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EDLD 5333 Leadership for Accountability

Holly Dornak

Week 1 Assignment: Analyzing Campus Need and Personal Vision Overview In this course, you will conduct a data-driven comprehensive needs assessment, and use the information from your data analysis to develop an action plan for the purpose of improving student achievement. School administrators and site-based decision-making teams use the skills required in data-based decision making to improve student achievement, which culminates in improved school performance ratings. In this week’s assignment, you will complete the first step in conducting a comprehensive needs assessment when you navigate the Texas Education Agency (TEA) Web site and locate and analyze Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) data for a campus, preferably your own. You will use the campus you select for all parts of the assignment. You will also develop a statement of your personal vision of leadership.

Lamar University

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EDLD 5333 Leadership for Accountability

Holly Dornak

Rubric Use the following rubric to guide your work. Tasks

Accomplished

Proficient

Needs Improvement

Unacceptable

Week 1 Assignment: Analyzing Campus Need and Personal Vision Part 1: Analyzing Campus Need (ELCC 1.2 k-i, ii; s-i, 2.2 k-i, iv; 2.5 k-i, si, ii, iii, iv; 2.9 k-i, si, ii, iv)

Successfully locates, summarizes, and elaborates Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) findings from AYP Guide. Successfully compares standards to actual campus performance for each AYP applicable indicator. Evaluates each subgroup’s performance (strengths and weaknesses) by indicator. Composes three one-paragraph comparisons for each performance area.

Locates and lists campus areas of strength and weakness in AYP findings. Little elaboration in the summaries. (8 points)

Summarizes indicator information from AYP Guide minimally. Lists areas of strength and weakness in AYP findings. No elaboration, no summarization.

Does not use applicable AYP indicators to compare standards to actual campus performance. (6-0 points)

(7 points)

(10 points) Part 2: Analyzing Personal Vision

(ELCC 1.1 k-i, ii; s-i, ii; 1.3 k-i, ii, iii; s-i, ii)

Part 3: Personal Vision of Leadership (ELCC 1.1 k-i, ii; s-i, ii ; 4.3 s-ii)

Mechanics

Lamar University

Answers all questions and cites information from Web sites; elaborates.

Answers all questions citing information from Web sites with minimal elaboration.

Answers three questions citing information from Web sites. No elaboration.

(10 points)

(8 points)

(7 points)

Completes all statements and creates a onesentence personal vision of leadership statement.

Completes five statements and creates a onesentence personal vision of leadership statement.

Completes four or fewer statements and creates a onesentence personal vision of leadership statement.

Does not create a one-sentence personal vision of leadership statement or assignment is not submitted.

(10 points)

(8 points)

(7 points)

(0 points)

Few errors in grammar, spelling, or punctuation.

Does not submit assignment. (0 points)

Multiple errors in grammar, spelling or punctuation.

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EDLD 5333 Leadership for Accountability

(5 points)

Holly Dornak

Responses lack clarity and depth. (0 points)

Lamar University

3 of 10


EDLD 5333 Leadership for Accountability

Holly Dornak

Part 1: Analyzing Campus Need (ELCC 1.2 k-i., ii; s-i, 2.2 k-i, iv; 2.5 k-i, s-i, ii, iii, iv; 2.9 k-i, s-i, ii, iv) Knowledge of the Texas Education Agency’s database provides an emerging leader a foundation for decision-making. In Part 1 of the Analysis Assignment, you will examine campus data available on the TEA’s Web site and compare your campus data to the criteria for meeting Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) standards. Directions 1. Type the TEA Web address http://www.tea.state.tx.us/ayp/2009/guide.pdf in your Internet browser’s address bar to access the 2009 AYP Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) Guide. 2. Print out Page 22 of the 2009 AYP Manual, “Exhibit 1: 2009 AYP Indicators,” and summarize the indicators used to determine a campus AYP rating. 3. Complete the following Summary of AYP Indicators table. Summary of AYP Indicators Reading/English Language Arts: Performance Standard: Either – An ever increasing percentage* of all students as a whole, as well as each of 6 subpopulations of students (meeting minimum size requirements) must score 67% or higher on test (or be projected to be proficient based on TPM.) Or – The number of students not proficient on test must decrease by 10% from previous year or graduation/attendance rate must show improvement. Note: Only 1% of participating students in the district may take TAKS-Alt. Only 2% of participating students in the district may take TAKS-M. *Percentage is determined after examining the percent of students who were proficient the previous year and increasing the expectation incrementally each year so that 100% of students will be expected to achieve proficiency by 2013-2014. Participation Standard: Either – 95% of students enrolled in the district on the date of testing must participate in test. Or – 95% of students enrolled in the district on the date of testing for the two previous school years must have participated. Mathematics: Performance Standard: Either – An ever increasing percentage* of all students as a whole, as well as each of 6 subpopulations of students (meeting minimum size requirements) must score 58% or higher on test (or be projected to be proficient based on TPM.) Or – The number of students not proficient on test must decrease by 10% from previous year or graduation/attendance rate must show improvement. Note: Only 1% of participating students in the district may take TAKS-Alt. Only 2% of participating students in the district may take TAKS-M. *Percentage is determined after examining the percent of students who were proficient the

Lamar University

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EDLD 5333 Leadership for Accountability

Holly Dornak

previous year and increasing the expectation incrementally each year so that 100% of students will be expected to achieve proficiency by 2013-2014. Participation Standard: Either – 95% of students enrolled in the district on the date of testing must participate in test. Or – 95% of students enrolled in the district on the date of testing for the two previous school years must have participated. Attendance Rate: 90% attendance rate or any improvement in attendance rate indicates AYP. Graduation Rate: 70% of students of the graduating class, or any improvement in graduation rate indicates AYP.

Lamar University

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EDLD 5333 Leadership for Accountability

Holly Dornak

Directions 

Type the TEA Web address http://www.tea.state.tx.us/ayp/index_multi.html in your Internet browser’s address bar to access your campus AYP report.

On the left, click Campus Data Tables.

On the Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) Campus Data Tables screen, answer questions 1 and 2 to locate your campus report. Then click continue.

Use the AYP data to complete the Campus AYP Data Table below. Record the data as follows: % meeting standard/participation rate. Note: The attendance rate and graduation rate will only have the first number: % meeting standard.

Compare the campus performance to the AYP indicators.

Campus AYP Data Table Campus Name: Jane Long Elementary Campus AYP Status: Exemplary, Meets AYP Title I Improvement Requirement: None

Percent Meeting Standard/ Participation Rate Performance Area All African Hispanic (most current yr.) Students American

White

Reading/ ELA

89%

81%

89%

96%

85%

81%

81%

n/a

Mathematics

90%

90%

88%

96%

89%

82%

89%

n/a

96.6%

97.1%

96.4%

96.5%

96.4%

96.6%

Attendance Rate

Econ. Sp. LEP LEP Disadv. Education (Measure) Students

97.8%

Graduation Rate

Lamar University

(not evaluated)

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EDLD 5333 Leadership for Accountability

Holly Dornak

Comparison of Campus AYP Data to AYP Standards In the table below, compose a one paragraph comparison for each performance area that is applicable at your campus. Evaluate each subgroup’s performance and areas of strength and weakness as identified by the indicators. Reading/English Language Arts: As a whole, 89% of students at Jane Long were successful in passing their respective Reading/English Language Arts TAKS test during the 2008-2009 school year. That being said, our campus has some major work to do to close the 15% gap that exists between the African American, Special Education, and LEP subpopulations and their white counterparts. Significant effort must also be focused on increasing the success rate of Hispanic students who, as a group, were 7% less successful than white students. Especially for African American students, this subject area seems to be an area of weakness as there is a significant (9%) difference between their rate of success in Reading/ELA and their Math TAKS success rate. Additionally, the gap (8%) between the Reading/ELA success rate and the Math TAKS success rate of LEP students evokes a call for effective instruction for this subpopulation as well. Mathematics: Though the 90% success rate of Jane Long students as a whole group on the Math TAKS nearly mirrors their success in Reading/English Language Arts, overall, students in most subpopulations were stronger in Mathematics. Test scores indicate that our campus needs to improve instruction for Special Education students in this area as they were 14% less successful than the overall white subpopulation. Hispanic, Economically Disadvantaged, LEP and African American students were around 6-7% less successful than the white subpopulation. These gaps are cause for concern and warrant increased scrutiny of baseline skills, effective instruction and student academic growth in successive school years. Attendance Rate: With a 96.6% average attendance rate, Jane Long seems to be doing well motivating students to attend school regularly. Differences between the attendance rates of subpopulations seem negligible as they are, at most, only slightly over 1% between any two subpopulations. Graduation Rate: Jane Long is an Pre-Kindergarten through Fifth Grade Elementary school and as such, graduation rates are not evaluated. It may be illuminating if TEA followed up this report in 7+ years and reported the graduation rate of former Jane Long students who remain in district.

Lamar University

7 of 10


EDLD 5333 Leadership for Accountability

Holly Dornak

Part 2: Analyzing Personal Vision (ELCC 1.1 k-i, ii; s-i, ii; 1.3 k-i, ii, iii; s-i, ii) All visioning entails development of core beliefs, whether you are developing a personal leadership vision or a campus vision. In Part 2 of the Analysis Assignment, you will investigate resources for creating a vision and then compose a personal vision of leadership by completing a series of statement stems. Directions 1. In preparation for composing your own “personal” leadership vision, access and review the following Web sites:

http://www.ncrel.org/sdrs/areas/issues/educatrs/leadrshp/le100.htm

http://www.leading-learning.co.nz/creating-vision.html

http://resources.sai-iowa.org/si/desiredfuture/vision.html

To access the Web sites, type the address into your Internet browser’s address bar, or access them in Resources: Helpful Web sites. 2. Using the information from the Web sites, answer the following questions: What is vision? What are the components of a shared vision? Vision is the shared high expectations a community of educators have for themselves and their students. The components of shared vision include clearly defined goals and a set of concrete steps to achieve those goals. After all, according to the Survival School for Iowa School Administrators, “Things that you want to have happen don’t happen by default, by hope, by mandate, or by chance—they happen by design.” Furthermore, shared vision manifests itself in the intrinsic motivation of faculty and staff to anticipate problems, creatively implement solutions, and build strong relationships between themselves and the student body they serve. (School Administrators of Iowa, 2009).

What are the steps in developing, articulating, and implementing a shared vision? How does your campus articulate its vision? While there is no fool-proof recipe for developing, articulating, and implementing a shared vision the first step is to develop a clear mission statement that gives voice to the vision. Second, the leadership must determine both broad and specific goals for the campus. The vision is further developed by a data driven examination of “where we are” and the penning and implementation of concrete steps designed to move the campus towards their goals. (Peterson, 1995). Finally it is imperative to create a safe environment in which people are encouraged to learn (even from their mistakes), grow and collaborate. (School Administrators of Iowa, 2009). This is done by establishing trust, opening effective channels of communication, and remaining consistent in the pursuit of campus goals. From day one, the administration at my campus has focused on relationships. Positive relationships are critical in motivating students, staff members and parents. The administration’s vision is apparent not only through their words, but through their actions. My principal knows every student’s name. She walks through our school not only looking for areas to build on, but praising the positive in each classroom. She is very direct and does not “beat

Lamar University

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EDLD 5333 Leadership for Accountability

Holly Dornak

around the bush.” This goes a long way in establishing trust between herself and her staff. This, in turn, manifests itself in the classroom through our faculty’s expectation that each student can be successful.

How can you use what you learned at these Web sites to help you articulate your personal vision of leadership? I can create a personal mission statement and publish it in my eportfolio. I can model what I have learned in my day to day dealings with educators and students.

With regard to the campus improvement process, why do you think it is important for the principal to have a personal vision of leadership? If the principal of a school does not have a personal vision of leadership, then the campus is a floundering ship, led hither and yon by whoever has the strongest will of the day-be it staff member, parent, or student. Faculty cannot operate as a cohesive unit under these conditions. They lose motivation, programs fall apart, and students suffer (Peterson, 1995). Thus, the principal’s personal vision of leadership is crucial in establishing the campus as a headed-entity that can both see where it is going and knows the steps needed to get there.

Lamar University

9 of 10


EDLD 5333 Leadership for Accountability

Holly Dornak

Part 3: Personal Vision of Leadership (ELCC 1.1 k-i, ii; s-i, ii ; 4.3 s-ii) In the table below, complete the core belief statements to gather your ideas about schools and leadership. Use the ideas to create a one-sentence personal leadership vision statement in the last section of the table. Schools should teach…how to think, not what to think.

A good school is one that…inspires an intrinsic motivation to learn.

An effective classroom is one in which…every student is actively engaged at a developmentally appropriate level, and challenged to think creatively.

A good principal is one who…always puts the good of their students first.

An effective school faculty is one that…takes a personal interest in the success of each student.

A quality instructional program includes…clear goals, an effective plan of action, and evaluation methods that result in improved instruction.

Personal Vision of Leadership (one sentence): High expectations, creative mindsets and a learning-centric culture inspire insatiable appetites for learning.

E-portfolio assignment: Complete “I-001 Vision and Campus Culture” Course-Embedded Internship Log 2. Continue to complete and post Campus-supervised reflection logs in the e-portfolio. All courseembedded and campus-supervised logs must be completed by your 11th course in the program prior to the EDLD 5398 Internship course.

Lamar University

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EDLD 5333 Leadership for Accountability

Holly Dornak

Week 2 Assignment: Mining for Data Overview In this week’s lecture, we discussed the Texas accountability system and the Academic Excellence Indicator System (AEIS) as a school improvement tool in relation to No Child Left Behind. This week, you will perform Step 2 of the comprehensive needs assessment, which you will use later to develop a campus action plan. In this assignment, you will explore the Academic Excellence Indicator System (AEIS) data, locate reports that are critical to your campus improvement team, and compare your selected campus’ performance to AEIS standards. Your goal in completing this data analysis is to determine areas of strength and weakness and identify patterns and trends at your selected campus.

Lamar University

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EDLD 5333 Leadership for Accountability

Holly Dornak

Rubric Use the following rubric to guide your work. Tasks

Accomplished

Proficient

Needs Improvement

Unacceptable

Week 2 Assignment: Mining for Data (ELCC 2.2 k-i, s-iv; 2.3 s-ii;2.5 k-i, s-i, ii, iii, iv; 2.9 s-i, ii, iii, iv) Part 1: Campus Report Summary

Conducts detailed comparison of scores in each subject, subgroup, and grade level to the standards for Acceptable, Recognized, and Exemplary.

Compares scores in each subject, subgroup, and grade level to the standards for Acceptable, Recognized, and Exemplary.

Does not compare scores in each subject, subgroup, and grade level to the standards for Acceptable, Recognized, and Exemplary.

Does not summarize Campus Report.

(8 points)

(7 points)

Compares scores in each subject, subgroup, and grade level to the standards for Acceptable, Recognized, and Exemplary.

Does not compare scores in each subject, subgroup, and grade level to the standards for Acceptable, Recognized, and Exemplary.

(8 points)

(7 points)

Notes one trend and/or pattern in campus AEIS data.

Does not note trends and/or patterns in campus AEIS data.

Does not turn in this portion of assignment.

(8 points)

(7 points)

(0 points)

Completes all applicable data in three AEIS Comparison Charts.

Completes all applicable data in two AEIS Comparison Charts.

Completes all applicable data in one AEIS Comparison Chart.

Does not turn in this portion of assignment.

(10 points)

(8 points)

(7 points)

Identifies one area of campus strength and two areas of weakness from AEIS data, and explains choices with detailed elaboration.

Identifies one area of campus strength and two areas of weakness from AEIS data, and explains choices with some elaboration.

Identifies one area of campus strength and two areas of weakness with no elaboration

(0 points)

(10 points) Part 2: Campus Group and CI Report Summary

Conducts detailed comparison of scores in each subject, subgroup, and grade level to the standards for Acceptable, Recognized, and Exemplary.

Does not turn in this portion of assignment. (0 points)

(10 points) Part 3: Multi-Year History Report Summary

Successfully notes trends and/or patterns in campus AEIS data. (10 points)

Part 4: AEIS Chart Completion

Part 5: Area of Strength

Lamar University

(0 points) Does not turn in this portion of assignment. (0 points)

(7 points)

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EDLD 5333 Leadership for Accountability

(10 points) Mechanics

Holly Dornak

(8 points)

Few errors in grammar, spelling, or punctuation.

Multiple errors in grammar, spelling or punctuation.

(5 points)

Responses lack clarity and depth. (0 points)

Lamar University

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EDLD 5333 Leadership for Accountability

Holly Dornak

Part 1: Campus Report Summary (ELCC 2.2 k-i, s-iv; 2.5 k-i, s-i, ii, iii, iv; 2.9 s-i, ii, iii, iv) A critical skill for an instructional leader is the ability to use data-based decision making. You will practice this skill in this Application assignment as you collect data in preparation for creating an action plan for school improvement. In this section, you will select a school—ideally one in which you work—and review its AEIS data. Directions 1. Navigate to http://www.tea.state.tx.us/perfreport/aeis. On the left side of the Web page, select the most current AEIS data. 2. When the next screen appears, click ―Campus Report‖ on the left. 3. Complete the form to select a campus and access a campus AEIS Report. Then click continue. 4. Print out the Campus Report. 5. Carefully review the data, and familiarize yourself with the format. Study Section I and Section II by row, title, and column heading so that you will know where to locate specific information. 

Look for increases and decreases in the two-year comparison provided

Review each indicator on the report, and compare your campus performance on each indicator to the standards for Unacceptable, Acceptable, Recognized, and Exemplary ratings

6. Summarize your Campus Report findings in the workspace below. Campus Report Summary Workspace This year at Jane Long Elementary, the passing rate of third graders in Reading fell approximately 9% but still remained exemplary. Students in each of the three monitored subpopulations (African American, Hispanic, and White) experienced passing rate decreases of about 9% between the 2008 and 2009 TAKS tests. In Mathematics the passing rate of third grade students increased around 2% and remained exemplary. The passing rate of African American improved a dramatic 26%. The Hispanic and White subpopulations experienced a drop in passing rates as high as 9 percent. These scores resulted in a 2% decrease in the overall passing rate of third graders on TAKS Reading and Mathematics, yet their overall passing rate remained exemplary. Overall African American students increased their passing rate by 17% while the passing rate of Hispanic and White students fell around 6-9%. Overall third grade male students remained exemplary between the two school years.

Lamar University

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EDLD 5333 Leadership for Accountability

Holly Dornak

Third grade female students experienced a 13% decrease in their Reading TAKS success rate, and a modest 1% gain in their Math TAKS success rate. The passing rate of economically disadvantaged students fell 11% from the prior year. Fourth grade students passed the Reading TAKS at a rate of 79% for an academically acceptable performance standard. This is a disappointing 14% decrease from the prior school year. African American students were hit the hardest, with a 45% decrease in passing rate to an academically unacceptable performance standard. The fourth grade Hispanic population experienced a 5% decrease in passing rate (recognized), while their white counterparts held steady with greater than 99% passing (exemplary.) Fourth grade girls scored slightly higher than their male counterparts on the Reading TAKS, but the passing rate of both genders fell from the previous year. Economically disadvantaged students experienced a 21% drop in passing rate to academically acceptable performance standard. In Mathematics, the passing rate of fourth graders at Jane Long fell 11% from the previous year to a recognized performance standard. Paradoxically, the passing rate of African American fourth grade students increased 14%, while the Hispanic subpopulation passing rate fell by 17%. White students again held steady at over 99% passing (exemplary). Male students scored 7% higher than female students and the passing rate of economically disadvantaged students fell 13% from the prior year to a recognized performance standard. In Writing, the overall passing rate also declined from exemplary to recognized. The passing rate of African American students experienced the greatest decline, falling a staggering 30% to academically unacceptable while the passing rate of white and Hispanic students remained exemplary. The passing rate of female students was a significant 13% higher than male students. The passing rate of economically disadvantaged students fell 8% from exemplary the prior year to recognized.

Lamar University

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EDLD 5333 Leadership for Accountability

Holly Dornak

In Reading the overall passing rate of fifth grade students fell 9% from the prior year to recognized. While 99% of White and African American students passed (exemplary), the passing rate of Hispanic students fell around 15% to recognized. Females scored slightly higher than males on this test, while the passing rate of economically disadvantaged students fell 12% from the previous year to recognized. In Mathematics, fifth grade students enjoyed a 1% gain in passing rate from the previous year and remained exemplary. As in Reading, there were not enough 5th grade African American students enrolled in the 2008 testing year to constitute a subpopulation. During the 2009 school year, African American students had a passing rate of 88% on the Math TAKS (recognized.) While the passing rate of Hispanic students fell 1% to 89% (recognized), White students were over 99% successful in passing the test (exemplary.) The passing rate of girls was slightly higher than that of fifth grade boys on the Math TAKS. Economically disadvantaged fifth graders improved their passing rate by 6% to an exemplary performance standard. Overall, Science was an area of growth for fifth grade students at Jane Long as their passing rate improved 8% from the prior year to an exemplary performance standard. The passing rate of African American students increased 66% and the passing rate of White students held steady at over 99% so both subpopulations met the exemplary performance standard. The passing rate of Hispanic students fell 4% but still remained exemplary. Male and female student had a near identical passing rate and met the exemplary performance standard. Economically disadvantaged students experienced a 2% drop in their passing rate but continued to meet the academically acceptable performance standard. Though there are many academic areas that require focused attention, because of TPM Jane Long Elementary met the exemplary performance standard.

Lamar University

6 of 16


EDLD 5333 Leadership for Accountability

Holly Dornak

Part 2: Campus Group and CI Report Summary (ELCC 2.2 k-i, s-iv; 2.5 k-i, s-i, ii, iii, iv; 2.9 si, ii, iii, iv) Prior to completing this part of the assignment, review ―Appendix F – Campus Comparison Group‖ in the Week 2 Reading 2009 Accountability Manual. Directions 1. Navigate to http://www.tea.state.tx.us/perfreport/aeis 2. Select the most recent year’s report from the column on the left. Next, click on ―Comparable Improvement‖ (left column). In the text, click on the highlighted words ―Campus Group and CI Report.‖ 3. Complete the form to select a campus and access a ―Campus Group and CI Report.‖ Select PDF format because this is the format used on the TExES Principal Exam. Then click continue. 4. Print out the ―Campus Group and CI Report.‖ 5. Carefully review the data, and familiarize yourself with the format. 6. Summarize your ―Campus Group and CI Report‖ findings in the workspace below. Campus Group and CI Report Summary Workspace Demographically, Jane Long Elementary is very similar to the average demographics of other campuses included in its CI Report. The most significant difference being, Jane Long has approximately 6% less LEP students that the average population of other campuses included in the report.

All other differences

in demographics between Jane Long and the average demographics of all campuses included in Jane Long’s CI report fell under 3%. In both Reading and Math, Jane Long TAKS scores were in the fourth quartile as compared to other campuses in their CI Report, and as such are not qualified for the Gold Performance Acknowledgement. On average, Jane Long students scored 0.30 below their expected TGI deviation in Reading and 0.18 below their expected TGI deviation in Mathematics.

Lamar University

7 of 16


EDLD 5333 Leadership for Accountability

Holly Dornak

Part 3: Multi-Year History Report Summary (ELCC 2.2 k-i, s-iv; 2.5 k-i, s-i, ii, iii, iv; 2.9 s-i, ii, iii, iv) Directions 1. Navigate to http://www.tea.state.tx.us/perfreport/aeis. 2. On the left, click Multi-Year: Schools. 3. Complete the form to select a campus and access a campus ―Multi-Year History Report.‖ 4. Select the most current span of years in PDF format because this is the format used on the TExES Principal Exam. Then click continue. 5. Print out the ―Campus Data Multi-Year History.‖ 6. Carefully review the data, and familiarize yourself with the format. 

Look for increases and decreases in performance by subject, grade level, and subgroups. Compare campus results with state, district, and campus group.

Note patterns and/or trends you see over time.

7. Summarize the patterns and/or trends noted in the data in the workspace below. Multi-Year History Report Summary Workspace As a whole, when you examine the trends in the TAKS data for Jane Long Elementary it is clear that the campus is moving in the right direction. Every subpopulation has improved their TAKS passing rate by an average of 34% since 2003. That being said, it seems that African American students have struggled keep pace since 2006 when the growth of their passing rate seems to have flattened out. Though some subpopulations experienced a drop in TAKS passing rate this past year, overall the data indicates a long-term trend in the growth of the passing rate of Hispanic, White and economically disadvantaged students. This growth is in step with the improved passing rate for our district as well as the state as a whole. In TAKS Reading, subpopulations have experienced long term growth in their passing rate that has been measured at between 11 and 27%. Hispanics experienced the greatest growth in this area, though each subpopulation at Jane Long fell slightly under the growth in passing rate experienced by the district overall. In TAKS Mathematics, each subpopulation has shown marked growth. 2006 and 2009 seem to have been difficult years for students at Jane Long since the passing rate for nearly each subpopulation fell during these years. The improvement in the passing rate of all subpopulations has not kept pace and is between 9 and 18% lower than district growth. Jane Long Elementary students are, for the most part, keeping up with district improvement in the area of TAKS Writing. The Hispanic subpopulation leads district improvement by 13%. Only the African American subpopulation did not keep pace with district improvement, though overall, all subpopulations at Jane Long have increased their passing rate by at least 11% since 2003. TAKS Science is another area in which Jane Long students shine. In all subpopulations there has been an astounding 67% increase in the passing rate. Hispanic and economically disadvantaged students have increased their passing rate by 75 and 77 percent respectively. Though there is still a great deal of work to be done, it is clear that students and teachers at Jane Long are focused on learning and their efforts are paying great dividends. The long term trend towards improved passing rates is clear in every subpopulation and subject.

Lamar University

8 of 16


EDLD 5333 Leadership for Accountability

Holly Dornak

Part 4: AEIS Comparison Chart – All Grades Tested (ELCC 2.5 k-i, s-i, ii, iii, iv; 2.9 s-i, ii, iii, iv) In the next section of the assignment, complete three charts using AEIS data: one for your selected campus; a second for a selected grade level; and a third for other campus factors. Directions In each of the four charts below, record the standard for performance on the AEIS base indicator. Next, measure your campus performance against the AEIS standard. See the Accountability Manual for the most current standards for each AEIS indicator. For example, for a campus to be rated ―Acceptable‖ according to 2009 standards, its students must score 70% on the Reading portion of the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS). Suppose your campus scored 65%. Then you would measure your campus against the standard by subtracting 65 (your campus score) from 70 (the Acceptable standard). There would be a difference of -5. In other words, your campus still has some work to do before it meets the standard. There are additional ways to achieve certain ratings under the Required Improvement (RI), Texas Projection Measure (TPM), and Exceptions rules that are addressed in the Accountability Manual, but for now, look strictly at the standards noted above. For a campus to be rated exemplary, the campus must score at least 90% in all applicable areas. Suppose, however, that your campus scored 95%. Then you would measure your campus against the standard by subtracting 90% (the standard) from 95% (your campus score). The difference would be +5. In other words, your campus is exceeding the exemplary standard.

Lamar University

9 of 16


EDLD 5333 Leadership for Accountability

Holly Dornak

AEIS Comparison Chart: All Grades Tested Acceptable Base Indicators

TAKS (use most recent results & most recent standards criteria)

Standard (varies by subject): 

Reading: 70%

Writing: 65%

Social Studies: 65%

Mathematics: 50%

Science: 45%

Recognized Standard (same for all subjects): 75%

Exemplary Standard (same for all subjects): 90%

Standard – Campus Score = Difference

Standard – Campus Score = Difference

Standard – Campus Score = Difference

Example: 70 – 65 = -5

Example: 75 – 65 = -10

Example: 90 – 65 = -25

70

75

90

All Students: 89

+14

-1

African American: 81

+6

-9

Hispanic: 89

+14

-1

Reading/ ELA

White: 99

+9

Econ. Disadvantaged: 86

Writing

65

All Students:88 African American: 69

+4

+11

-4

75

90

+13

-2

-6

-21

Hispanic:94

+4

White:99

+9

Econ. Disadvantaged:86

Lamar University

+11

-4

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EDLD 5333 Leadership for Accountability

Holly Dornak

AEIS Comparison Chart: All Grades Tested (Continued)

Social Studies

65

75

90

All Students

n/a

n/a

n/a

African American

n/a

n/a

n/a

Hispanic

n/a

n/a

n/a

White

n/a

n/a

n/a

Econ. Disadvantaged

n/a

n/a

n/a

Mathematics

50

75

90

All Students: 91

+1

African American:93

+3

Hispanic:89

+14

-1

White:96

+6

Econ. Disadvantaged:90

+0

Science

45

75

90

All Students:96

+6

African American:99

+9

Hispanic:93

+3

White:99

+9

Econ. Disadvantaged:94

+4

Lamar University

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EDLD 5333 Leadership for Accountability

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AEIS Comparison Chart: Grade Level For this portion of the assignment, select a grade level at your campus. Acceptable Base Indicators

TAKS (use most current AEIS data & standards)

Reading/ ELA

Standard (varies by subject): 

Reading: 70%

Writing: 65%

Social Studies: 65%

Mathematics: 50%

Science: 45%

Standard – Grade Level = Difference

70

All Students:88

Recognized Standard (same for all subjects): 75%

Exemplary Standard (same for all subjects): 90%

Standard – Grade Level = Difference

Standard – Grade Level = Difference

75

90

+13

-2

African American:99

+9

Hispanic: 81

+6

White: 99

-9 +9

Econ. Disadvantaged: 84

+9

-6

Writing

65

75

90

All Students

n/a

n/a

n/a

African American

n/a

n/a

n/a

Hispanic

n/a

n/a

n/a

White

n/a

n/a

n/a

Econ. Disadvantaged

n/a

n/a

n/a

Lamar University

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EDLD 5333 Leadership for Accountability

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AEIS Comparison Chart: Grade Level (Continued)

Social Studies

65

75

90

All Students

n/a

n/a

n/a

African American

n/a

n/a

n/a

Hispanic

n/a

n/a

n/a

White

n/a

n/a

n/a

Econ. Disadvantaged

n/a

n/a

n/a

Mathematics

50

75

90

All Students: 91

+1

African American: 88

+13

-2

Hispanic: 89

+14

-1

White: 99

+9

Econ. Disadvantaged:91

+1

Science

45

75

90

All Students: 96

+6

African American: 99

+9

Hispanic: 93

+3

White: 99

+9

Econ. Disadvantaged: 94

+4

Lamar University

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EDLD 5333 Leadership for Accountability

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AEIS Comparison Chart: Other Factors Acceptable

Recognized

Exemplary

Base Indicators

Standard: 75%

Standard: 85%

Standard: 95%

TAKS (use most current AEIS data & standards)

Standard – Campus Score = difference

Standard – Campus Score = difference

Standard – Campus Score = difference

All Students

n/a

n/a

n/a

African American

n/a

n/a

n/a

Hispanic

n/a

n/a

n/a

White

n/a

n/a

n/a

Econ. Disadvantaged

n/a

n/a

n/a

Standard: 2.0%

Standard: 2.0%

Standard: 2.0%

Standard – Campus Score = difference

Standard – Campus Score = difference

Standard – Campus Score = difference

All Students

n/a

n/a

n/a

African American

n/a

n/a

n/a

Hispanic

n/a

n/a

n/a

White

n/a

n/a

n/a

Econ. Disadvantaged

n/a

n/a

n/a

Base Indicators

Standard:

Standard: at least 97%

Standard: at least 97%

TAKS (AEIS reports the previous year’s attendance rate)

Standard – Campus Score = difference

Standard – Campus Score = difference

Standard – Campus Score = difference

-0.4%

-0.4%

Completion Rate (High School)

Base Indicators TAKS (use most current AEIS data & standards)

Dropout Rate (Grades 7 & 8)

Attendance Rate: 96.6%

Lamar University

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EDLD 5333 Leadership for Accountability

Holly Dornak

Part 5: Area of Strength (ELCC 2.2. k-i, s-i, iv; 2.5 k-i, s-i, ii, iii, iv; 2.9 k-i, s-i, ii, iii) In part 4, you completed the AEIS Comparison Charts to record your school’s scores and compare them to the standards for each AEIS rating by computing the difference between the standard for Acceptable, Recognized, and Exemplary in each subject, grade, and subgroup. Next, you will use the data to determine areas of strength and weakness at the campus. In a later assignment, you will use the data to build an action plan for school improvement. Directions 1. Use the AEIS Comparison Charts to target one area of strength and two areas of weakness at the campus. 2. In the workspace below, briefly explain why you chose each area of strength and weakness. Identified Area of Strength

1. Science

Why I Chose It

I chose to highlight Science as an area of strength this year because of the enormous improvement in the passing rate that has been made in all subpopulations since 2003. Furthermore, the fact that students at Jane Long are ahead of the district curve on the Science TAKS is further reason to cite this area as strength.

Identified Area of Weakness

Why I Chose It

1. Writing, especially amongst the African American subpopulation

This year there is a 21% gap between where we are in the passing rate of African American students and where we would like to be (>90%, exemplary.) Hispanic and White subpopulations passed at a rate of over 90% which further why this is an area of concern.

2. Reading, especially amongst the African American subpopulation

There is a 9% gap this year between where we are in the passing rate of African American students and where we would like to be (>90%, exemplary.) Our goal is to maintain a healthy margin between our passing rate and the passing rate of any other performance standard other than exemplary. Clearly there is work to be done in this area.

E-portfolio assignment:

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EDLD 5333 Leadership for Accountability

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Complete “II-004 Curriculum, Measurement, and Alignment of Resources� Course-Embedded Log 1. Continue to complete and post Campus-Supervised reflection logs in the e-portfolio. All CourseEmbedded and Campus-Supervised logs must be completed by your 11th course in the program prior to the EDLD 5398 Internship course.

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f

Week 3: Targeting and Addressing a Need Overview As a part of your Week 2 assignment, you chose two areas of weakness based on campus Academic Excellence Indicator (AEIS) Report data. This week, you will narrow your focus to one targeted weakness and write a measurable S.M.A.R.T. goal and an objective for the target weakness. You will also research appropriate strategies/activities, including specific professional development, to address the target area.

Lamar University

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EDLD 5333 Leadership for Accountability

Holly Dornak

Rubric Use the following rubric to guide your work.

Tasks

Accomplished

Proficient

Needs Improvement

Unacceptable

Week 3 Assignment: Targeting and Addressing a Need Part 1: Targets, Goals, and Objectives

States the area of weakness and rationale.

States either the area of weakness and/or the rationale.

(ELCC 2.2 k-i, s-i, iv; 2.3 k-i, s-i, ii,iii,iv; 2.4 k-i, ii,s-i, ii, iii; 2.5 k-i, s-i, ii, iii, iv; 2.6 k-i, ii, iii; s-i, ii, iii; 2.7 k-i, s-i; 2.9 k-i, s-I, ii, iii iv)

(10 points)

(8 points)

Part 2: S.M.A.R.T. Goal and Objective

Composes one S.M.A.R.T. goal and one objective according to the critical elements outlined in the lecture.

Composes one S.M.A.R.T. goal and one objective using some critical elements. (8 points)

No criteria stated and no points listed. (7 points)

Composes one S.M.A.R.T goal or one objective using critical elements. (7 points)

Does not state the area of weakness or the rationale. (0 points)

Does not compose one S.M.A.R.T. goal and/or one objective using critical elements. (0 points)

(10 points) Part 3: Strategies and Activities

Records and elaborates on the usefulness of three strategies/activities, including professional development, that address the target area’s weakness. Cites research.

Records, with minimal elaboration, two strategies/ activities, including professional development, that address the target area’s weakness.

No criteria stated and no points listed. (7 points)

Does not record strategies/activities, or records strategies/activities with no elaboration. (0 points)

(8 points)

(10 points) Mechanics

Few errors in grammar, spelling, or punctuation.

Multiple errors in grammar, spelling or punctuation.

(5 point)

Responses lack clarity and depth. ( 0 points)

Lamar University

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EDLD 5333 Leadership for Accountability

Holly Dornak

Part 1: Targets, Goals, and Objectives (ELCC 2.2 k-i, s-i, iv; 2.3 k-i, s-i, ii, iii, iv; 2.4 k-i, ii, s-i, ii, iii; 2.5 k-i, s-i, ii, iii, iv; 2.6 k-i, ii, iii; s-i, ii, iii; 2.7 k-i, s-i; 2.9 k-i, s-I, ii, iii iv) Remember from your lecture that goals should provide direction, focus, and be S.M.A.R.T. That is, they must be Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic/Results-oriented/Research-based, and Time-bound (Learning Point Associates, Inc., 2004). While goals and objectives are closely related, goals are broader, and objectives are more specific. Objectives (1) identify a target population, (2) identify assessments and data sources that will be used to meet the objective, and (3) specify anticipated growth or progress. For example, a goal might state, “By 2012, Paradise School will earn an Exemplary rating.” An objective related to that goal might state, “90% of all third grade students will meet or surpass the state standard on TAKS Reading by the end of the current school year.” Strategies then would be tied directly to the objectives. In this week’s assignment, you will decide on one area of campus weakness, state your rationale for selecting it, and write a S.M.A.R.T. goal and an objective to address the target need. You will also research strategies, including professional development ideas, to address the targeted weakness and meet the goal and objective. These will be used in Week 4 as you develop a campus action plan to address the target weakness. Directions 1. Select one area of weakness identified in your Week 2 AEIS Comparison Chart activity and compose a brief rationale explaining why you chose this weakness. 2. Compose a S.M.A.R.T. goal and an objective to address the weakness. 3. Locate three research articles that suggest strategies to address the target weakness. At least one of the articles should address professional development ideas. An Internet search would also yield ideas and best practices. Refer to Helpful Websites. Target Area of Weakness and Rationale for Selection In a paragraph, state the area of weakness that you will target and your rationale for selecting it. Writing, especially amongst the African American subpopulation is an area of weakness for Jane Long Elementary. Overall, the 2009 passing rate dropped 7% to 88%. This year there is a 21% gap between where we are in the passing rate of African American students and where we would like to be (>90%, exemplary.) Hispanic and White subpopulations passed at a rate of over 90% which further exemplifies why writing is an area of concern.

Lamar University

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EDLD 5333 Leadership for Accountability

Holly Dornak

Part 2: S.M.A.R.T. Goal & Objective Compose a S.M.A.R.T. goal and an objective to address the weakness. S.M.A.R.T. Goal: Jane Long Elementary school will maintain its Exemplary rating during the 2009-2010 school year without the benefit of TPM.

Objective: 95% of fourth grade students in all subpopulations* at Jane Long Elementary will meet or surpass the state standard for TAKS Writing by the end of the current school year (20092010.) *W, H, AA, ED, Spec Ed, G/T, Title I, Male, Female, Migrant, LEP, Bilingual/ESL, At-Risk, etc.

Lamar University

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EDLD 5333 Leadership for Accountability

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Part 3: Research Articles Choose three strategies/activities, including one that addresses professional development. Article (Cite in APA Style)

Strategy/Activity Ideas

Geisler, J., Hessler, T., Gardner, R., & Lovelace, T. (2009). Differentiated Writing Interventions for High-Achieving Urban African American Elementary Students. Journal of Advanced Academics, 20(2), 214-247. Retrieved from ERIC database.

Over the course of an entire school year encourage and monitor the use of:

Kennedy, E., & Shiel, G. (2010). Raising Literacy Levels with Collaborative On-Site Professional Development in an Urban Disadvantaged School. Reading Teacher, 63(5), 372-383. Retrieved from ERIC database.

Student “self-monitoring” of word counts/word graphs for weekly timed writing sessions (1 minute of planning time, 3 minutes of writing-evaluated for word count-followed by 5 minutes of continued writing) in first through 5th grades. Special attention given to the number of different words each student uses

use of collaboratively created synonym lists

K-5 teacher familiarity and weekly use of district developed writing rubrics

Effective Professional Development is: 

On-Site

Sustained over long term (2 hours every 2 weeks, in this study)

Customized

Builds on earlier success

Honors teacher creativity and autonomy

Based on constructivist principles

Uses student data to track the effectiveness of pedagogical changes

Professional reading material challenges teacher assumptions and sparks debate, change, and self-evaluation Facilitators model new practices in the classroom (as teachers observe) as well as observe the teacher in action. In this way, the teacher and facilitator collaborate to evaluate effective classroom practices. Warren, S., Dondlinger, M., & Barab, S. (2008). A MUVE towards PBL Writing: Effects of a Digital Learning Environment Designed to

Lamar University

Increased writing practice is vital to improving literacy skills. Therefore motivating students to write, or indeed become self-motivated

5 of 6


EDLD 5333 Leadership for Accountability Improve Elementary Student Writing. Journal of Research on Technology in Education, 41(1), 113-140. Retrieved from ERIC database.

Holly Dornak

writers is critical to student success. Underutilized but effective and highly motivating instruments of writing instruction include: 1. Gaming 2. Problem Based Learning Student response to optional quest-based writing activities was overwhelming when compared to students not challenged with a “quest.� This resulted in increased writing practice and ultimately higher achievement. In any subject area, finding the key to student motivation is pivotal.

E-portfolio assignment: Continue to complete and post Campus-Supervised reflection logs in the e-portfolio. All course-embedded and Campus-Supervised logs must be completed by your 11th course in the program prior to the EDLD 5398 Internship course.

Lamar University

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EDLD 5333 Leadership for Accountability

Holly Dornak

Week 4: Action Planning and Personal Growth Overview So far in the Comprehensive Needs Assessment of your selected campus, you have evaluated the various Academic Excellence Indicator System (AEIS) reports and selected a target area of weakness. You have written a measurable goal and objective for the target area, and you have researched strategies and activities, including specific professional development, to address the target area and meet the goal and objective. This week, you will complete a campus action plan and an agenda for a one-day professional development that addresses the target weakness.

Lamar University

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EDLD 5333 Leadership for Accountability

Holly Dornak

Rubric Use the following rubric to guide your work.

Tasks

Accomplished

Proficient

Needs Improvement

Unacceptable

Week 4 Assignment: Action Planning and Professional Growth Part 1: Create a campus action plan

Completes action plan with all critical elements from the lecture and PowerPoint addressed. Includes a minimum of three strategies/activities to address the objective in the action plan. (10 points)

Part 2: Complete an agenda for one professional development day.

Develops a professional development agenda that connects directly to the goal and objective stated in the action plan and includes the topic, subtopic, and strategies/activities for the agenda’s delivery. Completes a detailed timeline and evaluation plan for follow-up professional development to ensure implementation.

Completes action plan with five to six critical elements from the lecture and PowerPoint addressed. Includes two strategies/ activities to address the objective in the action plan.

Completes action plan with one to four critical elements from the lecture and PowerPoint addressed. Includes one strategy/activity to address the objective in the action plan.

(8 points)

(7 points)

Develops a professional development agenda that addresses the goal/objective cited in the action plan but does not specify strategies/activities to deliver professional development. Creates a follow-up plan that lacks sufficient detail for timeline and/or evaluation plan.

Develops a professional development agenda that fails to address one of the following: the goal/objective cited in the action plan or a follow-up plan for professional development and implementation. (7 points)

Does not complete an action plan. (0 points)

Does not tie the professional development agenda to the goal/objective stated in the action plan or state strategies/activities for professional development delivery. Does not create a timeline or follow-up professional development. (0 points)

(8 points)

(10 points) Responses and Mechanics

Few errors in grammar, spelling or punctuation.

Multiple errors in grammar, spelling or punctuation.

(5 points)

Responses lack clarity and depth. (0 points)

Lamar University

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EDLD 5333 Leadership for Accountability

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Part 1: Campus Action Plan (ELCC 1.1 s-ii;1.2 s-i, 1.3 s-ii; 1.4 k-i, ii, iv; 2.1 k-i, s-i, ii, iii, iv; 2.2 k-i; 2.3 k-I, s-i, ii, iii; 2.4 k-i, ii, s-I, ii, iii; 2.5 k-i, s-I, ii, iii; 2.6 k-i, ii; 2.7 k-i, s-i; 2.8 k-i, s-i, ii; 2.9 k-i, s-i, ii, iii, iv) For a campus to make lasting change, school improvement must be an ongoing, continuous process. In Part 1, you will demonstrate your understanding of continuous improvement by creating an action plan for an area of weakness that you identified in an analysis of AEIS data. Your budget for the plan is $10,000. Directions:  In Resources, locate and view the PowerPoint, District and Campus Planning and Decision Making, from Education Service Center XV. This PowerPoint provides information that will help you successfully complete the action plan for your Application assignment.  Review the Friend ISD Action Plan, and use it as an example for creating the action plan for your selected campus.  Complete the action plan for your selected campus. Remember your budget is $10,000.  This sample plan is “very” minimal. Research scientifically based strategies and programs including technology strategies and programs and professional development. (See Resources: Helpful Websites-Weeks 3 & 4). Be creative in your action plan. Sample Action Plan Goal: Friend ISD will have an Exemplary rating by 2013. Objective: By May 2010, 86% of all students and student groups*, including special education students tested, will pass all portions of the state assessment, and the performance gap will be reduced by 10% between student groups. Activity Strategy

Person(s) Responsible

Provide after-school tutorials for students atrisk for failure.

Sonia Jones

Hire two additional math teachers to reduce the studentteacher ratio from

Edward Goodwin

Lamar University

Timeline

Resources/Estimated Cost

Oct. – Nov. 2010

SCE Funds

Jan. – April 2011

.4 FTEs: $11,480

Aug. 2010 – May 2011

Materials: $2038

SCE 1.4 FTE: $42,000 (140 students, 5 math teachers, 70% at-risk Need 2 additional teachers to reduce the ratio to 20:1

Formative Evaluation Students atrisk for failure will demonstrate improvement on six-week exams and benchmark tests, per disaggregated data reports. Improved sixweek grades for all students, especially those at-risk for failure in math.

Calculation: 2 teachers

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EDLD 5333 Leadership for Accountability

28:1 to 20:1 to meet the needs of students atrisk for failure in math.

Holly Dornak

hired at $30,000 each; 70% of $60,000 charged SCE)* *Not included in the plan

Campus Action Plan Goal: Jane Long Elementary school will maintain its Exemplary rating during the 2009-2010 school year without the benefit of TPM.

Objective: 95% of fourth grade students in all subpopulations* at Jane Long Elementary will meet or surpass the state standard for TAKS Writing by the end of the current school year. Target Group(s): *W, H, AA, ED, Spec Ed, G/T, Title I, Male, Female, Migrant, LEP, Bilingual/ESL, At-Risk, etc. Activity/ Strategy (Include 3)

Timeline Person(s) Responsible

Provide a focused writingtutorial Power Hour (8:00-9:00 am) for all students grades 2-5 once a week. Power Hour groups shall be dynamic in nature and are determined through formative assessment. All students struggling with writing shall work in small

2-5 grade teachers

Reading Facilitator (Kimberly Reyhons)

Lamar University

GT Facilitator (Elena Young)

September 2009 through May 2010

Resources /Estimated Cost

Materials: Teacher developed formative assessments and differentiated lesson plans 3 sets of Promethean ActivExpressions (96 text-capable student response devices) 3x$3000=$9000 Funding for experience based enrichment activities $400 ($100 per grade level)

Formative Evaluation

Monthly teacher created formative assessments administered using Promethean ActivExpressions for use in determining group make-up and identifying objectives students are struggling with. Improved scores on teacher administered writing assignments as graded by district approved

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groups on specific objectives with a teacher (no more than a 6:1 student to teacher ratio.) Students who excel in writing shall be challenged to write during Power Hour through experience based enrichment activities in a larger group setting (no more than a 22:1 student to teacher ratio.) Provide a week long writing camp for all fourth grade students to build vocabulary, writing stamina, motivation, and experiential based review of the writing process.

Lamar University

writing rubric. Improved sixweek grades for all students, especially those who are At-Risk, or who have failed during the past six-weeks. Improved scores on district administered writing proficiency for all students.

Fourth Grade Teachers “Mystery Guests” to provide visual aid during morning minilessons and assist in leading motivationa l camp songs: Fireman (parent volunteer,) Principal (Jill Nehls,) Fisherman (parent volunteer,) Police officer (parent volunteer,) and Briscoe Jr.

February 2010

Materials: “Camp Write-Along” teacher/student guide (developed by Holly Dornak) printing costs: $15 Activity based snacks $100

Improved sixweek grades for all fourth grade students, especially those who are At-Risk, or who have failed during the past six-weeks. Improved district administered writing proficiency scores for all fourth grade students. Improved scores on teacher administered writing assignments as graded by district

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EDLD 5333 Leadership for Accountability

Holly Dornak approved writing rubric.

High Varsity Cheerleade rs Teachers will train students in grades 1-5 to conduct “selfmonitoring” of word counts/word graphs for weekly timed writing sessions (1 minute of planning time, 3 minutes of writingevaluated for word countfollowed by 5 minutes of continued writing) in first through 5th grades. Special attention given to the number of

Reading Facilitator (Kimberly Reyhons) Grade 1-5 Teachers

September 2009 through May 2010

Materials: Teacher developed writing prompts Student progress notebooks Student access to: http://nces.ed.gov/nceskids/createAgraph/

Improved sixweek grades for all students, especially those who are At-Risk, or who have failed during the past six-weeks.

printer

different

words each student uses.

Summative Evaluation: Explain the summative evaluation process for the campus action plan. Progress amongst 4th grade students will be evaluated summatively by the state administered Writing TAKS assessment. Progress in grades 2, 3, and 5 will be summatively evaluated by the district administered Writing benchmark tests. Data will be disseminated to evaluate which objectives students consistently struggle with from year to year in order to inform (and influence) the following year’s staff development topics, PLC schedule, and campus improvement plan.

Lamar University

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EDLD 5333 Leadership for Accountability

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Part 2: Professional Development Agenda (ELCC 2.3 k-I, s-i, ii, iii; 2.4 k-i, ii, s-I, ii, iii; 2.6 k-i, ii, iii, s-i, ii, iii) Professional growth is an integral part of a Campus Improvement Plan. In professional learning communities, staff members understand that continuously honing one’s skills is necessary for ongoing school improvement. In Part 2 of this week’s Application, you will develop an agenda for a professional development day that addresses the targeted campus need and include a timeline for follow-up professional development. Directions: 

In Resources, locate and view the PowerPoint, Professional Development Planning: Matching Trainings to Teacher and Student Learning Needs, from the School Improvement Resources Center (SIRC) of Region XIII Educational Service Center. This PowerPoint provides information that will help you successfully complete the professional development portion of this assignment.

Develop a one-day professional development agenda that does the following: - Connects directly to the goal/objective cited in the action plan. - Includes the topic and subtopics for the professional development day. - Includes strategies/activities from Week 3 research that are directly related to the goal/objective stated in the action plan.

Develop a timeline and plan for follow-up professional development to ensure implementation. Follow-up can include coaching, classroom observations with feedback, staff meetings, lesson plan reviews, and other appropriate activities.

Professional Development Agenda Action Plan Goal: Jane Long Elementary school will maintain its Exemplary rating during the 2009-2010 school year without the benefit of TPM. Action Plan Objective: 95% of fourth grade students in all subpopulations* at Jane Long Elementary will meet or surpass the state standard for TAKS Writing by the end of the current school year. Topic: Empowering Writers Subtopics: Disseminating Data, Incorporating Interactive Technology in Writing Lessons, Creating Effective Formative Assessment Grade Level:

Facilitator:

Location:

Start Time:

End-Time:

Kindergarten through Fifth Grade

Kimberly Reyhons (Reading Facilitator)

PLC Room A1

8:00 am

4:00 pm

Martha Reines (Empowering Writers Trainer) Holly Dornak (Campus Instructional Technology Specialist)

Lamar University

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EDLD 5333 Leadership for Accountability

Strategy/ Activity

Purpose

Holly Dornak

Description

Steps

Estimated Time

Ice Breaker

Build trust and credibility between teachers and facilitator

Introductions

Teachers and Facilitator introduce themselves and describe their past teaching history.

15 minutes

Pre-assessment of writing “best practices” using Promethean ActivExpressions

Determine a baseline of teacher knowledge and use of writing instruction best practices and provide blended technology training.

Teachers will use ActivExpressions to text in answers to questions regarding how teachers prepare and implement writing lessons, and use formative assessment in their classroom. Facilitator will provide “play by play” narrative while using ActivExpressions in order to provide blended technology training.

1.

Facilitator leads registration and teacher naming of ActivExpress ions using ActivInspire software.

45 minutes

2.

Facilitator models use of ActivExpress ions.

3.

Teachers use ActivExpress ions to text in answers to a set of selfpaced questions.

4.

Teachers work collaborativel y to discuss their current use of formative assessment and best practice for writing instruction.

1.

Teachers use highlighters to examine test results and find any questions where 70% or less students answered correctly.

Summative Data Dissemination

Lamar University

Identify objectives students are struggling with in specific classrooms

Teachers work collaboratively to identify areas of weakness by examining last year’s Writing benchmark and Writing TAKS results.

45 minutes

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EDLD 5333 Leadership for Accountability

Holly Dornak 2.

Break – Optional “ActivExpression Play-Time”

Teacher break time, and time for teachers to play with ActivBoard/ActivExpressions

Seeing is Believing: Viewing Best Practice in Action

Teachers view examples of teacher/student classroom interaction using Empowering Writer’s Instructional Material

Teacher break time, and time for teachers to play with ActivBoard/ActivExpressions

Teachers then create a list of objectives (based on questions answered incorrectly) upon which to focus improving writing instruction.

Excuse teachers for a short break.

15 minutes

1.

View DVD

30 minutes

2.

Discuss observations of strengths seen

3.

Applications: Teachers use ActivExpress ions to text a description of one new instructional practice they would like to try

New Learning

Familiarize teachers with Empowering Writers writing strategies

Martha will present an overview of 10 Empowering Writer’s writing strategies.

Martha presents an overview and student writing samples of 10 Empowering Writers strategies

45 minutes

Create a Lesson

Create teacher ownership of new learning

Teachers will collaborate in small groups to create and present an interactive lesson using one of the 10 Empowering Writers strategies Martha presented.

1.Teachers form groups of 3

45 minutes

2. Each group will choose one objective that their students have struggled with in the past. 3. Each group chooses one of the instructional strategies Martha presented. 3. Each group chooses a form of technology they would like to

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EDLD 5333 Leadership for Accountability

Holly Dornak incorporate into their lesson. 4. Each group will write a lesson that utilizes both an instructional strategy and an interactive form of technology (ie. iPods, TuneTalks, laptops, FLIP cameras, ActivExpressions, or ActivBoards.) 5. Martha, Kim, and Holly circulate amongst groups to scaffold learning and provide support.

Lunch Break 1 hour Complete “Create a Lesson” Activity

Create teacher ownership of new learning

Teachers will collaborate in small groups to create and present an interactive lesson using one of the 10 Empowering Writers strategies Martha presented.

4. Each group will write a lesson (around an objective their students have struggled with) that utilizes both an instructional strategy and a form of technology.

45 minutes

5. Martha, Kim, and Holly circulate amongst groups to scaffold learning and provide support. Present “Create a Lesson”

Lamar University

Create teacher ownership of new learning and encourage collaboration, feedback, and self-evaluation

Teachers role play and present the lesson that they created to the other teachers.

1.

Teachers will present their lessons to the entire group.

2.

Each lesson will utilize one or more of the Empowering Writers strategies as well as some form of interactive technology.

3.

After each group

1 hour 30 minutes +15 minute break around 2:30 p.m.

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EDLD 5333 Leadership for Accountability

Holly Dornak presents, teachers will collaborate as a whole group and use ActivExpress ions to post constructive feedback for each group.

Action Plan

Incite instructional change.

Teachers write a personal plan of action which identifies 1-3 instructional changes each teacher pledges to make during the upcoming 6 weeks.

Teachers write action plan and discuss what they have learned.

30 minutes

Professional Development Follow-up Explain in a paragraph how you would follow up your professional development agenda. Include the strategy/activity and a timeline. Teachers who have participated in the above professional development session will be asked to schedule an observation and feedback session with one (or more) of the facilitators during the subsequent six weeks. Additionally, they are to observe (complete and submit observation form to administrator) and give feedback on one or more lessons presented by other teachers who took part in the session. (Substitutes will be provided.) Further training, collaboration, and examination of teacher administered formative assessment will occur during next month’s PLC meeting.

E-portfolio assignment: Complete II-007 “Decision Making and Problem Solving” CourseEmbedded Internship Log 2. E-portfolio assignment: Complete “III-008 Budgeting, Resources Allocation, and Financial Management” Course-Embedded Internship Log 2. Continue to complete and post Campus-Supervised internship reflection logs in the e-portfolio. All Course-Embedded and Campus-Supervised logs must be completed by your 11th course in the program prior to the EDLD 5398 Internship course.

Lamar University

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EDLD 5333 Leadership for Accountability

Holly Dornak

Week 5: Reflection (ELCC 1.1 k-i, ii; 1.3 k-i, ii, iii; 1.4 k-Ii, ii, iii, iv; 2.1 k-i, s-i, ii, iii, iv; 3.4 k-i) Part 1: Site-Based Decision-Making At the campus level, site-based decision making (SBDM) is a collaborative effort among professional staff, parents, and community members to improve student achievement by addressing the outcomes of all students and determining goals and strategies to ensure improvement. Under state law, the Site-Based Decision-Making Committee establishes and reviews campus educational plans, goals, performance objectives, and major classroom instructional programs. Prior to completing this assignment, you will conduct two interviews—one with a member of the Site-Based Decision-Making Committee at your selected campus and the other with the campus principal. Your interview questions should address: 

The committee’s makeup

The use of formal agendas

Topics typically discussed

Level of perceived teamwork (group dynamics)

Specific decision-making strategies

Conflict-resolution techniques

Part 2: Next Steps As we stressed in this course, campus improvement is an ongoing, continuous process. When a campus receives its summative data reports, then the improvement cycle should begin again immediately. In your second reflection, you will reflect on the action plan you developed earlier. Use the following scenario to think about your action plan and how you can move that plan to another level. “Move forward in time to the end of the school year. Imagine that you and your staff implemented the action plan, which resulted in increased student performance on the latest Academic Excellence Indicator System (AEIS) reports. Your campus has moved a step closer to becoming Exemplary, and you want to maintain the momentum. What will you do now?” Directions 1. Record your reflection in the form of two 150-word essays. 2. Use the guiding questions in each section to stimulate your thinking and guide your writing. 3. Write reflectively instead of in a question-and-answer style, and follow the guidelines for writing listed in each section. Lamar University

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EDLD 5333 Leadership for Accountability

Holly Dornak

Rubric Use this rubric to guide your work. (ELCC 1.1 k-i, ii; 1.3 k-i, ii, iii; 1.4 k-Ii, ii, iii, iv; 2.1 k-i, s-i, ii, iii, iv; 3.4 k-i)

Tasks

Reflection

Responses and Mechanics

Accomplished

Proficient

Needs Improvement

Completes both reflections assignment using a minimum of 150 words in each reflection.

Completes both reflections assignment using fewer than 150 words in each reflection

Completes one reflections assignment using a minimum of 150 words.

(10 points)

(8 points)

Unacceptable

Did not submit reflection assignment. (0 points)

(7 points)

Few errors in grammar, spelling or punctuation.

Multiple errors in grammar, spelling or punctuation.

(5 points)

Responses lack clarity and depth. (0 points)

Lamar University

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EDLD 5333 Leadership for Accountability

Holly Dornak

Reflection One: Site-Based Decision-Making Remember, this is a journal entry. However, as with any scholarly writing, you should use: 

citations from the research when applicable.

professional writing protocols.

professional language.

What important information did you obtain about site-based decision making from your interviews with the SBDM member? The campus principal?

What information from the interviews aligned with your understandings of sitebased decision making?

What surprised you about the information that was shared?

Type your response in the space below. During the course of this week, I was able to interview four members of our Site Based Decision Making Committee as well as our principal. All evidence from these interviews indicates that we have a very healthy and active SBDM committee at Jane Long Elementary. On average, committee members rated their ability to work as team as “4” on a scale of 1-5 (1 being “Not Very Well” and 5 being “Very Well”.) This indicates that the perceived level of teamwork on the committee, while not perfect in all instances, is overall very positive. Since achieving consensus can be a difficult task, I was a little surprised to hear from all 4 committee members that overall that did not seem to be something with which the committee regularly struggled. One committee member noted, “Each member is allowed to give their opinion. Their views are discussed and their opinions are respected no matter how others feel about it.” I really feel that this is a strength that exists only in the healthiest of SBDM committees. Although the agenda is established by the principal, all committee members that were interviewed indicated that they felt comfortable bringing important decisions to the principal so that she could be sure to include them on the SBDM committee agenda. She is a new principal and through the course of this class I have gained a much greater appreciation for her concentrated effort to establish a shared vision at our campus.

Lamar University

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EDLD 5333 Leadership for Accountability

Holly Dornak

Reflection Two: Next Steps Remember, this is a journal entry. However, as with any scholarly writing, you should use: 

citations from the research when applicable.

professional writing protocols.

professional language.

Think about your action plan from the Application assignment. What have you learned in this course about the continuous campus improvement cycle that will dictate your next steps?

What will be your next steps in the continuous improvement process? How will you carry the action plan forward and maintain momentum? Outline and reflect on your next steps in this process.

Type your response in the space below.

The next step in the action plan is to desegregate and analyze the summative data provided by our TAKS scores in order to carefully evaluate which parts of the action plan had a positive impact on student performance.

Actions that resulted in

positive outcomes will be continued and even expanded, if possible. For example, one of the strategies in the action plan was to implement a weekly Writing Power Hour (inschool small group tutorial) for students in grades 2-5. Perhaps some of the methodology implemented in the Writing Power Hour could be expanded into other subject areas or grade levels, if warranted by the data. Looking at the data will allow us to identify and prioritize subject, demographic, and grade levels where our campus has room for improvement. Once the areas of improvement have been identified and prioritized it is important to communicate the summative data to all stakeholders and receive input from various perspectives regarding how best to improve student outcomes. Our campus improvement plan will be revised and the needs assessment cycle will continue. E-portfolio assignments: At the end of this course, you should have completed the following CourseEmbedded Internship Logs: 

I-001 Vision and Campus Culture” Course-Embedded Internship Log 2

II-004 Curriculum, Measurement, and Alignment of Resources” Course-Embedded Internship Log 1

II-007 Decision Making and Problem Solving” Course-Embedded Internship Log 2

Lamar University

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EDLD 5333 Leadership for Accountability

Holly Dornak

III-008 Budgeting, Resources Allocation, and Financial Management” Course-Embedded Internship Log 2

I-003 Integrity and Ethics“ Course-Embedded Internship Log 1

Continue to complete and post Campus-supervised internship reflection logs in the e-portfolio. All course-embedded and campus-supervised logs must be completed by your 11th course in the program prior to the EDLD 5398 Internship course.

Lamar University

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EDLD 5333 Leadership for Accountability

Prior to beginning work on this course, you completed a Pre-Course Self-Evaluation to measure your knowledge of the concepts and ideas discussed. Rate yourself again to measure how well you now understand these concepts and ideas. Rating Choices: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

My Rating

This is completely new to me. I’ve heard of this but don’t fully understand it. I understand these concepts. I use these concepts in my work. I can teach others how to do this.

1. Major legislative milestones mark the national standards and accountability movement leading to No Child Left Behind (NCLB) legislation. 2. Key components of No Child Left Behind (NCLB) legislation are Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP), School Report Cards, and ratings criteria. 3. The Academic Excellence Indicator System (AEIS) generates a variety of reports that schools should use to make data-driven instructional/ programmatic decisions. 4. Site-based Decision-Making (SBDM) Committees have specified roles and responsibilities that are legislated in Texas. 5. A principal must possess the knowledge and skills to lead others in campus planning, problem solving, and the change process. 6. A data-driven comprehensive needs assessment process should be implemented in a series of prescribed steps. 7. A Campus Improvement Plan must contain required Title I components. 8. Long-range goals and short-range measurable objectives for the purpose of campus planning are defined by critical attributes. 9. There are problem-solving strategies that are appropriate for Site-Based Decision-Making (SBDM) Committee work. 10. The application of scientifically based research is a critical factor in the review of programs and materials. TOTAL RATING SCORE


EDLD 5333 Leadership for Accountability