Hofstra University Museum of Art: New Perspectives: The Museum of Art at 60

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New Perspectives: The Museum of Art at60

HOFSTRA UNIVERSITY MUSEUM OF ART

Cover images (clockwise, from top left):

African, Cameroon, Dowayo peoples, Namji Fertility Doll, early 20th century, wood with patina, beads, leather, and metal, 11.5 x 4.25 x 2 in., Hofstra University Museum of Art, gift of Dr. and Mrs. Pascal James Imperato, HU2021.5

Conrad Felixmüller (German, 1897-1977), The Happy Marriage/The Married Couple in Winter (Gluchkliche Ehe Iv/Ehepaar Im Winter), 1919, oil on canvas, 26 x 22.25 in., Hofstra University Museum of Art, gift of Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Rittmaster, HU78.28

Gordon Parks (American, 1912-2006), Labyrinth, 1981, dye transfer print, 20 x 29.5 in., Hofstra University Museum of Art, gift of Carole and Alex Rosenberg, HU88.84

HOFSTR A UNIVERSIT Y MUSEUM OF ART

New Perspectives: The Museum of Art at60

September 5-December 15, 2023

Emily Lowe Gallery

The Hofstra University Museum of Art’s programs are made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of the Office of the Governor and the New York State Legislature.
© 2023 Hofstra University Museum of Art All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without prior permission of the Hofstra University Museum of Art.

Director’s Perspective: The Museum of Art at 60

The Hofstra University Museum of Art (HUMA) proudly celebrates 60 years of growth and service to the Hofstra University community and the residents of the New York metropolitan region. The past 60 years have seen the transformation of HUMA from a single gallery space constructed in 1963 to an American Alliance of Museums-accredited university fine art museum, serving audiences with high-caliber original exhibitions and educational programming throughout each year. HUMA has been recognized for its efforts by the National Endowment for the Arts and New York State Council on the Arts, as well as by other organizations. University students and faculty utilize the changing exhibitions and extensive permanent collection as catalysts for discussion and as integral components of their pedagogy and educational experiences. Public school children in prekindergarten through 12th grade have meaningful introductions and extended learning experiences with works of art in the HUMA galleries. These experiences connect directly to their classroom curricula and enhance skills that are so vital in our changing and complex world.

This exhibition celebrates the great range and quality of works in the permanent collection of more than 5,200 works of art, dating from 1500 B.C.E. to the 21st century, and demonstrates the Museum’s continued commitment to excellence. The collection includes paintings, prints, drawings, photographs, and sculpture with an emphasis on American and European art. Additional components of the collection include African, Asian, Melanesian, and Central and South American artifacts. We thank those individuals who over the past decades have gifted works of art to the Museum. Their philanthropy and generosity will enhance the cultural and educational life of Hofstra University and the Long Island region for generations to come.

For this exhibition, New Perspectives: The Museum of Art at 60, the Museum asked 10 individuals, from the University and local communities, to curate “mini” exhibitions. The guest curators reviewed the collection database, examined works in collection storage, and created their selections. Their entries express their individual points of view and perspectives. They vary in style and content, depending upon their interests and focus.

While this exhibition features only a small portion of the resources represented in the expansive collection, the depth and breadth of the collection is exemplified by the works that have been selected. We hope the works of art highlighted here will convey a sense of the collection’s importance, particularly for object-based learning with students, faculty, and the public.

As we look to the future, the Museum will continue to initiate and facilitate rich and varied cultural and artistic explorations in an atmosphere that promotes an open exchange of ideas. To help achieve our mission and vision, we are most fortunate to have the support of administrators, alumni, artists, educators, faculty, friends, staff, and students, along with the broader community. We owe our growth and success to their support and numerous contributions

A big thank-you to the guest curators for their creativity and insight:

Hon. Taylor Darling

New York State Assemblywoman, District #18, Nassau County, NY

E. Christa Farmer, PhD

Professor, Department of Geology, Environment, and Sustainability, Hofstra University

Martha Hollander, PhD

Professor, Department of Fine Arts, Design, Art History, Hofstra University

Jonathan Lightfoot, PhD

Director, Center for “Race,” Culture and Social Justice

Professor, Department of Teaching, Learning and Technology, Hofstra University

Veronica A. Lippencott, PhD

Director, Africana Studies Program

Associate Director, Center for “Race,” Culture and Social Justice

Adjunct Associate Professor, Department of Global Studies and Geography, Hofstra University

Margarita Lopez

MA in Creative Arts Therapy Counseling, Hofstra University, Class of 2023

Charles G. Riordan, PhD

Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs, Hofstra University

Michael Runkel

Director of Grounds and Landscape, Physical Plant Department, Hofstra University

Edward M. Segal, PhD, P.E.

Associate Professor, Department of Engineering, Hofstra University

Erik Jamal Sumner

Art Teacher, Northern Parkway Elementary School, Uniondale, NY

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Hofstra University’s 60th Museum Anniversary

I chose the following pieces of art for Hofstra University’s 60th Museum Anniversary due to their bold feminine qualities and their ability to captivate and engage the onlooker for further examination. These artworks, each in their unique way, possess a powerful feminine energy that resonates with the theme of the anniversary celebration and contributes to a diverse and thought-provoking exhibition.

The Dowayo peoples’ Namji Fertility Doll is a fascinating representation of feminine power and fertility. Its intricate craftsmanship and vibrant adornments draw the viewer’s attention and invite them to explore the cultural significance of the doll within the Dowayo community. By including this piece, I aimed to showcase the rich heritage and the strong connection to femininity and fertility that the doll embodies.

George Gach’s Maternity, created in 1963, presents a profound portrayal of the bond between a mother and child. The sculpture’s tender and emotional depiction of motherhood resonates with viewers on a deeply personal level. Its bold use of expressive carving captivates the onlooker, evoking a sense of empathy and appreciation for the inherent strength and nurturing qualities associated with motherhood.

Dong Kingman’s Harlem Girl captures the spirit and resilience of an African-American woman in an urban environment. The artwork’s vibrant colors and dynamic composition immediately draw the viewer in, encouraging them to contemplate the experiences, challenges, and triumphs of women within the African-American community. By showcasing this piece, I aimed to celebrate the boldness and vitality of the feminine presence in diverse cultural contexts.

Anton Mauve’s Untitled ceramic tile brings a touch of elegance and refinement to the exhibition. Its delicate craftsmanship and subtle beauty create an atmosphere of contemplation and intrigue. By including this ceramic tile, I sought to highlight the artistic versatility and creativity of women, showcasing the ability to transform functional objects into works of art.

Howardena Pindell’s Untitled #9B (Genesis II) challenges traditional artistic conventions and invites viewers to delve deeper into its intricate layers of mixed media. The artwork’s bold and experimental qualities provoke curiosity and encourage the audience to question and explore the complex intersections of identity and personal narrative. By featuring this piece, I intended to emphasize the importance of diverse perspectives and the power of women artists to push artistic boundaries.

Overall, the chosen pieces for Hofstra University’s 60th Museum Anniversary represent the bold and captivating feminine qualities that engage viewers and invite them to delve further into the multifaceted aspects of femininity, cultural heritage, and personal narratives. These artworks contribute to a diverse and compelling exhibition that celebrates the artistic achievements and the significant role of women in shaping our understanding of the world through art.

All My Best, Member of Assembly District 18

George Gach

(American, born Hungary, 1909-1996) Maternity, 1963 Wood

51.875 x 25.25 x 9 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art, gift of Dr. and Mrs. Daniel Mason HU86.80

6 7 ALBANY OFFICE: Room 323, Legislative Office Building, Albany, New York 12248 518-455-5861, FAX: 518-455-4329 DISTRICT OFFICE: 33 Front Street, Suite 303 Hempstead, New York 11550 | 516-489-6610, FAX: 516-538-3155 EMAIL: darlingt@nyassembly.gov
COMMITTEES Children and Families Economic Development, Job Creation, Commerce and Industry Local Governments Small Business Transportation
THE ASSEMBLY STATE OF NEW YORK ALBANY

Dong Kingman (American, 1911-2000)

Harlem Girl, undated Oil and collage on Masonite

31.25 x 24 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art, gift of Dr. Alfred Brotman HU74.09

Howardena Pindell (American, born 1943)

Untitled #9B (Genesis II), 2007

Watercolor, acrylic, thread, ink, oil stick, color pencil, and museum board

13 x 10.75 x 3 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art, gift of the artist HU2012.51

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Our Planet, Ourselves

I had so much fun looking through the Hofstra University Museum of Art collection to select these works of art for this exhibition commemorating 60 years of the Museum. I love photography, and I teach earth science, so I was drawn to several beautiful images of our planet. The grand sweep of Kazhitna Glacier, Denali, Alaska, 1990 by Marilyn Bridges symbolizes for me not only the majesty of the Earth’s climate system, but also its power to raise sea levels and affect us – even here on Long Island, so far away from the glaciers. And of course, I had to choose another Bridges’ image, Crater, Andagua, Peru, for its contrasting landforms of the sinuous eroded hills behind the nearly conical volcanic crater.

In the very small scale, the regular polygons of Brett Weston’s Mud Cracks intrigue me, as I teach sedimentation. Another image of Weston’s, Lava and Plant, Hawaii, represents to me the tight symbiotic relationship between the Earth and the living organisms that can be found everywhere we have looked.

A pair of lithographs by Louis Lozowick, Into the Canyon and Open Mine (Crushed Rock), tell me many stories of the Earth and our relationship to it. What do they say to you?

I chose the last two photographs because of their localities near Hofstra. Tom Baril’s lovely image of Taughannock Falls #2 reminds me of several places I have been in New York state on field trips with students and other professors in the Geology, Environment, and Sustainability Department, particularly Kaaterskill Falls in the Catskills and Awosting Falls in the Shawangunks. Finally, I love the dynamic sky in Barbara Roux’s Storm Approaching From the Sound and its lovely portrayal of Long Island’s important marshes.

Happy Birthday, HUMA! Here’s to many more.

and Sustainability, Hofstra University

Marilyn Bridges (American, born 1948)

Kazhitna Glacier, Denali, Alaska, 1990, from the portfolio Heightened Perspectives, 1990 Gelatin silver print

14.75 x 18.75 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art, gift of Susan and Steven Ball HU95.14.9

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Barbara Roux (American, born 1945)

Storm Approaching From the Sound, 2010

Digital print

12 x 18 in.

Brett Weston (American, 1911-1993)

Mud Cracks, 1977

Gelatin silver print

10.5625 x 13.6875 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art, gift of the artist HU2012.3
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Hofstra University Museum of Art, gift of the Christian Keesee Collection HU2021.24

The Museum and its Atmosphere: Art 1960-65

What was happening in the world of early 1960s art when the Hofstra University Museum of Art was founded? What were visual artists exploring? What were their priorities? How did they respond to the world around them? How did this sensibility shape Hofstra’s collectors?

By 1960, following a seismic cultural shift, the capital of contemporary Western art was no longer Paris, but New York. The diversity of the art world was stunning. (In fact, the term “artworld” was introduced in 1964 by critic Arthur Danto.) Some artists pursued already established modern ideas like abstraction and cubism; others explored new styles, subjects, and materials. Abstract expressionism, America’s first internationally recognized art movement, was barely 15 years old. Photography was being driven beyond documentation into aesthetic and conceptual realms. New forms of printmaking were evolving. Other artists reinvigorated conventional media and styles with new subjects.

Ironically, despite this exciting creative innovation, a great many artistic institutions (art schools, museums, and galleries) still functioned as gatekeepers of tradition, often unconsciously discriminating against women and people of color. It was only later in the decade, continuing into the 1970s and beyond, that these norms began to be substantially challenged.

My micro-exhibit brings together eight works, each by a different artist, created between 1960 and 1965. They represent a wide range of styles, subjects, media, and approaches. We find examples of traditional media, like oil painting, charcoal drawing, and bronze sculpture; more modern techniques, like photography and lithography; and the newly used screenprinting technique. We find representation of human and animal life, pure abstraction, and work that negotiates between them. The eight artists represented here experienced various levels of professional training, success, and renown.

As a group, these works reveal the artistic plurality of the early ’60s. At the same time, they invite us to see their underlying connections, often in conversation with one another. How do these different artists approach the same materials? Beyond common media and techniques, how do they approach similar subjects and forms? How do they use color, or its absence? How do they evoke intense feeling, or moments of everyday life?

Joan Mitchell (American, 1925-1992)

Metro, c. 1965

Oil on canvas

20 x 17 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art, gift of Dr. and Mrs. Milton Gardner HU80.15

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Danny

Cal, Springfield, Illinois, 1965

Gelatin silver print

13.25 x 9 in.

Stunt Man #1, 1962

Lithograph

17 x 13 in.

Lyon (American, born 1942) Hofstra University Museum of Art, gift of George Stephanopoulos HU2009.7.19 Robert Rauschenberg (American, 1925-2008)
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Hofstra University Museum of Art, gift of Dr. Milton M. Gardner HU70.101

Reflections on African Ar t

There are growing debates about the restitution and repatriation of sub-Saharan African art and cultural heritage in museums and private collections around the world. More than 90% of all cultural artifacts known to originate in Africa are displayed in Europe. This startling fact is part of the long, brutal legacy of European colonialism.

Nigeria has spent years trying to recover its Benin Bronzes, a collection of several thousand sculptures that were stolen by the British in the late 19th century. There have been waves of returns, prompted by social movements such as Black Lives Matter and Rhodes Must Fall. However, repatriation is far from complete, as institutions like the British Museum have remained silent despite housing the largest permanent collection of African arts and culture in the world.

In striking contrast, Hofstra University Museum of Art has a wonderful collection of African art, which does not share the brutal history of conquest and theft. The Museum collection contains 300 works of traditional African art representing 80 different cultures, mainly from west and central Africa. African artifacts have been donated since the 1960s and most were created in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. These works are integral to education programs across campus and the wider community.

From a geographic perspective, Hofstra’s collection of African artifacts offers opportunities to discover the rich historical, cultural, and environmental diversity of sub-Saharan Africa. The collection even includes a fake Benin bronze (HU66.3) that was added to the collection in 1966. The intricate bronze art of Benin illustrates the vitality of these precolonial Africana metalworking industries.

The African collection also includes female face masks of the Dan peoples of Côte d’Ivoire, which express feminine beauty (HU85.58, HU2016.1). These masks were used in masquerade performances and are made of wood with pigment and patina. What is noteworthy about these masks is that one is bare and void of its original attachments, usually done to attract Western consumers. The other mask is in its original form, which includes the adornments of metal, hair, animal teeth, and yarn.

Much of the African art in the collection is utilitarian, reflecting the skills and resources of communities that are specific in time and place. The art of the Dogon people of present-day Mali and Burkina Faso includes masks, jewelry, and other objects (HU2005.3.16, HU2005.3.2, HU2005.3.42). The Dogon are an agrarian society who cultivate crops such as sorghum, millet, and rice. These crops were first domesticated in sub-Saharan Africa. They harvested the grain and stored them in granaries with wooden doors and locks that are intricately carved with images (HU2005.3.30).

The Dogon region of Mali has a thriving tourism industry. Utilitarian objects and ceremonies take center stage as visitors come from around the world. Western consumption of African art and customs dates back well over a century. As we appreciate these African works of art, please be mindful of their important significance to African peoples, their artistic traditions, and rich cultures, all of which deserve our respect and dignity.

African, Côte d’Ivoire, Dan peoples Female Face Mask (Deangle or Tankagle), 19th-mid 20th century Wood with pigment and patina

9.5 x 6 x 4 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art, gift of Josephine and Sol Levitt HU85.58

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African, Côte d’Ivoire, Dan peoples Mask with Full Coiffure and Brass Bells, late 19th-early 20th century Wood with cloth, raffia, reeds, brass, iron, and patina

26.5 x 12.5 x 13 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art, gift of Dr. and Mrs. Pascal James and Eleanor Imperato HU2016.1

African, Mali, Dogon peoples Monkey Mask, early-mid 20th century Wood with pigment and patina

11.5 x 5.75 x 4.5 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art, gift of Roda Graham HU2005.3.16

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Embracing Collage

In art therapy, collage acts as a nonthreatening material for those who may be weary of the artmaking process. It invites creative expression and communication through the exploration of nontraditional media and techniques. What I enjoy most about collage-making is the freedom that comes with how one defines a “collage”; there are no rules. The lack of pressure allows you to be present and enjoy the physicality of the media, such as ripping paper or layering different textures. It becomes a full body experience. Collage encourages free association and individuality by taking materials and challenging their traditional meaning and purpose. The Museum works chosen display the versatility, engagement, and playful style that collage can offer its viewers and partakers

Benny Andrews (American, 1930-2006)

Chasty, 1961

Mixed media, oil and collage on canvas

18.25 x 24 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art, gift of Dr. and Mrs. Joseph Tucker HU85.2

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Margarita Lopez MA in Creative Arts Therapy Counseling, Hofstra University, Class of 2023

Lee Krasner (American, 1908-1984)

Free Space (Yellow), 1975

Screenprint and collage on Arches paper, deluxe edition

19.5 x 26 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art, gift of Carole and Alex Rosenberg HU88.13

Max Papart (French, 1911-1994)

Untitled, 1975

Etching and collage

6.5 x 7 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art, gift of Carole and Alex Rosenberg HU86.198

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Provost’s Selection

Charles G. Riordan, Hofstra’s provost and senior vice president for academic affairs, selected four diverse works of art of different media from the collection: two paintings, a photograph, and a screenprint. Conrad Felixmüller’s The Happy Marriage/The Married Couple in Winter (Gluchkliche Ehe Iv/Ehepaar Im Winter), with its distorted angles and fragmented images, is an excellent example of the German expressionist style. In contrast, American impressionist Jane Peterson’s The Lagoon, Venice captures the light reflecting off the water using broad brush strokes and vibrant colors. Photographer Berenice Abbott created images depicting principles of physical science, as shown in Falling Balls of Unequal Mass. To achieve her desired results, she developed new techniques and holds a number of patents for equipment she created. Ben Shahn, whose work often addresses social or political causes, illustrates Scientist with a combination of abstract and realistic elements.

Berenice Abbott (American, 1898-1991)

Falling Balls of Unequal Mass, 1958, from the portfolio Retrospective, 1982

Gelatin silver print

23 x 9 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art, gift of Lazarus Weiner HU83.28

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Jane Peterson

(American, 1876-1965)

The Lagoon, Venice, 1920

Oil on canvas 32 x 32 in.

Ben Shahn

(American, born Lithuania, 1898-1969)

Scientist, 1957

Screenprint with hand-coloring 12 x 10 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art, gift of Martin Horwitz HU72.1
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Hofstra University Museum of Art, gift of Ralph Barrocas HU2009.2.3

Nature: Beauty, Power, and Appreciation

We live in the age of technology and we often take for granted all that nature offers. When you look collectively at all five works, there is a story told about the beauty of nature, the power of nature, our deviation from nature, and how we must foster an appreciation of nature. Atchafalya and Tanah Lot, both by Sally Gall, illustrate the beauty of our natural landscapes in the form of a bald cypress grove and a breaking ocean wave. The latter demonstrates how powerful nature can be. The movement and abrasion of the ocean can lead even the mightiest of trees to be left as driftwood, like the sculpted tree pictured in Brett Weston’s Driftwood.

To New York (Approaching New York) by Victoria Hutson Huntley depicts our deviation from nature, as the lithograph shows New York City surrounded by grassy plains. We know all too well that development and urbanization have altered this pastoral landscape, leaving only remnants of the plains of Long Island. As a result, we must cultivate a new appreciation for nature and all it offers – an appreciation that is personified by J. Seward Johnson Jr.’s Creating. The bronze sculpture depicts a man sitting at the base of tree, enjoying the landscape around him and documenting the experience by sketching the tree before him.

Sally Gall (American, born 1955)

Tanah Lot, from the portfolio Selected Landscapes, 1992 Gelatin silver print

15 x 15.125 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art, gift of Susan and Steven Ball HU99.14.8

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Victoria Hutson Huntley (American, 1900-1971)

To New York (Approaching New York), 1933

Lithograph

7.875 x 12.375 in.

Brett Weston (American, 1911-1993)

Driftwood, 1958

Gelatin silver print

7.75 x 9.6875 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art, gift of Daniel Mason HU77.98
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Hofstra University Museum of Art, gift of the Christian Keesee Collection HU2021.9

Wood as Subject, Tool, and Medium

As a structural engineer who teaches students and designs new structures, I am well acquainted with wood as a building material. While designers frequently use wood in construction, wood has recently been used for new applications, as it is often regarded as a sustainable alternative to other major construction materials like concrete and steel. Perhaps more than any other material, wood links the natural environment to the built environment. On a daily basis, we interact with wood in nature and in our buildings (both the buildings themselves and the objects in the buildings). It is no surprise then that wood is also a material that artists both feature in and use to create their works. This “mini” exhibition focuses on the versatility of wood by showing it as the subject in photographs, the tool used to create prints, and the medium of artifacts and sculptures.

Lucien Clergue’s Sicilian Botanic Garden I and Brett Weston’s Wood photographs both treat wood as the subject. Sicilian Botanic Garden I shows the lower few feet of a series of tree trunks while Wood is a close-up of wood panels. The former is of wood in its natural state, while the latter shows wood after processing. Both images are immediately recognizable as wood, but the juxtaposition reminds us of the transformation that wood often undergoes on its way from the natural to the built environment.

Louis Schanker’s Polo and Katsuhika Hokusai’s Mishima Pass in Kai Province were both created through relief printing using wood as a tool. Polo is a woodcut print of a black and white abstract image of a figure and a horse. In contrast, Mishima Pass in Kai Province is a woodblock print of a color landscape with fine features. With this work, there is no trace that wood was the tool used to generate the print. Wood can be just an anonymous tool.

The ceremonial War Club created by Massim peoples and Standing Male Figure, a work by Dogon peoples, are two sculptures each constructed from a single piece of wood. The War Club is straight, smooth, and covered in precise carvings. The Standing Male Figure is rougher than the War Club, but its most prominent feature is the figure’s bent posture, which was realized by carving a curved piece of wood. The form is matched to the available material, or perhaps a material was finally found to create the desired form.

The six works on display show how these artists have focused on and/or used wood in a range of ways. Once outside the exhibition, it won’t take you long to encounter wood again. A reminder that this humble material that occasionally transcends usefulness – and becomes a piece of art – is ever-present as we pass back and forth between the natural and built environments.

Katsushika Hokusai (Japanese, 1760-1849)

Mishima Pass in Kai Province (Koshu mishima-goe), from the series Thirty-Six Views of Mt. Fuji, 1830-1831 Color woodblock print, ink and color on paper 10 x 14.875 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art, gift of Helen Goldberg HU2003.8.3

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Melanesia, Kiriwina Islands, Papua New Guinea, Massim peoples War Club, early-mid 20th century

Wood with pigment

34.25 x 5.25 x 0.75 in.

HU73.92

Brett Weston (American, 1911-1993) Wood, 1975

Gelatin silver print

10.6875 x 13.625 in.

HU2021.30

Hofstra University Museum of Art, gift of Cedric H. Marks
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Hofstra University Museum of Art, gift of the Christian Keesee Collection

Gordon Parks’ Instinctive Travels and His Paths of Rhythm: The Lost Mixtape

Yo, yo, yo! I go by the name of Erik Jamal Sumner, and as curator of this mini exhibition, I present to you THE worldrenowned iconoclastic photographer, Gordon Parks! Walk with me as I masterfully blend unfamiliar, “lost” works of Parks into a set that pairs his experimental pulchritudinous photos with classic hip-hop. So come alive y’all, and let me proceed to give you what you need in 2023, Gordon Parks’ Instinctive Travels and His Paths of Rhythm: The Lost Mixtape.

Track 1

From the day he was born, Gordon Parks encapsulated Public Enemy’s song title Black Steel in the Hour of Chaos. Pairing this title with Vide Noir, Gordon’s abstract expressionism piece meaning “black void,” sets off this mixtape like God did when She painted life into existence. My man was birthed, the last of 15 children, onto a Kansas farm, in 1912. When he was 11, three white boys threw him into a river figuring that he would drown. By 15, his mother died and he was homeless and striving to survive in cold ass St. Paul, Minnesota, during the Great Depression. By 28, Parks’ “weapon of defense” in his “hour of chaos” became a piece of “black steel,” a Voigtländer Brilliant camera he purchased in a pawnshop.

Track 2

P for the people who can’t understand, how one homeboy became a man – Schoolly D, P.S.K. What Does It Mean?

Most mixtapes have guest appearances. In this case it’s Mary Ellen Mark. She is an American photojournalist who from the years 1963 to 2015 became famous for photographing bohemian folks whose lives could conjure up songs like Geto Boys’ Mind Playing Tricks On Me. Mark’s Brothers Going to Church is featured for two reasons. First, because the photograph shares a symbiotic essence with the core of Gordon Parks, a country Black boy at a crossroads with one path obstructed. The second reason is because I needed to make sure the Black American male figure was present in HUMA’s exhibition New Perspectives: The Museum of Art at 60.

Track 3

In the time that it took Parks to walk down dusty Kansas roads to the golden paved concrete of Chi-town of 1940, he taught himself the art of photography, got married, opened a portrait business, and blossomed into a visionary who knew he didn’t have a lifetime to create the art he felt he needed to make. Every project was extremely important, because it would reflect upon the future of Black people in the arts. By the 1990s, Parks’ curly white hair with shades of gray conjured the same soft white and gray curves found in his photo Rose (White), and in this, he embodied Tupac Shakur’s poem The Rose That Grew From Concrete.

Track 4

The words love and life both have four letters But they’re two different things all together

– Whodini, One Love

Labyrinth seems to me like an alternate universe version of Rose (White). Dealing with the labyrinth of whiteness in America, Parks could have succumbed to the intimidations of hate, but just like every “labyrinth” Parks encountered, he solved the maze. Through his Instinctive Travels, he created roads where Black boys who bare their blues become men, turning pain and passion into One Love

Track 5

I told my little man, I’m a ghost, I broze

Left some jewels in his skull that he could sell if he chose

Words of wisdom from Nas, try to rise above

Keep an eye out for Jake, Shorty Wop, one love

– Nas, One Love

Originally, Parks punched out painful compositions on black and white ivory piano keys, blank white pages, and Black Steel lenses. Today Spike Lee, Ava DuVernay, Ryan Coogler, Lester Cannon, Jamel Shabazz, Devin Allen, Amanda Jones, Terence Blanchard, Kris Bowers, Ta-Nehisi Coates, Jacqueline Woodson, and Jason Reynolds are all Parks’ eternal reflections. They are the transformative, soulful polyrhythms paved by Parks’ Eye Music I. By Any Means Necessary, we mustn’t let his reflections turn out to be nothing more than Moments Without Proper Names, a score composed by Parks.

Track 6

With a rhythmic instinction to be able to travel

Beyond existing forces of life

Basically, that’s Tribal

And if you wanna get the rhythm

Then you have to join a Tribe

Word, peace

– A Tribe Called Quest, Youthful Expression

People’s Instinctive Travels and the Paths of Rhythm

There’s another horizon out there, one more horizon that you have to make for yourself and let other people discover it, and someone else will take it further on, you know.

– Gordon Parks

Parks belonged to a tribe. He repped hard for his tribe, 10 toes down! There are parts of Black people that no one would have known if it wasn’t for Parks. He lifted us up. He walked with us. He led us. He carried us on his back. He was our representative. He broke the ground, carved out the road, laid the concrete and painted it gold for us. Photographer, filmmaker, writer, and musician, Parks did that and then some! He’s a bad mother ... (Shut your mouth). Dammit, give this man a holiday!

Truth be told, Parks may have belonged to many tribes. He found these tribes by instinctively traveling roads unknown to him. But before he took his first step, he was sure to pack one very important thing: the rhythm of his Black folks.

A leopard’s rhythmic instincts allow it to be one of the most adaptable carnivores in the jungle. This ability allows it to travel beyond existing forces of its life. Leopards are known for being tenacious and courageous when faced with adversity. Symbolically, leopards represent ultimate power in several African tribes. They also symbolize wisdom and stability in business. In this bluesy image, Leopard became the logical apotheosis for Parks. I believe Parks left Leopard, and his other photographs that embody abstract expressionism, as a sign for us to take it further.

Stand up Strong Island!

Yeah! Huh ha! Word up! Erik Jamal Sumner representin’!

Gordon Parks’ Instinctive Travels and His Paths of Rhythm: The Lost Mixtape!

Big shout-out to Hofstra University Museum of Art’s director Karen T. Albert!

HUMA!

PEACE!

2023!

I’m out!

Erik Jamal Sumner

Art Teacher, Northern Parkway Elementary School, Uniondale, NY

Notes:

‘He’s inspired so many of us’: how Gordon Parks changed photography Documentary films | The Guardian, Tues 16 Nov 2021 02.02 EST https://www.theguardian.com/film/2021/nov/16/gordon-parks-documentary-hbo-photography

Dr Jeanetta Selier, SANBI Biodiversity Assessment & Monitoring /KARB_SCAU, 19 March 2018, https://www.sanbi.org/animal-of-the-week/african-leopard/

Hidden Tracks: Spoonie Gee The Godfather and LL Cool J I’m Bad

38 39

Track2

Mary Ellen Mark (American, 1940-2015)

Brothers Going to Church, Tunica, Mississippi, from the portfolio In America, 1990

Gelatin silver print

10.25 x 10.25 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art, gift of Susan and Steven Ball HU93.17.3

Track 5

Gordon Parks (American, 1912-2006)

Eye Music I, 1979

Dye transfer print

28 x 40.5 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art, gift of Carole and Alex Rosenberg HU88.88

40 41

Track 6

Gordon Parks (American, 1912-2006)

Leopard, 1961

Dye transfer print

13 x 19.5 in Hofstra University Museum of Art, gift of Carole and Alex Rosenberg HU91.92

42 43

New Perspectives: The Museum of Art at 60 Exhibition Checklist

Berenice Abbott (American, 1898-1991)

Falling Balls of Unequal Mass, 1958, from the portfolio Retrospective, 1982 Gelatin silver print

23 x 9 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art

Gift of Lazarus Weiner, HU83.28

African, Benin, Edo peoples

Standing Figure, 20th century Bronze with patina

15.75 x 5 x 5 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art

Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Baird

HU66.3

African, Cameroon, Dowayo peoples

Namji Fertility Doll, early 20th century

Wood with patina, beads, leather, and metal

11.5 x 4.25 x 2 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art

Gift of Dr. and Mrs. Pascal James Imperato, HU2021.5

African, Côte d’Ivoire, Dan peoples Female Face Mask (Deangle or Tankagle), 19th-mid 20th century Wood with pigment and patina

9.5 x 6 x 4 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art

Gift of Josephine and Sol Levitts

HU85.58

African, Côte d’Ivoire, Dan peoples

Mask with Full Coiffure and Brass Bells, late 19th-early 20th centur y

Wood with cloth, raffia, reeds, brass, iron, and patina

26.5 x 12.5 x 13 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art

Gift of Dr. and Mrs. Pascal James and Eleanor Imperato

HU2016.1

African, Mali, Dogon peoples Granary Door, early-mid 20th century

Wood

12 x 8.625 x 2.375 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art

Gift of Roda Graham

HU2005.3.30

African, Mali, Dogon peoples Monkey Mask, early-mid 20th century

Wood with pigment and patina

11.5 x 5.75 x 4.5 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art

Gift of Roda Graham

HU2005.3.16

African, Mali, Dogon peoples Monkey Mask, early-mid 20th century

Wood, pigment, patina

13 x 6 x 4.625 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art

Gift of Roda Graham

HU2005.3.42

African, Mali, Dogon peoples

Necklace, early-mid 20th century

Iron, stone

15 x 3.5 x 1.5 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art

Gift of Roda Graham

HU2005.3.2

African, Mali, Dogon peoples

Standing Male Figure, early-mid 20th century Wood, metal, iron, pigment, patina

37 x 11 x 15.75 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art

Gift of Roda Graham

HU2005.3.25

Benny Andrews (American, 1930-2006) Chasty, 1961

Mixed media, oil and collage on canvas

18.25 x 24 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art

Gift of Dr. and Mrs. Joseph Tucker

HU85.2

Tom Baril (American, born 1952)

Taughannock Falls #2, 2001, from the portfolio Tom Baril/Selected Images, 2004

Gelatin silver print

19.75 x 15.25 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art

Gift of Susan and Steven Ball

HU2005.10.8

Marilyn Bridges (American, born 1948)

Crater, Andagua, Peru, 1989 Gelatin silver print

11 x 14 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art

Gift of Peter and Susan Chatzky

HU2016.63

Marilyn Bridges

(American, born 1948)

Kazhitna Glacier, Denali, Alaska 1990, from the portfolio

Heightened Perspectives, 1990

Gelatin silver print

14.75 x 18.75 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art

Gift of Susan and Steven Ball

HU95.14.9

Lucien Clergue

(French, born 1934)

Sicilian Botanic Garden I, from the portfolio New Dimensions: Lucien Clergue, 1988

Cibachrome color photographic print

10 x 32 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art

Gift of Susan and Steven Ball

HU90.15.3

Conrad Felixmüller (German, 1897-1977)

The Happy Marriage/The Married Couple in Winter (Gluchkliche Ehe Iv/Ehepaar Im Winter), 1919

Oil on canvas

26 x 22.25 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art

Gift of

Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Rittmaster

HU78.28

George Gach (American, born Hungary, 1909-1996) Maternity, 1963 Wood

51.875 x 25.25 x 9 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art

Gift of Dr. and Mrs. Daniel Mason

HU86.80

Sally Gall

(American, born 1955)

Atchafalya, from the portfolio

Selected Landscapes, 1986

Gelatin silver print

15 x 15.125 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art

Gift of Susan and Steven Ball

HU99.14.5

Sally Gall

(American, born 1955)

Tanah Lot, from the portfolio

Selected Landscapes, 1992

Gelatin silver print

15 x 15.125 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art

Gift of Susan and Steven Ball

HU99.14.8

Anne Healy (American, born 1939)

Celtic Cloister, 1980

Photograph and collage

23.312 x 16.938 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art

Gift of the artist

HU80.114

Katsushika Hokusai (Japanese, 1760-1849)

Mishima Pass in Kai Province (Koshu mishima-goe), from the series Thirty-Six Views of Mt. Fuji, 1830-1831

Color woodblock print, ink and color on paper

10 x 14.875 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art

Gift of Helen Goldberg HU2003.8.3

Victoria Hutson Huntley (American, 1900-1971)

To New York

(Approaching New York), 1933

Lithograph

7.875 x 12.375 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art

Gift of Daniel Mason HU77.98

J. Seward Johnson Jr. (American, 1930-2020)

Creating, 1982

Bronze

36 x 41 x 43.5 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art

Hofstra University Purchase

HU85.68

Ellsworth Kelly (American, 1923-2015) Red Blue, from the portfolio X + X (Ten Works by Ten Painters), 1964 Screenprint on Mohawk Superfine cover paper 21.75 x 17.75 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art Gift of Dr. Milton Gardner HU84.42

Dong Kingman (American, 1911-2000) Harlem Girl, undated Oil and collage on Masonite 31.25 x 24 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art

Gift of Dr. Alfred Brotman HU74.09

Jirí Kolár (Czech, 1914-2002) Butterflies, 1968 Collage and pencil on paper 11.75 x 8.125 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art Gift of anonymous donor HU91.11

George Koras (American, 1925-2015) Bull, 1961 Bronze 13 x 17 x 4 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art Gift of Josephine and Sol Levitt HU84.49

Lee Krasner (American, 1908-1984) Free Space (Yellow), 1975 Screenprint and collage on Arches paper, deluxe edition 19.5 x 26 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art

Gift of Carole and Alex Rosenberg HU88.13

44 45

Louis Lozowick

(American, born Ukraine, 1892-1973)

Into the Canyon, 1932

Lithograph

15.5 x 7.25 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art

Gift of Daniel Mason

HU77.113

Louis Lozowick

(American, born Ukraine, 1892-1973)

Open Mine (Crushed Rock), 1937

Lithograph

14.375 x 10.125 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art

Gift of Daniel Mason

HU77.107

Danny Lyon

(American, born 1942)

Cal, Springfield, Illinois, 1965

Gelatin silver print

13.25 x 9 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art

Gift of George Stephanopoulos

HU2009.7.19

Mary Ellen Mark

(American, 1940-2015)

Brothers Going to Church, Tunica, Mississippi, from the portfolio

In America, 1990

Gelatin silver print

10.25 x 10.25 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art

Gift of Susan and Steven Ball

HU93.17.3

Anton Mauve (Dutch, 1838-1888)

Untitled, undated

Ceramic

16 x 24 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art

Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Howard Weingrow

HU80.107

Melanesia, Kiriwina Islands, Papua New Guinea, Massim peoples

War Club, early-mid 20th century

Wood with pigment

34.25 x 5.25 x 0.75 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art

Gift of Cedric H. Marks

HU73.92

Joan Mitchell (American, 1925-1992)

Metro, c. 1965

Oil on canvas

20 x 17 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art

Gift of Dr. and Mrs. Milton Gardner

HU80.15

Albert N’Kusu (Congolese, born 1914)

Tam-Tam Drummer, 1962

Oil on canvas board

32 x 24 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art

Gift of Olga Brom Spencer

HU2001.13.1

Max Papart (French, 1911-1994)

Untitled, 1975

Etching and collage

6.5 x 7 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art

Gift of Carole and Alex Rosenberg

HU86.198

Gordon Parks (American, 1912-2006)

Eye Music I, 1979

Dye transfer print

28 x 40.5 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art

Gift of Carole and Alex Rosenberg

HU88.88

Gordon Parks (American, 1912-2006)

Labyrinth, 1981

Dye transfer print

20 x 29.5 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art

Gift of Carole and Alex Rosenberg

HU88.84

Gordon Parks (American, 1912-2006)

Leopard, 1961

Dye transfer print

13 x 19.5 in

Hofstra University Museum of Art

Gift of Carole and Alex Rosenberg

HU91.92

Gordon Parks (American, 1912-2006)

Rose (White), 1981

Dye transfer print

20 x 29 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art

Gift of Carole and Alex Rosenberg

HU88.87

Gordon Parks (American, 1912-2006)

Vide Noir, 1981

Dye transfer print

29.5 x 19.75 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art

Gift of Carole and Alex Rosenberg

HU88.154

Jane Peterson (American, 1876-1965)

The Lagoon, Venice, 1920

Oil on canvas

32 x 32 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art

Gift of Martin Horwitz

HU72.1

Howardena Pindell (American, born 1943)

Untitled #9B (Genesis II), 2007

Watercolor, acrylic, thread, ink, oil

stick, color pencil, and museum board

13 x 10.75 x 3 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art

Gift of the artist

HU2012.51

Robert Rauschenberg (American, 1925-2008)

Stunt Man #1, 1962

Lithograph

17 x 13 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art

Gift of Dr. Milton M. Gardner

HU70.101

Barbara Roux (American, born 1945)

Storm Approaching From the Sound, 2010

Digital print

12 x 18 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art

Gift of the artist

HU2012.3

Louis Schanker (American, 1903-1981)

Polo, 1940 Woodcut

8.875 x 7.25 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art

Gift of Lou Siegel

HU97.10

Ben Shahn

(American, born Lithuania, 1898-1969)

Scientist, 1957

Screenprint with hand-coloring

12 x 10 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art

Gift of Ralph Barrocas

HU2009.2.3

Burton Silverman (American, born 1928)

The New Woman, 1960

Charcoal on paper

10.5 x 7 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art

Gift of Harvey Dinnerstein

HU70.67

Jerry Uelsmann (American, 1934-2022)

Home is a Memory, 1963

Gelatin silver print

12.75 x 9.75 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art

Gift of the Long Beach

Friends of Hofstra

HU72.68

Brett Weston (American, 1911-1993)

Driftwood, 1958

Gelatin silver print

7.75 x 9.6875 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art

Gift of the Christian Keesee Collection

HU2021.9

Brett Weston (American, 1911-1993)

Lava and Plant, Hawaii, 1980

Gelatin silver print

13.5625 x 10.5625 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art

Gift of the Christian Keesee Collection

HU2021.28

Brett Weston (American, 1911-1993)

Mud Cracks, 1977

Gelatin silver print

10.5625 x 13.6875 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art

Gift of the Christian Keesee Collection

HU2021.24

Brett Weston (American, 1911-1993)

Wood, 1975

Gelatin silver print

10.6875 x 13.625 in.

Hofstra University Museum of Art

Gift of the Christian Keesee Collection

HU2021.30

46 47

HOFSTRA UNIVERSITY

SUSAN POSER President

CHARLES G. RIORDAN

Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs

COMILA SHAHANI-DENNING

Senior Vice Provost for Academic Affairs

HOFSTRA UNIVERSITY MUSEUM OF ART

KAREN T. ALBERT Director

TAMARA ALFANO Museum Educator

KRISTEN DORATA

Collection Manager

JACKIE GEIS

Senior Assistant to Director

ALEXANDRA GIORDANO

Assistant Director of Exhibition and Collection

STEPHANIE MCGEE

Museum Educator

EILEEN MCKENNA Museum Educator

SARA SCHAEFER Museum Educator

AMY G. SOLOMON Director of Education

GRADUATE ASSISTANTSHIP

Mary Conroy

UNDERGRADUATE ASSISTANTS

Makayla Egolf, Syd Hartstein, Angelina Olivo, Bella Palaia, Josie Racette, Aurisha Rahman, Paxton Splittorff, Caitlin Treacy

48 49
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