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THE MAGAZINE FOR AND ABOUT HENRY COUNTY TM

Henry County Parks and Recreation

Wheelchair Coordinator

Harlon Matthews Georgia’s Lt. Governor

&Casey Cagle

FEATURES: • FEELIN’ THE JOY AT THE JOY PROM 2010 • WOMEN’S SAFETY EDUCATION WITH MAJOR STONEY MATHIS • DENNIS KERCE OF ALLAN VIGIL FORD LEADS THE CHARGE


www.peaceloveandpure.com

) p 5 p 2 (

benefitting:

SPECIAL GUEST PERFORMANCE

BY JONNY DIAZ! For more info call 404.713.3788


table of

contents

49

43

70 17

33

27

H Magazine would like to apologize to our readers and Dr. Nicky Chin. The office phone number we published last issue in our Top Docs feature was incorrect. The correct phone number for Dr. Chin is 770.507.2212.

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march/april 2010

features JOY PROM Thanks for the invite Hollywood but,… H Magazine covers the Joy Prom, an exclusive, local event for the developmentally and physically disabled ..............................................27

STONEY MATHIS Check out the women’s self defense classes offered by the Henry County Police Department. Don’t let yourself become the next victim!....................... 33

THE MAGAZINE FOR AND ABOUT HENRY COUNTY TM



Henry County Parks and Recreation

Wheelchair Coordinator

Harlon Matthews Georgia’s Lt. Governor

&Casey Cagle

DENNIS KERCE

ON THE COVER &%!452%3 s&%%,).4(%*/9!44(%*/902/- s7/-%.33!&%49%$5#!4)/.7)4(-!*/234/.%9-!4()3 s$%..)3+%2#%/&!,,!.6)'),&/2$,%!$34(%#(!2'%

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(l to r) Harlon Matthews & Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle

H Magazine shines the Business Profile spotlight on Allan Vigil Ford and, General Manager, Dennis Kerce................................... 49

departments publisher’s letter.................................................7 contributors.........................................................9 letters to the editor ......................................... 10 harlon matthews ............................................. 15 lt. governor casey cagle ................................ 17 diane hatcher ................................................... 21 joy prom............................................................ 27 neighborhood stabilization program.......... 30 stoney mathis/women’s self defense......... 33 my weight and my heart ............................... 35 sonny scott....................................................... 37 haven house...................................................... 41 dana yielding/kiwanis club ........................... 43 tl warehouse..................................................... 45 going green ...................................................... 47 paige copeland ................................................ 49 charities that care ........................................... 52 travel .................................................................. 53 henry medical center garden party ............ 55 relay for life....................................................... 57 physician’s profile ........................................... 61 legally speaking ............................................... 64 business profile: allan vigil ford .................. 65 fuller center ...................................................... 68 operation overseas ......................................... 70 student spotlight: will evans ........................ 73 community calendar ...................................... 80 march/april 2010 • www.hmagazine.biz

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from the

publisher

PHOTO: PICTURE THIS STUDIO

People are as happy as they allow themselves to be. – Abe Lincoln

I

was on the Leadership Henry Board when I met Harlon Matthews in the spring of 2008. He had applied to be a member of the Leadership Henry 2009 Class.

Harlon was the very first LH class member who was in a wheelchair. This posed an interesting and challenging dilemma for the LH Board. Not having either a class or board member serving from a wheelchair provided some additional challenges for the class, the individual and the board. Leadership Henry embraces diversity and so the response to Harlon’s application was one of excitement and a commitment to logistically discovering the challenges and to accommodate each and every one. Leadership Henry is a program that I cannot speak enough about. Its participants and supporters always leave the program with a greater sense of community pride. I find myself frequently telling people about the businesses I have been introduced to, the experiences I enjoyed and the better understand I have of our county and state government because of LH. Almost four years since completing my class I find myself having talked to someone from my Leadership

Henry Class, either personally or professionally almost everyday. Let me just say that Harlon stole my heart with his amazing smile. He lights up the room like a Christmas tree and draws you in with his charming way and gracious heart. Harlon is a fantastic tennis player and has a great gift of teaching the sport he loves. His attitude is a constant reminder that life can bring good things. One of the traits I find most refreshing about Harlon is how he can find humor in anything; all the while retaining a realistic perspective on the limited boundaries his physical handicap presents him. Harlon has a fan base like I have never seen before. I have the pleasure and privilege of being a judge at the Mr. and Miss Special Henry County. This past year I was thrilled to see Harlon roll into the auditorium. When I saw him across the room I couldn’t help but smile because I knew I was going be able to catch up with a great friend. I didn’t realize it would be like waiting for a celebrity to cross the room. The hugs, handshakes, the smiles, the small talk and the in depth conversations, from young to old, physically and mentally challenged,

to the leaders in our community...everyone wanted to speak and be around Harlon. There are probably a lot of reasons why everyone wants to be around Harlon, but, if you ask me, I think it’s because Harlon does not accept his physical limitation as a burden but as a challenge and this enables him to share his perspective with those who need him to be strong when they cannot. He shares his world, in which a wheelchair is the norm with those of us who cannot imagine a life without working legs. Through his physical challenges, his humor and his wonderful spirit he teaches us about ourselves and provides us with a renewed opportunity to learn and grow. You might say that Harlon Matthews is one of the greatest teachers I have ever had. This issue is dedicated to Harlon Matthews, a generous man who enjoys teaching - both on and off the court.

Lisa Kinchen Publisher/Editorial Director lisa@hmagazine.biz

Your feedback is extremely important to us, so, in this issue of H Magazine we are posting “Letters to the Editor”. Interested in sharing your thoughts? Please visit our updated website at www.hmagazine.biz.

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march/april 2009 • www.hmag.biz

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our

contributors John and Rosa Hitchcock are the owners of Signature Pressworks and Interpret Inc, companies that serve the printing and interpreting needs of Henry County and the Metro area. John and Rosa have 4 beautiful daughters: Danielle, Emma, Isabelle, and Caroline.

Amy Wolf Rollins has been a resident of Henry County since 2001. Amy runs her own consulting firm, Kenan Environmental Limited, is a Henry Soil & Water District Supervisor and is an adjunct biology instructor at Clayton State University. Amy, Mark, and their son Kenan live in McDonough.

Sandi Hutcheson grew up in the South Metro area and moved to Henry Country when the hospital was the only thing on Hudson Bridge Road. She has a degree in creative writing from Georgia State University and spends most of her time either reading or writing.

Jackie Brittain is a sophomore at Georgia State University. She is majoring in Journalism with a concentration in telecommunications. She is the daughter of Mark and Connie Brittain. She enjoys sports and spending time with her family.

Rebecca McClain, President of Life Treasures, LLC, is an entrepreneur, author, speaker, life and business coach. Rebecca McClain inspires people all across the nation and internationally. She balances her life with social and cultural activities, travel and reading.

Beverly Van Gorder has lived in Henry County for 14 years. She and her husband, Jim, have five children, two of which are U.S. Marines. She is Marketing Director for Golden Crest Assisted Living Community at Eagle’s Landing.

Kimberly Scott is a self proclaimed Southern Belle, being raised in the south and living in Henry County most of her life. She is a marketing professional for local businesses and lives with her husband Michael and their four children.

Diane Smith a native of Ohio, has enjoyed living in Henry County for seven years. She is mother to 14-year-old Travis and wife to Pastor George Smith of Solid Rock Church of Jackson, Georgia. Diane works ar Noah’s Ark in Locust Grove.

Lea Elam is a dedicated wife, mom of one fantastic girl, and general enthusiast of all good things. She is a Southerner by choice, and has found love in volunteering, writing, and enjoying life with family and friends.

Denese Rodgers is the Director of Social Services for Connecting Henry, Inc, the local branch of the Georgia Family Connection Partnership. It serves to network social, service, faith, business, and government to improve the welfare of families and children in Henry County.

Michael Ratti will graduate this year with a Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Studies and a minor in psychology from CSU. He has published several articles with The Bent Tree and has artwork published in The Cygnet. He currently serves as an announcer for H2X PWC Race Tour.

Ava Roxanne Stritt A resident of Henry County for 20 years, and husband Kerry Stritt have two children, Tyler and Alexis. Her travels, global contacts, and volunteerism (Olympics, Noah’s Ark, ELCA, & local spin instructor) leave her with a vast array of experiences and a deep appreciation for Henry County.

Kathleen Smith spent twenty years in marketing and communications for Disney Networks and the Woodruff Arts Center. Her passion for writing recently led to her first book, printed in November 2008.

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Mary House has been a practicing lawyer for twenty years and is an attorney with Meadows & Macie, P.C. in Stockbridge. She lives in Henry County with her husband and two sons where she is involved in many public service and extra-cirricular activities.


letters

to the editor Dear H, Henry County is a very dynamic and diverse community. Thank you for showing the leadership from every group. Michelle Dear Michelle, H Magazine is proud to share with our readers Henry Counties diversity.....Ed

Dear H, I listen to the Bert Show every morning and love following BBA. I was so pleased to read about BBA in H Magazine. I want to help them in anyway that I can and now I feel like I know how...by supporting them through out the year with fund-raisers. Thanks! Victoria Dear Victoria, H Magazine is a proud supporter of BBA..... we are thankful Bert and Stacey Weiss and Amy Moosbrugger work on BBA all year long to create a once in a lifetime trip for the BBA families. Thank you for thinking of them... your support is greatly appreciate! .....Ed

Dear H, As soon as I get my “H” in the mail the first thing I do is thumb through it to write down all of the dates/ events listed. I hate missing events and you do a great of keeping us in the “know”. Thanks Dana Dear Dana, Our philosophy at H Magazine is to write about events before they happen...this encourages and reminds people, just like yourself, not to miss them.......Ed Editor’s note: We appreciate your feedback and encourage you to let us know what you think.

march/april 2010 • www.hmagazine.biz

10


WHY DID WE INVEST

SO MUCH IN ORTHOPEDIC TECHNOLOGY?


LEADING EDGE TECHNOLOGY. FIRST CLASS CARE. CLOSE TO HOME.

SO MATCH POINTS CAN HAPPEN. We didn't invest in leading edge surgical technology because we saw how good it looks in our operating rooms. We didn’t acquire sophisticated diagnostics so others could see how far we’ve come. Or because we wanted to see the looks on the faces of our competition. We did it so you can do the things that you want to do.

|

www.henrymedical.com


Remembering the Day I Almost Lost My Son Dear Folks, The following story was published in the December 5, 2007 edition of The Henry County Times. It tells the story of how my son Noah’s life was saved by man who came out of the crowd at the McDonough Christmas parade and administered the infant Heimlich maneuver successfully after my wife and I both had tried and failed. After the story was published, the identity of the “angel” was revealed and our families became close friends! My family and I will be eternally grateful for the knowledge and training that our friend had and used on that day.

The importance of first aid training was brought painfully home to us. Every year in the Christmas edition I will place this same ad to raise awareness. You may tell yourself that you’ll never need it, but trust me, you could. I’m bringing this to your attention in the hope that you will sign up for a CPR class and learn what may turn out to be the best gift of all. Sincerely, Dr. H.C. Fallas

Angel of the Square Saves Young Boy By Jimmy Cochran The evening began with great anticipation for the Fallas family of McDonough as they prepared to attend the Christmas parade around the McDonough Square. Dr. Humberto Fallas is in the process of opening a new Vision Center on Highway 20/81 and the family was taking part in the parade by carrying a banner and having a float filled with children and adults behind. Somewhere toward the end of the parade route, a tragedy almost took the life of their three-year-old son, Noah. Noah began to choke on a piece of candy; however, in all the noise and confusion of the parade, no one noticed a small boy having difficulty and he could not call for help. Finally a lady on an adjacent float noticed his distress and got the attention of his parents and

CPR Courses at Henry Medical Center Henry Medical Center hosts Heartsaver First Aid courses taught by a certified American Heart association instructor and includes CPR and first aid for adult and pediatric victims. The first aid portion includes medical, injury and environmental emergencies. To register, please call the Henry Medical Center Community Education Department at 678.604.1040 or visit the Classes & Events page at www.henrymedical.com to register online. 2010 Class Dates Are: April 16, 9am - 4pm September 17, 9am - 4pm

friends. Humberto and Elizabeth Fallas rushed to try to help their son, but were both unsuccessful in performing the Heimlich maneuver on such a small boy. Fallas said, “unable to help and frozen from the shock, I yelled for help and the parade came to a stop. My son was truly dying in front of me. Right before he totally lost consciousness, a man rushed in from the crowd, jumped on the wagon and tried the infant Heimlich maneuver more aggressively and the piece of candy finally came out and Noah started to cry.” Fallas and his family firmly believe this man from the crowd was truly a guardian angel, someone who was there at just the right moment to save his son’s life. In the frantic rush of the moment, Fallas was unable to thank the

man or to even get his name. Fallas continues, “He brought light to a day bound to be the worst of my life. Just when we forget what is important in life, something like this happens to remind me nothing in life is more important than life itself. Those three minutes or less almost caused the loss of the most precious thing I have ever been given.” The Fallas family would like to be able to personally thank this man, this angel of the Square, who helped to save Noah. If you are aware of the identity of this man, please email editor@henrycountytimes.com. We will put the Fallas family in touch with you. In this season where miracles do happen, our angel of the Square may be anonymous forever. After all, that’s what angels do.


Harlon Matthews

our stories

PHOTOS: PICTURE THIS STUDIO

momentum

Makes the Difference:

t h e ha r l o n m a tt he w s st o r y...

H

arlon Matthews positions himself just behind the free-throw line on a basketball court and takes a shot. It’s an “air ball” that misses the goal by nearly a foot. He rebounds the ball and tries again. Only this time, he positions his wheelchair almost at the three-point line, gives his chair a push with his left hand, and releases the ball just as he reaches the foul line. It’s a legal free-throw in wheelchair basketball, and he sinks it cleanly. “Momentum,” he said, “makes the difference.” Matthews is the therapeutic recreation specialist for the Henry County Parks and Recreation Department. Part of his job is developing sports programs and teams for disabled youth and adults in Henry County. He is a certified teaching pro in tennis, and his adult team, the Henry Havoc, travels across the country competing in wheelchair tournaments. Six out of seven of the team’s members are nationally ranked wheelchair tennis players. Another of his programs is a basketball team of 10 students, ranging from fifth- through twelfth-graders. This team, the Henry Hurricanes, won the state Junior Varsity Wheelchair championships in 2008 and 2009. The competition is sponsored by the American Association of Adapted Sports Programs

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(AAASP), an interscholastic program recognized by the Georgia High School Athletic Association, through which disabled students can earn varsity sports letters in wheelchair basketball, football, and handball. Matthews is passionate about what he does, and it’s because of what he says sports did for him. “I was struggling with my disability in 2001,” he said. “I was told at my job that I would never be able to do anything with my life, and I felt worthless.” Then someone suggested that he begin participating in sports. He attended an all-sports camp, and Matthews says, “The most accomplished wheelchair athlete ever, Randy Snow, who has since passed away, was at that camp. He said to me across the tennis net, ‘Harlon, you’re a natural-born athlete, and if you don’t keep doing this, you’re selling yourself short.’” Matthews left the camp knowing what he wanted to do with his life. And that momentum still propels him. In addition to the school sports programs, Matthews runs the Henry County Adaptive Sports summer camp. The two-week, half-day program teaches life skills in addition to the sports instruction. Matthews emphasizes to the campers that although they may be physically challenged, they don’t have to be “collegiately” challenged. “I tell these kids they have opportuni-

ties to go to college,” he said. “There are collegiate wheelchair sports programs where they can earn scholarships. I want more for them than to be just a statistic–someone with a disability sitting at home not being productive.” This year, because of budget constraints, the Henry County school system is only offering two wheelchair sports, and Matthews was given the unenviable task of deciding which sport would be cut. “We were already beginning handball, and there was no way we were not going to play basketball after being state champs, so we picked those two sports,” Matthews said, adding, “If we don’t come up with around $6,800, we’ll have to cut football. But how do you tell these kids, ‘Sorry guys, we can’t do it?’” He gets choked up talking about his “kids” and the possibility of having to tell them their sport has been discontinued, saying, “When they’re playing, they’ve accomplished something.” “Everyone knows someone who has a disability,” he continued, adding, “Adult or child, I encourage them to contact me–not because I need a million people– but because I just want to reach as many people as possible to empower them. The energy they get on the court will transition to the rest of their life.” In other words, Matthews is in the business of helping others create their own momentum.


by Sandi Hutcheson

He said to me across the tennis net, ‘Harlon, you’re a natural-born athlete, and if you don’t keep doing this, you’re selling yourself short.’

march/april 2010 • www.hmagazine.biz

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Lt. Governor Casey Cagle

our stories

PHOTO: PICTURE THIS STUDIO

What I see myself doing is following my heart, and my heart is to make this state the very best that it can be.

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by Rebecca McClain

Casey Cagle Lt. Governor

ieutenant Governor Casey Cagle is no stranger to Henry County. He has visited the community on several occasions and had the opportunity to meet with County leaders and citizens. He is acutely aware of the issues that are important to the people of Henry County, and throughout the State, and is committed to creating opportunities for all Georgians. An issue that is dear to the Lt. Governor’s heart is the provision of resources and programs for the physically impaired. Having undergone a neck and spine surgery in April 2009, he has an even clearer understanding of some of the challenges individuals face with physical disabilities. Although his degenerating bone condition was successfully corrected through surgery, rehabilitation and medicine, he realizes that many Georgians live with permanent disabilities. One such individual is local resident, Harlon Matthews. Despite not being able to walk, Harlon’s disability has not held him back from making a contribution to better the lives others. “Henry County has had a great tradition of showing significance to individuals that have handicaps and Harlon, in particular, is a person who has a big heart and a real passion to give those who are physically challenged the same opportunities that others who aren’t physically impaired have. Special Olympics, and the things that he’s doing, are extremely worthwhile,” said the Lieutenant Governor. Families of individuals with disabilities can be particularly challenged because traditional insurance often doesn’t cover

the costs associated with the special needs of children. That’s where government steps in to help. With the improvements in technology over the past couple of decades, greater strides have been made in addressing many of these issues by providing easier access to programs that allow children and adults to be self-sustaining. The State of Georgia has a host of resources and programs that have been put into effect as prevention measures or to enhance the lives of individuals with physical disabilities. A few of them include, Babies Can’t Wait, which is early intervention for a child who is developing slowly to have a greater chance of reaching his or her development potential. The Brain and Spinal Injury Trust Fund distributes funds to provide care and rehabilitation services for people with brain and spinal cord injuries. The Exceptional Students division works to improve the performance of students with disabilities. These programs, along with many of the more common initiatives such as disability parking permits and hearing impaired assistance through Georgia Relay, are among Georgia’s top priorities for enhancing the lives of the physically impaired. On a broader scale, Lieutenant Governor Cagle is accountable to approximately nine million people in the State of Georgia. He doesn’t take that responsibility half-heartedly as he has made significant contributions in many areas that impact the daily lives of the people. “I carry that responsibility every day, with a very strong work ethic, and try to determine where our problems are

that the citizens are facing and how we can improve every person’s life—whether it’s in job creation, solving their water issues, congestion problems within our State or improving our public education system,” he said. He never thought that he would someday hold public office. It was while in business that he became aware of the impact that government has on, either in the promotion of or the interference with, the free market. Consequently, he felt compelled to try to make a difference. He began his political career as a State Senator in 1994 and, after two consecutive terms in the Senate, successfully defeated his challenger to become Lieutenant Governor in 2006. As you might imagine, public service has impacted his life significantly. In spite of the challenges of growing up in a single-parent household, working two jobs to make ends meet and many other sacrifices, he has triumphed to experience the American dream. The back and spine surgery repaired a painful degenerated disc that caused him to lose 50% strength in his left arm. Through extensive rehabilitation and a regular exercise regimen he’s well on his way to a full recovery. The typical Type A personality, he doesn’t see himself slowing down anytime soon. “What I see myself doing is following my heart, and my heart is to make this State the very best that it can be. It’s a very strengeous schedule and regimen that I’m involved in—in terms of work—but the benefits are huge because it’s really shaping the future of our State.”

march/april 2010 • www.hmagazine.biz

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1-800-NEW-HONDA

The All New 2010 Honda

ACCORD

CROSSTOUR 5FTU%SJWF0OF5PEBZ You’MM#F(MBE:PV%JE

.PVOU;JPO#MWEt.PSSPX ("t - 9


i:PVNBLFBMJWJOHCZXIBUZPVHFU CVUZPVNBLFBMJGFCZXIBUZPVHJWFw – Winston Churchill Henry County Fire Department

Henry County Rodeo

($10,000.00 towards the Awards Banquet and Fire Chief’s award)

($10,000.00 BeneďŹ ting A Helping Hand For Children and A Friend’s House)

Henry County Shades of Gray Fashion Show ($2,500.00 BeneďŹ ting Art In History Charitable Foundation, Juvenile Diabetes Research & Shining Light Ministry)

Henry County Police Department

Sounds of the Sixties Concert at Heritage Park ($3,500.00 BeneďŹ ting Henry County Sheriff’s OfďŹ ce Honor Guard OfďŹ cers and Family Fund)

Clayton County Fire Department

($10,000.00 to purchase in-car cameras & tasers for their ofďŹ cers)

($5,000.00 Sponsor of National Fireman’s Challenge)

Atlanta Bow Tie Society

Southern Crescent Very Special Arts Festival

($25,000.00 BeneďŹ ting Metro Atlanta Indigent Teenagers)

($1,200.00 BeneďŹ ting Clayton County Students with Disabilities)

The Jeff Foxworthy Show

Henry County Teacher of the Year Award

( $1,000.00 BeneďŹ ting the Henry County Fellowship of Christian Athletes)

 - 968 -t XXX8JMMFUU)POEB4PVUIDPN

($18,300.00 car donated to the teacher of the year)

1-800-NEW-HONDA


Diane Hatcher

By Diane Smith

dishes

FAMILY TIES S

itting down with Diane Hatcher for the very first time is like meeting an old friend. She greets you with a warm smile and instantly makes you feel at home, even in a public setting. Hers is a genuine southern graciousness, and she comes by it honestly. The English family, her maternal family, has been living in Henry County since 1840. “At least that’s the earliest record,” she commented.

How would she describe life in Henry County to someone wanting to move here? “This is home. It has a Norman Rockwell, small town feel,” she responded thoughtfully. “I think it’s a wholesome, family area that embraces good morals, values and ethics. It’s a good place to raise a family.” Diane still lives on the family farm in the Ola community, the one passed down through generations. She recalls growing up on that farm and learning an early work ethic by throwing her shoulder into her farm chores. “I was always a ‘girly’ girl,” she said with a laugh. “But I could still drive a tractor!” That same work ethic has carried

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Diane throughout her life, and serves her well at her current position in Human Resources at Chick-Fil-A headquarters. It’s a job she enjoys. She tells of seeing founder Truett Cathy one day, sitting on the bottom step in the building’s atrium. “He was sitting there, talking with a little boy of about five years old,” she remembered. “I could tell there was no pretense—it wasn’t for show. He was really enjoying his conversation with that little boy.” As you talk with her, you realize she doesn’t really like to talk about herself. And it doesn’t take long to figure out what is important in the life of Diane Hatcher. Woven throughout her conversation are two elements—faith and family. She talks easily about God and her belief in His goodness. She speaks fondly of her church, Sharon Baptist, where she has attended since she was a small child, enjoying many longstanding friendships there. She has been married for nine years to Ken Hatcher. He is employed at the Forest Park Post Office. She has two sons, Trea Pipkin, Assistant District Attorney for Henry County (see H Magazine Nov/

Dec issue) – and Adam Pipkin, who is an accountant and lives in Atlanta. Talk of family generally leads to talk of family gatherings, and Diane’s clan specializes in them—especially for Easter dinner. It’s been held at...you guessed it— the family farm for the past 10 years. “All the aunts, uncles, brothers, sisters, cousins and friends gather together,” she shared. “There’s usually about 40 or 50 of us, and we all bring covered dishes.” She says the dinner, started by this generation’s mothers, has evolved through the years into the large gathering now held at the farm. Does she have any specialties? As a matter of fact, she does. Each year she creates her version of a broccoli and cauliflower casserole that always proves popular. And then, there is…The Carrot Cake. It’s a recipe handed down from an aunt 25 years ago. According to Diane, it is a lot like a recipe of a famous southern cook who shall remain nameless, but whose initials are “P.D.” But,“It’s NOT her recipe.” So, with no further ado, here is it is. (Remember, it’s a family secret, so don’t tell anyone…)


I think it’s a wholesome, family area that embraces good morals, values and ethics. It’s a good place to raise a family.

CARROT CAKE Ingredients • 2 cups self-rising flour • 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon • 2 cups granulated sugar • 2 (4oz) jars carrot baby food • 4 eggs • 1 ½ cups vegetable oil Frosting • ½ cup butter, softened • 1 (8oz) package cream cheese, softened • 1 (16oz) box confectioners’ sugar • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract • 1 cup chopped pecans

Directions: Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Grease and flour three (8 or 9 inch) cake pans. For the cake: Mix together the flour, cinnamon and sugar in a large bowl. Add the remaining ingredients and blend well with a mixer for about 2 minutes. Pour batter into prepared pans. Bake for 25-30 minutes, or until golden brown. Allow to cool in pan for 5 minutes. Invert, and allow to cool completely. For the frosting: Mix all ingredients (except pecans) with mixer and blend until smooth and creamy. Stir in pecans. Frost layers, top, and sides of cooled cake. Take to family gathering, and watch it disappear!

march/april 2010 • www.hmagazine.biz

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Is Permanent

Birth Control the Right Decision

for You E

very day, people make choices about their health. One of the most important choices, for both men and women, involves family planning. Nearly half of pregnancies [49%] are unintended and half of those unintended pregnancies occur during a month that some form of birth control was used. Unfortunately, there are still many misconceptions about the different forms of contraception that are available and the health risks involved with each one. “For women who have completed childbearing, there is no need to take a pill every day or continue to worry about unplanned pregnancy,” says Dr. Simpson-Jones of Women’s Health Specialists. “A permanent birth control procedure, called Essure, is a great option for women who have completed their families.” Essure is a permanent birth control procedure that can be performed in the comfort of a physician’s office in about thirteen minutes — without hormones, cutting, burning or any of the risks associated with surgery and general anesthesia. During the procedure, small, flexible micro-inserts are placed in the woman’s fallopian tubes through the vagina and cervix. Within three months, the body forms a natural barrier around the micro-inserts that prevents the sperm from reaching the egg. A woman must continue to use another form of birth control during this time. Three months after the Essure procedure, a doctor will perform an Essure Confirmation Test to confirm that the tubes are fully blocked and that the woman can rely on Essure for permanent birth control. Having confirmation that the procedure is successful relieves the fear of an unplanned pregnancy and the routine of temporary birth control. “Every woman must make the decision about whether or not permanent birth control is the right solution for her and her family. For many women, the ability to take control over their fertility and know that they are permanently protected from

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future pregnancies is very empowering and liberating,” continues Dr. Simpson-Jones. “Permanent birth control allows women to be more spontaneous with their partners and allows them to focus more on their families and their relationships.” Developed, manufactured and marketed by Conceptus Inc., the Essure procedure has been FDA-approved since 2002. It is 99.8% percent effective and is the only birth control method with zero pregnancies* Most insurance companies cover the cost of the Essure procedure. However, patients should check with their insurance provider or physician’s office to be certain. Visit www. essure.com to learn more about Essure.

* BASED ON 4 YEARS OF CLINICAL DATA.... The Essure procedure may not be suitable for all women and there are risks. The procedure is not reversible, and you must use another form of birth control for at least three months following the procedure. Risks may include cramping/pain, nausea/vomiting, dizziness/lightheadedness, bleeding/spotting. Visit www.essure.com for a complete list of risks and considerations. ©2008. All rights reserved. Conceptus and Essure are registered trademarks and your Family is Complete your Choice is Clear is a service mark of Conceptus Inc.

Let’s talk about whether Essure is right for you. Call our office today 770-474-0064. Sheryl Simpson-Jones, MD Kimberly Mcintosh, MD Temitope Olubuyide, MD Women’s Health Specialists at Eagle’s Landing 115 Eagle Spring Drive Stockbridge, GA 30281

A PAID ADVERTORIAL


Vince Dooley & Steve Penley

book signing McDonough Arts will be hosting a book signing on April 25, 2010 featuring Vince Dooley and Steve Penley. “Vince Dooley’s Garden”, illustrated by Steve Penley, will be the feature book at the signing. “Dooley’s Play Book”, highlighting the 34 most memorable plays in UGA’s history, will also be available for signing.

There will be a McDonough Arts Member / Sponsor reception from 2 PM until 3 PM. The signing will be open to the public from 3 PM until 5 PM. For more information please contact Mcdonougharts@charter.net.

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march/april 2010 • www.hmagazine.biz

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The Joy Prom

our stories

Thanks for the invite,

Hollywood...

but we’re

booked. by Jackie Brittain

G

littering ball gowns, a new black suit paired with a crisp new tie. Roll out the red carpet because they’re ready to go, and don’t you dare stop the music. The Joy Prom is an exclusive event for those who are developmentally disabled or physically impaired, age 16 and above. Jay Vanderbur is the front-runner of the program and was inspired by a program developed by Providence Baptist Church in Raleigh, North Carolina. On a trip he made with Roger Moss and Jimmy Higginbotham, they visited the church to learn about their ministries. They also learned about the Joy Prom, and all three were instantly inspired so much that they brought the idea back to Henry County. This will be its third year. Joy Prom is put on by First Baptist Church Stockbridge with the help of many church members and several community volunteers. For volunteers Nick Hendrix, Roger and Beth Moss, this event is a gift to the community. “It’s the greatest thing I’ve ever been a part of,” Beth said. With about 200 volunteers, the evening starts with separate stations that are divided into hair, make-up, shoe shining, you name it.

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Participants are given boutonnieres and corsages, as well as a gift bag. Kelly Lewis Browning Photography provides the participants with a free prom portrait to take home. Chick-fil-A caters the event for free. Decorations are donated mostly from church members of First Baptist Church of Stockbridge. The red carpet is by far the highlight of the night. Each participant has their name announced to the crowd and volunteer “paparazzi” take pictures and cheer them on. It’s a night of Hollywood blended with southern hospitality. Beth Moss recalls a story that she’ll never forget. After complimenting one young lady’s gown, Beth learns that the girl didn’t have only one gown, but her mother bought her two. “I never thought I’d have an opportunity to buy one [for her],” the mother told Beth. “I still get choked up,” she said, forcing tears away. “It’s truly a blessing,” added Roger. Several adults from the church and community and students from ELCA, SRCS, Stockbridge, Union Grove, and Woodland have been hosts/hostesses in the past and they created a bond with the participants. The volunteers are coached on how to handle certain situations, should they

arise. Medical personnel are also in place in case of emergency. The sheriff’s department even joins the party, coming out to regulate traffic. Regular breaks are scheduled for the participants to cool off and regain energy before hitting the dance floor again. “They love to dance!” Beth said. “We literally have to make them stop.” Parents are welcome to stay. They enjoy themselves while dining in the “hospitality room,” that includes a catered meal. Reservations are required in order to attend this free event because of the increased number of participants in just two years of being active. In its second year, there were already 95 participants. For Jay, this is a monumental step. This is something that went from being an idea to the fulfillment of a dream for people who never thought they’d ever have the chance to experience a night under the spotlight. For those of you who dominate the spotlight to yourselves, do everyone a favor and give your time to others in your community who may need it more than you do. This group of four volunteers has affected the lives of so many people; and I don’t even think they know it, because they are simply just doing what’s right: giving back.


THEY LOVE TO DANCE! WE LITERALLY HAVE TO MAKE THEM STOP.

march/april 2010 • www.hmagazine.biz

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HENRY COUNTY

neighborhood STABILIZATION PROGRAM

by John Hitchcock

IN JULY 2008, the Housing and Economic Recovery Act (HERA) of 2008 was signed into law. Under the provisions of this act, Henry County, through the State of Georgia, was granted $6.2 million and the Henry County Neighborhood Stabilization Program was established. Having been given the option to use this money in a variety of ways the County decided to focus on the purchase and renovation of foreclosed properties in Henry County. It works like this – six different asset management companies have been tasked with evaluating and recommending home purchases to the County. This evaluation and recommendation process includes many different criteria, one of the most important being that the home in question must be purchased and renovated to market standards and resold. “The real impact in not in taking some 60 houses off the market. The real impact is the changes in sales prices in the commu-

nity thereby enabling continued economic activity” states Larry Yager, Henry NSP, LLC project manager. “Take a recent home sale for example. The foreclosed home was purchased at $128,000 and, after renovations, was sold for $164,000. Instead of the sale price of $128,000 affecting the local appraisals, a final sale price of $164,000 was listed on the home. This greatly impacts the appraisal for any new listings in that neighborhood.” This example is only one of many homes sales happening in locations across the county with selling prices in the range of $60,000 to $180,000. By law, the County is not allowed to make a profit on the sale of the home. Once the County has renovated and sold a home, the money from the sale of that home is used to purchase another property which is, in turn, renovated and resold. This process continues until the funds are depleted. For more information regarding the program and a listing of the assent management companies and the properties please visit www.henrycountynsp.org.

march/april 2010 • www.hmagazine.biz

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Southern Heart Specialists, P.C. 1050 Eagle’s Landing Parkway; Suite 101 Stockbridge, Georgia 30281 770.474.4248 www.southernheart.com


WOMEN ARE FIVE TIMES MORE LIKELY TO BE VICTIMS OF CRIME THAN MEN ARE.

IF WE CAN TEACH THEM TO PROTECT

THEMSELVES AND HELP THEMSELVES TO NOT BECOME VICTIMS, THEN THEY’RE HELPING US IN RETURN BY FREEING UP THE POLICE DEPARTMENT TO GO AFTER OTHER CRIMINALS.

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Major Stoney Mathis

Sandi Hutcheson

feature

THE

defense BEST

IS A GOOD OFFENSE!

LAST YEAR’S HIT MOVIE THE BLIND SIDE HAS A SCENE IN WHICH LEIGH ANNE TOUHY, PLAYED BY SANDRA BULLOCK, CONFRONTS A DRUG DEALER. SHE PATS HER SMALL GUCCI PURSE AND SAYS, “I’M A MEMBER OF THE NRA, AND I’M ALWAYS PACKING.” THE DEALER ASKS, “WHAT CHU PACKIN’? A .22? A LITTLE SATURDAY NIGHT SPECIAL?” TUOHY ANSWERS, “YEP. AND IT SHOOTS JUST FINE EVERY OTHER DAY OF THE WEEK, TOO.” MOVIE AUDIENCES CHEER THE SCENE, THRILLED, PERHAPS, AT THE THOUGHT OF A TINY SOUTHERN WOMAN PROTECTING HERSELF. MAJOR STONEY MATHIS of the Henry County Police Department appreciates that response. “We [in the Police Department] are advocates of guns and think everyone should have one. The ‘perps’ are going to have guns. But if they think every homeowner has a gun, they’re less likely to break into a house,” he said. In fact, he’s so convinced that citizens should at least be armed with the knowledge of how to protect themselves that he started teaching female self-defense courses. He borrowed material from a course designed in 1998 by then-Chief of Police Jimmy Mercer, updated it, and began teaching in 2005. A 15-year veteran of the Henry County Police Department, Mathis graduated with

a degree in criminal justice from Cameron University, in Oklahoma, in 1992. He is currently pursuing a master’s degree in public administration at Columbus State University. “It’s command college, so they teach nothing but law enforcement classes geared to public administration,” he explained, noting with a grin that his master’s degree is being paid for by the drug dealers of Henry County. The three-day self-defense course is offered eight times every year, and classes fill up almost as soon as they’re offered. The first twohour block is dedicated to teaching women basic principles for protecting themselves– things like parking in well-lit areas, having their keys out when they approach their car, checking the back seat before driving off, and perhaps most importantly, paying attention to their surroundings. The second evening is a hands-on class teaching how to get away from a perpetrator. Mathis cites the grim statistic that 90 percent of people who are abducted get killed. “In an abduction, there are two crime scenes–the place of abduction and the place where the body is found,” he said, adding, “We teach women to fight like mad to avoid being abducted, for two reasons. First, it might ‘thwart a perpetrator,’ and secondly, if the victim is killed, having put up a fight will aid the police in finding the killer.” The final evening of the course is a onehour class on gun safety followed by instruc-

tion and actual practice using a handgun. Different weapons are brought to the range, allowing participants to try several sizes and choose a weapon they are comfortable with. Participants are then given a gun lock so that they can safely keep a gun in the home. Another program Mathis has designed primarily for women is a 12-week course called “Citizens Police Academy,” which shows citizens “the whole gamut of what we do in law enforcement,” he said. The course explains what various departments inside the police force do–from uniform patrol to investigators to narcotics to the SWAT team. It includes tours of the jail and the courthouse and a twohour trip to the shooting range with a certified gun instructor. The Citizens Police Academy is offered twice every year, usually beginning in March and September. Mathis explains his motivation for designing and teaching the classes: “Women are five times more likely to be victims of crime than men are. If we can teach them to protect themselves and help themselves to not become victims, then they’re helping us in return by freeing up the police department to go after other criminals.” For information on upcoming classes please contact Officer Jason Duffey at 770.288.8275 orr email to jduffey@co.henry.ga.us.

march/april 2010 • www.hmagazine.biz

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Abiodun Olatidoye, MD, FACC

heart healthy

PHOTO: PICTURE THIS STUDIO

OBESITY IS ON THE RISE NOT ONLY IN ADULTS, BUT IT IS ALSO BECOMING A MAJOR PROBLEM IN ADOLESCENTS AND CHILDREN.

Dr. Abiodun Olatidoye is a board certified physician in internal medicine, cardiovascular disease, nuclear cardiology and echocardiography. When he is not practicing cardiology at Southern Heart Specialists, he participates in community health outreach programs and ministry.

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MYWEIGHT & MY HEART As the New Year progresses, you may wonder if you’re keeping the promises you made to yourself at the close of 2009. One of the most common resolutions people make is to lose weight or to maintain an ideal body weight. This can be challenging at times considering the daily temptations we face with food and the discipline required to keep up an exercise routine. Understanding the risks of being overweight or obese versus the benefits of an ideal body weight, especially as it relates to heart disease can be helpful in motivating us to keep our promise. Over the last several years, the incidence of obesity has increased in great proportions in the United States. Obesity is on the rise not only in adults, but it is also becoming a major problem in adolescents and children. So, how do I know if I’m overweight or obese? Various measurements have been used to assess whether a person is overweight or obese, including body mass index (BMI), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), and waist circumference (WC). Of these measurements, BMI has become most popular. BMI is simply calculated as your weight in kilograms divided by your height in meters squared. A BMI between 25 and 29.9 is considered as overweight, while a BMI of 30 or more equals obesity. About 70% of adults in the United States are considered as being overweight or obese. Although a significant proportion of obesity is inherited, a number of people become overweight or obese through the lifestyles they choose. Inadequate physical activity combined with eating high fat and high calorie foods are the major lifestyles resulting in weight gain and obesity. Even though you can’t change your genes, you can modify your lifestyle. We know that smoking, excessive alcohol intake and poverty are related to several dis-

eases. However, obesity is associated with more medical problems than all these three issues. Obesity increases the risk of developing high blood pressure, high cholesterol and triglycerides, diabetes, coronary heart disease, stroke, heart failure, and atrial fibrillation (irregular heart beat). It also predisposes to venous thrombosis (formation of clots in the veins) and pulmonary embolism (formation of clots in the lungs). In fact, your risk of developing high blood pressure is three times higher if you are obese than if you were not. Apart from heart disease, obesity is also associated with sleep apnea, osteoarthritis and certain cancers. In order to prevent these diseases, or improve their outcome, weight loss is very essential. What can you do to attain the right weight for your body? It is recommended that you try to achieve and maintain a BMI less than 25. Changing your lifestyle is the most important way to accomplish this. The amount of calories in your food should be reduced. Fat intake should be less than 30% of your total calories. Simple things such as using the stairs instead of the elevator or parking your automobile further away from your destination can go a long way. A good advice is to begin a regular aerobic exercise routine. Targeting a loss of about one pound per week is reasonable. If your BMI is above 30 or 35, especially if you already have medical problems, seeking medical attention regarding your weight may be helpful. When indicated, doctors may offer other treatment options such as medication or surgery in certain cases. Achieving your ideal body will not only reduce your risk of heart disease and its complications, it will also give you an overall sense of wellbeing. I wish you a healthy heart as you pursue your goals this year.


march/april 2010 • www.hmagazine.biz

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Sonny Scott

our stories

W Our family certainly wouldn’t have had our happy ending without the God-filled hearts at Shepherd Center. www.shepherd.org

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By Kimiberly (Skinner) Scott

I NEVER THOUGHT THAT I WOULD BE WRITING A SPECIAL ARTICLE ABOUT MY OWN FAMILY FOR THE VERY MAGAZINE THAT I HAVE PENNED ARTICLES OF MIRACLES MANY TIMES. BUT GOD HAD AN AWESOME PLAN FOR OUR LIVES IN 2009. I HOPE YOU ENJOY A LITTLE PEAK INTO OUR JOURNEY OF FAITH AND HOPE . . .

what

FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT SONNY’S MIRACULOUS STORY OF HEALING, PLEASE SEARCH FOR THE PRAY FOR SONNY PAGE ON FACEBOOK.

ARE MADE OF !

W

e all have dates in our lives that are important to us. Birthdays and anniversaries are the first important time stamps written in each New Year’s calendar, along with all of the holidays that will grant us our three-or four-day weekends. Then there are other dates that we recall each year, like the date that Elvis died, September 11th, or the date of the first Space Shuttle take-off, always drawing up conversations of what you were doing at that precise moment. The date of July 15, 2009 is a date that has scarred the hearts of my family and me forever! On that date, little did we know that God was about to take us down a path that would end in nothing short of a life-altering miracle! On Old Conyers Road, at approximately 10:00 a.m., my brother Sonny was in a motorcycle accident that should have ended his life! Accidents happen every second, but as miracles have it, my brother is alive and I am here to share our story of how tragedy has an opportunity for healing and hope. In the trauma unit at Grady Hospital, my brother laid unconscious while his body endured

healing processes that no human would want toexperience! At one point he was being treated with more than a dozen different medical apparatuses, and he was connected to countless other devices to monitor his progress. Sonny was diagnosed with a severe, traumatic brain injury that end most lives and was the cause of countless other loss of life issues and paralysis of his right side. It is safe to say that in those moments, it was sometimes hard to see a positive end. We were surrounded by families leaving the hospital without their loved ones and one could only assume that our story would end the same. But God had another plan, and after six long weeks, we finally got to see his beautiful smile, knowing that our story would have an ending that movies are made of. He spent another six weeks recovering at Shepherd Center’s inpatient hospital and several more months of rehab at their outpatient facility. It would require too many words to describe what my brother had to endure to fight his way back to the life that he had left behind. But with countless hours of prayer, and the

incredible, often underestimated, power of the human spirit, he is BACK! We prayed and prayed that God would return him to us just as he was before the accident, and He did! Today, Sonny is almost completely recovered and has no life-delimiting issues related to his multiple injuries. He will soon be driving again (wrapped in bubble wrap, of course!) and has even returned to work. No one will ever know why God allowed this to happen in our lives, and there is no need to know. I can tell you without doubt that He didn’t need to teach my family how to love each other, we do that well! I can tell you that many miracles have happened throughout this ordeal. My brother is a changed man, and by his own admission, is, for the first time, truly happy! So as 2010 began with the annual inking in of important dates on yet another calendar, I gleefully stained the date of July 15th once again. But this time the date is here to give me a gentle nudge and remind me to count my many blesses, chief off all that my family is still intact and to never take that for granted! march/april 2010 • www.hmagazine.biz

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STOP BY THE HAVEN HOUSE BOOTH AT THE GERANIUM FESTIVALTO GET YOUR HOME-MADE ICE CREAM!

ALSO SERVING CURRY & ECHOLS’ ORIGINAL HOT AND SALTY PICKLES! WWW.CURRYANDECHOLSPICKLES.COM

SATURDAY, MAY 15 FOR M ORE INFORMATION C A LL 770 . 9 5 4 . 1 0 0 8 O R V I S I T WWW. H E N RY H AV E N H O U S E. O R G .


march/april 2010 • www.hmagazine.biz

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Dana Yeilding

By John Hitchcock

feature WE REVIEW OUR LISTS OF CHARITIES AND DETERMINE, BASED ON A DETAILED LIST OF NEEDS, WHAT WE WILL BE ABLE TO GIVE TO THE INDIVIDUAL AGENCIES.

The Kiwanis Club is a worldwide community-service organization for men and women. Founded in Detroit, Michigan in 1915, the Kiwanis Club currently has over 300,000 members in 13,000 clubs across 90 countries. The members of Kiwanis International seek to provide assistance to the young and the elderly, create international understanding and goodwill, help develop community facilities, support agriculture and conservation, and mount programs to safeguard against crime and eliminate alcohol and drug abuse. The name Kiwanis is derived from an American Indian term meaning “we make ourselves known” and making themselves known is exactly what Dana Yielding and the Henry County Kiwanis Club has been doing. Henry County originally had two separate clubs, one in McDonough and the other in Stockbridge, both founded over 40 years ago. About 10 years ago the two clubs merged and became the Henry County Kiwanis Club. At the beginning of each year the Kiwanis Club board of directors establishes a budget Seated on the left: Beth Barlow basedononthecommunity fundDunken raising efforts by Seated right: Bridget Standing Left: John Wadsworth using projections from previous years fund Standing raisingMiddle: efforts. Sue TheHarden money from the variStanding Right: Charles Woodroof ous fund raisers goes to different non profit organizations in the community including A Friends House, Connecting Henry, The Food

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Pantry, Haven House, Noah’s Ark, the Henry County Scholarship Fund and Operation Christmas. “We review our list of charities and determine, based on a detailed list of needs, what we will be able to give to the individual agencies,” says Dana Yielding, Henry County Kiwanis Club president. “Our list of potential recipients includes those charities from previous years as well as new requests.” The Henry County Kiwanis Club’s largest annual fund raiser is the Henry County Fair. Organized and run entirely by the Henry County Kiwanis Club and its 50 members, the County Fair opens in October each year and includes carnival rides, local school bands, lawn mower races and too many other things to list. “Planning the fair takes months. The weeks leading up to the fair is a huge time investment for the members,” says Yielding. “Our members bring different talents and abilities to the table. The fellowship we experience is truly unique.” The Kiwanis Club will also be participating in the upcoming Geranium Festival. They will have a booth and will be selling boiled peanuts and their “county famous” corn on the cob. And the entire time they will be “making themselves known” to all.


march/april 2010 • www.hmagazine.biz

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TL Warehouse

feature

PHOTOS: PICTURE THIS STUDIO

tim ? Oliver

M I L I TA RY S E RV I C E F O U N D AT I O N FOR SUCCESS IN LIFE AND BUSINESS. By Michael Ratti

I

n spite of a constantly fluctuating, ever changing economy, many community based business owners of Henry County shine with a type of charismatic uniqueness that major corporations often lack. When it comes to office and home furniture sales, comprehensive layout design, professional installation and a philosophy of providing quality products and reliable services at extremely competitive prices, TL Warehouse Office and Home Furniture in Stockbridge takes the cake. When H Magazine first discovered TL Warehouse, I was privileged to have the opportunity to meet with owner and President Tim Oliver and, VP of sales, Jennifer Watson in their spacious facility in the Hudson 75 Business Park. We chatted for an hour or so during which time I learned not only about a thriving business in Henry County, but about an inspiring man who exemplifies honor both in his work and in service to his community. At the fresh young age of 17, Tim began his five-year military career by joining the United States Marine Corps, an experience that he says led to the development of strong core values to which he attributes the success of TL Warehouse today. Upon completion of his tour of duty, he set off for college in South Florida where he would major in Finance, and minor in accounting, graduating in 1997. He married and began a family and by 2003 that family was expanding with the coming of their second child, Isabella. With wife Teresa, who has a PhD in Education, Tim decided it was time for a career change that would allow

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for him to be at home more with his growing family so he shifted from a full-time traveling position with Pricewaterhouse to be the founder of TL Warehouse in 2003. Although it is currently expanding, the business experienced humble beginnings in a small, 3,000 square foot rented space in a local industrial complex. As the business slowly grew and prospered, Tim relocated to an area of 6,000 sq ft along highway 42, and finally in 2005 as a result of building a strong repeat customer base and good client relationships, he moved the business to its current residence at 200 Andrew Drive, Stockbridge, GA, with over 30,000 square feet at their disposal. The space is clearly needed to house the home furniture (featuring the Ashley line), office furniture including a large variety of desks, chairs, cabinets, tables, cubicles, and partitioning among many other office and computer related supplies. With such an impressive inventory, one need not venture outside of the county to purchase furniture. When asked about the things he enjoys most about the business, Tim, a service disabled veteran, explained in a composed and assured demeanor that his fulfillment is attained through being privileged to work with local, state and federal governments and helping other war veterans, as well as being involved with charities. He prides himself in the savings he is able to pass on to customers through his ability to buy consumer products in large quantities, often truckloads. Through this process, customers may experience savings of up to 50 percent off retail costs com-

pared to prices found in corporately owned furniture stores. Tim finds his military skills serve as strength and inspiration as they, “give you an advantage when in pressured situations.” He feels that success is achieved by following the concept of “esprit de corps” putting the mission/business before the individual because ultimately, “the customer signs the check. Even more important than what you do”, Tim says, “is surrounding yourself with people you enjoy; you will be happy with the results.” The success of TL Warehouse extends beyond that of financial and industrial expansion. As a generous philanthropic contributor in the community who seeks no special recognition, Tim supports an array of non profits such as schools, Adopt-a-Kid programs that provide for children that have been abused or neglected, the Special Olympics, the Henry County Police Department, and a variety of churches. There is little doubt that Tim and TL Warehouse, now enjoying their 7th year in business, will continue to prosper and provide support to the community in so many ways. More information may be found at: www.tlwarehouse.com


Even more important than what you do, is surrounding yourself with people you enjoy; you will be happy with the results.

march/april 2010 • www.hmagazine.biz

46


going

green

Green Dawgs?

d

ale Rutledge and Chuck Ferrell are known as “The Trash Dawgs.” How did these two guys go from playing baseball together as kids to owning Rover, Inc. The story involves a new business and thinking green. Both worked at Eastern Airlines together back in the day and have kept in touch over the years. When Eastern went out of business in 1991 Chuck went to work for a coffee company and Dale to Burlington Air Express. We all have stories about how 9/11/01 affected our lives, but for Dale and Chuck it was a real turning point. Dale traveled a lot with his job and was on the way to L.A. for a trade show on that day. After that the trade show business slowed down and with just a few months of planning, Rover Inc. was born on January 1, 2002. Chuck was brought in as a partner and the rest is history. But… how and why the trash business? Dale lived in Lakehaven and saw 5 different trash haulers go in and out of the subdivision. He thought that he and Chuck could do a better job. They went door to door in Lakehaven and eventually had 200 customers and one truck and away they went. Today they have 8000 customers and 4 trucks. In September of 2009, Rover started a recycling program. Why? Because it is the right thing to do and it creates jobs in Georgia. Recycling can reduce your trash volume by 75%. Rover offers a 95 gallon bin for recycling, no separating involved. Currently they have over 200 customers and haul off 7000lbs of recycling every 2 weeks. Where does it go? We have a regional recycling hub right here in Griffin owned and run by Pratt Industries. Their biggest challenge is educating the public about the benefits of recycling. All the information you need is on the Rover website (www.roverinc.com). Other sites for information are: Pratt Industries (www.prattindustries. com/) and the Georgia Recycling Coalition (www.myecoville.com/us/ga/home). From baseball to recycling…an American pastime to a good thing for America. How could it be bad?

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By Amy Rollins


november/december 2009 • www.hmagazine.biz

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Paige Copeland

feature

By Sandi Hutcheson

Whether or not you’re special, you can face the challenges by seeing them as storms, or you can see them as rainbows. I choose to see mine as rainbows, and I challenge everyone here to do the same.

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KEEPING UP WITH

Miss Special HENRY COUNTY P

aige Copeland, the reigning Miss Special Henry County, is a busy lady. Halfway through her year as queen, she has made nearly 50 appearances on behalf of People First of Henry County, the organization sponsoring the Special Henry pageants. Her duties have included leading the parade of athletes during the opening ceremonies at the Special Olympics Georgia Games, giving speeches, appearing at fundraisers, giving radio and television interviews, and even getting to say, “Gentlemen, start your engines!” at the prerace parade at Atlanta Motor Speedway. The king and queen of the pageant, Todd McEarchern and Copeland, have a pair of teen counterparts, Mr. and Miss Teen Special Henry County. This year, the teen king and queen are Jake Thrasher and Katie Toreno. People First is a non-profit organization started by Connie Dodgen, Joan Angelini, and Tina Mills to promote fairness towards and awareness of people with disabilities. In addition to the pageants, People First sponsors several special events and socials throughout the year, including an annual “Abilities Day,” during which participants demonstrate their abilities versus their dis-

abilities; culminating in a large Easter Egg Hunt at Nash Farms for special needs people and their families. “We want to build self-esteem and awareness,” Dodgen said, adding, “We emphasize abilities – not disabilities.” Copeland, herself a bundle of abilities, is a fine representative for the organization. This year, she will preside over “Abilities Day” at the Georgia Aquarium. She is also a gold medalist in bocce ball, a silver medalist in the equestrian event, and part of a gold-medal bowling team at the Special Olympics. This year, she plans to compete in track. In addition to her duties as Miss Special Henry County, Copeland volunteers one day a week at Strong Rock Christian Academy, in Locust Grove, where the students call her “Aunt Paige.” She also volunteers in the youth ministry, Awana, and teaches a first-grade Sunday school class at her church, Sharon Baptist. The eighth Miss Special Henry County, with her outgoing personality and her enthusiasm for making new friends, has over 2,100 Facebook friends. Copeland is especially close to her family – her parents, Mike and Pam Copeland of Locust Grove, and her sister and brother-inlaw, Amy and Greg Buice. She adores her

two nieces, Maci and Lanie, whom she helps babysit. And she proudly shows off a ring her boyfriend of almost two years, Josef Hudson, recently gave her. The two met at the pageant the year before Copeland won. A highlight of her year has been meeting comedian Jeff Foxworthy at the Southwest Christian Care 17th Annual Benefit Dinner and Auction, but perhaps her proudest moment was in giving the welcoming speech at a women’s business conference at the Merle Manders Conference Center, in Stockbridge. The theme of the conference was “rainbows,” and Copeland was asked to incorporate that theme into her welcome. This is what she said: “Being special has brought many challenges into my life, and all special needs people have big challenges in their lives. In fact, we all face challenges. But whether or not you’re special, you can face the challenges by seeing them as storms, or you can see them as rainbows. I choose to see mine as rainbows, and I challenge everyone here to do the same.” In short, Paige Copeland is a perfect ambassador for People First. Focused on her abilities, she portrays a happy confidence that lets everyone know she does, indeed, see the positives in her life rather than the challenges.

march/april 2010 • www.hmagazine.biz

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local charities that

care for our community

“My wish is for us to continue our Board Development to include multi-city, cross country representation that will help us to better serve Henry Cunty..”

– Nicole Daniel

DOING THE MOST GOOD by Denese Rodgers

T he Salvation Army’s McDonough Thrift Store is in the process of getting a new electric red and white sign for one simple reason: they blend into the neighborhood so well that it is hard to pinpoint their location. A door or two down from Wesley Chapel UMC on Racetrack Road is the Salvation Army’s Worship and Service Center location where they provide Thrift Store, Social Services, Utilities Assistance, and Disaster Relief Services. In the grandiose vision, our Salvation Army is part of an international movement – an evangelical part of the universal Christian church. In the US, they are organized into four territories: Central, Eastern, Southern, and Western. They work quietly in our community, utilizing a local advisory committee comprised of volunteers. The Center’s Director, Doug McClure, is a former Salvation Army Officer and prior to that he worked over a decade with the Pizza Hut Corporation. When asked to list and prioritize a couple of his most urgent needs, Doug chuckled, “Besides money? Furniture and household items for the thrift store.” The staff of the Salvation Army consists of an Assistant Director, Sonia Leath, and six part-time employees. They cherish their wonderful cadre of volunteers and community service workers and they’re always willing to bring new folks into the fold. While they work year-round in the Thrift Store, volunteers and staff are most visible to the rest of us during Christmas when you see the “Red Christmas Kettles” at various social and retail locations within our Community. If you’re willing to be a host site for a kettle or willing to share holiday cheer as a bell ringer, give them a call at 770-957-8868. The Chair of the Advisory Board is Nicole Daniel, Vice-President of SunTrust Bank in McDonough. As with the other Board members Nicole’s day is already full, but she donates her time to the Salvation Army because, “it is a matter of community involvement where we can make a difference.” When asked about her 2010 wish list for the Salvation Army, Nicole grins, “My wish is for us to continue our Board Development to include multi-city, cross county representation that will help us to better serve Henry County.”

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SALVATION ARMY OF GEORGIA http://www.salvationarmy-georgia.org/ SALVATION ARMY USA www.salvationarmyusa.org/


Henry County has been hit pretty hard. It has been quite disheartening, but I know better days are ahead. january/february 2010 • www.hmagazine.biz

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One Ocean Resort

travel

one ocean resort florida

By Roxanne Stritt

one ocean resort • one ocean boulevard • atlantic beach, jacksonville, fl 32233 • 904.249 .7402 • www.preferredhotels.com

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A

ll of us want our travels to be magical. Well, your 2010 Spring Trip should be no different. This spring I will divert from my usual route to follow not a mouse, but a rabbit through an azure sparkling tunnel to a Wonderland Resort. The term Wonderland refers to an imagined, marvelous place perceived to have dreamlike qualities. Well, One Ocean Resort Hotel and Spa is definitely a wonderland, but it is not imaginary! Experience an exhilarating return to tranquility at One Ocean Resort Hotel and Spa. One Ocean Resort Hotel and Spa is a place where the logistics of the day never need to enter your thoughts. All details will be taken care of by your personal Docent. Your specially trained Docent will welcome you at your car, escort you to your room and serve as your personal guide throughout your stay, intuitively attending to your every need from unpacking bags, ensuring morning coffee service, scheduling tee times and reserving restaurant reservations. If you feel the need to venture out and explore, leave the details to them. They provide the insider’s edge. All you have to do is show up. Their personal touch really sets this luxury resort apart from any other Florida resort. Many aspects set One Ocean Resort Hotel and Spa apart from other beachfront properties. The Spa at One Ocean is the only northeast Florida ocean view spa. It is here you can receive one of their Signature Seashell Massages. This treatment embraces the ancient art of healing, using elements of Mother Nature to

bring relief to tense muscles, sore joints, stressed emotions and weary spirits. Smooth, heated, recycled seashells are combined with massage for an exceptional experience. Reserve their VIP suite and enjoy your spa treatment with a gathering of friends. This full-service spa includes a juice bar, heated beachside pool and a modern fitness center. Many classes are on their fitness menu, including tai chi and yoga. The resort’s own culinary gem is the Azurea Restaurant, where Executive Chef Ted Peters shines bright. Just this February he joined the ranks of chefs honored with the invitation to cook at the historic James Beard House. Only chefs of the highest caliber are entitled to showcase their talents in this legendary setting. This truly sets your culinary experience apart from everyday meals. Let One Ocean Resort Hotel and Spa sweep you away from daily routine. Treat yourself to a wonderland escape where azure surf and rolling dunes await, along with stylish design and luxury. Don’t forget to also check out their Sea Turtle Kids Club, where kids also receive their own personalized attention. Discover your own Wonderland and you will leave grinning like a Cheshire Cat! One Ocean Resort Hotel and Spa is located in North Florida near both Neptune and Atlantic Beaches (around a five-hour drive). Contact them at 904.249.7402 or online at www.oneoceanresort.com. H Magazine readers will receive a special rate by using code SPAGET as long as availability lasts. Pack your Veris Sunscreen and call! march/april 2010 • www.hmagazine.biz

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2010 Garden Party

feature

HENRY MEDICAL CENTER STEPS INTO THE SPOTLIGHT WITH

garden party 2010

Henry Medical Center Foundation will roll out the red carpet as it hosts ‘Hollywood Hits Henry,’ the organization’s 30th annual Garden Party, on May 1 at Eagle’s Landing Country Club. Guests will feel like celebrities as they are received with a photo opportunity against a commemorative, movie premierestyle step-and-repeat backdrop. After passed hors d’oeuvres and cocktails on the clubhouse landing, the party will move outside to an elegant, white tent. You’ll be reminded why this is the hottest ticket in town as you enjoy dinner under the stars and dance the night away with live music by the Atlanta Beat. Glitz, glamour, and giving is the theme for the black tie optional fundraiser, says Garden Party Chair Julia Kelley. “Our community is

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extremely lucky to have a first-class facility like Henry Medical Center (HMC). This shouldn’t be taken for granted. By purchasing a ticket or sponsoring this event, you are investing in the health of our community. Your support of the Foundation ensures that you will always have these amazing doctors, nurses, and staff close to home when you need them the most.” The youngest Garden Party Chair in its thirty-year history, Kelley has a strong association with and passion for the Foundation. Julia’s grandfather- in-law, Bud Kelley, was a Henry County commissioner in the 1970’s and instrumental in having the original Henry General Hospital built. She feels her generation should be more involved in their community. “We are all a part of this growing

community and we should commit to helping HMC provide the best care possible for my generation, my parents, grandparents, and our children,” she says. The Foundation supports CEO Charlie Scott’s vision for HMC to become the premier hospital of the Southside of Atlanta. Henry County is expected to have an additional 250,000 people living in its borders by the year 2030. The Foundation will support the necessary expansion of hospital technology and patient services to prepare for this growth. Tickets to the Garden party are $150 each. Sponsorships ata a variety of giving levels are also available. For information, visit the Foundation’s website, www.henrymedical.com/foundation.


By Kathleen Smith

Julia 2010 Garden Party Chair

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Relay For Life

feature

ATTENTION

IT’S THAT TIME AGAIN T H E AM ER IC A N C A N CE R S O CI ETY ’S R ELAY FO R LIF E IS BACK F O R ITS 18TH Y E A R. A ND E V ERYON E IS IN V ITE D!

A P R I L 3 0 - M AY 1 57

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By Lea Elam

Every year, Henry County participates in this much needed event. Relay for Life is an overnight experience, celebrating cancer survivors, remembering those lost to this growing disease, and raising money to fight for a cure through research. Thousands of participants form hundreds of teams to walk in this one-of–a-kind function. Held at Woodland High School, each team will have at least one member walking on the track at all times. Entertainment is provided throughout the evening, including inflatables for the kids, a DJ, and a Mr. Relay competition for the guys. There is a Luminary Ceremony when candles are lit in memory of a loved one, or to celebrate someone’s victory over cancer. It’s not uncommon to see tears and smiles all night long. Everyone participates for different reasons. Tonya Brantley is a commitee

member and participant in the Henry County Relay for Life, and longtime Henry County resident. She originally walked for a previous coworker, just one year before cancer struck closer to home, when her mother was diagnosed with breast cancer. Now a survivor, her mother has her own team walking for a cure. “I have two little girls. We know the cure can be found, so we just have to do our part,” she said. For Henry County, The Relay brings a sense of community. “Cancer does not sleep. Cancer doesn’t care if you are tired. People are fighting cancer all the time,” Brantley stated. Through this event, Henry County residents are able to band together, support each other as a whole, and feel a sense of pride in their community’s fight against cancer. Teams raise money in very unique ways. Some groups fundraise all year long. One hundred percent of Henry

County schools participate to raise funds. Henry County High School is having a Prom Shop, selling gently used donated prom dresses and donating all proceeds to their team. Last year, Henry County raised $428,000. Proceeds are used toward cancer research, and at facilities like Hope Lodge, which houses cancer patients and their families while they are in town for treatment. Henry County’s Relay for Life is reaching for a record year. The event is scheduled April 30-May 1, beginning at 5:00 p.m. with a Survivors Dinner, hosted by Shane’s Rib Shack. With over 70 teams registered so far, they are hoping to see 120 teams before the day of the event.

By going to www.relayforlife.org/henryga, you can join an existing team, make a new team, or simply donate to the cause.

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Back row; Left to Right: Vikram Mandadi, M.D.; Abiodun Olatidoye, M.D.; Duminda Wickramasekera, M D.; Minnette Williams, M. D.; Devendra Koganti, M. D.; M.N. Inba-Vazhvu, M D.; and Siva Mohan, M D.

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Front row; Left to Right: Kenneth Gimbel, M.D.; Ronald Freireich, M.D.; Kuchela Reddy, M.D.; Barry Dix, M.D.; Kandathil Mathew, M.D.; and B. Krishna Mohan, M.D. march/april 2010 • www.hmagazine.biz


Southern Heart Specialists

physicians profile

ne American dies every 32 seconds of cardiovascular disease, disorders of the heart and blood vessels. Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the United States, costing society over 83.7 billion dollars each year in health services, medications and lost work time due to disability. Each year, approximately five and a half million stress nuclear cardiology studies are performed in the United States. Both the pump function and the blood flow of the heart are assessed during nuclear cardiology testing procedures. As a result, physicians are able to detect the presence of cardiovascular disease and may also discover important information regarding the occurrence of future heart attacks. The heart is evaluated at rest and during exercise using a small amount of radioisotope during the noninvasive procedure. A complex imaging technique, nuclear cardiology testing relies on the experience and training of both the physician and the technologist. Their interpretive and technical abilities determine the diagnostic accuracy of the examination. The Intersocietal Commission for the Accreditation of Nuclear Medicine Laboratories (ICANL) has developed an accreditation program that evaluates the quality of these and other critical elements of a nuclear cardiology laboratory.

O

Southern Heart Specialists, P. C., located in Riverdale GA, Stockbridge, GA, Locust Grove, GA, and Fayetteville, GA was recently granted accreditation by the ICANL. The laboratories are one of a growing number of nuclear cardiology laboratories in the United States, Canada and Puerto Rico to be so recognized for its commitment to high quality patient care and its provision of quality diagnostic testing. The ICANL was established with the support of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, the Society of Nuclear Medicine, the Society of Nuclear Medicine Technologist Section, the American College of Cardiology, the American College of Nuclear Physicians and the Academy of Molecular Imaging (formerly known as the Institute for Clinical PET). The ICANL provides a peer review mechanism to encourage and recognize the provision of quality nuclear cardiology and nuclear medicine diagnostic evaluations by a process of voluntary accreditation. A non-profit organization, the ICANL is dedicated to ensuring high quality patient care and to promoting health care. Participation in the accreditation process is voluntary. Accreditation status signifies that the facility has been reviewed by an independent agency that recognizes the laboratory’s commitment to quality testing for the diagnosis of heart disease. march/april 2010 • www.hmagazine.biz

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legal

matters depicts the ADA’s relationship to other laws, explains insurance issues, prohibits state immunity, provides congressional inclusion, sets regulations by ATBCB, explains implementation of each title and notes amendments to the Rehabilitation Act of 1973.

by Mary House

WHO DOES THE ADA COVER, AND WHAT IS A DISABILITY? Not everyone is covered under the ADA. There are certain basic requirements that must be met in order to be protected. The first and most obvious requirement is that a person must have a disability.

THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT

MEMORANDUM

O

n July 26, 1990, President George H. W. Bush signed into law the Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”) saying these words, “Let the shameful wall of exclusion finally come tumbling down.” The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) was passed July 26, 1990 and became effective on January 26, 1992. The ADA is landmark federal legislation that opens up services and employment opportunities to the 43 million Americans with disabilities. The law was written to strike a balance between the reasonable accommodation of citizens’ needs and the capacity of private and public entities to respond. It is not an affirmative action law but is intended to eliminate illegal discrimination and level the playing field for disabled individuals. The law is comprised of five titles that prohibit discrimination against disabled persons within the United States. Titles I and II are the primary sections that affect local governments. TITLE I EMPLOYMENT Title I prohibits employers, including cities and towns, from discriminating against qualified job applicants and workers who are or who become disabled.

TITLE II PUBLIC SERVICES Title II prohibits state and local governments from discriminating against disabled persons in their programs and activities. Title II also sets forth the applicable structural accessibility requirements for public entities. TITLE III PUBLIC ACCOMMODA TIONS & SERVICES OPERATED BY PRIVATE ENTITIES Title III prohibits private enterprises who provide public accommodations and services (e.g., hotels, restaurants, and transit systems) from denying goods, services and programs to people based on their disabilities. Title III also sets forth the applicable structural accessibility requirements for private entities. TITLE IV TELECOMMUNICATIONS Title IV makes available telecommunications devices and services for the hearing and speech impaired. These regulations spell out certain mandatory minimum standards telephone companies must maintain to be in compliance with the ADA. TITLE V MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS Title V includes some miscellaneous provisions that relate to the construction and application of the ADA, including alternative dispute resolution. In general, this title

DISABILITY DEFINED The ADA defines disability as a mental or physical impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities. QUALIFIED PERSON WITH A DISABILITY Having an impairment that substantially limits a major life activity may mean that a person has a disability, but that alone still does not mean that individual is entitled to protection under the ADA. A person with a disability must also qualify for protection under the ADA. A “qualified individual with a disability” is someone who meets the essential eligibility requirements for a program, service or activity with or without (1) reasonable modifications to rules, policies, or procedures; (2) removal of physical and communication barriers; and (3) providing auxiliary aids or services for effective communications.

REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION MAY INCLUDE ANY OF THE FOLLOWING: • Job restructuring; • Part-time or modified work schedules; • Reassignment to a vacant position; • Acquiring or modifying equipment; • Changing exams, training materials, or policies • Providing qualified readers or interpreters

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Dennis Kerce

business profile

Dennis Kerce:

ALLAN VIGIL FORD hen asked to share some of his business philosophies, Dennis Kerce, General Manager of Allan Vigil Ford Lincoln Mercury states “We tell our team members that they are representing the company and that it’s all about taking care of the customer.” After working for a brief time with Ford Motor Company, Mr. Allan Vigil went to work at Handshaker Ford on Tara Boulevard before moving on to Riverside Ford in Macon. After several years Vigil was asked to move back to Handshaker Ford as General Manager and help the dealership get back on its feet. Vigil was eventually offered an opportunity to buy out the current owners and Allan Vigil Ford was founded. The dealership continued to operate at the same Tara Boulevard location until additional room was needed to expand the operations. In February 2003, Allan Vigil Ford moved to its current location at 6790 Mt. Zion Boulevard in Morrow. It was during the Tara Boulevard years that Dennis Kerce began working at Allan Vigil Ford as a sales consultant. After working in sales for two years, Kerce was promoted to sales manager. His responsibilities included managing inventory and sales associates along with making sure cars were sold. After several successful years as sales manager, Kerce was promoted again in 2000, this time into the position of General Manager.

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“It’s like having six businesses running all from under one umbrella. We have used car sales, new car sales, fleet and commercial sales, retail and wholesale parts operations, a collision center, the service department and a Quick lane quick service center.” says Kerce. “My job is to make sure we have activity in every department. From the beginning Allan Vigil Ford has stressed the importance on doing business the right way with honesty and integrity. Making sure our customers are happy doing business with us ensures they’ll come back again and again and refer their family and friends.” says Kerce. “It’s all about taking care of our customers.” The quality of customer care can be represented by the longevity of Allan Vigil Ford’s employee base. “We have a wall by the front door displaying photos of our employees by years of service. The top row spotlights employees that have been with us for twenty or more years. The second row is for employees that have been with us for fifteen years and the third row shows employees with ten years of service. All combined we have 61 photos in those three categories.” states Kerce. “A company that takes care of its employees will take care of its customers too. Happy employees make happy customers.” For more information on Allan Vigil Ford Lincoln Mercury please visit their website at www.vigilford.com or call 678-364-3673.

Making sure our customers are happy doing business with us ensures they’ll come back again and again” says Kerce. “It’s all about taking care of our customers. What’s fair is fair.”


By John Hitchcock

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By Lea Elam

the

FULLER CENTER

S

hane’s drive and passion comes from knowing that he can offer to help others and make a difference. He is the President and Founder of Building Design Partnership, LLC, a design firm that has been involved in projects spanning the Commercial, Retail, Healthcare, Educational, Religious, Civic and Residential markets. After moving to Henry County in 2004 with his wife Colleen and two boys, he was looking for a way to “give back” and to build stronger community ties. It was this quest that led him to his involvement with The Fuller Center for Housing of Greater Atlanta and Project McDonough. Having served as a volunteer with the Fuller Center for almost a year now, Shane Persaud is putting the foundations in place for the start-up of a new Covenant Partnership of the Fuller Center of Henry County. He will be heading up all projects that fall within the Henry County and surrounding area as the organization continues to grow. His affiliation with this Faith-based, Christcentered organization began last summer when he accepted an invitation from Mark Galey, President of The Fuller Center for Housing of Greater Atlanta. Together with other volunteers they led a large project in McDonough, repairing and remodeling 16 homes for families in need. The work of this organization continues, and while the Family Selection Committee continues to interview and approve families in need, volunteers are gearing up to tackle one more major rehabilitation project for another deserving family. Not long ago, Ed Delee lived a different

life. Governor of the Moose Lodge, and sole breadwinner for his family, he worked hard as a local construction worker. Then a motorcycle accident last year changed that. Now confined to a wheelchair, Mr. Delee is unable to work, and the family was forced to move. But some friends and fellow Henry County residents have stepped in and found a solution. A fellow Moose Lodge member, Bruce Westcott, together with two associates, Annette O’Banion and Yul Monta Brown, approached The Fuller Center with a request - a new home for this hurting family. Monta Brown will be donating a piece of property that has been in his family, which will now become the Delee homestead. Gutted due to a fire, there stands a small home and untended land that will be cleared, stripped, and rebuilt to suit the Delee family’s needs. The concrete block structure will need to have all floors, interior walls, and the roof removed and replaced. Additions will have to be attached to allow for extra rooms. Ramps will be incorporated, and amenities designed to allow for wheelchair accessibility. The preliminary projections put the project cost at about $55,000. Fundraising for this project will extend through June, when construction is to begin. Local businesses and individuals are invited to sponsor parts of the project by donating money or in kind donations. Moose lodges from across the State have pledged to send tradesmen to donate their skilled time to assist their brother in need. They hope to have the home completed for the family by July 2010.

A CHALLENGE FOR YOU The Fuller Center for Housing is challenging your church or congregation, school, office or organization to sponsor at least one home in Haiti as part of its plans to establish a long-term recovery effort there. Currently, the Haitian government is finding any available land to set up makeshift tents for the up to one million earthquake victims left homeless. But these tents will be insufficient when the rainy season comes in spring. The Fuller Center aims to construct permanent, safe, low-cost structures for Haitian families by partnering with Lazarian World Homes. A one-room, 16’ x 16’ earthquake-, fire- and hurricane-resistant house can be sponsored for only $3,000. An estimated 300,000 churches are in The United States, with an average of 75 participants who worship regularly. If every church would build one house, each member would only need to give $40. The Fuller Center will build as many homes as funding allows. VOLUNTEER The Fuller Center hopes to begin building as early as March. Once homes are under construction congregations can also sign up volunteers to build in Haiti. For more information please visit www.fullercenter. org/news/fuller-center-challenges-organizations-to-sponsor-haiti-house march/april 2010 • www.hmagazine.biz

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Undergraduate and Graduate Programs

Call 800.252.5119

Extraordinary Lives

In my opinion, the greatest thing about online education is that I do not have to sacrifice so much family time in an actual

I am able to multitask family and school.”

classroom;

—Jediah Carling, Business Management

w w w. g o b r e n a u . c o m

(R to L) Dr. Jim Wayne Latimer & his mother Hattie Caroline Moseley Latimer, Photo in hand is Dr. Latimer’s great great grandfather John Shirley Elliott, Left-Hand Wall Photos are Dr. Latimer’s great great great grandparents, William M. Gunter and Rebecca Peel Gunter, Right-Hand Wall Photo is Dr. Latimer’s great great grandfather, Dr. Ira Lawson Gunter


overseas

operation

With Grateful HEARTS Article & Photographs By: Beverly Van Gorder

M

any young people grow up with a dream to serve their homeland through military service, but not all are able to ultimately fulfill the dream in the way they originally intend. One such individual is Dave Murphy, a native Newfoundlander currently residing in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Having been raised with a heart for service, at the age of 17, any hopes of active military duty were shattered by enduring physical effects left in the wake of a brutal assault by three men at knife point. Not to be outdone by any physical limitation, Dave has been an active supporter of servicemen and women in a multitude of ways since 2007. And his interest is not exclusive to lending support to Canadian troops, but to all of the Allied Forces currently serving. Dave founded a group called “Thank a Soldier” and began solicitation for members through the social medium of Facebook as a “Cause” page. Within the first 13 months of its creation, “Thank a Soldier” garnered over 3.4 million followers from around the world. This springboard prompted Dave’s current work on “The Gratitude Project.” The essence of this endeavor is to offer folks worldwide the opportunity to join together as cohesive morale boosters of all troops serving the Allied nations. Dave is collecting countless photographs in which military supporters describe their appreciation for sacrifices being made in order to preserve our freedoms and deliver help to hurting nations. These photos will be combined in a series of YouTube videos set to music sending messages of thanks and hope from home to all service person-

nel deployed around the globe. The first video, currently undergoing production, had a submission deadline of February 28, 2010. However, due to the vast interest generated by this campaign, Dave plans to continue the project for as long as he can maintain its present momentum. He welcomes the arrival of new photographs for several additional videos. Submission of photographs should be e-mailed to thankyou@thankasoldier.net . Along with photos, Dave is also reviewing musical submissions for the background scores which will play during the video presentation of pictures. He has received songs from well-known established artists, but he is also interested in the musical talents of those yet to be discovered. Lyrics are expected to pertain to the objective of thanking all allied troops and not just our “American soldiers.” Two songs chosen for the first video are original works of men currently serving. Canadian soldier, MCpl Elton Adams wrote, “Miss You Like Hell” to his family while on duty in Afghanistan. J.C. Vanluyn wrote, “It’ll Be All OK” after serving a tour in Iraq. Those interested in donating their own musical ingenuity to the cause should visit the following link: http://thankasoldier. wordpress.com/2010-thankasoldier-presentsgratitude-project-music-search/. To view the promotional video describing “The Gratitude Project,” visit: http://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=yCDseAUV6oc.

On the home front, cadets from Union Grove High School’s NJROTC program in McDonough took time out from their military inspection on uniform day to express their gratitude. Additionally, Mrs. Stacy Young’s Second Grade class at Timber Ridge Elementary School also in McDonough spent a morning creating colorful “thank you” posters and demonstrated lots of enthusiasm on picture day. Thank you, high school teens, and second graders, for your participation and patriotism. With grateful hearts, you too have served–as encouragers to our armed forces around the world. **Author’s Note: Our hope here at H Magazine is that Henry County will eagerly rally behind this cause of sending out tangible images of heartfelt gratitude. If you choose to participate, please copy me on your photograph submission so that we can share in a future issue some of the creative ways Henry County folks are giving thanks to our armed service personnel. I look forward to hearing from you: Beverly@goldencrest.com.**

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Don’t miss an issue. YOU might be in it!

Subscribe today www.hmagazine.biz

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IN HONOR AND MEMORY OF: Sergeant First Class John C. Beale February 11, 1970—June 4, 2009

United States Army Killed in action while serving in Afghanistan “My family and I are so grateful and blessed by the outpouring of love, prayers, and patriotism from our beloved community with the loss of my husband. God bless you for all the kindness extended to my family. Don’t forget to hug a soldier knowing now what they and their families may face. And, pray for them that they will have peace with their Maker as my John did.” – Crystal Beale

page sponsored in appreciation by

september/october 2009 • www.hmag.biz

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by Sandi Hutcheson

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PHOTO: ALLISON GLADIS

EVANS WILL EVANS, A SENIOR AT EAGLE’S LANDING CHRISTIAN ACADEMY, RECENTLY SIGNED A NATIONAL LETTER OF INTENT TO PLAY GOLF FOR GEORGIA SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY IN STATESBORO, GEORGIA. Evans, who was named the 2009 Henry County Male Athlete of the Year, was ranked in the nation’s top 100 golf recruits for the class of 2010. In addition, he boasts a 4.0 GPA. And while these accomplishments are impressive, his “calm demeanor” is what attracted the Georgia Southern coaching staff. In fact, on signing day, Head Coach Larry Mays said, “With this 2010 signing class, we focused on getting the best players who fit our program and where we are headed. Will has a calmness about him that has allowed him to become a great competitor, and throughout the recruiting process, everyone spoke highly of him as a person and a player.” “One of the things that is so good about Will and what makes him so successful at golf is that he doesn’t get too emotional about what he just did,” Evans’ father David said, adding, “Whether he made a birdie or a double bogey, you can’t tell.” When asked how he gets to that place of calmness, Evans says, “Reading. There are two books, Fearless Golf and Zen Golf, that have helped me. It’s all in your head, in the inches between your ears. I’m trying to get to where I forget everything forget the past no matter if it’s good or bad. It’s focusing on what’s at hand the present. The past and future are all gone.”

And while the past may be a hindrance during a round of golf, it’s still important for understanding what he’s accomplished. His mother Susan said his interest in golf began as a toddler who loved to ride in the golf cart with his father and grandfather. When he was six, he began taking lessons from Cathy Mant, who was the teaching pro at Eagle’s Landing Country Club. His love for the game soon attracted the attention of their neighbor, Charlie Busbee, who took an interest in the youngster and began encouraging and helping Evans with his game. It was Busbee, in fact, who told the Evanses that if their son was going to compete at a higher level, he needed better equipment and gave Evans a new set of Callaway irons. Evans and his parents speak gratefully of the people who have helped him along the way: Busbee, of course, and his son, Chris, who is the pro at Eagle’s Brook Country Club. Rusty Strawn, who also played for Georgia Southern, has encouraged Evans by sharing his experience and knowledge of college golf and putting in a good word for him with the Georgia Southern coaches. And, although he doesn’t allow himself to think about the future while he’s playing golf, he has mapped out his plans very carefully. He says he chose Georgia Southern, primarily because of the

Will Evans

student spotlight

One of the things that is so good about Will and what makes him so successful at golf is that he doesn’t get too emotional about what he just did, whether he made a birdie or a double bogey, you can’t tell.

coaching staff of Mays and his assistant, Carter Collins. He plans to major in business management or international business and hopes to become an Academic All-American. Evans also has a very specific goal for his freshman season of golf. Out of the 10 players on the team, only five travel to tournaments and events, while the others stay behind to work on their game. “I want to make the travel team,” he said. And he’s eager to experience life in the dorm. “I’ve already met my roommates (fellow signees Hayden Anderson of Knoxville and and Drew Guffey of Bartow, Florida),” Evans said. “Since one’s from Tennessee and one’s from Florida, football Saturdays in our room are going to be very interesting,” he said. And he smiles as he anticipates his future, both on and off the golf course.

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BY B Y DAN GARRET GARRETT TT

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Welcome to

Main Street McDonough Classic and Open Car Show Saturday, April 17th 12am-5pm In the back parking lot of the Henry County Judicial Center located on John Frank Ward Blvd. For information call 770.898.9868 or go to www.mainstreetmcdonough.org www.mainstreetmcdonough.com

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Pictured: Ted & Hannah-Claire Echols

P.O. Box 1390 McDonough, GA 30253 or visit www.hmagazine.biz

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2010

MARCH

community calendar S

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Boy Scouts of America Golden Eagle Dinner Reception begins at 6:00 p.m. and Program begins at 6:45 p.m. Flint River Council, Boy Scouts of America Locust Grove Community Center heather.kostka@scouting.org / 404.783.9377

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Georgia Power NASCAR Sprint Cup Qualifying Night Atlanta Motor Speedway www.atlantamotorspeedway.com

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Atlanta 200 NASCAR Camping World Truck Series Race Winter Flurry Legends Racing-Race No. 6 Atlanta Motor Speedway www.atlantamotorspeedway.com

07

Kobalt Tools 500 NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Race Atlanta Motor Speedway www.atlantamotorspeedway.com

11

Big Day GiveAway Announcement Party Merle Manders Conference Center / 7 p.m. MRoberts@cityofstockbridge-ga.gov

13

Library Roast Eagle’s Landing Country Club Call 770.914.1040 for ticket information

17

St. Patrick’s Day

19

Dance Social / 7 - 9 p.m. Golden Crest Assisted Living Community at Eagle’s Landing www.goldencrest.com

20

Eagle’s Landing Crystal Ball/ 6:30 p.m. Eagle’s Landing Country Club sharon@davidblack.com or Anne Belcher @ 770.389.2000

21

Ballet Magnificat!/ 7 p.m. Community Bible Church cindy.hall@communitybiblechurch.com or call 770.914.0808

27

People First of Henry County / 2-5 p.m. Third Annual Special Needs Easter Egg Hunt / Nash Farm peoplefirstofhenrycounty@yahoo.com

Events & Listings: Henry County Parks and Recreation Event and Program registration Go to www.hcprd.org for complete listings.

Lasers 4 Literacy/ 9 a.m. - NOON McIntosh Trail Family Practice Griffin location only/ www.mcintoshtrail.com

True Oldies Show Gateway Event Center www.gatewayeventcenter.com/770.279.9853 march/april 2010 • www.hmagazine.biz

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2010

community calendar

APRIL

community calendar

03

Off-Season Legends Race Atlanta Motor Speedway www.atlantamotorspeedway.com Locaust Grove Easter Egg Hunt and Bonnet Contest / 10:00 a.m. City of Locust Grove lhutchison@locustgrove-ga.gov

10

Stepping Stone’s Brew and ‘Que 770.229.5511 www.steppingstonesschool.org

16

“Pinwheels for Prevention” Child Abuse Awareness Day / NOON Prevent Child Abuse Henry County On the McDonough Square Dance Social / 7-9 p.m. Golden Crest Assisted Living Community at Eagle’s Landing www.goldencrest.com

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17

Strawberry patch Opens - U - Pick Southern Belle Farm www.southernbellefarm.com 0r 770.898.0999

23

Taste of Henry / 6-9 p.m. A benefit for A Friend’s House / Jason T. Harper Event Center www.tasteofhenry.org 770.957.1100

25

Book Signing with Steve Penley and Vince Dooley / 2-5 p.m. Hosted by McDonough Arts Mcdonougharts@charter.net

30

Friday Night Drags / Show-N-Shine / Wings and Wheels Atlanta Motor Speedway www.atlantamotorspeedway.com

march/april 2010 • www.hmagazine.biz

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Events & Listings: Henry County Parks and Recreation Event and Program registration Go to www.hcprd.org for complete listings.


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september/october 2009 • www.hmagazine.biz

H Magazine March/April 2010  

Ever wanted a magazine that was all about you? Well, here’s your chance. Introducing H Magazine – For and about Henry County. The only magaz...

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