Issuu on Google+

 

HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation  

   

HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

 

 

IAC Pre‐Conference, 20‐21 July 2012,  Washington, DC  Conference Report 

 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

                                       

 

Funding for this conference was made possible (in part) by the Centers for Disease Control and  Prevention. The views expressed in written conference materials or publications and by speakers  and moderators do not necessarily reflect the official policies of the Department of Health and  Human Services, nor does the mention of trade names, commercial practices, or organizations  imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.    

 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation

 

IAC Pre‐Conference, 20‐21 July 2012, Washington, DC  Conference Report  

 

 

 

HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

 

 

   


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation IAC Pre‐Conference, 20‐21 July 2012, Washington, DC   

HIV and Health Systems Pre‐Meeting Series  The fourth annual “HIV and Health Systems” IAC/IAS pre‐meeting took place on July  20‐21, 2012, immediately prior to the International AIDS Conference in Washington,  DC.  The meeting agenda was developed by a planning group of global experts (see  page 44), who graciously contributed their time and effort to ensuring an  outstanding event. The pre‐meeting was hosted by ICAP Columbia University, the  International AIDS Society, the World Bank, UNICEF and the World Health  Organization, with additional support from the U.S. National Institutes of Health, the  Office of the U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator (OGAC) and the President’s Emergency  Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR).  

 

This report provides a brief summary of the meeting; slides, video, transcripts and a  complete webcast are available at:  http://www.iasociety.org/Default.aspx?pageId=671      

 

 

 

HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

  

   


Table of Contents  Background 

Page 8 

Conference agenda 

Page 12 

Session summaries 

Page 14 

Planning group 

Page 44 

Speaker biographies 

Page 48 

Participant list 

Page 72 

Slide presentations 

Page 82 

 

   

 

 

 

HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

 

   


Background The International AIDS Conference (IAC) and International AIDS Society (IAS) meeting, held  in alternate years, are among the premier gatherings for those working in the field of HIV, as  well as policymakers, persons living with HIV, and other individuals committed to ending the  pandemic. In recent years, new conference tracks have been added to reflect growing  interest in implementation science, health systems, and health economics. In addition,  increased attention to the linkages between HIV scale‐up and health systems has brought  into sharp focus the common goals underpinning programs to improve health outcomes in  resource‐limited settings, as well as the need to translate HIV scale‐up into broader health  systems benefits.   In 2009, ICAP at Columbia University, the International AIDS Society (IAS), and the Global  Fund to Fight AIDS, TB and Malaria convened a pre‐conference meeting in advance of the  IAS 2009 meeting in Cape Town, with support from the Rockefeller Foundation.  Informed  by a 2008 Bellagio conference hosted by ICAP Columbia University, the 2009 meeting was  entitled “Accelerating the Impact of HIV Programming on Health Systems Strengthening.” It  convened 100 researchers and implementers to explore the impact of HIV scale‐up on  health systems, including those who had never before attended an international AIDS  meeting. The Bellagio and Cape Town conferences resulted in a special issue of JAIDS,  dedicated to the topic of HIV scale‐up and global health systems, and to a second Bellagio  conference in 2010.  

 

In July 2010, ICAP partnered with IAS and the Global Fund to host a two‐day meeting prior  to AIDS 2010 in Vienna. Entitled “Bridging the Divide: Interdisciplinary Partnerships for HIV  and Health Systems,” the pre‐conference meeting was intended to foster new partnerships  amongst a wide range of global experts. The following year, ICAP partnered with IAS, the  Global Fund, the NCD Alliance, the National Institutes of Health, the U.S. Office of the Global  AIDS Coordinator (OGAC), the Rockefeller Foundation, and other partners to host a pre‐ meeting at IAS 2011 in Rome. The meeting, “HIV and Health Systems: Leveraging HIV Scale‐ up to Strengthen Chronic Disease Services,” focused on the intersection between HIV and  non‐communicable chronic diseases, convening a diverse audience of HIV, NCD, and health  systems experts. A second JAIDS supplement, entitled “Bridging the Divide,” was published  in July 2011.   In 2012, this series of successful HIV and Health Systems pre‐conference meetings  continued, with a focus on health systems barriers to HIV scale‐up: this year’s meeting is  entitled “Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation.”  

 

 

HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

Recent research has confirmed the efficacy of antiretroviral therapy for prevention of HIV  transmission in HIV serodiscordant couples, and the potential impact of “treatment as  prevention” has raised a wide range of policy questions. Many countries are now changing  treatment guidelines to include patients with higher CD4+ cell counts, markedly expanding  the numbers of people eligible for care and treatment and necessitating new approaches to  decentralized diagnosis, support for adherence and retention, laboratory monitoring, and  program design.  At the same time, the global financial crisis has limited the availability of  additional resources for HIV scale‐up, and HIV programs are being asked to do more with  less. What are the health systems implications of expanding treatment criteria? How can  country programs define prevention and treatment priorities in 2012? How can health  systems be strengthened so that programs and services are positioned to ensure an AIDS‐ free generation? How can the use of modeling and economic data assist countries to  effectively prioritize interventions? Are there optimal ways to approach the issues of ethics  and equity raised by the dual use of antiretroviral therapy for both treatment and  prevention?  As WHO develops new guidelines for HIV prevention, care, and treatment,  exploration of these key questions will be an important and complimentary endeavor.  

Goals and Objectives: The goal of the 2012 pre‐conference was to contribute to both HIV scale‐up and health systems  strengthening in low‐ and middle‐income countries (LMIC) by:   Facilitating productive discussions between policymakers, front‐line implementers  and technical experts in HIV and health systems;    Highlighting key health systems barriers to the expansion of HIV prevention, care  and treatment services needed to ensure an AIDS‐free generation;   Identifying policy‐relevant questions about HIV scale‐up, with particular attention to  the policy needs of partner country Ministries of Health, Finance and Planning;    Discussing the challenges of decentralization, integration, and the expansion of HIV  counseling and testing services required to engage a broader range of patients;  considering the implications for laboratory and diagnostic systems;    Fostering  professional  relationships,  partnerships  and  communities  of  practice  between experts in the HIV community and health systems community, in order to  strengthen  health  systems,  enhance  HIV  services,  and  catalyze  implementation  science.  

Participants:  

The HIV and Health Systems pre‐conference series has been particularly successful in its  ability to attract a truly interdisciplinary group of participants. The 2012 meeting similarly  engaged a wide range of participants, including high‐level policymakers, experts in health  systems and HIV program implementation, and leaders in HIV and health systems research. 

 


As with earlier pre‐conferences in this series, special attention was paid to ensuring  representation from the global South, and to supporting the costs of researchers,  implementers, and policymakers from LMIC. A list of participants can be found on page 68. 

Pre‐Meeting Agenda: The over‐arching goal of the pre‐meeting was to bridge the divide between country‐level  policymakers, implementers, and technical experts in HIV and health systems, identifying the  policy‐relevant information required by key Ministries and other implementers in order to  strengthen health systems and expand HIV prevention, care, and treatment services to achieve  the goal of an AIDS‐free generation.   A detailed agenda can be found on page 12. 

Further Information:  

“High‐level ICAP Meeting in Bellagio Addresses Impact of HIV Program Scale‐Up on  Health Systems in Africa”: http://www.mailman.columbia.edu/news/article?article=669  Accelerating the Impact of HIV Programming on Health Systems Strengthening: Pre‐ Conference Meeting of Health Systems Experts, HIV Researchers and Implementers ‐  Cape Town, South Africa, 17 ‐ 18 July 2009,  http://www.iasociety.org/Default.aspx?pageId=344  Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes: November 2009 ‐ Volume 52 ‐  Supplement 1, HIV Scale‐Up and Global Health Systems:  http://journals.lww.com/jaids/toc/2009/11011  Bridging the Divide: Inter‐Disciplinary Partnerships for HIV and Health Systems: HIV and  Health Systems Pre‐Conference Meeting, 16th‐17th July, Vienna, Austria:  http://www.iasociety.org/Default.aspx?pageId=405  HIV and Health Systems: Leveraging HIV Scale‐up to Strengthen Chronic Disease  Services, HIV and Non‐Communicable Diseases Pre‐Conference, 15th ‐ 16th July, Rome,  Italy: http://www.iasociety.org/Default.aspx?pageId=555  Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes: August 1, 2011 ‐ Volume 57 ‐  Supplement 2, Bridging the Divide: http://journals.lww.com/jaids/toc/2011/08012 

 

HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

   

    10 

 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

 

11 

 

 


Meeting Agenda Friday, July 20 (opening reception)  Welcome and introductions   ‐ Dr. Elly Katabira, President, International AIDS Society    Keynote speakers:    ‐ Ambassador Eric Goosby, United States Global AIDS Coordinator    ‐ Dr. J. Stephen Morrison, Director, Center on Global Health Policy, Center for Strategic  and International Studies    Wrap‐up/concluding remarks:     ‐ Dr. Wafaa El‐Sadr, Director, ICAP Columbia  

 

Saturday, July 21 (morning session)    Welcome, opening remarks:     ‐ David Wilson, Director, Global AIDS Program, World Bank    Framing presentations:    ‐ Dr. Rifat Atun, Imperial College: Investing for sustained scale‐up of HIV services   ‐ Dr. John Blandford, CDC: Using modeling and forecasting to inform planning and policy   Panel Presentations: Planning for Sustained Scale‐up: Where is the Evidence?     ‐ Moderators: Dr. Till Bärnighausen, HSPH/Africa Centre, Ms. Sharonann Lynch, MSF     ‐ Panelists: “lightning” panel: 5 minutes each, followed by discussion and Q&A  1. Dr. Charles Holmes, CDC:   How an empirical costing model influenced USG policy and targets    

2. Dr. Jan Hontelez, Africa Centre:    Human resources modeling for ART scale up in South Africa 

3. Dr. Emmanuel Njeuhmeli, USAID:   How VMMC modeling & costing studies influenced USG policy 

4. Mr. Leonard Nkosi, MSH Malawi:  

 

HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

Assessment of Malawi’s emergency hiring project  

5. Dr. Claudes Kamenga, UNICEF:   Planning and costing of PMTCT in Francophone Africa 

Panel Discussion: Key questions from the policy‐maker perspective:    ‐ Moderators: Dr. Estelle Quain, USAID  and Dr. Wafaa El‐Sadr, ICAP Columbia  ‐ Panelists:   1. Honorable Minister Benedict Xaba, Minister of Health, Swaziland  

 

  12 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

2. Dr. Faustine Ndugulile, Tanzania parliament   3. Dr. Kesetebirhan Admasu, State Minister for Health, Ethiopia    4. Dr. Ibrahim Mohamed, Director of Kenya’s National AIDS/STI Control  Programme (NASCOP)   5. Dr. Yogan Pillay, Deputy Director General of Strategic Health Programmes,  South Africa Department of Health   

Saturday, July 21 (afternoon session):   Welcome, opening remarks:    ‐ Dr. Gottfried Hirnschall, Director, HIV/AIDS Department, WHO     

Panel presentations: Decentralization ‐ examples/case studies:      ‐ Moderators:  Dr. Anita Asiimwe, Rwanda Biomedical Center, Dr. Eric Goemaere, MSF  ‐ Panelists: “lightning” panel: 5‐7 minutes each, followed by discussion and Q&A  1. Dr. Tom Decroo, MSF Mozambique:    Community‐based ARV groups in Tete, Mozambique       

2. Dr. Connie Celum, University of Washington:   Home‐based testing in Kwa‐Zulu Natal, South Africa 

3. Dr. David Hoos, ICAP Columbia:   Decentralization of PMTCT and HIV care and treatment services in Tanzania 

Panel presentations: Integration of HIV programs into health systems: What do and don’t  we know about the tradeoffs?       ‐ Moderators: Mr. Craig McClure, UNICEF and Dr. Miriam Rabkin, ICAP Columbia   ‐ Panelists: “lightning” panel: 5 minutes each, followed by discussion and Q&A  1. Ms. Stephanie Topp, CIDRZ Zambia:   Integration of HIV into PHC in Lusaka  

2. Dr. Karl Dehne, UNAIDS:   Costs and efficiencies of integration  

3. Ms. Bertha Katjivena, MOH Namibia:   Challenges of HRH integration in Namibia 

4. Dr. Sanjana Bardwaj, UNICEF South Africa:   Integration of PMTCT & MNCH in South Africa  

 

13 

Facilitated audience discussion: Key questions from the implementer perspective:    Moderators: Dr.  Anthony Harries, International Union against TB & Lung Disease and Dr.  Nancy Padian, University of California, Berkeley  Closing comments: Next steps /priorities: Discussants: Dr. Estelle Quain, Dr. Jean‐Paul  Moatti, Dr. Anita Asiimwe, Dr. Charles Holmes, and Dr. Miriam Rabkin  

 


Session Summaries  

Session # : Opening Reception and Keynote Addresses   Friday 

 July 

Welcoming remarks from Dr. Elly Katabira,  President of the International AIDS Society:  I want to begin by thanking Wafaa El‐Sadr and ICAP  Columbia for organizing this meeting. This is the fourth  in a series of annual meetings on HIV and health systems  which ICAP and the International AIDS Society have co‐ hosted prior to our International AIDS conference.    The main reason behind these meetings has been to  bridge the divide between different disciplines. This  year, we are focusing on the potential divide between  researchers, policymakers, and program implementers.       As you know, there are many different disciplines involved in HIV prevention, care and  treatment, including the communities working in the field towards actually scaling up  services to reach an AIDS‐free generation. Now, when we talk about the AIDS‐free  generation, many people become skeptical and say, “What is he talking about?” But I have  been working in this same field for 27 years and I can tell you from my experience that we  now have the tools. The tools are before us to make it happen.    One of the ways to make it happen is to address health systems. This topic and this meeting  become extremely important. Many of us do research, in addition to clinical work. In  Uganda, for example, many people ask me, “We hear about your research results in  conferences, but it doesn’t help us. Why are you doing it?” So we want to see that we close  that divide between the researchers and the policymakers in order to achieve the real  change we know is possible.    We want researchers to work together with policymakers so that they can implement the  findings – and to encourage the policymakers to fund the right things, things which will  make a difference to our HIV‐infected patients and their communities. It is important to  address this issue of translating knowledge to practice, not only in our own clinics, but at the  national and international levels.      

 

HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

  14 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

For example, we now have HIV 2.0 and we have Option B for PMTCT. All these are new  things and those of you who come from resource limited settings are asking yourselves:  Should we go for option B when we haven’t even done option A? And then there is option  B+. Does it make sense?     You say: we talk about treatment as prevention. We can’t even put people in treatment and  now we are talking of preventing patients by treating them. Is this possible? All these  questions, of course, are addressed by modellers. But our modellers need to work together  with the policymakers and the implementers.    How can modellers and researchers assist policymakers and implementers? We’re going to  discuss this. How can implementers and the policymakers provide the appropriate inputs for  these modellers who are becoming important in our day‐to‐day life because they predict  where we want to be? As you know, with modeling, the details in the assumptions and the  assumptions are based on what we give them as data.    So this is what we hope we’ll discuss over the next two days. I’m sure, at the end of it all,  you will make a difference where it matters – that is in the community with our patients.     Thank you very much.   

Keynote presentation by Ambassador   Eric Goosby, U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator  It is an honor to be here today at the fourth annual  HIV and Health Systems pre‐conference.  Thank you to  ICAP Columbia University for again bringing us  together to discuss this important topic – and  especially to Dr. Wafaa El‐Sadr for her leadership and  unwavering dedication to the fight against AIDS.   Thank you also to the other co‐sponsors of this pre‐ conference: the International AIDS Society, the World  Bank, UNICEF, and the World Health Organization.  The success of this pre‐meeting series has been its focus on examining the critical linkages  between HIV scale‐up and health systems.  It’s an opportunity to highlight the common  goals underpinning programs to improve health outcomes in resource‐limited settings.  

 

15 

This year’s meeting focuses on the health systems barriers to HIV scale‐up, concentrating on  information needs of policymakers and implementers to scale‐up prevention and treatment.   Today, on behalf of PEPFAR, I will outline some of these critical information needs.   

 


But first, I think it is important to recognize what we as a global community have  accomplished over the last decade and to think about how to apply the lessons to our  current challenges. We have seen substantial investments in critical elements of health  systems, by PEPFAR, the Global Fund, other donors, and national governments in support of  HIV treatment scale‐up.  These have resulted in access to life‐saving medications for over  6.6 million people with HIV in resource‐limited settings, around four million of whom are  directly supported by PEPFAR programs.  

 

 

Our response to the global AIDS crisis has also transformed the health sector.  Our  investments have focused on HIV, but they have also strengthened national health systems  so these systems can more effectively deliver essential services to meet the needs of their  people, including the non‐HIV needs of HIV‐positive people.  Clinics and hospitals that were overwhelmed dealing with AIDS now have the capacity to  address other health issues that people face.  Beyond that, we have rebuilt hospitals and  clinics, increased quality and numbers of trained health care workers, put in patient  information systems, put in quality laboratories, and strengthened commodity procurement  and distribution systems.  

HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

Our focused investments have enabled access to basic health care, often where little or  none existed before.    In countries with substantial PEPFAR investments, we’ve seen reductions in maternal, child,  and tuberculosis‐related mortalities and wider availability of safe blood, to name just a few. 

 

  16 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

17 

I would like to highlight two recent studies that demonstrate this type of health impact.  The  first was a study done in 257 health facilities across eight countries in Africa; it was  presented at CROI and published in Health Affairs this year.  The investigators showed that  the presence of HIV care and treatment programs was associated with increased utilization  of facilities for giving birth, an important indicator linked to maternal and child health  outcomes.    Another recent study, including over 1.5 million people from 27 countries, showed that in  PEPFAR focus countries, the adjusted risk of all cause mortality significantly decreased from  2004‐2008 – and was approximately 16% lower than in other populations without significant  PEPFAR intervention.   The success of PEPFAR’s investments to date and new evidence demonstrating HIV  treatment as potentially powerful prevention tool, led Secretary of State Clinton to declare  the historic goal of creating an AIDS‐free generation last October.    Less than a month later, on World AIDS Day, President Obama underscored the importance  of this goal and announced ambitious new targets for evidence‐based combination  prevention, including support for six million people on treatment, antiretrovirals to prevent  mother‐to‐child transmission (PMTCT) for 1.5 million mothers, voluntary male medical  circumcision for 4.7 million men, and the distribution of one billion condoms.   On a practical level, how will we support the health systems needed to reach these goals  and achieve an AIDS‐Free Generation?  We will reach these goals with an approach built on systems – and integrating what we have  learned from our investments over the last eight years.  Let me give you some examples.  One of the principal constraints to tackling AIDS in Africa is a serious shortage of health  workers.  Task‐shifting is one way countries can address this issue.  In task‐shifting, certain  duties are delegated to less specialized health workers. Several countries are now using  task‐shifting to strengthen their health systems and to scale up access to services.  For instance, even in South Africa, where physicians are relatively plentiful, there are simply  not enough health care workers.  Task‐shifting, through the Nurse Initiation and  Maintenance of Antiretroviral Therapy, or NIMART, program improves access to HIV  treatment and care in a cost‐effective manner.  Further, a study examining the model has  shown that nurse‐based treatment can achieve similar outcomes of viral suppression,  adherence, toxicity, and death as physician‐based care.    Turning to male circumcision, studies – including a recent meta‐analysis with more than  25,000 circumcisions from six countries – have shown that with proper training and  supervision, task‐shifting to non‐physician clinicians can be done safely.  Outcomes for 

 


doctors and non‐physicians showed comparable low rates of adverse events.  Most  countries with accelerated male circumcision plans are incorporating task‐shifting. 

 

But task‐shifting alone will not meet all human resource needs.  This is a familiar slide to us  all, from 2006, a powerful picture of the extraordinary need in many countries.  57 countries had critical shortage of doctors, nurses, and midwives; 36 of these countries  are in Sub‐Saharan Africa.  A 140% increase of health care providers is required to meet the  basic needs of the population.   Against this backdrop, PEPFAR has embarked on bold initiatives to support governments,  institutions, and other partners to strengthen and expand pre‐service training and  educational programs for doctors, nurses, midwives, and other health professionals.    PEPFAR’s target is to support countries in training 140,000 new health care professionals  and paraprofessionals.  We’re emphasizing education in country.  And PEPFAR wants to help  ensure that we will not only train, but retain these workers to support countries in achieving  staffing levels of at least 2.3 doctors, nurses, and midwives per 1,000 population, as called  for by the World Health Organization.   

 

HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

  18 

 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

19 

 

Let me spend a few minutes providing an update on the current status of the two initiatives  supporting this goal– the Medical and Nursing Education Partnership Initiatives (known as  MEPI and NEPI).  Both MEPI and NEPI were awarded in 2010, and awardees represent a  wide range of countries, institutions, and partners.    PEPFAR is funding these jointly with other U.S. agencies.  The medical initiative includes two  types of awards: 11 HIV basic programmatic awards to establish key training and  educational interventions, and eight non‐HIV linked and pilot awards to address other  health priority areas such as maternal/child health, cardiovascular disease, and cancer.  We  intend to provide up to $130 million over five years to African institutions, forming a  network of 30 regional partners, country health and education ministries, and more than 20  U.S. collaborators.   The nursing grants were awarded to three countries—Lesotho, Malawi, and Zambia—and  may expand to new countries in the future.  These awards were provided to the countries to  support the direct scale up of nursing and midwifery training and retention activities based  on country priorities.  We intend to provide up to $35 million over five years to support  country efforts and to a coordinating center for curriculum model development, evaluation  and information dissemination.   Improving supply chains is also critical to HIV programs.  One key improvement has been the  transition from air transport to land‐ or sea‐based shipment.  Between 2005 and 2007, the  Supply Chain Management System (SCMS) established by PEPFAR decreased the percentage  of antiretroviral drugs shipped by air from 91% to 28%, while increasing sea shipments from  9% to 72%.  It is estimated that using sea freight for major shipments saved up to 85% in 

 


transportation costs, and through 2010, sea transport had saved PEPFAR about $40 million  in transportation costs.    In support of improved financing, PEPFAR’s Impact and Efficiency Acceleration Plan is  supporting expanded generation and use of economic and financial information, efficient  implementation of PEPFAR programs, and coordination to maximize the impact of PEPFAR  resources.   Economic and financial programmatic data are fundamental to improving program planning,  performance and efficiency.  PEPFAR has developed a new approach known as expenditure  analysis.  The approach involves the collection of expenditure data covering a period of one  year, by country, cost category, and program area.  These expenditure data are then linked  to achievements reported through PEPFAR’s monitoring and evaluation system.    With these links, PEPFAR can determine the expenditure per beneficiary reached for a wide  variety of services.     PEPFAR has pioneered the use of outcome‐linked expenditure analysis exercises among  prevention, care, and treatment partners in several countries.  We are working to quickly  routinize this activity PEPFAR‐wide.  These data are shared with partner governments, and used in decision‐analytic and cost‐ projection modeling sponsored by PEPFAR and others to improve national program  planning.  Updated economic and financial data and indicators will allow for PEPFAR and  governments to make rapid course corrections to improve planning and effectiveness and to  avoid inefficient use of resources.  Our path to creating an AIDS‐free generation requires us all to work smarter and better  together, which brings me to another element that is needed: country ownership, working  even more closely with the governments and civil society of the countries in a partnership.    Part of this discussion is asking countries to assess what complementary resources they can  bring to the table.  In some cases, they have responded with strong financial commitments,  such as the South African government’s impressive recent increases in investments in their  HIV program.  Country ownership also takes the form of leadership in prioritization, implementation, and  accountability at the local level.  Through the over 20 Partnership Frameworks that PEPFAR  has signed with partner countries, we are working with countries to put them in the driver’s  seat of their national HIV responses.  For HIV, as for other development issues, countries  must lead their own responses, and we must model our commitment to be supportive  partners as they assume increasing responsibility for their health systems. 

 

 

HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

  20 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

21 

But country ownership alone will not solve the AIDS crisis, let alone our broader global  health systems challenges.  We must also challenge the world to accept that global health  remains a shared responsibility.  A crucial part of this shared response is the multilateral  mechanisms, including the Global Fund.   The Global Fund really is an indispensable tool and remains a single conduit through which  other countries that will never have a bilateral program can funnel resources to those  countries in need.  Part of our shared responsibility is to ensure that all resources are used as efficiently and  effectively as possible.  With our support and encouragement, the Global Fund has taken a  number of actions in recent months to recommit itself to this goal.    To support country‐owned programs, PEPFAR and the Global Fund are increasingly engaging  in joint planning and now co‐finance many components of country responses.  Together we  can do this.    Over this year we have seen exciting new evidence and guidelines, and with them new  challenges.  Following the release of HPTN 052 last year, the World Health Organization  released guidelines on the treatment as prevention for HIV‐infected partners in sero‐ discordant couples.    In addition, the World Health Organization recently released a programmatic update on  PMTCT, highlighting the need to improve access to therapy for pregnant women and  recognizing the potential benefits of a “test and treat” approach in this population.  Supporting national programs in scaling these types of approaches will require us to push  even harder to innovate, streamline, and be smarter about our investments.  However, as  we tackle these new challenges, we should not forget the lessons of the past and resist the  temptation to re‐invent the wheel.  We should take the lessons we have learned from  integrating treatment into thousands of primary care clinics and hospitals across Africa to  ante‐natal clinics.    This is where HIV‐infected women and their partners are more likely to be identified, and in  many cases, have access to treatment if it is provided.    We should take the example of Malawi, where a national supervision strategy is being used  to maintain the quality of the HIV response, even as the program rapidly decentralizes to  the hardest‐to‐reach areas, even in the midst of an economic crisis.  We must continue our  investments in training health‐care workers and invest in community health workers, taking  care that we are “task‐shifting” and not “task dumping.”   

 


And we must move to enhance our laboratory networks, quality control, and investments in  point of care testing to support decentralized sites.  In terms of implementation science, we  should focus more on the “how” and less on the “if” in improving retention and adherence  in challenging populations, including pregnant women, especially in the context of a “test  and treat” approach.    And as the global HIV response moves from an emergency to a sustained response, we will  also need to think more about cross‐cutting programs, such as pharmacovigilance, in future  programming to ensure that the antiretroviral drug regimens and monitoring approaches  we use are as safe and effective as possible, over both the short and long‐term.     Challenging?  Yes.  Insurmountable?  No.  In reality, if there is anything I have learned, it is  that PEPFAR has proved that we can take a situation with little hope and turn it around.  It  challenges all of us to raise the bar for what our global programs are expected to achieve.  I  look forward to working with you to raise that bar still higher.  Thank you very much.    

HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

  22 

 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

23 

Keynote presentation by Dr. J. Stephen Morrison, Director, Center on Global  Health Policy, Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS)  Thank you all – it is a real pleasure to be here.     I am going to speak very rapidly to several topics,  starting with the environment here in Washington and  how that relates to what you are going to be debating     People in Washington have been extremely busy  getting ready for the International AIDS Conference.  What has that revealed to us, that process and  preparation that’s relevant to the subjects that you’re  going to address here? One is the enormous pride that  people bring to this task of talking about PEPFAR nine  years on. There is this sense of a great moment that has  arrived here. In terms of being able to come on U.S. soil  and reflect about the achievements, about the  difficulties that were faced, about the value of the  investment, about the partnerships that were created, about the science and the  administration and the political leadership that was brought to this task.    It’s also brought home that we are in the midst of a very mixed opinion climate. This  program was launched with enormous bipartisan support and enormous leadership from  the Bush White House, and has been carried forward by the Obama White House. It was  launched with enormous support from the faith community, from the business sector, from  universities, from the foundation world. That marvelous coalition still persists, but there is  an aging and thinning process going on and we were up on the hill last week briefing on this.     It was interesting to see that first of all, there’s a core of folks there that understand and  identify and are very, very warmly and immediately connected – but there is also the need  to continue to educate and engage and bring about very forcefully and in very clear terms  what these achievements have been. Many of the people that were there at the creation of  PEPFAR are no longer there in Congress, and we’re in a period of considerable angst about  budgets. We’re in a period of great contestation politically, and polarization, and the  uncertainty and difficulty there bring forward new skepticism as well. The work that you do  in terms of demonstrating to policymakers, the translation from the kind of very dense  applied research you do into intelligible forms that can be acted upon, becomes that much  more valuable in this climate.     We have seen in the course of deliberations around U.S. policy a recurrent message which is  that people return to the notion that PEPFAR has become the fundamental reference point, 

 


the vital platform in which we build off of, and that moving forward and protecting that  becomes very important.    What do policymakers need to hear in this particular period? The AIDS‐free generation  concept has emerged as the defining concept. I think that that brings both opportunity and  a certain amount of risk. First of all, it’s going to beg, ultimately, the question of what we are  talking about in terms of concrete priority investments. How do we begin to measure and  know as we move forward that we’re getting progress? How do we calibrate those goals to  be realistic and feasible and not be captured by any runaway hubris or enthusiasm in this  period? Because people are going to push back on that in this climate, I think.  I believe  we’ve seen this with the health systems debate that people can turn it off or they can  change the subject if they believe that it’s too broad or it’s too imprecise as a concept.      Helping through research in terms of identifying how to talk about this, how to talk about  the AIDS‐free generation in very clear and intelligible terms to a policymaker or a lay  audience that’s interested in this, I think that still remains as one of our key, one of our  really key challenges.    Modeling in particular is problematic. I’m a political scientist. The field of political science  was captured by modellers about 30 years ago and it’s been a big internal debate around  have the political science modellers become too arcane and too insular in their own world  that others that are outside of that domain have great difficulty understanding what it is.    The translation issue becomes very important. I know that there’s been enormous effort  undertaken by CDC and OGAC to begin using modeling in order to project cost and  understand how to shift resources and investments. This has been one of the great  successes, I believe, in the last period in reengineering programs in order to make the case  that we’re getting much higher returns. But it’s still a process that for many people is hard  to understand. That complexity hasn’t been fully conveyed, I don’t think.    We have to guard against the risk of not having the comprehension levels where they really  need to be and focusing on that as something where you can test it. You can test it outside  to people who are interested and engaged in important positions of shaping opinion and  making decisions on allocations but who may not understand the terminology terribly well.  They may find this too abstruse at different points. I think that’s one of the challenges.    It’s not just the modeling that you’re undertaking, I think this is true for economists and it’s  true for political scientists and we’ve seen that problem in cross disciplinary translation of  knowledge and impact into policy making in many ways.      Thank you all for coming and thank you for the chance to be here.     

 

 

HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

  24 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

25 

Opening remarks from Dr. Wafaa El‐Sadr, Director  of ICAP Columbia   Thank you Eric, thank you Stephen. What a wonderful  start to our pre‐meeting. I wanted to take a moment to  put this gathering into context, and to say a little bit  about where we have been and where we hope to go.     As many of you are aware, the conversation about HIV  programs and health systems is not a new one. Even in  the early days of HIV scale‐up, important questions were  being asked. People both within and without HIV  programs wondered: How has HIV scale‐up impacted the  broader health system? Has it resulted in enhancement of  health systems, expansion of the opportunities for people  with HIV, and also improvements in services for people without HIV?  Or has it offered risks?   Has it taken away from the ability to respond to other major health threats?      These kinds of conversations and discussions prompted this series of meetings, conferences  and academic endeavors, as we attempted to bring a wide range of disciplinary expertise to  try to tackle this central issue.      Our first pre‐meeting was in Cape Town, before the IAS meeting in 2009. That meeting was  called “Accelerating the Impact of HIV Programming on Health Systems Strengthening.”  We  brought together experts and individuals across the board to talk about this central issue: as  we work to accelerate access to robust and durable HIV services, how can we enhance the  health system to respond to other health threats as well as HIV?    Our next pre‐meeting was in 2010, before the International AIDS Conference in Vienna. That  meeting was called “Bridging the Divide: Interdisciplinary Partnerships for HIV and Health  Systems.”  You will hear us use this term a lot – bridging the divide. It stems from the  realization that, often, we each work within our own discipline area, with people who do  what we do. There’s very little opportunity for people from different disciplines to come  together and try to solve the problem together or to work together or to do research  together or to do programming together.  The idea was that we needed to convene people  across different disciplines to actually plan the work together and learn from each other.      In 2011, we had another pre‐meeting before the IAS meeting in Rome. At that meeting, we  focused on the links between HIV and non‐communicable diseases, and on leveraging HIV  scale‐up to strengthen chronic disease services.  Participants spent a lot of time discussing  the fact that, actually, for many countries around the world, the HIV response is really the  very first large‐scale response to a chronic disease. There are exciting opportunities to build 

 


on this experience to provide services for other chronic diseases – the non‐communicable  diseases. We also need to think carefully about how to provide NCD services – prevention,  care and treatment – to people living with HIV.      Now, we’re here in Washington.  The unifying theme across all of these meetings has been  an attempt to foster a new dialogue and bring together a diverse community of researchers  and implementers and policymakers and modelers as well as the affected communities in  order to work together and to learn from each other.      What has been the result of prior meetings?  I think it’s heartening to know that the pre‐ meetings that we’ve had over the years have been followed often by joint projects, where  people have met each other for the first time through these meetings and developed joint  initiatives, embarked in joint research. Other outputs include several journal supplements,  which enabled us to share the meeting contents, and to allow for interdisciplinary  collaboration on guidelines and policies and priority‐setting.       As you heard from both Ambassador Goosby and Stephen Morrison, it’s a very exciting  moment in time in the history of the HIV response, but it’s also a fragile moment in time.   There’s lots of excitement, but there is also a bit of trepidation and anxiety about what’s  ahead of us.     There’s also a commitment and a true belief that we can achieve an AIDS‐free generation.   That excitement is based on new science that has spurred a lot of optimism, new science in  terms of concern for people living with HIV, but also for prevention of HIV.      In this moment in history, there’s a lot of new science and evidence that’s emerging, and  that offers opportunities to actually make a dent to stem this epidemic. But there are also  complexities – of prioritization and implementation and effective scale‐up. There’s an  appreciation of the sciences, but also an appreciation of what we need to do in order to  scale up and to implement programs with fidelity and with success.     Lastly, of course, is the realization that achieving an AIDS‐free generation is going to require  a whole new collaboration to truly bridge the many divides.    The focus of our meeting today and tomorrow is to explore the potential divide between  researchers, policymakers and implementers. There are not always divides and dissociations  amongst these groups, but when they do occur, they can really prevent us from achieving  our goals.        We certainly heard this loud and clear in many settings and from many people like you in  this room who felt that there’s something missing, and that there is an opportunity to bring 

 

 

HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

  26 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

27 

these two or three groups together and to come up with a joint agenda, a common future, a  common response to the challenges.     

    For example, how often do researchers engage policymakers before selecting a research  question? It’s not common, is it? In some cases, researchers only go to policymakers when  their research is complete, expecting successful interventions to be adopted into policy –  and funded – irrespective of national priorities. But researchers are also asking questions,  like: “What data do policymakers need in order to design and deliver effective health  services?  What are the important questions they have?”  They want to listen to those  questions, but may not have access to the right people to ask. Implementers also have  questions – and these may not always be evident to researchers, modellers or policymakers.  How can we facilitate this dialogue?  Lastly, what are the data that modelers need in order  to answer these questions? Those inputs, those data – they come from implementers.        Clearly, in order to move forward, we need to be listening to each other.  We need to be  listening to the questions that each group has, but we also need to be trying to derive the  answers that are truly meaningful and that can drive policy and can drive implementation  forward so that we can meet the goal of an AIDS‐free generation.      How can we build these bridges?  We’re hoping that through the conversations that we’ll  have tomorrow throughout the day we can tackle this issue and bring groups together and  try to articulate those questions both from the policymakers’ and implementers’ perspective  as well as from the modelers and researchers’ perspective and find a way to move the field  forward in order to reach our collective goals.    What does our agenda look like?  For tomorrow, Saturday morning, we’ll have two framing  presentations.  The first one will be by Rifat Atun and he’ll be talking about “Investing for  Sustained Scale‐Up of HIV Services.” As you know, Rifat is a professor at Imperial College  and we’re very thrilled to have him here with us.   

 


The second framing presentation will be given by John Blandford.  John is the director of the  Health Economics, Systems and Integration Branch at CDC, and is also well‐known to many  of you.  He’ll be talking about “Using Modeling and Forecasting to Inform Planning and  Policy.”      Then, we have two panel discussions.  The first one is “Planning for Sustained Scale‐Up:  Where is the Evidence?”  That will be co‐moderated by Till Bärnighausen and Sharonann  Lynch.  It will be an interesting conversation.  The second panel is focused on “Key  Questions from the Policymaker’s Perspective.”  I will co‐moderate this with Estelle Quain  from USAID.       Then, in the afternoon, we’ll start with two panels.  The first panel will focus on  “Decentralization and Policy Priorities.”  That will be moderated by Anita Asiimwe from the  Ministry of Health in Rwanda and Eric Goemaere from MSF, followed by the second panel  entitled “Integration of HIV Programs Into Health Systems: What Do and Don’t We Know  About the Tradeoffs?”  The moderators are Miriam Rabkin from ICAP Columbia and Craig  McClure from UNICEF.    And lastly, we will end by facilitated audience discussion.  We’ll hear from all of you.  This  discussion will be focusing on key questions from the implementer’s perspective.  The  moderators will be Tony Harries from The Union and Nancy Padian from OGAC.      We will then have closing comments by Jean‐Paul Moatti from ANRS, Anita Asiimwe from  the Rwanda Ministry of Health, John Blandford from the CDC, and Estelle Quain from USAID.     So that’s what’s ahead of us tomorrow.  We have a very ambitious agenda, but a very  exciting agenda. We are very excited to have you here and are looking forward to a  wonderful meeting tomorrow.  Thanks again.   

       

 

HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

 

  28 

 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

 

29 

 

 


Session #2: Welcome and Framing Presentations    Saturday 

 July 

The Saturday morning session started with opening remarks from Dr. David Wilson, Director  of the World Bank’s Global AIDS Program:  Welcome to the World Bank. Last night, we had an excellent  reception here, and then I went to a reception of the Global  Forum of Men Having Sex with Men and the Global Network of  People Living with HIV. We heard talks and we heard  marvelous songs from the Washington Gay Men’s Choir.   What struck me most is that I was fortunate to be at the last  AIDS Conference held in the U.S., in San Francisco in 1990,  where the San Francisco Gay Men’s Choir also sang. After their  song, they put up a picture of the choir three years before, but  with the faces of people who had died of AIDS blank—and at  least half were blank.  In contrast, standing in our auditorium  last night, there was so much levity in the room that speakers  could hardly be heard. To me it reflected the remarkable  transition of a period of 20 years. Yet the job isn’t complete; it’s not finished. We still have  immense challenges. That was the dilemma before me. Kevin De Cock, in a very nice blog for  this conference, said that we have to overcome forgetfulness and fatigue. We’ve forgotten  what the face of AIDS was like in Africa 20 years ago when hospitals overflowed with  emaciated patients; it was the leading cause of adult death. Coffin making was the fastest  growing business, lining miles of highways for cemeteries.   This group will look at some of the critical issues before us. In my framing remarks, I’d just  like to talk about the three I’s that are going to be so important for today. I think the first  one is one we’ve already heard: implementation. I think many of us could agree, and you  will discuss this in greater detail. If we can implement the best proven interventions; get as  close to 15 million people on treatment as possible; get as many people in the 14 priority  eastern and southern African countries circumcised as possible; implement intervention for  key populations; for pregnant mothers and for most at‐risk populations. If we can do all this,  we can perhaps reduce new infections by about half. You will decide whether we can do  more, or whether that will be our best.   This brings me to the second I: innovation. In a panel on Monday with Ambassador Goosby  and our President, Jim Kim, Bill Gates is going to argue that we don’t have the tools to do  the job, that we have the tools do about half of the job. We need further innovation to do  the rest. You’ll have your own views on that. I personally think he’s right to pose it that way.  I think the danger of the phrase we’re using – “ending  AIDS” – is that, in the public mind, it   

 

HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

  30 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

31 

basically equates to AIDS has ended, it’s ending, this is an end, and this conference is a  valedictory conference – which it isn’t.   I think the third critical I – and that’s why this group is so beautifully poised to address it – is  integration. Not in an abstract way, not in a confrontational way; but I think rallying around  the fact that PEPFAR is the largest single global health initiative in history. We have the  largest health platform we’ve had and what we need to do is look at how we can use AIDS  platforms for wider health delivery and wider health outcomes. No one’s been looking at it  longer and harder than Wafaa El‐Sadr and ICAP. You’ve helped to bridge this important  divide. I think before us at this conference, we need to balance implementation, innovation  and integration.   Let me conclude by simply saying that the World Bank is very proud you have chosen to  come to us for this meeting. We’re proud to host you. We’re very keen to strengthen our  partnerships with academic institutions. We’re very keen to bring epidemiology and  economics closer together. This is a great group to do it. Have a great conference!      Following Dr. Wilson’s remarks, Dr. Rifat Atun of Imperial College and Dr. John Blandford of  CDC gave framing presentations, addressing the twin themes of HIV and health systems.  Their slides begin on pages 86; slides, transcripts, and a webcast of the morning  presentations are available on the meeting website.  Dr. Atun’s presentation, entitled “Scaling up for Sustainable  Impact,” began with a call to build upon existing success, and a  review of the economic returns to investments in HIV/AIDS  services. Dr. Atun then discussed key challenges to scale‐up,  including weak health systems, declining health ODA, ongoing  challenges in retaining patients on care and treatment, and the  emergence of drug resistance. He briefly reviewed the vital  need to enhance the data, information and knowledge required  to assess impact and inform policy as HIV scale‐up continues,  and highlighted the importance of analyzing and modeling  complex adaptive systems in order to understand the factors  influencing the adoption of innovations.        

 


Dr. Blandford’s presentation was entitled “Bridging the Divide  (redux): Using Modeling and Forecasting to Inform Planning and  Policy.” He focused on the policy challenge facing PEPFAR  following the release of the HPTN 052 study, which  demonstrated the impact of ART on prevention amongst  serodiscordant couples. By 2011, PEPFAR was directly  supporting nearly 4 million patients on ART. At the same time,  funding resources had plateaued – but the new data suggested  that expanding access to ART might have dramatic effects on  prevention. Dr. Blandford summarized three key questions  facing PEPFAR policy‐makers at that time: is treatment  sustainable? What does treatment buy/what are the societal benefits? How do the  HPTN052 data change projection models? He described PEPFAR’s ART costing model and its  inputs, including field‐based primary data collection, analysis of procurement and budget  trends, and expenditure analysis. He also described PEPFAR’s analysis of societal benefits;  both the direct health impact of HIV services on patients and the indirect benefits to others,  including averted secondary infections. For every 1,000 patient‐years of treatment, PEPFAR  found that 228 patient deaths are averted, 449 children are not orphaned, 61 sexual  transmissions of HIV are averted, 29 mother‐to‐child infections are averted, 9 TB cases are  averted amongst HIV patients, and 2,200 life‐years are gained. Dr. Blandford briefly  describing the modeling involved in projecting the impact of accelerated treatment scale‐up,  and concluded by describing how the ability to use modeling and forecasting to answer  these three questions influenced a change in USG policy, prioritization, and targets. 

       

 

HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

   

    32 

 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

 

33 

 

 


Session # : Morning Panel Presentations    Saturday 

 July 

 

PANEL 1: Planning For Sustained Scale‐up: Where is the Evidence?  The first panel of the morning focused on examples of policy‐focused modeling and  research. Moderated by Dr. Till Bärnighausen from Harvard University and the Africa Centre  and Ms. Sharonann Lynch from Médecins Sans Frontières, the “lightning panel” format  required presenters to describe their research in no more than five minutes (for slides, see  page 96ff).   Dr. Charles Holmes, the Chief Medical Officer and Director of the  Office of Research and Science at the Office of the U.S. Global AIDS  Coordinator (OGAC), discussed ways in which research influenced USG  policy and treatment targets. Following the HPTN 052 trial findings,  which showed the dramatic impact of treatment on prevention  amongst serodiscordant couples, PEPFAR’s Scientific Advisory Board  recommended acceleration of ART scale up to all individuals with CD <  350, and to selected populations with CD4 > 350. Impact projections  and cost analyses were used to support reallocation of resources to  treatment, and to increase PEPFAR treatment targets.   Dr. Jan Hontelez, from the Erasmus University Medical Center and the Africa Center for  Health and Population Studies, described a time‐motion study conducted in HIV clinics in  rural South Africa. Extrapolating the results under various assumptions enabled his team to  describe the number of health workers needed to provide universal access to HIV care and  treatment in South Africa. Sharing these projections with health workforce policymakers will  be a key next step.   Dr. Emmanuel Njeuhmeli, the Senior Biomedical Prevention  Advisor at the Office of HIV/AIDS at USAID Washington, described  the value of modeling and costing studies for voluntary medical  male circumcision (VMMC). Following recommendations from  WHO and UNAIDS on VMMC, the project aimed to describe the  importance of VMMC within the prevention portfolio of PEPFAR  partner countries, to determine how much money is required for  VMMC scale‐up, to identify drivers of the unit cost, and to project  the impact of VMMC scale up in each country. The initiative 

 

 

HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

  34 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

combined facility‐based costing studies, modeling, funding gap analysis, and technical  support, leading to inclusion of the strategy in each of the 14 countries, and to allocation of  PEPFAR resources to VMMC scale‐up.   Mr. Leonard Nkosi, Project Director at Management Sciences for  Health for the AIDSTAR‐Two Malawi Project, described a  collaborative analysis of Malawi’s Emergency Human Resources  Project. The EHRP used five strategies – incentives, increased intake  of health workers, use of volunteers, central‐level technical  assistance, and an enhanced HRIS – in order to address Malawi’s  HRH crisis. The analysis was designed to evaluate the strategy, and  found dramatic impact on outputs, outcomes, and impact. Over the  period of the EHRP strategy, Malawi saw a 49% increase in OPD attendance, a 15% increase  in safe deliveries, a 7% increase in ANC visits, a 10% increase in immunization coverage, and  an 18% increase in PMTCT coverage.   Dr. Claudes Kamenga, UNICEF Regional Advisor for HIV/AIDS in West and Central Africa,  described a six‐country PMTCT bottleneck analysis, designed to identify key barriers to  expansion of PMTCT services. The results showed widespread similarities in the types but  not the significance of bottlenecks amongst and between study countries. Frail policy and  management environments, weak procurement and supply chain management, scarcity of  human resources and weak monitoring and evaluation systems contributed to low coverage,  inequitable access, and high dropout rates.  

35 

 


PANEL 2: Key Questions from the Policy‐Maker Perspective 

 

The second morning panel was hosted by Dr. Wafaa El‐Sadr, Director of ICAP Columbia, and  Dr. Estelle Quain, Senior Technical Advisor for Human Resources for Health and Team  Leader for Health Systems Strengthening in the Office of HIV/AIDS at USAID.   Panelists included Mr. Benedict Xaba, the Honorable Minister of Health of Swaziland, Dr.  Faustine Ndugulile, Vice‐Chairman of the Parliamentary Social Services Committee in  Tanzania’s Parliament, Dr. Kesetebirhan Admasu, State Minister for Health Programs for the  Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia, Dr. Ibrahim Mohamed, Director of Kenya’s  National AIDS/STI Control Programme in the Ministry of Medical Services, and Dr. Yogan  Pillay, Deputy Director General of Strategic Health Programmes at South Africa’s  Department of Health.   The discussion revolved around the need to align research and modeling with policy and  national contexts, and the challenges of fostering early dialogue between national  policymakers and researchers. Each of the speakers gave examples of health Ministry  information needs and priorities, from health workforce modeling to cost projections to  questions about optimizing service delivery models.   (A webcast of the proceedings is available on the meeting website).   

 

HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

        

 

 

  36 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

 

37 

 

 


Session # : Afternoon Panel Presentations    Saturday 

 July  Dr. Gottfried Hirnschall, Director of the HIV/AIDS Department at  the World Health Organization, opened the afternoon session,  and welcomed participants to the afternoon session on behalf of  WHO.    

  PANEL 3: Decentralization – Examples and Case Studies  The afternoon’s first panel was moderated by  Dr. Anita Asiimwe from the Rwanda  Biomedical Center and Dr. Eric Goemaere of  Médecins Sans Frontières. It was a “lightning  panel,” in which presenters were limited to a  mere five minutes to describe examples of  decentralization of HIV prevention, care and  treatment programs. Presenters focused on  the challenges of geographic decentralization;  subsequent discussion also included the issue of decentralizing management and  governance. Slides are available on page 105.   Dr. Tom Decroo, who leads MSF’s HIV project in the province of  Tete, Mozambique, described the community ART groups (CAGs)  which he developed in partnership with patients and communities.  The CAGs are designed to bring care and treatment to the  community level; group members meet monthly in the community,  verify members’ adherence to treatment, complete a group card,  and designate one member to travel to the ART clinic on behalf of  the entire group, which can be no larger than six people. That  member reports to the clinic staff and receives refills for each group  member, which s/he brings back to the community. MSF has enrolled  nearly 5,000 patients in the CAGs, which are completely voluntary; results are excellent, and  more than 96% of patients are retained in care.  

 

 

HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

  38 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

Dr. Connie Celum is Professor of Medicine and Global Health,  Adjunct Professor of Epidemiology, and Director of the  International Clinical Research Center in the Department of  Global Health at the University of Washington. She described a  home‐based HIV counseling and testing program piloted in  South Africa, which demonstrated the acceptability and  effectiveness of home‐based HIV testing and point‐of‐care CD4  testing. The study enrolled 282 households, testing 673 adults  (91% uptake). Of these, 201 were found to be HIV‐positive, 30%  of whom were diagnosed for the first time; 95% had visited an  ART clinic at six months. The point of care CD4 testing had good agreement with flow‐ cytometry‐based CD4 testing. The pilot project will be followed by larger Phase 2 studies in  South Africa and Uganda.   Dr. David Hoos, Senior Implementation Director at ICAP Columbia  and Assistant Professor of Clinical Epidemiology at the Columbia  University Mailman School of Public Health, discussed ICAP’s  experience supporting decentralization of HIV services in Tanzania.  In the four ICAP‐supported regions, the number of sites providing  HIV care and treatment services has grown from 78 in end‐2008 to  127 in end‐2011, including a mix of hospitals and primary health  centers (PHC). Most PHC offer PMTCT services, which are  geographically accessible to most pregnant women. ART, however,  is less accessible.  Of the 595 facilities offering PMTCT services, only  118 (20%) have on‐site access to ART, requiring women to travel for ART services.  Dr. Hoos  highlighted the fact that while PMTCT uptake and coverage is high, only 13% of newly‐ diagnosed HIV‐positive pregnant women in Tanzania initiate therapeutic ART (i.e., life‐long  ART for their own health). If all currently‐eligible pregnant women initiated treatment, ART  enrollment would increase by 40%, raising policy questions regarding the location of that  care. Dr. Hoos discussed the implications of these data for the Option B+ strategy, in which  all pregnant HIV‐positive women are intended to initiate therapeutic ART, noting the  substantial systems challenges in providing lifelong ART to so many women during and after  pregnancy, particularly as most of these women will initiate services at PHC and other  clinical sites which do not currently provide ART.    

 

39 

   

 


PANEL 4: Integration of HIV Programs into Health Systems – What Do  and Don’t We Know About the Tradeoffs?   The final “lightning panel” of the day was  moderated by Dr. Miriam Rabkin of ICAP‐ Columbia and Mr. Craig McClure from UNICEF.  The moderators emphasized the panel’s focus  on the integration of HIV programs into  broader health systems, rather than on the  integration of clinical services at the point of  care. This type of integration, or  “mainstreaming,” of HIV programs is often  assumed to be the solution to challenges of  both access and efficiency – but the evidence base to support these assumptions is limited.  The panel focused on what is (and is not) known about the tradeoffs implied in moving from  “vertical” HIV programs to “diagonal” or fully‐integrated programs. What is the impact of  integration on the broader health system – on quality, coverage, equity, and efficiency?  What is the impact of integration on the HIV programs themselves? And what is the priority  research agenda as HIV initiatives evolve from highly vertical “siloes” to services integrated  into national planning, financing, and service delivery programs? As before, presenters were  limited to five minutes each; their slides are available on page 110 ff.   Ms. Stephanie Topp, former Integration Program Manager at the  Centre of Infectious Disease Research in Zambia (CIDRZ) and a current  doctoral candidate at the Nossal Institute for Global Health at the  University of Melbourne, discussed the Zambian experience with  integrating HIV services into primary health care. Between 2008 and  2011, the Lusaka District Health Management Team with support from  CIDRZ, piloted and then scaled‐up a model that integrated HIV and  general outpatient (OPD) services. She reviewed the advantages of  integrated services in areas such as staff scheduling, supervision and  work culture, as well as disadvantages, including increased waiting times for both HIV and  OPD patients and a slight worsening in some indicators of the quality of HIV care.  Ms. Topp  concluded by asking the audience to consider three key questions: where is there greatest  resistance to the idea of integrated programming, and why? What indicators are important  when considering whether and how integration can help strengthen health systems? And  finally, what research methods are most appropriate for studying a phenomenon that is  both complex and context‐specific?  

 

 

HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

  40 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

41 

Dr. Karl Dehne, acting Chief of the Economics, Evaluation and Program  Effectiveness Division at UNAIDS, presented the results of a systematic  review on the costs and efficiencies of integrating HIV/AIDS services  with other health services. The review included 46 studies (and 666  citations); Dr. Dehne noted that most of the research explored the  integration of clinical services, not integration into health systems. The  review concluded that HIV counseling and testing is less expensive  when integrated into primary health care or family planning than when  provided as a stand‐alone service. The authors also highlighted the fact that there is very  limited evidence on the cost of integrating HIV care and treatment services with other  programs, despite the frequent assumption that this approach will provide cost‐savings  compared to stand‐alone ART clinics.  They also noted that there is hardly any costing data  on above‐facility costs, e.g., integration of supply systems, training, supervision or  monitoring and evaluation. Dr. Dehne concluded that while integration can lead to  efficiencies, not every model in every setting will do so.  Ms. Bertha Katjivena, Director of Policy, Planning and Human  Resource Development for the Namibian Ministry of Health and  Social Services, shared Namibia’s experience with re‐integrating  donor‐funded HIV project staff into Health Ministry structures. She  noted that Namibia has had a rapid and largely successful HIV/AIDS  response. However, one consequence of robust donor support and  the rapid scale‐up of highly vertical programs is that by 2012, the  salaries of 1,455 clinical and non‐clinical health workers were  funded by donors, in a country whose total public‐sector workforce  totals 4,400 health workers. Ms. Katjivena described the daunting  financial, legal, and operational challenges of absorbing donor‐funded HIV staff into existing  government structures without disrupting HIV programs.   Dr. Sanjana Bardwaj, Senior PMTCT and Pediatric HIV Specialist at  UNICEF South Africa, presented a brief overview of South Africa’s  efforts to fully integrate PMTCT services into the country’s  maternal, neonatal and child health programs. She highlighted  progress on three levels: policies, programs, and practice.  At the  policy level, she noted the complexities of changing not only the  national Action Framework, but 9 provincial and 52 district Action  Frameworks, and the need to harmonize plans across multiple  domains, including the country’s MCH Strategy, its National  Strategic Plan for HIV/AIDS, STI and TB, its National Health  Insurance initiative, its Primary Health Care Reengineering strategy and its Campaign on   


Accelerated Reduction of Maternal and Child Mortality in Africa (CARMA), among others. At  the program level, she described the use of Data for Action reports and a robot dashboard,  showing progress at the national, province, district, sub‐district, and facility levels. At the  practice level, Dr. Bardwaj highlighted the challenge of synergized messaging, joint  accountability, and the need to maintain focus on both HIV and MCH outcomes.  

   

 

 

HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

  42 

 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

 

43 

 


Planning Group  Wafaa El-Sadr (Chair) Director, ICAP Columbia University Professor of Epidemiology and Medicine Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health New York USA Rifat Atun Professor of International Health Management Imperial College Business School and Faculty of Medicine London UK Till Bärnighausen Assistant Professor of Global Health and Population Harvard University School of Public Health Boston USA Paulin Basinga Lecturer, School of Public Health National University of Rwanda Kigali Rwanda Stephen Becker Affiliate Associate Professor of Global Health University of Washington Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Seattle Washington

 

HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

Deborah Birx Director, CGH Division of Global HIV/AIDS Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Atlanta USA John Blandford Chief, Health Economics, Systems & Integration Branch CGH Division of Global HIV/AIDS

 

  44 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

45 

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Atlanta USA

Chris Duncombe Senior Program Officer Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation Seattle USA Gottfried Hirnschall Director, HIV Department World Health Organization Geneva Switzerland Charles Holmes Chief Medical Officer, Office of the U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator Washington, DC USA Elly Katabira President, International AIDS Society and Associate Professor of Medicine Makerere Medical School Kampala Uganda Sharonann Lynch Senior HIV/AIDS Policy Advisor Treatment Action Campaign Médecins sans Frontières Craig McClure Chief, HIV/AIDS Section Associate Director, Programmes UNICEF New York USA Paulo Miotti Senior Scientist Office of AIDS Research National Institute of Health

 


Bethesda USA

Jean-Paul Moatti Professor of Health Economics University of the Mediterranean Marseilles France Faustine Ndugulile Regional Representative, IAS Governing Council Director, HealthConsult Tanzania Ltd Dar es Salaam Tanzania Estelle Quain Team Leader, Health Systems Strengthening Office of HIV/AIDS USAID Washington, DC USA Miriam Rabkin Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine & Epidemiology Director for Health Systems Strategies, ICAP Columbia Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health New York USA Pratima Raghunathan Acting Country Director, CDC Rwanda Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Global AIDS Program Kigali Rwanda David Wilson Director, Global AIDS Program The World Bank Washington, DC USA    

 

 

HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

  46 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

 

47 

 


Speaker and Panelist Biographies  

 

 

 

Kesetebirhan Admasu, MD, MPH is currently serving as the  State Minister for Health Programs of the Federal Democratic  Republic of Ethiopia. Prior to his appointment as State Minister  in October 2010, Dr. Kesetebirhan served as Director General of  Health Promotion and Disease Prevention General Directorate  in the Ministry. In his capacity as DG, Dr. Kesetebirhan oversaw  health sector reform and led the implementation of Ethiopia’s  flagship health program, the health extension program. He is a  champion of innovation, task‐shifting, and implementation at  scale.      Dr. Kesetebirhan has dedicated his entire career to public  service and scientific research, focused on major public health  problems in Ethiopia. A medical doctor by training with  Master’s in Public Health, Dr. Kesetebirhan has served in a  number of clinical and public health positions. He has worked  as a public‐private partnership team leader, the CEO of a  tertiary hospital and DG, before assuming his current  ministerial portfolio.    Anita Asiimwe, MD, MPH specializes in public health strategies,  tackling the HIV/AIDS epidemic and other health conditions. A  medical doctor by profession, she holds a Master’s degree in  Public Health from Dundee University (UK). Currently, Dr.  Asiimwe is the Deputy Director General of the Rwanda  Biomedical Center and Head of the Institute of HIV, Disease  Prevention and Control (IHDPC) where she is the overall  coordinator of the national response to all disease conditions.     While she was the Executive Secretary of the Rwanda National  AIDS Control Commission, Dr. Asiimwe was also an overseer of  the Global Fund Projects Monitoring Unit in Rwanda. Prior to  this, she served as the Deputy Director General of TRACPlus,  the Director of HIV/AIDS and IST’s Unit at TRACPlus, and the  advisor to the State Minister in charge of HIV/AIDS and other 

 

HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

  48 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

epidemics in the Ministry of Health, among other  responsibilities. Dr. Asiimwe is presently a member of the  Eastern and Southern Africa region’s high‐level task force for  women, girls, gender equality, and HIV. During Rwanda’s  Chairmanship of the GLIA (Great Lakes Initiative on AIDS), she  chaired the GLIA Executive Committee, composed of the Heads  of National AIDS Control Commissions of Burundi, the  Democratic Republic of Congo, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania, and  Uganda. She is also a research scientist, and the principal  investigator for several studies of the Rwandan HIV/AIDS  program.     Rifat Atun, MBBS, MBS, DIC, FRCGP, FFPH, FRCP is Professor of  International Health Management at Imperial College Business  School and Faculty of Medicine Imperial College London. He  heads the Health Management Group at Imperial College  Business School. Between 2008 and 2012, he was a member of  the Executive Management Team at the Global Fund to Fight  AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria in Switzerland as the Director of  Strategy, Performance, and Evaluation Cluster. Since 2009, he  has been the Chair of the Stop TB Partnership Coordinating  Board.    Professor Atun has worked globally with the UK Department for  International Development, the DFID Resource Centre for Health  Systems, the World Bank, World Health Organization, and other  international health agencies to design, implement, and evaluate  health systems reforms and communicable and non‐ communicable disease programs. His research focuses on  innovation in health systems. Professor Atun was a member of  the Strategic Technical Advisory Group of the World Health  Organization for Tuberculosis, and the Advisory Committee for  WHO Research Centre for Health Development in Japan. He is a  member of the Scientific Advisory Board for PEPFAR, the Global  Health Group at the UK Medical Research Council, and the  Global Task Force for Expanding Cancer Care and Control in  Developing Countries. He has published extensively on health  systems, communicable disease control, and innovation in  health and biopharmaceutical sectors.  

49 

 


Professor Atun studied medicine at the University of London as a  Commonwealth Scholar, and completed his postgraduate medical  studies and Master’s in business administration at University of  London and Imperial College London. He is a Fellow of the Faculty  of Public Health of the Royal College of Physicians (UK), a Fellow  of the Royal College of General Practitioners (UK), and a Fellow of  the Royal College of Physicians (UK).    Till Bärnighausen, MD, PhD, MSc, ScD is Senior Epidemiologist at  the Africa Centre for Health and Population Studies and Assistant  Professor of Global Health in the Department of Global Health  and Population at the Harvard School of Public Health. He  received his MD and PhD (in the History of Medicine) from the  University of Heidelberg, an MSc in Health Systems Management  from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, an  MSc in Financial Economics from the University of London and a  ScD in international health (economics) from the Harvard School  of Public Health.    

Sanjana Bhardwaj, MBBS, MD, MPH is the Senior PMTCT and  Pediatric HIV Specialist at UNICEF South Africa, responsible for  technical support to the government and partners for scaling up  PMTCT and pediatric AIDS programs integrated with maternal  and child health programs. She has 17 years of experience as a  clinician, researcher, trainer, and program manager and has  been involved in policy development work in public health,  particularly HIV/AIDS and maternal and child health. Since  2004, Dr. Bhardwaj has worked with UNICEF, providing  technical assistance and supporting systems strengthening,  evidence‐based planning and policy development for  Governments in India, Papua New Guinea, and South Africa. Dr.  Bhardwaj has designed and led programs on HIV prevention,  focused on the most at‐risk and especially vulnerable  adolescents and youth; PMTCT and Pediatric AIDS; and  protection, care, and support of children affected and made  vulnerable by HIV/AIDS.   

 

 

HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

  50 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

Dr. Bhardwaj has a Master’s degree in Public Health in Health  Behavior from the University of Alabama at Birmingham, and is  an alumni fellow of the AIDS International Training and  Research program of the National Institutes of Health, USA. She  has medical degrees from India. She graduated from the  Leadership Development Initiative UNICEF and completed the  ‘Health Policy and Financing: Achieving Results for Children’  course at the London School of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.    Deborah Birx, MD has been the Director of the Division of  Global HIV/AIDS in CDC’s Center for Global Health since 2005.  Dr. Birx oversees all of CDC’s global HIV/AIDS activities in  support of the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief  (PEPFAR), which includes nearly 400 staff at headquarters, over  1,200 staff in the field, and more than 43 country offices in  Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, and Latin America. With her  specialized knowledge and decades of international experience  in the field of HIV/AIDS, coupled with her dedication for  enhancing prevention, care and treatment programs, she has  greatly expanded CDC’s role and impact in achieving the goals  of PEPFAR.    Beginning her career in 1985 in immunology, Dr. Birx focused  on HIV/AIDS vaccine research. From 1985 to 1989 she served as  the Assistant Chief of the Allergy Immunology Service at Walter  Reed Army Medical Center, earning the U.S. Meritorious Service  Medal for her leadership in refining, validating, and  standardizing cell‐mediated immunity testing in HIV‐infected  patients. She was also recognized with the U.S. Meritorious  Service Medal for her groundbreaking work in organizing and  implementing a vaccine therapy efficacy trial from 1990‐1995.  She served as the Director of the U.S. Military HIV Research  Program at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research from  1996‐2005 and received the Legion of Merit award for her  leadership. Dr. Birx received her medical degree from the  Hershey School of Medicine, Pennsylvania State University. She  trained in basic and clinical immunology at the National  Institutes of Health/Walter Reed Army Medical Center and is  board certified in internal medicine, allergy and immunology,  and diagnostic and clinical immunology. 

51 

 


John M. Blandford, PhD is Chief of the Health Economics,  Systems, and Integration Branch in the Division of Global  HIV/AIDS (DGHA) of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and  Prevention. Since joining the Division of Global HIV/AIDS in  2003, he has established DGHA’s leadership in the use of  economic research and financial analyses to support  sustainable scale‐up and efficient operation of global PEPFAR  programs. He directed the PEPFAR ART Costing Project, a multi‐ country public health evaluation to study the costs and cost  drivers of PEPFAR’s treatment programs. He has grown the  economics team to support PEPFAR in planning and  optimization of resources in global HIV programming and has  pioneered routine expenditure analyses to inform program  management and efficiency.    For two years, Dr. Blandford was seconded to the Office of the  U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator, where he led public health  evaluation activities and guided efforts to project resource  needs for scale‐up of PEPFAR programs. He entered federal  service as a postdoctoral Prevention Effectiveness Fellow in  CDC’s Division of STD Prevention. Prior to joining CDC, he was a  Social Science Research Council postdoctoral fellow at the  University of Chicago. He has also worked in the philanthropic  sector supporting grant review and grant‐making operations  and as an adjunct instructor of undergraduate and graduate  courses in economic theory and public policy.     Connie Celum, MD, MPH is a Professor of Medicine and Global  Health an Adjunct Professor of Epidemiology and Director of the  International Clinical Research Center in the Department of  Global Health at the University of Washington.  She is an  infectious diseases physician and epidemiologist, and her  research interests include HIV‐prevention, microbicide, and  vaccine trials with the objective to find effective strategies to  reduce HIV acquisition and transmission. Dr. Celum was the  Principal Investigator of two recently completed trials of genital  herpes suppression for prevention of HIV acquisition,  transmission and disease progression (the Partners in Prevention  HSV/HIV Transmission Study and HPTN 039 trials) that were 

 

 

HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

  52 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

conducted in 20 sites in the US, Peru, and eight countries in  Africa (Botswana, Kenya, Rwanda, South Africa, Tanzania,  Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe).  She is the Principal  Investigator of the Partners PrEP Study of pre‐exposure  antiretroviral prophylaxis among HIV serodiscordant couples in  Kenya and Uganda.  She is leading studies of home‐based HIV  testing and combination HIV prevention in South Africa and  Uganda. After completing her BA at Stanford University (1979),  she received her MD from the University of California, San  Francisco (1984) and her MPH in Epidemiology from the  University of Washington (1989).    Tom Decroo, MD has been engaged in MSF’s HIV/AIDS projects,  mainly in Mozambique, since 2003. Dr. Decroo studied medicine  at the University of Gent, in Belgium, and as a clinician, he has  experienced the tremendous impact of ART on people’s lives.  During the years, he worked as the doctor responsible for the  HIV project in Tete, Mozambique. Two questions guided him:  First, how can the model of ART care be adapted to scale up ART  in the resource constrained contexts in Sub‐Saharan Africa?  Second, how could lessons learnt from chronic disease care be  applied to involve PLWHA themselves as a resource for their own  lifelong condition? In an attempt to respond to these questions,  Dr. Decroo developed an innovative model of ART care, driven  and owned by the community, called Community ART Groups.     Karl L. Dehne, MD, PhD is the acting Chief of the UNAIDS  Economics, Evaluation and Program Effectiveness Division in  Geneva. This is a newly established division that provides  leadership on policies and approaches for achieving the HLM  goals related to efficiency and financing of HIV responses.  Previously, Dr. Dehne was the Team Leader, System Integration,  UNAIDS. He was also instrumental, together with colleagues in  PEPFAR and UNAIDS, in developing the Global Plan for the  Elimination of New Child Infection by 2015 and Keeping Their  Mothers Alive.     Dr. Dehne has worked on HIV prevention, treatment care and  support for more than 25 years, in various positions in WHO, 

53 

 


UNAIDS, NGOs and the Government of Zimbabwe. From 1998 to  2000, he was a lecturer at the University of Heidelberg,  Germany, where he led the UNAIDS Collaborating Centre on  AIDS Strategic Planning and Operational Research. Dr. Dehne  holds an MD from Heidelberg, and a PHD and MPH from Leeds.    Wafaa El‐Sadr, MD, MPH, MA is the director of ICAP and the  Global Health Initiative at the Mailman School of Public Health  and is professor of epidemiology and medicine at Columbia  University. She is a leader in global health with many  contributions in HIV/TB, tuberculosis, maternal and child health,  and broad health systems strengthening.     Dr. El‐Sadr has been a member of the Columbia community for  close to 25 years. For two decades, she led the Division of  Infectious Diseases at Harlem Hospital where she successfully  established a multi‐dimensional research and service program  responsive to the needs of the community. Building on this  experience, Dr. El‐Sadr took the lessons learned from Harlem to  the global arena at a time when millions had little or no options  for HIV prevention or treatment. Through ICAP, the center she  founded and directs, more than a million people with HIV have  received HIV‐related services in sub‐Saharan Africa and Central  Asia. Dr. El‐Sadr’s work demonstrates a deep appreciation of the  breadth of issues fundamental to transforming the health of  populations at local and global levels—from scientific discovery  to implementation science.     Dr. El‐Sadr received her medical degree from Cairo University in  Egypt, a Master’s of public health from Columbia Mailman  School of Public Health, and a Master’s of public administration  from Harvard University. She has received numerous awards for  her scholarship and is a recipient of a MacArthur Genius  Fellowship. Dr. El‐Sadr is a member of the Institute of Medicine  of the National Academies, one of the highest honors in  medicine. 

 

HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

  54 

 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

Eric Goemaere, MD, DTMH, PhD is a Regional HIV/TB advisor for  MSF South Africa. He has extensive humanitarian experience  with MSF. For the last 13 years, he has been involved in  developing HIV programs in sub‐Saharan Africa. He is associated  with the Centre for Infectious diseases, Epidemiology & Research  at Cape Town University, and is a technical adviser for the South  African National Aids Council.   

Eric Goosby, MD serves as the United States Global AIDS  Coordinator, leading all U.S. Government international  HIV/AIDS efforts. In this role, Ambassador Goosby oversees  implementation of the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS  Relief (PEPFAR), as well as U.S. Government engagement with  the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. He  serves on the Operations Committee that leads the U.S. Global  Health Initiative, along with the heads of the U.S. Agency for  International Development and the Centers for Disease Control  and Prevention.          Ambassador Goosby served as CEO and Chief Medical Officer of  Pangaea Global AIDS Foundation from 2001 to 2009. He also  previously served as Professor of Clinical Medicine at the  University of California, San Francisco. Ambassador Goosby has  played a key role in the development and implementation of  HIV/AIDS national treatment scale‐up plans in South Africa,  Rwanda, China, and Ukraine, focusing his expertise on the  scale‐up of sustainable HIV/AIDS treatment capacity, including  the delivery of HIV antiretroviral drugs, within existing  healthcare systems. Ambassador Goosby has extensive  international experience in the development of treatment  guidelines for use of antiretroviral therapies, clinical mentoring  and training of health professionals, and the design and  implementation of local models of care for HIV/AIDS. He has  worked closely with international partners on the development  of successful HIV/AIDS treatment and treatment‐based 

55 

 


prevention strategies for high‐risk populations.     Ambassador Goosby has over 25 years of experience with  HIV/AIDS, ranging from his early years treating patients at San  Francisco General Hospital when AIDS first emerged, to  engagement at the highest level of policy leadership. As the first  Director of the Ryan White Care Act at the U.S. Department of  Health and Human Services, Ambassador Goosby helped  develop HIV/AIDS delivery systems in the United States. During  the Clinton Administration, he served as Deputy Director of the  White House National AIDS Policy Office and Director of the  Office of HIV/AIDS Policy of the U.S. Department of Health and  Human Services. Ambassador Goosby has longstanding working  relationships with leading multilateral organizations, including  UNAIDS, the Global Fund, and the World Health Organization.    Anthony David Harries, MD is Senior Advisor at the  International Union against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease in  France and an honorary professor at the London School of  Hygiene and Tropical Medicine in the UK. He is a physician and  a registered specialist in the United Kingdom in infectious  diseases and tropical medicine.    

Dr. Harries spent over 20 years living and working in sub‐ Saharan Africa, starting in North‐east Nigeria in 1983. In 1986,  he moved to Malawi, where he was consecutively Consultant  Physician, Foundation Professor of Medicine at the new medical  school in Blantyre, National Advisor to the Malawi Tuberculosis  Control Programme and National Advisor in HIV care and  treatment in the Ministry of Health, responsible for scaling up  antiretroviral therapy in the country. In 2008, he returned to  the UK where he works for the International Union Against  Tuberculosis and Lung Disease.  

 

HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

 

Dr. Harries’ main interests are in the field of TB, HIV/AIDS,  tropical medicine, and operational research.  He has received  several awards and prizes for his work, and in 2002 was  appointed Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE) for  his services in tuberculosis in Africa.   

 

  56 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

Gottfried Hirnschall, MD, MPH is the Director of the HIV/AIDS  Department of the World Health Organization. In this role, he  leads the organization’s work in development and  implementation of cutting‐edge normative policies and  guidance for HIV prevention, treatment, care and support. Over  the past twenty years, Dr. Hirnschall has contributed to WHO’s  work in child, adolescent, reproductive health, and HIV,  supporting numerous programs worldwide to change realities  for millions of people in need of quality health services.     Dr. Hirnschall has also managed several major initiatives at  WHO, including the mobilization of global partners and donors  for the historic “3 by 5” initiative for scaling up HIV treatment in  developing countries. He also directed the Caribbean HIV  program for the Pan‐American Health Organization (PAHO),  subsequently leading WHO’s HIV work for the Americas based  at the PAHO office in Washington D.C.  Since 2010, Dr.  Hirnschall has been directing the WHO’s global HIV Program,  focusing on optimizing the organization’s role in improving  effectiveness, impact, and sustainability of the global HIV  response in the new decade.    As an MD specialized in Family Health at the University of  Vienna, Dr. Hirnschall holds a Diploma in Tropical Medicine  from the Swiss Tropical & Public Health Institute. He completed  the Epidemic Intelligence Service at the Centers for Disease  Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, USA, and conducted  special studies in health economics at the London School of  Economics and Political Science. He has a Master’s degree in  Public Health from the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health.  

57 

 


Charles Holmes, MD, MPH joined the Office of the U.S. Global  AIDS Coordinator (OGAC) in 2008, and currently serves as Chief  Medical Officer and Director of the Office of Research and  Science. Following medical school at Wayne State University, and  an MPH in Epidemiology from the University of Michigan, he  completed clinical training in internal medicine and infectious  diseases at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical  School. During his training, Dr. Holmes performed clinical work in  Malawi and assisted in the development of Malawi’s Round 1  application to the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB and Malaria. He  went on to serve on the faculty at Harvard Medical School,  focusing on outcomes research and the cost‐effectiveness of  antiretroviral treatment strategies in South Africa. Dr. Holmes  was a member of the 2010 World Health Organization Treatment  Guidelines Committee, and he remains involved in efforts to  update the guidelines and to ensure their strategic adoption at  the country level.     In his current role at OGAC, Dr. Holmes oversees PEPFAR’s  clinical and research programs and provides input into  policymaking. He continues to provide patient care as an  infectious diseases physician and is actively engaged as a co‐ investigator on several clinical and epidemiological studies.  David Hoos, MD, MPH is Senior Implementation Director at ICAP  Columbia and Assistant Professor of Clinical Epidemiology at  Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health (MSPH).  A board‐certified internist, Dr. Hoos was an initial member of the  MTCT Plus Secretariat at MSPH, where he was responsible for  establishing the procurement system for antiretroviral drugs and  other HIV‐associated medications and diagnostics – the first  multicountry, full‐formulary ARV procurement system to be  established. Dr. Hoos was also the director for the Multicountry  Columbia Antiretroviral Program (MCAP), an eight‐year  cooperative agreement funded by the CDC, which supported the  scale up of HIV prevention, care and treatment in Cote d’Ivoire,  Ethiopia, Kenya, Mozambique, Nigeria, Rwanda, South Africa,  and Tanzania.  Dr. Hoos has been recognized as a technical  expert in a number of areas related to HIV policy and  programming. He served as a member of the Technical Review 

 

 

HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

  58 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

Panel (TRP) for the Global Fund for AIDS, TB and Malaria  (GFATM). He also serves as the chairperson for the Procurement  and Supply Management Advisory Panel (PSMAP), which is  advisory to the GFATM on procurement related policy and  country guidance. He has been a member of several WHO  technical panels, and was seconded to UNAIDS in Geneva as a  treatment advocacy advisor for eight months in 2011.     Jan Hontelez, MPH holds two Master’s degrees, in epidemiology  and public health, and works at the Erasmus University Medical  Centre in Rotterdam, at the Department of Public Health. He is  currently doing research on the impact of ART on HIV epidemic  dynamics using mathematical models, with a focus on South  Africa and sub‐Saharan Africa. Mr. Hontelez is also affiliated with  the Africa Centre for Health and Population Studies in South  Africa, and the Raboud University, Nijmegen (Netherlands).  

Claudes Kamenga, MD is a medical doctor and a public health  specialist with more than 20 years of international experience in  health and HIV/AIDS programming and research. He currently  serves as Regional Advisor, HIV‐AIDS, UNICEF West and Central  Africa Region. In this position, he provides technical leadership,  expert advice, analysis and technical support to the 24 countries  in West and Central Africa on HIV and AIDS policies and  programs.    Before joining UNICEF, Dr. Kamenga worked for Family Health  International where he last served as Senior Director, Technical  Support and Research Utilization, providing oversight and  leadership on technical support on HIV prevention, care and  treatment, and research utilization.

59 

 


Elly Tebasoboke Katabira, MBChB, FRCP Edin., is a Professor of  Medicine and former Deputy Dean for Research of the Faculty of  Medicine at Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda. He was  trained as a medical doctor at Makerere University and later  specialized in Neurology (Manchester UK; 1984). Since his return  to Uganda in 1985, he has worked extensively in the field of care  and support for people living with HIV. He is the Clinical Advisor  at the AIDS Clinic in Mulago Hospital and at the Infectious  Diseases Institute of Makerere University College of Health  Sciences.    In 1990, Dr. Katabira was recognized as a World AIDS Foundation  International Scholar. His strength is in the development of  treatment and management guidelines for HIV/AIDS and he has  written several publications and chapters in various books on  this topic. His research interests include clinical trials and  operational research issues on various aspects of HIV/AIDS care  and support, both within institutions and in the community. Dr.  Katabira is also co‐founder of The AIDS Support Organization  (TASO) and has been their Medical Advisor since 1987. He is a  founding member of the Academic Alliance of AIDS Care and  Prevention in Africa. Dr. Katabira is also the author of more than  200 published scientific articles and abstracts. In June 2000, he  was elected a member of IAS Governing Council in the African  Region. Since then he has actively participated in many IAS  activities, including as a co‐chair of the IAS Industry Liaison  Forum (ILF) and as a Co‐Editor of the Journal of the International  AIDS Society (JIAS). He was elected President‐Elect of IAS in  December 2007 and took office as President in July 2010. 

 

HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

  60 

 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

Bertha Katjivena, MA, MHMPP is currently the Director of  Policy, Planning, and Human Resource Development for the  Ministry of Health and Social Services of the Republic of  Namibia. In this position, Ms. Katjivena is responsible for the  overall coordination of strategic planning for health services,  policy formulation, development cooperation, health facility  planning, management information and research, as well as the  coordination of human resource development for the Ministry.  Ms. Katjivena, a Registered Nurse by profession, holds a  master’s degree in Health Management, Planning, and Policy  (MHMPP) from the University of Leeds, United Kingdom as well  as a Diploma in Health Economics from the University of Cape  Town, South Africa.      Sharonann Lynch is a Senior HIV/AIDS Policy Advisor for the  Treatment Access Campaign at Médecins sans Frontières. A  longtime activist and advocate, she has also worked with ACT‐ UP and Health GAP. 

61 

 


Craig McClure is the Chief of the HIV/AIDS section at UNICEF  New York, where he provides leadership and coordinates  UNICEF’s work on HIV and AIDS at a global level.    Prior to his appointment, Mr. McClure served as Coordinator,  A.I., and Senior Adviser, HIV/AIDS at the World Health  Organization (WHO) in Geneva, where he coordinated the  treatment and care team in the HIV Department. From 2004‐ 2009, Mr. McClure was Executive Director of the International  AIDS Society (IAS), where he oversaw the staging of six major  international and scientific conferences.    In 2000, Mr. McClure worked for the International AIDS Vaccine  Initiative (IAVI) on public policy and community‐preparedness for  vaccine trials. He then joined WHO in 2002 to support  partnerships for the “3 by 5” initiative.    Mr. McClure has a background in political science, international  relations, education, and counseling. His involvement in the fight  against AIDS began in 1991 when, while teaching secondary  school in the UK, he joined the activist group ACT‐UP  Manchester.  He returned to his native Canada in 1993 and  worked for five years in the community‐based sector with the  Canadian AIDS Treatment Information Exchange (CATIE) as an  educator and coordinator of treatment advocacy, information,  and literacy programs. After leaving CATIE, Mr. McClure co‐ founded the consulting firm Health Hounds focused on  organizational development and HIV policy for government, not‐ for‐profit organizations and industry.       Mr. McClure is committed to working to end the AIDS epidemic  through approaches that balance investments in research with  achieving and sustaining universal access to prevention, treatment and care, and promoting and protecting the rights of people living  with and most affected by HIV.     

 

HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

  62 

 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

Jean‐Paul Moatti, PhD obtained a doctorate in Economics in  1982 at the University of Paris, and initially worked in  environmental economics for the French Atomic Energy  Commission (CEA). He ultimately moved to INSERM (the French  National Institute of Health) to develop research in health  economics with applications in the field of prenatal diagnosis,  therapeutic innovations in hematology and oncology, as well as  screening and antiretroviral therapies for HIV infection. Since  2000, he has been actively involved in research about access to  HIV treatment and issues related to equity in health systems of  developing countries.    He is currently a Professor of Health Economics at the University  of the Mediterranean (Marseilles, South Eastern France),  Director of the INSERM/IRD (French Public Institute for Research  in Developing Countries) Unit 912 (Economic and Social Sciences,  Health Systems & Societies, SE4S), Director of the Federative  Research Institute on Human, Economic & Social Sciences  Applied to Health of Aix‐Marseille Universities, INSERM and  French National Center For Scientific Research (CNRS). He chairs  the Social Science Committee of the French Agency for AIDS  Research (ANRS) and is a member of the Advisory Committee on  Health Research for the General Director of the World Health  Organization (WHO). He is also an adviser to the Executive  director of the Global Fund Against AIDS, Tuberculosis & Malaria  (GFATM). He has extensively published in health economics, as  well as biomedical and public health scientific journals.  

63 

 


Ibrahim Mohamed is a Public Health Physician with over 17  years of experience in HIV/AIDS.  He has been the head of  Kenya’s HIV/AIDS/STI Control Program (NASCOP) in the Ministry  of Medical Services for the past eight years.  Dr. Mohamed  spearheaded the implementation of Kenya’s National AIDS  Strategic Plan that has led to the scale‐up of HIV/AIDS  interventions and the improvement of HIV indicators in Kenya,  as well as the scale‐up of HIV/AIDS treatment resulting in  600,000 patients accessing antiretroviral treatment within the  past eight years.    Previously, Dr. Mohamed was responsible for the management  and evaluation of the National HIV/AIDS surveillance program  to ensure efficient monitoring and assessment of HIV/AIDS  trends. Dr. Mohamed is also a researcher and was the Principal  Investigator of the first‐ever Kenya AIDS indicators survey (KAIS)  in 2007, the findings of which gave insights into the Kenya  HIV/AIDS epidemic and subsequently informed the  development of the Kenya AIDS Strategic Plan III. Dr. Mohamed  has also been involved in monitoring of early warning indicators  as well as HIV resistance survey studies, and developing and  implementing electronic medical records systems for  monitoring HIV/AIDS patients, Management, and TB HIV  integration. Currently, Dr. Mohamed is involved in quality  improvement in HIV/AIDS treatment outcome indicators.    J. Stephen Morrison, PhD is the director of the Center on Global  Health Policy and a Senior Vice President at CSIS. With support  from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, other foundation  and corporate contributors, the Center seeks to advance a long‐ term strategic U.S. approach to global health, cultivate new  global health champions, enrich understanding of the security  and foreign policy dimensions of global health, and link  Washington‐based work to emerging policy expertise in key  developing and middle income countries. Beginning in the spring  of 2009, Dr. Morrison directed the CSIS Commission on a Smart  Global Health Policy, comprised of 25 diverse high‐level opinion  leaders. Its findings are detailed in the final report A Healthier,  Safer, and More Prosperous World: Report of the CSIS 

 

 

HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

  64 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

Commission on Smart Global Health Policy, published in 2010.  Dr. Morrison writes widely, testifies often before Congress, has  directed several high‐level task forces and commissions, and is a  frequent contributor in major media on U.S. foreign policy, global  health, Africa, and foreign assistance. He served for seven years  in the Clinton Administration, four years as committee staff in the  House of Representatives, and taught for twelve years as an  adjunct professor at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced  International Studies. He holds a PhD in political science from the  University of Wisconsin and is a magna cum laude graduate of  Yale College.  Faustine Ndugulile, MD, MPH is a Member of the Tanzanian  Parliament and the Vice‐Chairman of the Parliamentary Social  Services committee. He received his Doctor of Medicine degree  from the University of Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania in 1997, a Master  of Medicine in Microbiology and Immunology in 2001 from the  same university, and a Master of Public Health degree from the  University of Western Cape, South Africa in 2010.    Between 2004 and 2006, Dr. Ndugulile was the Head of  Diagnostic Services of Tanzania’s Ministry of Health, where he  was instrumental in building the capacity of laboratory services  to support the roll out of the HIV/AIDS Care and Treatment  program. In addition, as part of the HIV/AIDS prevention  strategy, Dr. Ndugulile was tasked with transforming the blood  transfusion service from hospital‐based service to a centrally  coordinated system that is reliant on voluntary blood donors.  Between July 2007 and September 2010, Dr. Ndugulile was  contracted by the U.S. Centers for Diseases Control to provide  technical assistance to the South African Field Epidemiology and  Laboratory Training Programme, aimed at building the capacity  of South Africa in field epidemiology and diseases surveillance.    Dr. Ndugulile has actively been involved in the HIV/AIDS field  since 1993. He is a member of the Governing Council of the  International Aids Society, a position he has held since 2008. In  addition, he is a member of the American Society of  Microbiologists, Tanzania AIDS Society, and Tanzania Public  Health Association.  

65 

 


Emmanuel Njeuhmeli, MD, MPH, MBA is the Senior Biomedical  Prevention Advisor at the Office of HIV/AIDS at USAID  Washington and Co‐Chair of PEPFAR’s Male Circumcision  Technical Working Group.  He is also member of the PEPFAR HIV  Prevention Steering Committee, the WHO‐UNAIDS Male  Circumcision Steering Committee and the WHO Technical  Advisory Group on Innovations in Male Circumcision. Dr.  Njeuhmeli holds a Medical Degree from the Faculty of Medicine  and Biomedical Sciences of University of Yaounde in Cameroon,  a Master of Public Health from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School  of Public Health and a Master of Business Administration from  John Hopkins Carey Business School.     In his current role, Dr. Njeuhmeli provides high‐level technical  support to all 14 countries in Eastern and Southern Africa for  launch and accelerated scale up of male circumcision programs.   He is a strong advocate of use of innovative service delivery  models to maximize use of the limited resources available and to  have the maximum public health impact on the HIV epidemic in  the region.     Leonard Nkosi, MA earned a Master of Arts Degree in  Population Studies from the University of Ghana, Legon, in  1986; a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Sociology and English from  the University of Malawi, Zomba, in 1977; a Diploma in Training  of Advisors for Improvement of Human Resource Management  in the Public Sector from the ILO International Training Centre,  Turin, Italy, in 1994; and a Diploma in Labour, Cooperation and  Development from the International Institute for Development,  Cooperation and Labour Studies, Tel Aviv, Israel, in 1983.   Mr. Nkosi is currently Project Director for the AIDSTAR ‐ Two  Malawi Project, a component of Management Sciences for  Health (MSH) in Malawi, providing capacity building technical  assistance to Civil Society Organizations working in HIV and  AIDS services. Prior to this, Mr. Nkosi was the Deputy Project  Director for the Evaluation Project for the Emergency Human  Resource Program in the Ministry of Health and the health  sector in Malawi, where he led the country team in the 

 

 

HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

  66 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

evaluation of the 5‐year program funded by DFID. Mr. Nkosi has  also held positions in a number of projects of Management  Sciences for Health in Malawi, including as the Human and  Institutional Capacity Development Specialist for the bilateral  USAID funded Child Health and Systems Strengthening Project  in Malawi from 2003 to 2007.    Mr. Nkosi also worked as a Senior Management Development  Consultant in the Malawi Institute of Management (MIM),  from  1994 to 2003, where he provided technical assistance and  management consultancies to the public and private sector  organizations in a number of areas, including Health Systems  Planning and Management, Human Resource for Health, Project  Planning and Management and Institutional strengthening and  Management. Mr. Nkosi also has wide experience working in  the civil service where he worked in the Ministry of Labour,  where with the collaboration of the International Labour  Organization, he helped improve working conditions of the  working population of Malawi from 1981 to 1994.      Nancy Padian, PhD, MPH is an internationally‐recognized leader  in the epidemiology and prevention of sexually transmitted  infections including HIV. She is a senior technical advisor at the  Office of the Global AIDS Coordinator (OGAC/PEPFAR), a  consultant for the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, and a  faculty member at the University of California, Berkeley in the  Department of Epidemiology. Dr. Padian is an elected member of  the Institute of Medicine, the American Epidemiology Society,  and the International Society for Sexually Transmitted Disease  Research. She frequently consults for UNAIDS (where she is a  member of the Prevention Reference Group and the Evaluation  Reference Group) and also for the WHO on programs related to  care, treatment and prevention of HIV. For more than two  decades, Dr. Padian has developed and directed a range of  research and intervention projects on HIV, sexually transmitted  infections, and contraception in high‐risk populations in the U.S.  and internationally. Her portfolio includes serving as the  Principal Investigator on the Methods for Improving  Reproductive Health in Africa (MIRA) trail which examined the  effectiveness of diaphragm use in preventing acquisition of HIV 

67 

 


and other STDs.  While focusing on HIV and other sexually  transmitted diseases, Dr. Padian’s research addresses the  broader context of economic development, empowerment, and  gender‐based violence. In addition, she has expertise in the  rigorous design and evaluation of public health interventions.    Yogan Pillay is the Deputy Director General of Strategic Health  Programmes in South Africa’s National Department of Health,  responsible for the national HIV/AIDS, TB, and MCH programs. In  addition, he is currently overseeing the strengthening of the  district health system as well as communicable diseases, non‐ communicable diseases and nutrition programs. He has recently  co‐authored Textbook of International Health: Global health in a  dynamic world (with Drs. Anne‐Emanuelle Birn and Tim Holtz). 

  Estelle Quain, PhD serves as Senior Technical Advisor for Human  Resources for Health and Team Leader for Health Systems  Strengthening in the Office of HIV/AIDS at the U.S. Agency for  International Development (USAID) in Washington D.C.  In this  position, she is responsible for overseeing USAID’s health  systems strengthening and health workforce development  activities for HIV/AIDS programs under the President’s  Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR). Dr. Quain serves as the  co‐chair of the PEPFAR HRH Technical Working Group and the  co‐chair of the PEPFAR HSS Steering Committee. She has worked  on health systems and human resource issues in PEPFAR since its  inception, including a one‐year assignment to the Office of U.S.  Global AIDS Coordinator.    Prior to joining USAID’s Office of HIV/AIDS, Dr. Quain worked in  training and capacity development for reproductive health  programs for almost 20 years, including 10 years in USAID’s Office  of Population and Reproductive Health.  She is the USG delegate  to the Board of Directors of the Global Health Workforce Alliance  (GHWA) and a member of the editorial board of Human  Resources for Health.  She holds a PhD from Harvard University. 

 

HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

  68 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

Miriam Rabkin, MD, MPH is a senior staff member at ICAP  Columbia University, where her work focuses on HIV and health  systems, access to HIV services in resource‐limited settings, and  the design, delivery and evaluation of chronic care programs for  HIV and non‐communicable diseases (NCDs). She has supported  the implementation of HIV programs in Ethiopia, Kenya,  Mozambique, Nigeria, Rwanda, South Africa, Swaziland,  Tanzania, Thailand, and Zambia as well as health systems  research and training in multiple countries in sub‐Saharan Africa.  Her current research interests include the impact of HIV scale‐up  on health systems and the intersection of HIV and NCDs in  lower‐income countries.     At Columbia University, Dr. Rabkin is an Associate Clinical  Professor of Medicine and Epidemiology. She teaches at the  College of Physicians and Surgeons and the Mailman School of  Public Health (MSPH), and has worked with MSPH colleagues to  lead a distance education course on Health Systems  Strengthening for mid‐career health professionals at CDC, USAID  and health ministries in Barbados, Jamaica, Kenya, Namibia,  South Africa, Uganda, and Vietnam. Dr. Rabkin received her  medical degree from Columbia University’s College of Physicians  and Surgeons and a master’s degree in public health  (epidemiology) from Columbia University’s Mailman School of  Public Health.   Stephanie Topp was formerly the Integration Program Manager  at the Centre of Infectious Disease Research in Zambia (CIDRZ).  In this role she was responsible for the development,  implementation, and research efforts related to the integration  of stand‐alone HIV care and treatment into routine outpatient  services in primary healthcare facilities across two Zambian  provinces. She successfully developed, piloted, and promoted a  model of integrated HIV service delivery and is now acting as a  consultant to support the Ministry‐led scale‐up Zambia‐wide.     Ms. Topp trained originally in political science and modern  history.  She holds a dual Master’s in International Public Health  and International Development Studies, the latter as a Rhodes  Scholar at Oxford University.  She is currently a PhD candidate 

69 

 


in the Nossal Institute for Global Health at the University of  Melbourne Australia, where her dissertation is exploring the  characteristics of primary healthcare service‐delivery systems,  examining where and why differences occur between de jure  (assumed) and de facto (actual) systems, and with what  implications for strengthening health systems.     Prior to living in Zambia, Ms. Topp was the Think Tank  Coordinator at the Cape York Institute for Policy and Leadership  in Northern Queensland, working directly under lawyer and  academic Noel Pearson.  Her job encompassed development of  and advocacy for social and economic policy reform related to  health, welfare, housing, and employment issues of remote and  rural Indigenous Australian communities. Her eclectic training  has resulted in a strong belief in multi‐disciplinarity and a  professional focus on the intersection between research, policy  development, and implementation. She has worked in Papua  New Guinea, China, Lesotho, and Zambia.      David Wilson is the World Bank’s Global AIDS Program Director  and was previously the Bank’s Lead HIV Specialist.  His work on  HIV/AIDS spans almost 25 years.  During his career he has  worked as a scientist and program manager in over 50 countries  and published approximately 100 scientific papers.  His  interests lie in HIV epidemiology, HIV prevention science, and  program evaluation.  He has developed prevention programs  that have been recognized as best practice by the World Bank,  WHO, and DFID, and have been influential in international HIV  prevention science.  In addition, he has served as technical  consultant and adviser to many international agencies,  including USAID, DFID, EU, AUSAID, SIDA, NORAD, UNAIDS,  UNICEF, and WHO. 

 

HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

  70 

 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

Benedict Xaba, the Honorable Minister for Health for the  Kingdom of Swaziland, is a registered professional nurse. He  holds a Baccalaureate (Honours) Degree with majors in Health  Care Management, Occupational Health, and HIV/AIDS Care  from the University of Free State in South Africa. He also holds a  Master’s Degree in Development Studies and is pursuing a  Master’s degree in Business Management (UNISA).       Prior to his current appointment, Minister Xaba worked as a  Public Health Nurse for eight years. He then became involved in  HIV/AIDS campaigns; in 2004, he formed the Nhlangano AIDS  Training, Information and Counseling Centre, which focuses on  HIV counseling and testing in the rural areas of Swaziland. He  has also initiated a number of HIV support groups in Swaziland.    Minister Xaba was elected to Parliament in 2008, and appointed  by His Majesty the King to be the Minister for Health that same  year. He has subsequently introduced major restructuring  reforms within the Ministry of Health and a campaign for  universal access to HIV services.     The Minister is passionate about scaling up HIV prevention  efforts, targeting universal access. With the support of PEPFAR,  he recently initiated a massive campaign on male circumcision,  aiming to circumcise 152,000 men within an eight‐month  period. He is also championing the national efforts towards the  Virtual Elimination of Mother to Child Transmission of HIV, and  is a member of the Global Task Team on the Elimination of New  HIV infections among children and Keeping their Mothers Alive.    The Minister is also passionate about the involvement of civil  society and communities in the fight against HIV, TB and  Malaria, and is committed to building stronger health systems  and saving lives by improving the management and leadership  of priority health programs, health organizations, and  multisectoral partnerships, and developing a critical mass of  managers at all levels of health system who can lead and inspire  teams to achieve results.

71 

   


Participant List

 

HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

  Aramati, Mireille  Global health consultant 

 

72 

Asiimwe, Anita  Rwanda Biomedical Center, Rwanda Ministry of Health    Atun, Rifat  Imperial College Business School and Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College  Audoin, Bertran  International AIDS Society  Bärnighausen, Till  Harvard School of Public Health and Africa Centre  Barcikowski, Nicole  Abt Associates  Barr, David  Fremont Center  Basinga, Paulin  Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation  Becker, Stephen  Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation  Bemelmans, Marielle  MSF Brussels  Bennett, Sara  Johns Hopkins University  Berg, Roland  Deutsche AIDS Hilfe  Bhardwaj, Sanjana  UNICEF  Bilger, Catherine  UNAIDS  Biribonwoha, Harriet Nuwagaba  ICAP Columbia  

 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

73 

Birx, Deborah  Office of the Global AIDS Coordinator (OGAC)  Blandford, John  CDC   Borse, Nagesh  CDC   Broughton, Edward  University Research Co., LLC  Buono, Nicole  Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation  Cates, Ward  FHI360  Cavanaugh, Karen  USAID  Celum, Connie  University of Washington  Chamrad, Diana  University Research Co, LLC  Clay, Robert  USAID  Coovadia, Jerry  University of Kwa‐Zulu Natal  Culler, Tegan  ICAP Columbia  Davidson, Veronica  CDC   De Cock, Kevin  CDC  Decroo, Tom  MSF  Dehne, Karl‐Lorenz  UNAIDS  Dohrn, Jennifer  ICAP Columbia   


Driwale, Alfred  Uganda Ministry of Health   Drobac, Peter  Partners in Health  Duncombe, Chris  Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation  Eisenberger, Robert  NIH  Ekpini, Rene  UNICEF  El‐Sadr, Wafaa  ICAP Columbia  Fan, Victoria  Center for Global Development   

Farias, Robert  Cnapsis, Inc  Gaudreault, Suzanne  USAID  Geng, Elvin  University of California, San Francisco  Gloyd, Stephen  University of Washington  Goemaere, Eric  MSF  Goosby, Eric  Office of the Global AIDS Coordinator (OGAC) 

HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

Gross, Marty  Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation  Hall, Carolyn  HRSA    74 

Hallett, Timothy  Imperial College, London   

 

 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

Harries, Anthony  The Union  Hijazi, Mai  USAID  Hirnschall, Gottfried  WHO  Hirschorn, Lisa  Harvard University  Holmes, Charles  Office of the Global AIDS Coordinator (OGAC)  Hontalez, Jan  The Africa Centre   Hoos, David  ICAP Columbia   Jain, Vivek  University of California, San Francisco  Jarawan, Eva  The World Bank  Justman, Jessica   ICAP Columbia  Kadisia, Bernard  IAS  Kamenga, Claudes   UNICEF  Katabira, Elly  IAS  Katjjivena, Bertha  Namibia Ministry of Health   Katz, Itamar  Abt Associates 

 

75 

Kesete, Admasu   Ethiopia Ministry of Health    

 

 


Koech, Emily   ICAP Kenya  Kurian, Manoj  IAS  Lazarus, Jeffrey  Copenhagen HIV Program (CHIP)  Leach‐Lemens, Carol  NAM  Legins, Kenneth  UNICEF  Lion, Ann  Abt Associates  Lueck, Renee  Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation  Lukas, Damali    Lynch, Sharonann  MSF  Lyons, Charles  EGPAF  Maguet, Olivier  Médecins du Monde  Marquez, Lani  USAID 

 

Marten, Robert  The Rockefeller Foundation  Massoud, M. Rashad  USAID 

 

HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

Mastro, Timothy  FHI360    McArthur, Bruce   

 

  76 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

McClure, Craig  UNICEF  McNairy, Margaret  ICAP Columbia  Mensah‐Abrampah, Nana  University Research Co, LLC  Miller, Anna    Miotti, Paulo  NIH  Moatti, Jean‐Paul  ANRS  Mohamed, Ibrahim  Kenya National AIDS/STI Control Programme (NASCOP)  Morrison, J. Stephen  Center for Strategic and International Studies  Mubangizi, Deus  Results for Development   Muraguri, Nicholas    Mwanguo, Raphael  Clinical Officer, Tanzania  Ndizihwe, Assay  CDC Uganda  Ndugulile, Faustine  Tanzania Parliament and IAS  Njeuhmeli, Emmanuel  USAID  Nkosi, Leonard  MSH Malawi 

 

77 

Northrup, Gayle  Partnership for Management Development     

 


Ntomwa, Benson  Namibia Ministry of Health   Ntumy, Raphael  ICAP South Africa  Odlum, Michelle    Okeke, Chukwudera Bridget  University of Manchester  Okello, Velephi  Swaziland Ministry of Health  Onyeizu, Ichenna  Martha Iyaya Development Foundation  Padian, Nancy  Office of the Global AIDS Coordinator (OGAC)  Palen, John  Abt Associates 

 

Papenburg, Rudolph  Cnapsis, Inc  Pash, Rebeen  Peace Corps  Pequegnat, Willo  NIH  Perez, Freddy  PAHO  Perriens, Joseph  WHO  Philips, Mit  MSF 

HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

Pillay, Yogan  South Africa Department of Health   Pluies, Julie  IAS   

 

  78   


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

Pollock, John  MSH  Quain, Estelle  USAID  Pakhmanove, Nilufar  FHI360  Rabkin, Miriam  ICAP Columbia  Rasschaert, Freya  ITM Antwerp  Reuben, Elan  USAID  Sabain, Syncia  DBMI  Sahabo, Ruben  ICAP Swaziland  Sangiwa, Gloria  Management Sciences for Health  Schouten, Erik  Malawi Ministry of Health  Shaffer, Nathan  WHO  Shisana, Olive  Human Sciences Research Council, South Africa  Sinkala, Moses  CMMB Zambia  Smart, Theo  NAM  Sulzbach, Sara  Abt Associates 

 

79 

Timilshina, Narhari  Toronto General Hospital   

 


Topp, Stephanie  CIDRZ Zambia  Van Damme, Wim  Institute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp  Voets, Joanna  Médecins du Monde, Tanzania  Wilson, David  The World Bank  Wuliji, Tana  USAID  Xaba, Benedict  Swaziland Ministry of Health  Zewdie, Debrework   The Global Fund     

   

HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

  80 

 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

 

 

 

 

81 

   


Slide Presentations   Ambassador Eric Goosby, Keynote Address, Friday 20 July             

 

 

HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

Slides and video are also available on the meeting website, at http://www.iasociety.org/Default.aspx?pageId=671  

 

82 

 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

Dr. Wafaa El‐Sadr – Welcome Remarks, Friday 20 July   Slides and video are also available on the meeting website, at http://www.iasociety.org/Default.aspx?pageId=671  

                   

 

   

83 

   

 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

 

  84 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

85 

 

 


Dr. Rifat Atun – Framing Presentation, Saturday 21 July   Slides and video are also available on the meeting website, at http://www.iasociety.org/Default.aspx?pageId=671  

 

 

HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

  86 

 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

 

87 

 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

 

  88 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

 

89 

 

 

 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

  90 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

91 

 

 


Dr. John Blandford – Framing Presentation, Saturday 21 July   Slides and video are also available on the meeting website, at http://www.iasociety.org/Default.aspx?pageId=671  

 

   

 

HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

  92 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

 

93 

 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

 

  94 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

95 

 

 

 


Dr. Charles Holmes – Panel 1, Saturday 21 July   Slides and video are also available on the meeting website, at http://www.iasociety.org/Default.aspx?pageId=671  

 

       

HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

       

 

  96 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

 

 

97 

 

 


Dr. Jan Hontalez – Panel 1, Saturday 21 July   Slides and video are also available on the meeting website, at http://www.iasociety.org/Default.aspx?pageId=671  

     

                 

HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

      98 

   

 

 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

 

99 

 

 


Dr. Emmanuel Njeuhmeli – Panel 1, Saturday 21 July   Slides and video are also available on the meeting website, at http://www.iasociety.org/Default.aspx?pageId=671  

 

       

HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

  100

 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

  101 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Mr. Leonard Nkosi – Panel 1, Saturday 21 July   Slides and video are also available on the meeting website, at http://www.iasociety.org/Default.aspx?pageId=671  

 

       

HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

       

 

  102


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

 

 

  103 

 

 


Dr. Claudes Kamenga – Panel 1, Saturday 21 July   Slides and video are also available on the meeting website, at http://www.iasociety.org/Default.aspx?pageId=671  

 

       

HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

       

 

  104


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

  105 

Dr. Tom Decroo – Panel 3, Saturday 21 July   Slides and video are also available on the meeting website, at http://www.iasociety.org/Default.aspx?pageId=671 

   

 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

 

 

 

  106


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

Dr. Connie Celum – Panel 3, Saturday 21 July   Slides and video are also available on the meeting website, at http://www.iasociety.org/Default.aspx?pageId=671 

                         

  107 

   

 


Dr. David Hoos – Panel 3, Saturday 21 July   Slides and video are also available on the meeting website, at http://www.iasociety.org/Default.aspx?pageId=671 

                  

                 

 

HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

  108

 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  109 

 

 


Ms. Stephanie Topp – Panel 4, Saturday 21 July   Slides and video are also available on the meeting website, at http://www.iasociety.org/Default.aspx?pageId=671 

 

 

 

HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

  110

 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

Dr. Karl Dehne – Panel 4, Saturday 21 July   Slides and video are also available on the meeting website, at http://www.iasociety.org/Default.aspx?pageId=671 

   

  111 

 

 


Ms. Bertha Katjivena – Panel 4, Saturday 21 July   Slides and video are also available on the meeting website, at http://www.iasociety.org/Default.aspx?pageId=671 

   

 

 

HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

  112

 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

 

  113 

 

 


Dr. Sanjana Bardwaj – Panel 4, Saturday 21 July   Slides and video are also available on the meeting website, at http://www.iasociety.org/Default.aspx?pageId=671 

                 

           

 

HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

  114

 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

 

 

  115 

 

 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

  116


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

 

 

  117 

 

 


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

  118


HIV and Health Systems: Strengthening Health Systems for an AIDS‐Free Generation 

 

         

Pre‐Meeting Support Provided by:

     

 

ICAP Columbia University  The International AIDS Society  

     

The World Bank  The National Institutes of Health   The Office of the Global AIDS  Coordinator (OGAC)  The President’s Emergency Plan  for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR)  UNICEF  The U.S. Centers for Disease  Control and Prevention   The World Health Organization   

  119 

 


Report: 4th Pre-Meeting on HIV and Health Systems