up to friends and families surmounting teenage insecurities

on occassion

Slytherin or Gryffindor? gryffindor

Do your morals ever affect your ability to do your job?

AMY SANTIAGO

LOUISE BELCHER (Bob’s Burgers)

(Brooklyn Nine-Nine)

No doubt you earned your gold star. Sorry, stars–plural, you high achiever. Your convictions fuel your work, your relationships and your aspirations, but don’t let perfection be your Achilles heel. Your competitive spirit isn’t your greatest strength. What is, however, is way more significant.

never

slytherin

JACKIE SHARP (House of Cards)

People find your success off putting. Probably because you crushed the competition. Maybe you double-crossed them. Or both. Your Machiavellian prowess will come in handy, but don’t let it short sight your overall well being. Happiness isn’t served on a cold, silver platter, – it’s enjoyed among friends i.e. people you didn’t backstab.

Your lust for dramatic conflict and reckless intolerance for sheeple will provide ample adventures in a very, very mad world. Embrace your headstrong tendencies, but if you don’t learn how to take responsibility for your own actions, you’re not so different from a nine-year-old brat.

LANA KANE (Archer)

What didn’t kill you made you stronger– strong enough to crush and dismantle an entire task force of KGB field agents. You wouldn’t be the person you are today without overcoming some adversity. Change is hard, but you can prevent your past from plaguing your future.


merci, pinot noir and caviar please! hahahahahahahaha. no.

Could you see yourself as the star of your own show?

obviously, I’m an inspiration to all

ambition

MINDY LAHIRI

(The Mindy Project)

You’ve got it going on and you know it. You’ve hurdled over hardships and earned that swagger. You’ll definitely encounter some smug opposition– they’ve been temporarily blinded by your assertive aura and winsome smile. Once they come around to you, they’ll appreciate your personal and professional panache.

Which trait best defines you? loyalty

ILANA WEXLER (Broad City)

Praise Mother Minaj you are as affable as you are effable, because Yeezus knows you can be self-absorbed. It’s cool though because people do wanna be you– that’s not in your head. Hakuna matata, but try to reign in your vicariousness. Your radiating self-confidence and devotion to your bestie(s) will be enough to galvanize an epic time.

JANE VILLANUEVA COSIMA NIEHAUS (Orphan Black)

You’re the embodiment of interesting people do interesting things, or at least you have the potential to be, so what’s stopping you? Emotions? Embarrassment? Crippling disease? Don’t be too proud to ask for advice or too scared to let someone take care of you– it doesn’t make you any less of a kick ass human being.

(Jane the Virgin)

While your enthusiasm and tenacity will keep your big dreams alive, it’s your articulate pragmatism that will get you there (and keep your credit score green). Like a good pair of clogs, sensibility is a trade off for glamour. In the long run though, you’re the most prepared to take advantage of spontaneous opportunities, so keep your head up and stay sharp because when things crazy, you best be ready to handle it.

KIMMY SCHMIDT

(The Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt)

Your determination (and mild ignorance) is admirable. Never lose your effervescent optimism, no matter how many people try to slap it out of you. Your resolute courage and work ethic will sustain you, even if $1 pizza can’t. True grit isn’t about macho cowboys, it’s a pair of light up sneakers and the audacity to smile instead of struggle.


n e w photographed by andre’ fuqua styled by jareline guerrero

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spring/summer 2015

Hoot Magazine: Spring/Summer 2015  

hoot magazine