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earbook Y2009-2010

The 44th Irish Antique Dealers’ Association Fair RDS, Ballsbridge, Dublin 4


Marlay Demesne 18th Century House and Regency Walled Garden History Mr. David La Touché purchased the Estate in 1764. La Touché then Governor of the newly established Bank of Ireland extended the house and renamed it ‘Marlay’ having married Elizabeth Marlay, daughter of the Right Rev. George Marlay, Bishop of Dromore.

Regency Walled Garden The 4.5-acre Walled Gardens, which were provided under the Great Gardens of Ireland Restoration Programme are designed and planted in an authentic Regency style. The ornamental section boasts an extensive display of period plants, ranging from herbaceous borders to shrub beds. At the centre of the garden is the Orangery, which together with the Head Gardener’s house, arbour and water features combine to create a distinctive atmosphere.

Open

Georgian House

Admission

The oldest part of the house is over 300 years old. The main house dates from the 18th Century and boasts a very fine bow-ended ballroom with elaborate Adamesque plasterwork, with its large windows providing a panoramic view of the Dublin Mountains, and an impressive oval room, its plasterwork containing musical motifs attributed to James Wyatt The house was fully restored within the last 10 years. The house is available to hire for suitable private functions e.g. weddings, corporate events, etc.

There is no admission charge

Situated West of Rathfarnham and Dundrum Villages, off the Grange Road, Rathfarnham. Alternative access off the M50 at Dundrum exit, in the direction of Rathfarnham.

Marlay House is open to visitors by appointment

Facilities Craft centre with extensive retail units, coffee shop and toilet facilities, 200 acres of parkland incorporating sports pitches, adventure playground, model railway (Saturday afternoons) woodland nature trails and lakeside walks.

Contact Dun Laoghaire Rathdown County Council, County Hall, Marine Road, Dun Laoghaire, Co Dublin Telephone 00 353 1 205 4899 ext 4446 (parks department) ext 3851 (Marlay House) Email parks@dlrcoco.ie www.dlrcoco.ie


THE HUNT MUSEUM The Hunt Collection is an internationally important holding of some 2,000 original works of art and antiquity. The Collection has generously been donated by the Hunt family to the people of Ireland and is housed in Limerick’s elegant 18th century Custom House.

Something for everyone... On display are objects from all periods of time, from the Stone Age to the twentieth century. Each piece was selected by John and Gertrude Hunt according to the quality of its design, craftsmanship and artistic merit. Among the many important pieces in the collection are the personal seal of Charles I of England, the Mary Queen of Scots cross, a coin revered since the Middle Ages as being one of the ‘thirty pieces of silver‘ and a bronze horse by Leonardo da Vinci.

Open Monday to Saturday 10am to 5pm and free admission on Sunday 2pm to 5pm The Custom House, Rutland Street, Limerick T: 061 312833 E: info@huntmuseum.com

WWW.HUNTMUSEUM.COM


The 44th Irish Antique Dealers’ Association Fair Yearbook 2009-2010

PRODUCTION ROXANE MOORHEAD DESIGN HELEN GUNNING 091 638205 PRINT GRAHAM & HESLIP LTD, ALANBROOKE ROAD, BELFAST BT6 9HF


Tara’s Palace

The dolls House Museum • courtyard of Malahide castle

OPEN FROM APRIL TO OCTOBER 2008 MONDAY TO SATURDAY 10AM TO 4:30PM SUNDAYS FROM 1 TO 5PM CLOSED WEDNESDAYS CLOSED FOR LUNCH FROM 12:45 TO 2PM CALL 086 4056171

visit taraspalace.ie

THE DOLLS HOUSE MUSEUM ALSO AJOINS THE WORLD FAMOUS FRY MODEL RAILWAY


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Introduction

11 |

Presidents welcome

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Bursary awards Ronald McDonnell Award and Louis O’Sullivan Award information

14 |

Members The directory

The Fair 2009

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28 |

Date Lines

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Antique Lecture Series

31 |

Exhibition floor plan

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The Exhibitors

19 |

The History of The Irish Antique Dealers’ Association Gerald Kenyon on the Association

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Sign of the Times Desmond FitzGerald, Knight of Glin and James Peill write about a newly discovered signature on a piece of Irish furniture

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19 |

Cocktails and Diamonds Phyllis MacNamara on jewellery in the 1950s

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Features

CONTENTS

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The Council PRESIDENT George H Stacpoole Main Street, Adare, Co Limerick Tel: 061 396 409 Fax: 061 396 733 Email: stacpoole@iol.ie VICE PRESIDENT Gerald Kenyon HON. SECRETARY Ian Haslam The Silver Shop, Powerscourt Centre, South William Street, Dublin 2 Tel: 01 679 4147 Fax: 01 679 4147 Email: ianhaslam@eircom.net HON. TREASURER Roxane Moorhead

The Irish Antique Dealers’ Association was formed by a small group of dealers from both North and South of Ireland in 1969. It is the only antique trade association in Ireland. Today the membership consists of some 80 members, who are scattered all over Ireland. embers of the Association deal in a very wide range of objects and therefore there is a wide range of expertise to offer. Members of the Association have to abide by a stringent code of practice, which is overseen by the Council Members. To become a member of the Association, applicants are strictly vetted before acceptance and their membership is renewed annually to

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make certain that they maintain a high standard. It is essential to maintain confidence with the public that high standards are adhered to and also good relationships maintained with everyone interested in the antiques trade. This fair is solely for members of the IADA and consequently a large proportion of the membership exhibiting at it, are showing the finest goods and many of these pieces relate to Ireland. Throughout the fair, lectures are given by members of the Association on a wide diversity of subjects. The IADA is a highly professional Association and it is certain that you can buy from or sell to a member of the Association with a great deal of confidence and understanding.

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MEMBERS Grainne Pierse, Ib Jorgensen, Rupert MacHenry, Phyllis MacNamara, Rosemary Whelan, Niall Mullen, Kevin Chellar and Suzanne Macdougald

The Irish Antiques Dealers’ Association


Oh, cheer up darling! How were you to know it wasn’t an original?

Buy with confidence from a member of the Irish Antique Dealers’ Association Contact 01 679 4147 or 061 396409 email irantda@eircom.net

visit iada.ie


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are interested in a roadshow please communicate with us at email stacpoole@iol.ie. Hunting the antique can be both exciting and rewarding in many ways. Chose carefully and remember that the right pieces will give you pleasure and last forever. The Members of the Irish Antique Dealers Association are always delighted to help and advise you in your quest.

George Stacpoole PRESIDENT

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certain of finding the finest items of quality, many pieces of Irish interest and even starting prices of below fifty Euro. Perhaps it is not possible to visit the fair or a member’s shop, but with today’s great Welcome to the 44th Irish Antique Dealers’ communicator, Association Fair and our 2009-2010 yearbook. the computer, it is now possible to go online and peruse memwill allow you to try out the together so they look well. bers stock from the comfort of furniture in the house before Today with the huge amount your armchair at www.iada.ie. you make a decision unlike the of modern pieces being made People are always curious Auction Room where you have with careful thought many of to find out what an object is to make an instant decision. these pieces can look really worth. During the past year and good with pieces of previous hile the IADA fair in the future the Association periods; this mix must be held at the RDS will be holding Antique encouraged in every way possiin September is Roadshows around the country; ble. Good design whatever its the showcase of the year for the venues will be advertised in period can fit harmoniously its members, you can always be local and national press. If you with the most modern room and members of the Irish Antique Dealers Association are very anxious to actively encourage this. Members of the Association at all times are prepared to give advice and indeed

WELCOME

With all the uncertainty of the world at present antiques and fine art still look a really good buy. Prices have adjusted and there are many worthwhile items at realistic prices available. Tradition is something none of us can escape from but the interpretation changes all through the ages in different ways, chairs need legs, we need tables to eat off, beds are needed to sleep on, each generation and each person designs them in a different way using different materials. All the designs of each period can be mixed together and can sit comfortably beside a different period if well chosen. Likewise good antique jewellery can look well on a modern dress; it is all in the taste and careful choosing. What you need is imagination and self confidence. Many people mix the Georgian, the Victorian and Edwardian pieces


The Ronald McDonnell Bursary

The Louis O’Sullivan Bursary

The Ronald McDonnell Bursary is awarded every September. The Bursary was founded by Ronald and Doreen McDonnell, who had a shop in Kildare Street for many years, and he was a nephew of the famous dealer Henry Naylor. Ronald McDonnell was the founder President of the Irish Antique Dealers Association.

This bursary is worth €3,500 will be awarded to further understanding and appreciation of the Irish decorative arts of 18th, 19th, 20th centuries (furniture, paintings, metalwork, glass, porcelain, jewelley, textiles, etc.)

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Pictured: Martin Mansergh TD, Cathy O’Donnell from Ballinasloe, Co Galway, 2nd year student on the BS in Furniture Conservation and Restoration at GMIT Letterfrack and George Stacpoole President IADA. Photo Paul Sherwood

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To make an application for the bursaries, send: a detailed account as to why you need the funding; evidence of applicants experience and competence in research; curriculum vitae and names and addresses of two referees. Further information from The Irish Antique Dealers Association, Adare, Co Limerick 061 396409 or email: stacpoole@iol.ie

13 I A DA Y E A R B O O K 2 0 0 9 - 2 0 1 0

he objective of the bursary is to assist an Irish craftsperson of exceptional talent and commitment to undertake a specialised or advanced skill course at home or abroad to further their skill, study or career. The bursary is worth €2,500. The areas of the bursary cover a wide variety of advance skills applicable to conservation and restoration of art objects in wood, stone, marble, metals, parquetry, needlework and tapestry, porcelain, glass, paper and similar specialised skills. Since the foundation of the bursary, it has been awarded to a gilder, bookbinder, textile restorer, paper conservator, ceramic and related materials restorer.

he object of the bursary is to help the applicant with further studies of his or her work with a final result culmination in a publication or paper on the chosen subject which can be placed in a suitable publication or given at a suitable occasion.

BURSARIES

Ronald McDonnell Bursary Award presented to Cathy O’Donnell from GMIT Letterfrack by Martin Mansergh TD Minister of State for OPW

The Irish Antique Dealers Association awards two bursaries annually, The Ronald McDonnell Bursary and The Louis O’Sullivan Bursary. The closing dates for both bursaries are the 1st September 2010.


The Irish Antique Dealers’ Northern Ireland

MEMBERS

Cork FORTLANDS ANTIQUES | 2

MOYCULLEN VILLAGE ANTIQUES | 7

Fortlands, Charleville Principal: Mary O’Connor T: 063 81295

Clarenbridge, Co Galway Principal: Maura Duffy T: 086 8235976

GEORGIAN ANTIQUES LTD | 2

TEMPO ANTIQUES | 6

Sandpit Cottage, Newtown, Ballyhea, Charleville Principal: Pat Jones M: 087 2563721 By appointment only

9 Cross Street, Galway Principals: Frank and Phil Greeley T: 091 562282 Home: 093 41461 E: tempo@iol.ie www.tempoantiques.com

LINDA’S | 3

37 Main Street, Kinsale Principals: LindaWalsh T: 021 4774754 F: 021 4777582 E: brendan@diamondbroker.ie www.diamondbroker.ie LYNES AND LYNES | 1

48A McCurtain Street, Cork Principal: Denis Lynes T: 021 4500982 M: 087 2531580 E: info@lynesandlynes.com

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FRAMEWORKS | 8

37 New Street, Killarney Principal: Katie O’Connell T: 064 6635791 E: kate@frameworks.ie www.frameworks.ie

Kildare SOLOMON FINE ART | 29

MONA’S ANTIQUES | 1

Savoy Centre, Patrick Street, Cork Principal: Monica Noonan T: 021 4278171 NIAMH O’MAHONY | 1

Kingsland House, Kingsland, Ballinhassig, Co Cork Principal: Niamh O’Mahony Opening Time by appointment T: 021 4276599 M: 087 2627498 E: niamh.mc.omahony@gmail.com SOUTHGATE FINE ART | 1

14

Kerry

Marybrook House, Kanturk, Co Cork Principal: Chris Southgate T: 022 48555 M: 087 285 8814 E: chsa@eircom.net

Donegal DONEGAL ANTIQUES AND ART GALLERY | 4

Carrick, Glencolmcille Principal: Patricia and Rory Byrne T: 074 973 9885 M: 087 7701447 E: ruairiobyrne@eircom.net www.donegalantiques.com

Galway COBWEBS | 6

7 Quay Lane, Galway Principal: Phyllis MacNamara T: 091 564388 F: 091 564235 E: cobwebs@eircom.net www.cobwebs.ie

Rathmore, Naas Principal: Suzanne Macdougald T: 045 862940 F: 045 862941 M: Suzanne Macdougald 086 2301983 and Tara Murphy 086 8142380 E: info@solomonfineart.ie www.solomonfineart.ie

O’TOOLE ANTIQUES & DECORATIVE GALLERIES | 12

Upper William Street, Limerick Principal: Noel O’Toole T: 061 414490 F: 061 411 378 M: 087 255 0985 E: shop@browserslimerick.com

Louth OLIVER WALSH ANTIQUE CLOCKS | 13

1 Forrest Hill, Drogheda Principal: Oliver Walsh T: 041 9837789 M: 087 9835025 E: oliverjameswalsh@eircom.net

Mayo

Barberstown Cross, Straffan Principals: John and Marie Ryan T: 01 6274018 F: 01 627 4023 E: info@straffanantiques.com www.straffanantiques.com

Laois SEAN EACRETT ANTIQUES | 10

Ashgrove, Ballybrittas, Portlaoise Principal: Sean Eacrett T: 057 8626290 F: 057 8626298 E: info@ashgrovegroup.ie www.ashgrovegroup.ie

Leitrim

Lower Bunree Road, Ballina, Co Mayo Principal: Philip Maguire T: 096 77335 Home: 096 22598 M: 086 3850804 E: info@connaughtantiques.com www.connaughtantiques.com

82 Donegal Pass, Belfast Principal: John Carroll T: 048 90 238246 M: 078 0234 5529 By appointment only ROBERT CHRISTIE ANTIQUES | 27

20 Calhame Road, Straid, Ballyclare BT39 9NA Principal: Robert Christie T: 028 9334 1149 M: 07802 968 846 E: robertchristie@btconnect.com www.robertchristieantiques.com MACHENRY ANTIQUES | 21

MAGUIRE ANTIQUES | 15

1-7 Glen Road, Jordanstown, Whiteabbey, Newtownabbey B37 ORY Principal: Rupert MacHenry T: +44 (0)2890 862036 F: +44 (0)2890 853281 M: +44 (0)7831 135226 E: rupert.machenry@ntlworld.com

Connolly Street, Ballina, Principal: Martin Maguire T: 096 20074 M: 087 234 9564

PARVIS & MERIEL SIGAROUDINIA | 23

The Old Thatched Cottage, Mulranny, Co Mayo Principals: Roger Grimes T: 098 27823 M: 087 2339221 E: vrmayo@gmail.com

Meath GEORGE WILLIAMS ANTIQUES | 16

The Annexe, Newcastle House, Kilmainhamwood, Kells Principal: George Williams T: 046 905 2740 M: 087 2529959 E: gwilliams@eircom.net www.georgian-antiques.com

Derry PAUL CRANNY ANTIQUES | 24

Bank Square Gallery, 63 Maghera Street, Kilrea Principals: Paul and Susan Cranny T/F: 048 29 540279 M: +44 (0)780 270 8656 E: paulcrannyantiques@yahoo.co.uk

Down ADAM ANTIQUES & INTERIORS | 25

Principal: Eileen McGrillen T: +44 (0)2844 83 9746 M: +44 (0)7711442515 E: seamusclare@hotmail.com

Mountain View House, 40 Sandy Lane, Ballyskeagh, Lisburn BT27 5TL Principals: Parvis and Meriel Sigaroudinia T: 048 90 621824 E: parvissig@aol.com info@parvis.co.uk www.parvis.co.uk

THE NEWCASTLE ART GALLERY | 26

DAVID WOLFENDEN ANTIQUES | 22

RYAN & SMITH LTD | 28

219b Lisnevenagh Road, Antrim BT41 2JT T: +44 28 9442 9498 M: +44 (0)7768 128800 E: antiquewolfirl@aol.com www.davidwolfendenantiques.com

18-22 Main Street (upstairs) Newcastle BT33 0AD Principal: Denis Murphy T: 048 43723555

Tyrone 1-3 North Street, Stewartstown, Co Tyrone BT71 5JE Principal: Don Ryan T: +44 28 87738071 F: +44 28 87738059 E: fireplaces@hotmail.co.uk www.antiquefireplacesireland.com

Tipperary ABBEY ANTIQUES | 17

Main Street, Dromod, Co Leitrim Principal: Hugo Greene M: 086 854 4933 www.greenesantiques.com

Upper Cahir Abbey, Cahir Principals: Michael and Celine Kennedy T: 052 41187 M: 087 2728844 E: celine@antiquewarehouse.ie www.theantiquewarehouse.ie

Limerick

Wicklow

GEORGE STACPOOLE | 11

CLANCY CHANDELIERS | 18

Main Street, Adare Principal: George Stacpoole T: 061 396409 F: 061 396733 E: stacpoole@iol.ie www.stacpooles.com

Villanova, Ballywaltrim, Bray Principals: Ger and Derek Clancy T/F: 01 2863460 M: 087 2422838 E: info@clancychandeliers.com www.clancychandeliers.com

GREENE’S ANTIQUE GALLERIES | 13

JOHN CARROLL ANTIQUES | 20

CONNAUGHT ANTIQUES | 15

ROGER GRIMES ANTIQUES | 28 STRAFFAN ANTIQUES | 19

Antrim

Book Dealers DE BURCA RARE BOOKS | 5

27 Priory Drive, Blackrock, Co Dublin Principal: Eamon de Burca T: 01 288 2159 F: 01 283 4080 51 Dawson Street, Dublin 2 T: 01 671 9722 E: deburca@indigo.ie www.deburcararebooks.com

VANESSA PARKER RARE BOOKS | 28

The Old Thatched Cottage, Mulranny, Co Mayo Principals: Vanessa Parker and Roger Grimes T: 098 27823 M: 087 2339221 E: vrmayo@gmail.com P & B ROWAN | 20

Carlton House, 92 Malone Road, Belfast BT9 5HP Principals: Peter and Briad Rowan T: 048 90 666448 F: 048 90 663725 E: peter@pbrowan.thegap.com


COLERAINE

Association

ANTRIM

24

LETTERKENNY DERRY

KILREA

DONEGAL

DERRY BALLYMENA LARNE

STRABANE

4 CARRICK

DONEGAL

22

TYRONE

BALLYCLARE

21

ANTRIM COOKSTOWN

OMAGH BALLYSHANNON

27

20

28

STEWARTSTOWN DUNGANNON

NEWTOWNABBEY

BELFAST

23

LISBURN PORTADOWN

BELMULLET ENNISKILLEN SLIGO

ARMAGH

BALLINA

26

SLIGO

NEWCASTLE

MONAGHAN

28

NEWRY

LEITRIM

MULRANNY

14

CARRICK-ON-SHANNON

CASTLEBAR

KILKEEL

CAVAN

WESTPORT

DUNDALK

MAYO

CAVAN

BALLYHAUNIS

ARDEE

ROSCOMMON

16

LONGFORD

LONGFORD

ROSCOMMON

LOUTH

13

KELLS

DROGHEDA

CLIFDEN TUAM

NAVAN MULLINGAR TRIM

GALWAY

6

WESTMEATH

ATHLONE

MEATH

5

7

GALWAY CLARENBRIDGE NB

STRAFFAN

TULLAMORE

OFFALY BIRR

10

18 BRAY

KILDARE

KILDARE

PORTLAOISE

ATHY

ROSCREA

CLARE

DUBLIN

DUBLIN

NAAS

ENNISTYMON

ENNIS

19

29

LOUGHREA

MALAHIDE

WICKLOW

LAOIS

NENAGH

WICKLOW RATHDRUM

CARLOW

KILKEE

12

KILRUSH

11 ADARE

GOREY

TIPPERARY

LIMERICK

CASHEL TIPPERARY

2

KILKENNY

17

CHARLEVILLE

TRALEE

15

CARLOW

CAHIR

CLONMEL

NEW ROSS

ENNISCORTHY

WEXFORD

CARRICK-ON-SUIR DINGLE

WEXFORD WATERFORD

8 KILLARNEY

MALLOW

WATERFORD

FERMOY

TRAMORE

MILLSTREET

CAHERSIVEEN

DUNGARVAN

CORK

KERRY KENMARE

1

MACROOM

MIDLETON

CORK

COBH

BANDON BANTRY

3 KINSALE

CLONAKILTY SKIBBEREEN

CLOYNE

YOUGHAL

ROSSLARE

I A DA Y E A R B O O K 2 0 0 9 - 2 0 1 0

LISTOWEL

DUNDRUM

ARKLOW THURLES

LIMERICK

KILKENNY

BALLYBUNION

25

MEMBERS

ARMAGH

MONAGHAN

PORTAFERRY

DOWN

FERMANAGH

15


Institute of Professional Auctioneers and Valuers

Diploma Course This unique and well established course is designed to provide an opportunity for those who wish to pursue the ďŹ ne and decorative arts in a supervised and structured manner. The course will run over three terms coinciding with the academic year. Lectures will be held on Mondays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays from 10am to 4pm at IPAV Headquarters. Principal Subjects include History of Furniture, History of Architecture & Interior Decoration, History of Painting and History of Silver. Three days per week from October 2009 to May 2010

Certificate Course

For further details www.fineartcourses.ie or contact IPAV 129 Lower Baggot Street, Dublin 2 01 6785685 info@ipav.ie www.ipav.ie

This part-time course aims to stimulate and encourage an interest in the Fine & Decorative Arts in a friendly and relaxed atmosphere, with the emphasis on the identiďŹ cation and appreciation of their historical context. This course ia a less intensive version of the Diploma Course. One evening per week from October 2009 to May 2010. Many graduates of both courses are working in leading art galleries, antique shops and fine art auction houses throughout Ireland, while others have gone on to continue their interest in the fine arts through further education.


Dublin City and County 12

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JORGENSEN FINE ART | 10

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69-70 Francis Street, Dublin 8 Principals: Paul and Chris Johnston T: 01 473 2384 F: 01 473 5020 E: johnstonantiques@ireland.com www.johnstonantiques.net

ST

DAWSO N ST

ST TON

7

9 NASSAU

ME SQ R UA

ANTIQUE PRINTS | 7

MICHAEL CONNELL ANTIQUES | 1

Elm Grove House, Miltown, Dublin 6 Principals: Hugh and Anne Iremonger T: 01 269 8373 E: antiqueprints_irl@yahoo.ie

58 Francis Street, Dublin 8 Principal: Michael Connell T: 01 473 3898 / 087 257 0150 E: ellconn@eircom.net www.connell-antiques.com COURTVILLE ANTIQUES | 4

DMG House, Deanes Grange Business Park, Co Dublin Opening Time by appointment T: 086/087 277 7222 E: anthonyantiques@oceanfree.net

Powerscourt Townhouse Centre, Dublin 2 Principal: Grainne Pierse T/F: 01 679 4042 E: courtville@eircom.net www.courtvilleantiques.com

ARCHITECTURAL CLASSICS | 13

MARIE CURRAN ANTIQUES

Princes Court, South Gloucester Street, Dublin 2 T: 086 820 7700 F: 01 686 4991 E: info@architecturalclassics.com www.architecturalclassics.com

Principal: Marie Curran T: 01 280 2631

ANTHONY ANTIQUES | 21

DUBLIN 23 CITY 16

18 19 TALLAGHT AL

17 15

14 24 21

SHANKILL

BEAUFIELD MEWS ANTIQUES | 17

Woodlands Avenue, Stillorgan, Co Dublin Principal: Jill Cox T: 01 288 0375 F: 01 288 6945 E: jbcox@indigo.ie www.antiques-ireland.ie www.beaufieldmews.com LORCAN BRERETON | 7

29 South Anne Street, Dublin 2 Principal: Diarmuid Brereton T: 01 677 1462 F: 01 677 1125 E: lorcanbrereton@eircom.net

16 Herbert Street, Dublin 2 Principal: lb Jorgensen T: 01 661 9758 F: 01 676 3008 E: info@jorgensenfineart.com www.jorgensenfineart.com

Unit 15, Greenhills Business Park, Tallaght, Dublin 24 T/F: 01 4516086 / 4516089 M: 086 3853180 / 1716501 E: info@dalyantiqueservices.com www.dalyantiqueservices.com H DANKER | 7

10 South Anne Street, Dublin 2 Principal: Joy Danker T: 01 677 4009 F: 01 677 4544 E:contact@hdanker.com www.hdanker.com L&W DUVALLIER

Principal:William Crofton M: 00353 87 253 5313 E:duvallier@hotmail.com

OMAN ANTIQUES GALLERIES | 4

20-21 South William Street, Dublin 2 Principals: James and Angela Oman and Rosemary Whelan T: 01 616 8991 F: 01 677 4846 E: info@omanantiques.com www.omanantiques.com ORIEL GALLERY | 11

M: 087 9081639 www.kenyon-antiques.com

17 Clare Street, Dublin 2 Principal: Mark Nulty T: 01 6763410 F: 01 6763410 E: info@theoriel.com www.theoriel.com

THE LEINSTER GALLERY | 9

IRENE O’SULLIVAN

27 South Frederick Street,Dublin 2 Principal: Loretta Meagher T: 01 679 0834 M: 086 828 8283 E:art@leinstergallery.com www.leinstergallery.com

By appointment only T: 01 493 3589

GERALD KENYON ANTIQUES | 12

PETER LINDEN | 15

Rear 15 Georges Ave, Blackrock, Co Dublin Principal: Peter Linden T: 01 288 5875 F: 01 283 5616 E: lindorient@hotmail.com www.peterlinden.com THE MALAHIDE ANTIQUES SHOP | 20

14 New Street, Malahide, Co Dublin Principal: Frank Donnellan T: 01 8452900 F: 01 8324277 E: malahideantiques@gmail.com

DALY ANTIQUE SERVICES | 19

ROGERS & CARROLL | 1

54 Francis Street, Dublin 8 Principal: John Carroll and Rory Rogers T: 01 473 7408 M: 078 0234 5529 E: info@rogersandcarroll.com www.rogersandcarroll.com

Principals: Sir Robert and Lady Goff T: 01 840 5045 F: 01 840 1220 E: cynthiaoconnor@lissenhall.com

MITOFSKY ANTIQUES | 18

Principals: Laurence and Anne Citron T: 00 44 207 7223536 E: info@mitofskyartdeco.com ROXANE MOORHEAD ANTIQUES | 16

Principal: Roxane Moorhead T: 01 660 5165 / 086 814 7451 E: roxanemoorhead@gmail.com

O’SULLIVAN ANTIQUES | 1

43/44 Francis Street, Dublin 8 Principals: Chantal O’Sullivan T: 01 454 1143 F: 01 454 1156 E: info@osullivanantiques.com www.osullivanantiques.com SANDYCOVE FINE ARTS | 24

55 Glasthule Road, Sandycove, Co Dublin Principal: Fiona O’Reilly T: 01 280 5956 M: 087 640 3688 ESTHER SEXTON ANTIQUES | 1

51 Francis Street, Dublin 8 Principal: Esther Sexton T: 01 473 0909 M: 086 1616166 THE SILVER SHOP | 4

23b Powerscourt Townhouse Centre, Dublin 2 Principal: Ian Haslam T/F: 01 679 4147 E: ianhaslam@eircom.net www.silvershopdublin.com TIMEPIECE | 2

MORRIN ANTIQUES | 2

37 Francis Street, Dublin 8 Principal: Kieran Morrin T: 01 454 0299 M: 086 245 6414 E: morrin@eircom.net

57-58 Patrick Street, Dublin 8 Principals: Kevin and Carol Chellar T: 01 454 0744 F: 01 454 0774 M: 087 226 0212 E: timepieceireland@eircom.net www.timepieceantiqueclocks.com

NIALL MULLEN ANTIQUES | 1 JOHN FARRINGTON ANTIQUES | 3

32 Drury Street, Dublin 2 Principal: John Farrington T: 01 679 1899 E: farrington711@hotmail.com www.johnfarringtonantiques.com

Book Dealers see page 14

105 Francis Street, Dublin 8 Warehouse by appointment Principal: Niall Mullen T: 01 4538948 M: 086 2575988 E: niallmullenantiques@gmail.com www.niallmullenantiques.com

J.W. WELDON | 5

55 Clarendon Street, Dublin 2 Principals: James and Martin Weldon T: 01 677 1638 E: antiques@weldonsofdublin.com www.weldonsofdublin.com

DE BURCA RARE BOOKS 51 Dawson Street | 8 27 Priory Drive, Blackrock | 15

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CYNTHIA O’CONNOR & CO LTD

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Shankill Castle, Shankill, Co Dublin Principals: Charlotte and Andrew Bonor Law T: 01 282 2139 E: abl@nep.ie

17 South Anne Street, Dublin 2 Principal: Keith Cusack T: 01 671 1262

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NEPTUNE GALLERY | 22

20 Molesworth Street, Dublin 2 Principals: James and Therese Gorry T: 01 679 5319 F: 01 679 5319 www.gorrygallery.ie THE JEWEL CASKET | 7

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GORRY GALLERY | 10

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OPENING TIMES TUE - SAT 10am–5pm | SUN 12pm–5pm | MON CLOSED FOR BOOKINGS CONTACT T: +353-1-702 6165 F: +353-1-702 7796 E: numbertwentynine@esb.ie W: www.esb.ie/numbertwentynine 29 Fitzwilliam St. Lr., Dublin 2, Ireland | ENTRY FEE APPLIES

DUBLIN’S GEORGIAN HOUSE MUSEUM

PRESENTED BY ELECTRICITY SUPPLY BOARD AND THE NATIONAL MUSEUM OF IRELAND


The story of the Irish Antique Dealer’s Association really began with the annual Antique Dealer’s Fair having begun to take on significance. The fair started in 1965, which was at the time when most of the old time Irish dealers had died and, thus, an opportunity arose for the newer and younger dealers to begin to make a name for themselves. B Y G ERALD K ENYON

When I first came to Dublin in 1947, Henry Naylor was the supremo. He had an enormous stock and really ruled the trade with a rod of iron. I remember a sale at Town & Country salerooms, in Nassau Street, when two good Venetian paintings turned up. One of the London dealers at the sale overbid Naylor. It was in the days of the big knockouts and Henry Naylor was not amused. He kept on bidding and

eventually bought the first picture for three or four thousand pounds. When it was knocked down to him, he gestured for the porter to bring it over to him and then proceeded to stab it with his walking stick to show the London dealer that he was of no importance to him. Naylor accompanied by his team of Edward Butler and Willie Reilly went to most of the sales round the thirty-two counties so one

had to play with him or be flattened. His only saving grace was that he loved money, so one had chance if you wanted something very badly. y 1960 I had got myself a shop in South William Street as well as the old family business in Chester. Paul Johnston had a shop opposite to me and later took a big shop down the street.

B

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The History of The Irish Antique Dealers’ Association


The Irish Antiques Fair Catalogue from 1966

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Neither of us had any money, but relied on a large and fast turnover – very different to the style of business of Naylor and his team. John O’Reilly had come into our orbit at this time, having moved from the north side of the city to open a shop in South Anne Street and he had started to sell furniture. He had originally dealt in silver, jewellery and china, but had now spread his wings. The three of us began to get a lot closer since the start of the Antique Fair and we often gathered for a drink after business had finished for the day. One afternoon, John rang me and asked if I had a hundred pounds in cash which, surprisingly, I had. He told me that he had a deal going on and that we would need

this cash to do it and to come over to the pub opposite the shop. So over I went, where he introduced me to a man called de Groot who was an old dealer who had come to Ireland from Australia. It seems that before the War (WW11) none of the local dealers talked to one another. In 1936 he had registered the name ‘The Irish Antiques Dealers Association’, but no other dealer was interested and so nothing had developed. John had agreed with him to buy the name for one hundred pounds cash. I found this intriguing. I had never set eyes on


him before and actually never seen him since. The interesting thing about the name de Groot is that it is also the name of a nineteenth century mirror maker. I bought a large black and gilt overmantle which had the signs of the Zodiac as decoration. This style became popular at the time of the Battle of the Nile around 1810-20. I have had over the years three versions of this mirror, one of which I bought in Australia. They each had a printed label on the back giving full details of Cornelius de Groot of Henry Street, Dublin.

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ly respected and when questions are of interest, we usually have three of four additional delegates at the conference. Membership of our Association is limited to residents of the thirty two counties. We have a varied group of people who have many different points of view and it is up to the council to represent them. Indeed, over the years, they have had to put these views to both the Irish government and to meetings in Brussels and with the Irish customs officials. We formed a relationship with the Customs Authorities in many countries and our certificates are accepted which eases the export of merchandise worldwide. ur Association has hosted various functions including the annual conference of CINOA. From time to time, we hold Balls for the membership. During the last few years we have held ‘Road Shows’, where members of the public can bring articles to be ‘expertised’ and valued by our members and we have found some exciting things. We have also had experts giving lectures on various subjects and we hope to increase the number of these. During the last few years some of the older members have died and other dealers have joined the Association. Harry Wine, Ronnie McDonnell, John O’Reilly, Hymie Danker, Paul Johnston and two of our northern members, Charlotte and John Lambe who were great fun, amongst many others, were lost to us. Harry Wine was an extremely important dealer in silver and he was one of the first dealers, other than picture dealers, to exhibit in New York. When I was a boy in the thirties he would appear at our shop in Chester with his cousin from Manchester. In those days he was a big man of importance as well as in size. Ronnie was Naylor’s nephew, which must have been dif-

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fter a few drinks we completed the deal and got him to sign the name over to us after which we adjourned to the Saddle Room in the Shelbourne Hotel to have dinner. Whilst sitting there we noticed Jeremy Altamont who was also having a meal. He had seen our excitement and came over to see what was going on. He had an antique shop in his home, Westport House. We asked him if he would like to join us and when he said he would, we suggested that the subscription would be twenty pounds payable immediately. He gave us the money and we duly gave him a receipt and made him the first member of the Association. Needless to say, we spent twenty pounds on our dinner! The next day we gathered Paul Johnston and Ronnie McDonnell and began the formation of the Association, I think we suggested Harry Wine for Life President and Ronnie for President. It took several months to get ourselves completely organised, but we were finally a legal entity by 6th of May 1969. The final set up was as follows: Hon Life President: Harry Wine; President: Ronnie McDonnell; Vice Presidents: Alec Wine & Tony Thompson; Treasurer: Leonard Clarke; Secretary: John O’Reilly;

Council: Hymie Danker, Gerald Kenyon, Paul Johnston, George Stacpoole, Robert MacHenry; Solicitor: Hubert Wine. I was given the job of sorting out the rules which I took and amended from the rules of the British Antique Dealers Association as I had a copy being a member and which my father had been associated with the formation of. Our secretary, John O’Reilly, was the power of the Association and from the beginning restricted the numbers to fifty. There were always dealers wanting to join, but having a limit enabled us to select people who we thought would be an asset. We immediately applied to join CINOA, the International group of dealers which lent us more prestige. From the outset, John and I took turns to attend these meetings and if it were important both of us would go. The senior European members were usually older than us. CINOA had been formed by the French, Dutch and UK Associations. Some of their representatives were very important dealers and as CINOA grew, we got to know them very well. When VAT was introduced John became known as a great authority, goodness knows why and his opinion was looked for by people from all over Europe. One of the battles John and I fought was over membership of CINOA. Several countries had more than one Association and began to demand greater voting rights. We insisted that if that happened there was no point in us remaining a member as our vote would not count. After many hard fights we won the battle and the rule of one vote per country still survives. We gradually got the Irish delegation known and we were expected to speak. Our present delegation of George Stacpoole (president) and Ian Haslam (secretary) are great-


ficult, as his uncle was a very miserable man, but he became a very decent friend when he got away from Naylor. The Naylor business was sold by auction and Ron opened a shop in Molesworth St and later moved to a fine Georgian building in Kildare Street. After Harry and Alec Wine died the business closed down and the remaining stock was sold. The two nephews went to Canada where they still are. Our Treasurer, Leonard Clarke and his wife, Elva, and family went to Vancouver and opened a business there. It must have been quite a wrench for Len as his roots were in Cork, in fact, his father was one of the people involved in introducing Ford Motors to Cork. He called in to see George Stacpoole on a visit to Ireland earlier this year. The photograph shows the presentation of two Cork watercolours to them on their departure for Canada. delegation of dealers went to see Mr Haughey, who was then Minister of Finance, when it was mooted that the antique trade should pay wholesale tax and we won our case not to do so! Six months later the Government brought in VAT, so we lost out in the end. Over the years the Antique Dealer’s Fair at the end of September has become of greater importance to the Association. It was originally held to coincide with the Horse Show Week. When the antique boom was at its height, there would be a queue with the Antique and Art Dealers from all over the world outside the Mansion House. It is sad to think that of the twenty three dealers, plus the organiser Louis O’Sullivan and his partner, only six and Louis are still alive. The fairs were occasions for great parties, the main one at the Hibernian Hotel which was situated across Dawson St and continued at various nightclubs. On one occasion we pre-

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sented Jane Williams with a set of ‘combinations’ which all the men folk had signed. We insisted on them being tried on. The compliment was returned and a set was presented to me, duly signed by all the girls, which I also had to wear. Jane and I still have them! During the present difficult times, prices have dropped and the Association is encouraging and recommending that this is one of the best times to buy antiques of all descriptions. Over the years members have done a lot of research into goods of Irish manufacture. It was quite a shock when I discovered that there was no book written on Irish furniture. Lately, the Knight of Glin has produced a book on furniture which is a help and I have written a large treatise which the Association gave me an award for. The first book the Association promoted was on Stained Glass by Nicola Bowe. We submitted it for a

CINOA prize, which it won, and is presented for the promotion of knowledge. Another of our members, Andrew Bonor Law wrote a book on maps which was also promoted by CINOA. t the present time, with the price of antiques at its lowest level for many years, it is to the advantage of any perspective purchaser to consider what can be afforded. Even though I have been retired for some years I have bought one or two pieces at current prices. The Association is now firmly established on the Irish as well as the international scene. We put our point of view to Governments both domestic and European. The present times are difficult for everybody and the antique trade is no different, but we look forward to an improvement which will surely happen.

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Sign of the Times A newly discovered signature on a piece of Irish furniture B Y D ESMOND F ITZG ERALD , K NIGHT

OF

G LIN

AND

J AMES P EILL

One of the great advantages of writing a book on an almost unknown subject is that an abundance of information generally comes to light following its publication. Therefore it was a cause of much celebration for us, the authors of Irish Furniture (2007), when during a visit to the European decorative arts galleries at the Art Institute of Chicago, the curator Ghenete Zelleke whisked open a drawer of a marquetry-inlaid walnut secretary bookcase on display and revealed the signature of its maker John Kirkhoffer or Kirchoffer and the date 1732 (Figs. 1, 1a). In the sparsely documented field of Irish eighteenth-century furnishings it is rare to find the names of craftsmen attached to their products, making this discovery particularly noteworthy.

Fig 1

Fig 1a

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(Figures 1,1a) Secretary bookcase made by a John Kirchoffer; probably Dublin, 1732. Signed and dated ‘John Kirkoffer/facit/1732’ on the base of one of the small drawers. Walnut, holly marquetry, gilded gesso, mirror glass and brass; height 85½, width 36, depth 22 inches. Art Institute of Chicago, Robert Allerton Fund.


(Figure 2) Secretary bookcase, Irish, c1735. Inscribed ‘Mrs McAndrews... Mr Swift’s House’ under a top drawer in the cabinet. Walnut and marquetry; height 87, width 49½, depth 21¾ inches. Victoria and Albert Museum, London; photograph by courtesy of V and A Images.

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n our book we discussed the Art Institute’s piece as belonging to a group of four walnut and one in mahogany secretary bookcases with very unusual compositions (see Figs. 1-5).1 We had long thought that the group was crafted in Dublin, for the construction and inlay were utterly unlike anything else in England at that time, and we suggested that the group was made by Dutch or German itinerant craftsmen.2 Four of the pieces have a distinctive narrow mirrored upper section with Corinthian pilasters above a drawer, and all have inlaid marquetry in the manner of the French designer Jean Bérain (1638-1711). Two of the pieces have marquetry-decorated brackets supporting candleholders on either side of this section of the bookcase. The desk section of each of the four pieces has a fitted drawer above a slide and a kneehole flanked by six short drawers. The Art Institute’s secretary bookcase is particularly fine, with moulded serpentine drawer fronts flanking an apsidal door in the centre. The niche-like treatment of the door and other simularities can be seen in the group (see Figs. 2, 4). The interior of the secretary drawer on the Art Institute example echoes the serpentine front, with undulating small drawers centred by an architectural composition composed of a scrolling pediment above a niche door. The pencil inscription on the Art Institute cabinet is on the underside of a lower drawer and reads ‘John Kirkoffer/facit /1732.’ We immediately recognised the surname from our research, and turned to John Roger’s ‘Dictionary of Irish Furniture Makers’, which forms an appendix in our book, to learn more. A John Kirchoffer is listed as an auctioneer, cabinetmaker, and timber merchant in Dublin on Marlborough Street between 1749 and 1776, and at 26 Denmark Street between 1781 and 1783. But as this John married in 1736, he was most likely between twenty and thirty years old in 1732, too young to be the maker of this piece.3 This John was possibly the son of another John Kirchoffer, a descendant of Franz Ludwig Kirchoffer, one of the German Palantines who fled the contested Rhineland-Palatinate region and

I


settled in Dublin and in counties Limerick and Kerry in the autumn of 1709.4 An old jingle tells of the group’s arrival: In the year of seventeen hundred and nine In came the brass-coloured Palatine From the ancient banks of the Swabian Rhine 5

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(Figure 3) Secretary bookcase, Irish, c1735. Walnut and marquetry. Whereabouts unknown; photograph by courtesy of the Glin Archive.

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ccording to Vivien Hick, who has done extensive research on the Kirchoffers and other Palatines in Ireland, Franz Ludwig Kirchoffer was a joiner by trade and appeared in a 1715 list for payment of subsistence as Francis ‘Kirkhover.’6 He was recorded in Dublin in 1720 using the same spelling. Hick points out that we do not know whether he had a family with him because family members are not listed in 1715 or 1720. However, it appears that he had at least one son, John, who could well be the maker of the Art Institute cabinet. According to Hick, John was recorded as a cabinetmaker leasing a warehouse and sheds in Great Marlborough Street, Dublin, in 1736 from the merchant George Felster for himself, his wife Mary, and Mary’s sister Catherine Kindt. The Felsters were leading Dublin upholders, auctioneers, and dealers in furniture, porcelain, paintings, silks, textiles, and wine, among other things.7 The connection between these three families of German origin, the Kirchoffers, Kindts, and Felsters, was typical of many immigrant families who frequently intermarried. Further references to Kirchoffers have been found by Hick, including Francis Kirchoffer (1747-1827), the son of another John Kirchoffer (1711-1753) and Elizabeth Dunn.

Francis was a cabinetmaker on Henry Street and Denmark Street in Dublin.8 He appears to have continued John Kirchoffer’s unusual practice of signing furniture, for his name appears on the bottom board of a mahogany pedestal desk in the collection of Duke University in Durham, North Carolina.9 Sir Hugh Roberts, Director of the Royal Collection and Surveyor of the Queen’s Works of Art, discovered an extensive series of bills from Francis and John Kirchoffer made out to James Alexander (1730-1802), later first Earl of Caledon, but it is unclear which John Kirchoffer this is.10 The earliest bill, covering November 1777 to June 1778, totals £222 2s. 7d. and appears to relate to furniture for a house in Saint Stephen’s Green, Dublin. The second account is from Francis only and refers to a bill delivered in August 1783 to Alexander at Caledon in county Tyrone totalling £294 3s. 11d. A letter from Francis dated August 3, 1784, mentions additional furniture and upholstery sent to Caledon and some to Merrion Square, Dublin. Two accounts from Hall Kirchoffer (recorded as the son of John Kirchoffer),11 dated July 1789 and December 1792, complete the series of bills. Hall must have run an extensive cabinetmaking business, for, like Francis, he served as both warden (1770-1771) and master (1780-1781) of the Joiners’ Guild.12 Hall’s trade label inscribed ‘Kirchoffer/CABINET MAKER/to the Right Hon’ble/His Majesty’s Board of Works,/62 Henry Street/DUBLIN’ appears on a mahogany bookcase in a private collection in Ireland. W hen Hall’s son Francis Kirchoffer II went bankrupt in 1817, his stock


was sold by auction, as advertised in the Dublin newspaper Freeman’s Journal and Daily Commercial Advertiser on April 28 of that year: Cabinetmaker’s stock in trade to be sold by Auction. On Tuesday, 29th April 1817, and succeeding days. By orders of Francis Kirchoffer, a Bankrupt. At his house, No 62 Henry Street. The bankrupt’s entire stock in trade, comprising a very extensive assortment of well manufactured household furniture; a quantity of seasoned mahogany in flitches, boards, and veneer; Purple, Satin and Rose Woods; Oak, Maple, Deal and Pine; Calicoes, Fringes, Binding, Haircloth and Linen, an assortment of cabinet brass work; office and ware house fixtures, benches, tools etc. Amongst the furniture are several very handsome Rosewood and Mahogany sofas, tea, card, and pier tables; a beautiful oblong table, on a pillar richly inlaid, a large sideboard on massy carved consoles; several smaller sideboards; Trafalgar and pillar dining tables; a superb sarcophagus beautifully carved; wine coolers, guardevines, and tea stores; a great variety of fashionable drawing room, parlour, bed-chamber, and study chairs, and sofas; secretary’s and bookcases, wardrobes, chests of drawers, and commodes; Capital four-post elliptic and wagon-roof bedsteads with and without hangings, and bedding, sofas, bedsteads, children’s and servants ditto; cloth and calico curtains; glasses, mirrors, music stands, work tables, fire screens, etc. Further particulars in handbill. Mack, Williams, and Gibton Auctioneers.

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he Kirchoffers became an established Dublin dynasty and graduated from the furniture trade to become painters and clergymen. Henry Kirchoffer (c1781-1860), a miniaturist and painter working in Ireland, Wales, and England, was best known for his painting A View of Mrs Francis Johnston’s Garden in Eccles Street from Her Dining Room (private collection), which was exhibited in the Royal Hibernian Academy in Dublin in 1832.13 Later in the 1830’s members of the family emigrated to Texas and Canada. Signed pieces of eighteenth-century Irish furniture are rare. The only other signed piece of marquetry furniture we are aware of is a walnut and marquetry chair of Dutch form and originally from Kilkenny Castle (now in

T

(Figure 4) Secretary bookcase, Irish, c1735. Walnut and marquetry; height 96, width 49 inches. Formerly in the collection of Oliver V Watney, Cornbury Park, Charlbury, Oxfordshire. Private collection; photograph courtesy of Christie’s Images.


(Figures 5a) The marquetry below the scrolled pediment is inlaid with Commedia dell’Arte figures and a central mask. (Figure 5) Secretary bookcase, Irish, c1730. Mahogany with marquetry. The marquetry and construction links with figures 1-4. Courtesy of The National Trust of Northern Ireland, Florence Court, Co Fermanagh. (Photographs: James Fennell)

the National Museum of Ireland, Dublin) that is signed ‘Maher fecit Kilkenny 1744.’ By the end of the eighteenth and throughout the nineteenth century, it was much more common to find trade labels on the backs of mirrors, frames, and cabinetwork, where they survived on their flat surfaces, undisturbed by the rigors of time. Even though we have not been able to pinpoint which John Kirchoffer made the Art Institute’s secretary bookcase, our discovery of the signature supports our theory that it was made in Dublin. DESMOND FITZGERALD, KNIGHT OF GLIN, is president of the Irish Georgian Society, a governor of the National Gallery of Ireland, and doctor in letters honoris causa of Trinity College, Dublin and a member of the Royal Irish Academy. He is a former deputy keeper of the Furniture and Woodwork Department at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London. JAMES PEILL is the Curator of Goodwood, West Sussex. He was formerly a director of Christie's, where he was a specialist in European Furniture.

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This article first appeared in ‘The Magazine Antiques’, October 2008

Fig 5

Fig 5a

1 See ‘Marquetry Furniture’ in the Knight of Glin and James Peill, Irish Furniture: Woodworking and Carving in Ireland from the Earliest Times to the Act of Union (Yale University Press for the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art, New Haven and London, 2007), pp. 50-58. 2 Knight of Glin, ‘The Marquetry Decoration of Early Eighteenth-Century Irish Furniture’, Irish Arts Review Yearbook, vol. 13, 1997, pp. 35-42. 3 John Rogers, ‘A Dictionary of Eighteenth-Century Irish Furniture-Makers,’ Appendix 1 in Knight of Glin and Peill, Irish Furniture, p. 285. Rogers records that John Kirchoffer was married to Katherine Kindt in the church of Saint Bride, Dublin, on February 19, 1736. It is possible that she was his first cousin. The Kindts were of German origin and, according to Vivien Hick, were recorded as joiners in Dublin. See Vivien Hick, ‘The Palatine Settlement in Ireland’ (PhD diss., University College Dublin, 1994). John Rogers brought this work to our attention. See also Henry Z. Jones Jr, The Palatine Families of Ireland, Rockport, Maine, 4th edition, 1965, p. 70, where he states that the founder of the family in Ireland was Francis Ludwig, who was a first arrival in England and a joiner. He was in Ireland from 15 July 1715 and in Dublin by 1720. 4 Hick, ‘The Palatine Settlement in Ireland.’ 5 The rhyme was collected by Patrick Weston Joyce of Glenosheen, Kilfinane, county Limerick, and was published in Mainchín Seoighe, The Joyce Brothers of Glenosheen (Coiste Scoil na Seoigheach, Cill Fhionáin, County Luimnigh, 1987), p. 5. 6 Hick, ‘The Palatine Settlement in Ireland.’ 7 Knight of Glin and Peill, Irish Furniture, p. 274. 8 Rogers, ‘A Dictionary of Eighteenth-Century Irish Furniture-Makers’, p. 285. 9 Christopher Gilbert, The Pictorial Dictionary of Marked London Furniture 1700-1840 (Furniture History Society, London, and W.S. Maney and Son, Leeds, 1996), p. 36, Fig. 557. When this book was published Gilbert was not aware of the Irish family of cabinetmakers, so he speculated that the signature ‘Francis Kirkhoffar’ was that of journeyman or the name of the owner. 10 The Caledon papers are in the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland, Belfast, D 2433/A/2/2/2-6. 11 See Rogers, ‘A Dictionary of Eighteenth-Century Irish Furniture-Makers,’ p. 285. 12 Ibid. 13 Painting Ireland, Topographical Views from Glin Castle, ed. William Laffan (Churchill House Press, Tralee, 2006), p. 206, Fig. 140; and Walter George Strickland, A Dictionary of Irish Artists(1913; reprint, vol. 2, pp. 581-582. Strickland states that Henry Kirchoffer was descended from a Swiss surgeon who served in Ireland under William III (r. 1689-1702), which conflicts with our theory that he descended from the Palatine Kirchoffers.


75 years or over for furniture, metalwork and architectural fittings

THE FAIR

Pre 1950 for prints and photography

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Pre 1950 for glass, china, clocks, silver, jewellery, lighting, carpets and works of art Only genuine antiques and works of art are allowed into the Fair, with strict regulations governing the date, description and the amount of restoration permitted. These regulations are enforced by panels of Vetting Committees, the members of which are drawn from both within and outside the Fair. Conclusions by these Committees can sometimes be matters of opinion, albeit learned ones, but the knowledge and experience of the Irish Antique Dealers’ Association is the equal of any in the world. Potential buyers have this confidence in the authenticity of their purchases. The illustrations on the following pages have been submitted by exhibitors and members as examples of the type of antique or work of art in which they deal and the items illustrated are not necessarily on view at the Fair.

Pre 1970 for paintings, drawings and etchings Contemporary pieces are allowed to be shown but must be of exceptional quality

are requested to note that all articles exhibited have been submitted for inspection to the Vetting Committees appointed to ensure that, as far as possible, the items conform to the regulations laid down for the conduct of the Fair. Vetting

ll exhibits except for special loans, are for sale and in the interest of security, no exhibit will be allowed out of the Fair without a full and accurate description of the articles purchased. Neither the Irish Antique Dealers’ Association, the Council and Vetting Committees of the Irish Antique Dealers’ Fair not the publishers of the Yearbook in any way hold themselves responsible for, or warrant the genuineness or age of any article exhibited at the Fair, or illustrated. Visitors and readers

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The Irish Antique Dealers Association Fairs are strictly vetted for quality and authenticity. The Irish Antique Dealers Association and the vetters do not in any way hold themselves responsible for the genuineness of any item, nor the veracity of any descriptive label, visitors are advised that every reasonable attempt has been made to ensure that exhibits are fair worthy and comply with the Irish Antique Dealers Association vetting guide lines and code of practice.


The 44th Irish Antique Dealers’ Association Fair 23 to 27 September 2009 29

Main Hall RDS Ballsbridge Dublin 4

Open Hours Thursday 24 September | noon to 9pm Friday 25 September | noon to 9pm Saturday 26 September | noon to 7pm Sunday 27 September | 11am to 6pm

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Fair Preview Wednesday 23 September | 4pm to 9pm


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Antique Lecture Series All are welcome to these free lectures Held in the RDS lecture theatre

Thursday 24 September 2pm Outstanding pieces of Irish Silver by James Weldon 4pm Images of Dublin in the

work of Jack Yeats by Dr Roisin Kennedy

Friday 25 September 2pm Quirky Irish houses by Robert O’Byrne 4pm Renaissance to Revolution,

four centuries of costume in art by Sara Donaldson

Saturday 26 September 2pm The work of Sean Keating 1922-1970 by Dr Eimear O’Connor 4pm Dirty paintings by Mary McGrath


1 2 3 4 5a 6 7

7a 8, 25 9 10 11 11b 12, 15a 13

7a

8

Donegal Antiques Anthony Antiques MacHenry Antiques Morrin Antiques Georgian Antiques Traditional Antique Restoration Martin Maguire Antiques David Wolfenden Antiques

14a 14b 14c 15 17 18 15b 19

Courtville Antiques Cobwebs Timepiece Antique Clocks Beaufield Mews Antiques Michael Connell Antiques J.W. Weldon Vanessa Parker Rare Books Niall Mullen Antiques

10

9

11 11b

29 25

30

28

12 31a

24a

31

32 13

42

6

34 24

33

HOSPITALITY AREA 41

5a

ENTRANCE 14a 37

40

36

14c 14b

5a

Main Hall

7

23 18 22

15a

19

20

48

15

17

5

50 49

22 23 24 24a 28 29 30 31

Connaught Antiques Daly Antique Services Vanessa Parker Rare Books Straffan Antiques Gormley Fine Art Johnston Antiques Paul Cranny Antiques L & W Duvallier Oliver Walsh Antique Clocks

3

31a 32

33 34 36 37 40

George Stacpoole Antiques The Irish Antique Dealers’ Association in conjunction with The Interiors Association H.Danker Antiques The Silver Shop Jorgensen Fine Art Greene’s Atique Galleries Sean Eacrett Antiques

2

1

41 42 48 49 50 51

51

Frameworks O’Sullivan Antiques Neptune Gallery The Hunt Museum Irish Georgian Society Houses, Castles and Gardens of Ireland All information correct at time of press

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EXHIBITORS

5

George Williams Antiques John Farrington Antiques Esther Sexton Antiques Robert Christie Antiques Ryan and Smith Fireplaces Newcastle Art Gallery Marie Curran Antiques Adam Antiques


EXHIBITORS

S TA N D 1 4 C

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TIMEPIECE ANTIQUE CLOCKS Specialists in fine clocks since 1983 Prop: Kevin & Carol Chellar

57-58 Patrick Street, Dublin 8

Telephone 01 4540774 Mobile 087 2260212

www.timepiece.ie

A green tortoiseshell clock with ormolu mounts of waisted design c1875

Walnut cased Verge Bracket clock by Adams of London c1820

Venus and Adonis by Charles Oudin c1825

English bracket clock in a mahogany case c1830


Marshall's Bracket clock is of the earliest mahogany, of complex design and beautifully executed. Among it's quality's one can find a verge escapement, pull repeat of hours and quarters, calendar and phase of the moon.

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The Walnut Irish Longcase clock c1710 with yew wood and mulberry panels is enriched by Gilded Capitals of Corinth and Flambeau urns.

EXHIBITORS

These wonderful rare pieces of Irish heritage were created by Wm. Marshall on his premises at the sign of the Black Bull in Capel St. Dublin in the early years of the 18th century when the battle of the Boyne was but 20 years past. Historical buildings such as The Mansion House and The Tailors Hall were being constructed at this time and the shelves of Marshes library were only now being filled by it's first librarians.


TIMEPIECE ANTIQUE CLOCKS

Ormolu Gorge Carriage clock c1875

Ormolu carriage clock in an engraved Gorge case c1880

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Miniature carriage clock c1900

A rare and early Irish mahogany Longcase by Phil Glasco of Dublin c1730

Ormolu and Sevres clock set c1870

Irish mahogany longcase by Jas. Warren Dublin c1810

EXHIBITORS

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Irish mahogany longcase by Booth of Dublin c1850

Irish mahogany longcase by Jameson of Dublin c1875

French empire Portico clock in a mahogany case with gilt bronze mounts c1820

Figural French clock c1870

EXHIBITORS

Empire period Portico clock in a black marble case with gilt bronze mounts c1820

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www.timepiece.ie

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57-58 Patrick Street, Dublin 8 Telephone 01 4540774 Mobile 087 2260212


EXHIBITORS

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58 F RANCIS S TREET, D UBLIN 8 T: +353 1 473 3898 M: +353 87 257 0150 E:

ELLCONN @ EIRCOM . NET

WWW. MICHAELCONNELLANTIQUES . IE

A

PAIR OF MID

V ICTORIAN

GILT CONSOLE TABLES

IN OUT STANDING CONDITION WITH ORIGINAL MARBLE TOPS .

C IRCA 1870


ST TA AN ND D 1 27 3 S

EXHIBITORS

PRESENTED TO

58 F RANCIS S TREET, D UBLIN 8 T: +353 1 473 3898 M: +353 87 257 0150 E:

ELLCONN @ EIRCOM . NET

WWW. MICHAELCONNELLANTIQUES . IE

J OHN E R EDMOND MP

FROM THE CITY OF

WATERFORD 1902.

J OHN E DWARD R EDMOND (S EÁN É AMONN M AC R ÉAMOINN ) (1856-1918). A N I RISH THE

BARRISTER AND

MP

AT

W ESTMINSTER ,

WHO BECAME LEADER OF

I RISH PARLIAMENTARY PARTY (1900-1918). H E

UNITY AND, IN

1914, I RISH H OME

ACHIEVED BOTH PARTY

RULE UNDER AN

ACT

AN INTERIM FORM OF SELF - GOVERNMENT FOR

P RECEDED

BY

C HARLES S TEWART S UCCEEDED

BY

THAT GRANTED

I RELAND.

J OHN D ILLON.

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A N I RISH OAK A RTS & C RAFTS F REEDOM B OX


EXHIBITORS

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JW WELDON Fine diamond jewellery & early Irish silver

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Diamond solitaire by Van Cleef and Arpels

55 Clarendon Street, Dublin 2 Telephone 01 677 1638 www.weldonsofdublin.com


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EXHIBITORS

JW WELDON Fine diamond jewellery & early Irish silver

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55 Clarendon Street, Dublin 2 Telephone 01 677 1638 www.weldonsofdublin.com

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Rare Cork 5 piece tea and coffee service by Terry & Williams. Circa 1800.


EXHIBITORS

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L&W Duvallier 17th & 18th Century Irish Silver

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40 A rare George I Dublin Silver Chocolate Pot by Thomas Walker 1717

Mobile: +353 (0)87 253 5313 Email: duvallier61@hotmail.com Viewing by appointment


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A N T I Q U E S

EXHIBITORS

COURTVILLE

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TELEPHONE: 01 679 4042 EMAIL: COURTVILLE@EIRCOM.NET

WWW.COURTVILLEANTIQUES.COM

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GRAINNE PIERSE POWERSCOURT TOWNHOUSE CENTRE, SOUTH WILLIAM STREET, DUBLIN 2


EXHIBITORS

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Jorgensen Fine Art Irish, English & Continental Paintings

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42 16 Herbert Street, Dublin 2 Tel: 01 661 9758/9 Fax: 01 676 3008 Email: info@jorgensenfineart.com

www.jorgensenfineart.com Evie Hone, HRHA (1894-1955) Mother & Child Oil on canvas, 22”x18”


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EXHIBITORS

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The Silver Shop Powerscourt Townhouse Centre, South William Street, Dublin 2 Tel/Fax: 01 679 4147 Email: ianhaslam@eircom.net

www.silvershopdublin.com The shop that really caters for the unusual presention or personalised gift Always a large selection available

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A selection from our large range of Georgian Irish bright cut silver


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EXHIBITORS

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69/70 Francis Street, Dublin 8, Ireland Tel: 00 353 1 4732384 Fax: 00 353 1 4735020 Email: johnstonantiques@ireland.com

www.johnstonantiques.net

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The Bucket Family

An Important Irish 18th Century brass bound ribbed peat bucket of massive proportions x collection Westport House, Co. Sligo Circa. 1790 38" High, 26" Diameter An Irish 18th Century Mahogany Brass Bound ribbed peat bucket. Circa. 1790 A Pair of Irish 18th Brass Bound wine coolers. Circa. 1780 An Irish 18th Century Brass Bound wine cooler Circa.1780


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EXHIBITORS

A superb Art Deco rosewood settee with attached bookcase ends, upholstered in black hide with cream piping. Circa 1935 97" L 29" D 32" H

A very funky perspex screen depicting a dancer on a plinth. Signed Joan R. Hathaway

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105 Francis Street, Dublin 8 warehouse by appointment T: 01 453 8948 M: 086 257 5988 E: niallmullenantiques@gmail.com

WWW.NIALLMULLENANTIQUES.COM

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112" L 79" H


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EXHIBITORS

EXHIBITORS

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7 Q UAY L A N E , G A LWAY 091 56 4 3 8 8 C O B W E B S . I E


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Antiques & Fine Art, Picture Framing

EXHIBITORS

George Stacpoole

51

Adare, Co Limerick Telephone 061 396 409 Facsimile 061 396 733 Email stacpoole@iol.ie

www.stacpooles.com

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Library table in oak circa 1840, Gothic design after A W N Pugin, Collection of commerative china relating Father Matthew and total abstinence and Charles Stewart Parnell MP., Irish bog oak truncheon circa 1880.


EXHIBITORS

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Martin Mooney (born 1960) Still life on Kelim Oil on Board 16” x 24”

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The Newcastle Art Gallery Fine Art Dealers in Irish, English and Continental Art 18 to 22 Main Street (upstairs), Newcastle, Co Down, Northern Ireland BT33 0AD Telephone 048 4372 3555


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A George III mahogany sideboard of deep proportions, the top above a single long drawer with arched apron

EXHIBITORS

STRAFFAN ANTIQUES STOCK AN EXTENSIVE COLLECTION OF 18TH AND 19TH CENTURY FINE ANTIQUE FURNITURE.

flanked by two large drawers on turned and reeded legs. 175cm wide 79cm deep 94cm high

E M P H A S I S I S O N Q U A L I T Y.

WE

W E L C O M E Y O U R V I S I T.

Barberstown Cross, Straffan, Co Kildare Telephone 01 6274018 Email info@straffanantiques.com Open Tuesday to Saturday 10am to 6pm and Sunday 2pm to 6pm

www.straffanantiques.com

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OUR

53


EXHIBITORS

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PAUL CRANNY

ANTIQUES

Mary Jenners c1852 Oil on Canvas in gilt frame

ADAM ANTIQUES & INTERIORS Late 18th early 19th Century child’s piano on later stand

8 Main Street, Dundrum, Co Down Telephone 048 437 51 544 Mobile +44 7711442515 Email seamusclare@hotmail.com

Bank Square Gallery, 63 Maghera Street, Kilrea, Co Derry BT51 5QL Tel/Fax: (048) 2954 0279 Mob: +44 7802 708656 Email: paulcrannyantiques@yahoo.co.uk


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19th C gilt girandole wall mirror with three candle sconces. C1850. £785/€985

19th C french gilt window seat,newly upholstered. C1880. £760/€950

Geo 111 mahogany and brass bound revolving pot stand in the form of a bucket. C1810. £1850/€2350

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Pair William IV carved mahogany hall chairs. C1835. £850/€1075

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Regency rosewood games table. C1825. Beautiful condition. £2075/€2575

20 Calhame Road, Ballyclare, Co. Antrim, BT39 9NA T: 028 9334 1149 M: 07802 968 846 E: robertchristie@btconnect.com

EXHIBITORS

ROBERT CHRISTIE ANTIQUES


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S TA N D 1

George Williams A NTIQ UE S

OLIVER WALSH ANTIQUE CLOCKS

Furniture & paintings you can live with

Life-size sculpture in bronze by David Willimas-Ellis. The title is Jane 11.

EXHIBITORS

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1 Forest Hill, Drogheda, Co Louth Telephone 087 9835025 041 9837789 Email oliverjameswalsh@eircom.net www.oliverwalshantiqueclocks.com

RESTORATION • UPHPOLSTERY GILDING • VALUATIONS

Irish Mahogany Brass Dial Longcase Clock by Francis Kerr, Monaghan, circa 1750/1760

The Annexe, Newcastle House, Kilmainhamwood, Kells, Co Meath Tel: 046 9052740 Mob: 087 252 9959 Email: gwilliams@eircom.net

www.georgian-antiques.com


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18TH, 19TH & 20TH CENTURY FURNITURE ESTD. 1886

NEW SHOP OPENING! MAIN STREET, DROMOD, CO.LEITRIM

EXHIBITORS

Greene’s Antique Galleries

57

TELEPHONE:

086 8544933

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A fine quality Edwardian Bonheur Du Jour in rosewood with satinwood inlay.


EXHIBITORS

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MarieCurran Antiques Specialising in Silver and Collectables

Telephone 01 280 2631 Mobile 087 990 8654

Coffee cups in sliver holders. Birmingham 1930

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David Wolfenden Antiques Established 1984

The Home of Fine Antiques Specialising in Quality Antique rosewood, walnut, mahogany furniture

219b Lisnevenagh Road, Antrim BT41 2JT Tel +44 (0) 28 9442 9498 Mob +44 (0) 7768 128800 Email: antiquewolfirl@aol.com www.davidwolfendenantiques.com

Very unusual Victorian Burr Walnut kidney shaped Desk c1860 48ins x 23.5ins x 35ins high

Beautiful William IV Rosewood Teapoy c1835 19.5ins dia x 29ins high {Complete with pair of Caddies}

Magnificant Inlaid Mahogany Display Cabinet [Serpentine Front] c1890 85ins x 38ins


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A George IV Mahogany Serving Table, Circa 1825

EXHIBITORS

CONNAUGHT ANTIQUES

59

Lower Bunree Road, Ballina, Co. Mayo Tel/Fax : 096 77335 Mobile 086 3850803 Email: info@connaughtantiques.com

www.connaughtantiques.com

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A Victorian Mahogany Carlton House Desk, Circa 1870


EXHIBITORS

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ESTHER SEXTON ANTIQUES

George III Mahogany pembroke table, the figured top with a broad satinwood banding decorated in penwork with berried stems. Circa. 1790

51 Francis Street, Dublin, Ireland Telephone 014730909 Mobile 086 1616 166


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SeanEacrett Antiques

Donegal Antiques Antiques and Art Gallery

A 19th century walnut Centre Table with shaped serpentine top and boxwood inlay circa 1860

Ashgrove, Ballybrittas Portlaoise, Co Laois Phone: +353 (0)57 862 6290 Email: info@ashgrovegroup.ie

www.ashgrovegroup.ie

Patricia and Rory Byrne Glencolmcille, Donegal T: 074 973 9885 M: 087 7701447

www.donegalantiques.com


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Jill Cox

Sculpture by leading Irish sculptors of the day Imogen Stuart, John Behan, Bob Quinn, Leo Higgins, Eamonn O'Doherty, Aidan Lambert, Richie Healy and others. Always a good stock of 19th century Irish Artists George Campbell, Letitia Hamilton, Mary Rose Barton, Mary Swanzy, Grace Henry, Harry kernoff among others. Bi-annual Living Art Exhibitions of Painting and Sculpture Brett MacEntaggart, Geraldine Hone, Bob Ryan, Maria Simonds Gooding, Olivia Hayes, Anne- Marie Keaveney, Ludmila Korol, Janetta Mellet, Declan Marry, and many more. Collectors' Items in Irish Silver and early Irish Glass.

Woodlands Avenue, Stillorgan, Co. Dublin (off the N11 at Stillorgan, just inland from Blackrock)

Tel: 01 2880375 Email: jbcox@indigo.ie www.antiques-ireland.ie www.beaufieldmews.com Mary Swanzy: H.R.H.A 1882 to 1978 'Cat up a Tree' oil on canvas Provenance Mary St. Clair Swanzy.

Christmas Sculpture & Art Exhibition opens 24 November 2009

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Galleries open Wednesday to Saturday 3pm to 9pm & Sunday 1pm to 5pm. Dining nightly & Sunday Lunch; weddings, functions, garden parties. Ample Car Parking.

EXHIBITORS

Beaufield Mews is a legend in Ireland; the oldest and most progressive Antique Shop and Restaurant and in the same family since 1948. Its newly renovated interior, and granite faced entrance courtyard, contrast now with the romantic walled cottage gardens. Art and Sculpture on display everywhere. A real treat.


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Anthony Antiques

MARTIN MAGUIRE

ANTIQUES

EX MOLESWORTH STREET E S TA B L I S H E D 1 9 6 3

A fine mid Victorian rosewood centre table with superb urn shape base.

A superb French mahogany, ormolu mounted, Vernis Martin style secretaire/bonheur du jour, in the manner of Millet of Paris. Circa 1870

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64 A Regency rosewood and crossbanded work table.

EXHIBITOR AT THE IRISH ANTIQUE DEALERS FAIR  RDS AND MAJOR IRISH ANTIQUES FAIRS

SHOWROOMS DEANSGRANGE BY APPOINTMENT MOBILES 086 OR 087 2 777 222 EMAIL ANTHONYANTIQUESOCEANFREE.NET

Willow Creek, Sligo Road, Ballina, Co Mayo Telephone 096 20074 Mobile 087 234 9564

Life-size sculpture in bronze by David Willimas-Ellis. The title is Jane 11.

EXHIBITORS

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S TA N D 1 0

ANTIQUES

37 Francis Street, Dublin 8 Telephone 086 2456414 Email: kieranmorrin@eircom.net

S TA N D 3 3

H. DANKER Antiques

EXHIBITORS

KIERAN MORRIN

A pair of mid Victorian carved walnut ladies and gents occasional chairs, deep buttoned in ivory damask on cabriole legs. A Regency mahogany nest of four tables on turned supports and splayed strechers. A Irish Georgian brass bound mahogany peat bucket.

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Specialists in Irish and English antique silver and jewellery 10 South Anne Street, Dublin 2 Telephone: +353 1 677 4009 Fax: +353 1 677 4544 Email: contact@hdanker.com Opening hours: Mon – Sat 9:30am – 5:30pm. Viewing on request outside hours.

www.hdanker.com

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Antique Irish 4 piece silver tea set made in Dublin, 1840 – 1841, by James Le Bass. Embossed with floral decoration and eagle motif to body, on 4 masqued head feet with flower finials to coffee pot and tea pot.


VANESSA PARKER S

RARE BOOKS

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O LD T HATCH , M ULRANNY, C O M AYO T: 098 27823 AND 087 2339221 VRMAYO @ GMAIL . COM


MODERN & CONTEMPORARY ART SPECIALISING IN SCULPTURE & SITE-SPECIFIC COMMISSIONS Gallery artists include: John BELLANY RA Comhghall CASEY Peter COLLIS RHA Colin DAVIDSON RUA Orla DE BRí Margaret EGAN Trevor GEOGHEGAN Rowan GILLESPIE James HANLEY RHA Hector McDONNELL Patrick O’REILLY Bob QUINN Charlie WHISKER

SOLOMON FINE ART Rathmore, Naas, Co. Kildare (by appointment) tel: +353 45 862 940 / +353 86 814 2380 www.solomonfineart.ie Barry Flanagan Accompanied, 2001, bronze, ed. 5/8, 25” x 6” x 6”

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Also available: Basil BLACKSHAW HRHA John DOHERTY Barry FLANAGAN RA Martin GALE RHA Louis LE BROCQUY HRHA Patrick SCOTT HRHA John SHINNORS Donald TESKEY RHA and other Irish & British artists of note


PETER LINDEN

ROXANE MOORHEAD ANTIQ U ES

19th C Kazak prayer rug

Valuations for insurance & probate

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Antique & Exceptional Oriental Rugs & Carpets

Specialist advisor on period furnishings for the home & office

George's Avenue, Blackrock, Co Dublin, Ireland Tel: +353-1-2885875

www.peterlinden.com

BY APPOINTMENT ONLY

Professional Restoration and Cleaning Valuation and Commissions

Open Wednesday to Saturday 10.30 to 16.30 or by appointment PLEASE PHONE BEFORE YOU CALL OUT

T: 01 660 5165 086 814 7451 E: roxanemoorhead@gmail.com


CLANCY CHANDELIERS Period and reproduction chandeliers bought and sold. Professional cleaning, restoration and hanging service.

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Tel/Fax: 01 2863460 Mobiles: (Ger) 087 242 2838 and (Derek) 086 3612083 Email: info@clancychandeliers.com

www.clancychandeliers.com

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Villanova, Ballywaltrim, Bray, Co Wicklow


(Left) Christian Dior Coat Dress Autumn/Winter 1947 (Right) French poodle pin by Van Clef & Arpels, 1952

Cocktails and Diamonds Jewellery in the 1950s B Y P HYLLIS M AC N AMARA Jewellery of the 1950s was mainly influenced by two entirely different events: World War II and a fashion show held by Christian Dior on 12th February 1947. he austerity imposed by war caused an almost complete shutdown of the jewellery trade in England and France. Fine metals were required for the war effort, jewellers joined the armed forces, and the small amounts of jewellery being made were refashioned from existing pieces. Punitive taxes of over one hundred percent on new jewellery ensured that what little trade existed was in second hand jewels. Clothing became utilitarian, masculine and boxy, using as little fabric as possible and was subject to rationing which remained in force until 1949. At the end of the war a battered and bashed Europe started to rebuild itself with the financial assistance of the Marshall Plan of 1947 from the United States. Food was in short supply, and post-war regulations in

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© Association Willy Maywald/ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2009

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England stipulated that no more than three yards of cloth could be used to make a skirt. Despite the great poverty many women craved luxury. One man who understood the spirit and mood of the age was couturier Christian Dior. Backed by a wealthy textile magnate, Marcel Boussac, he opened his couture house in 1946. His first collection, ‘Corolla’, meaning the opening of a flower, which took place on the 12th February 1947, was christened the ‘New Look’ by Carmel Snow, editor of Harpers Bazaar. It caused a sensation and changed the face of fashion forever. The ‘New Look’ was elegant, feminine and opulent, characterised by narrow shoulders, longer length flared skirts, tight waists, and v-shaped necklines. The pleated ‘bar’ skirt, for example, used in excess of twenty-five yards of fabric – more than six times the amount used for the average day dress. Dior’s use of tightly woven luxurious fabrics with opulent embroidery made this a collection for the wealthy elite. The collection was a symbol of optimism as well as opulence.


Not everyone embraced the look. The poverty and homelessness that followed the end of the war left the majority exhausted, and to these people the cost of a Dior creation was several months’ salary. Women queuing for food at a market in Montmartre vented their anger by trying to rip the clothes off a model during a Dior fashion shoot. The hostility felt by many of the poor women of Europe was the obverse of the thrill felt by the wealthy. Dior had created a soft line, curving and rounded, that was to be brought into every aspect of design. The hourglass shape of the New Look appeared in architecture, interior design, the kidney shaped dressing table, vases, and the applied arts of the 50s. Jewellery design followed the New Look and the new lifestyle.

F

base metals were lifted the fashionable girl just could not get enough jewellery. Designers such as Dior, Schiaperialli, Trifari and Miriam Haskell designed costume jewellery that was worn by all. Mamie Eisenhower wore costume jewellery by Trifari to the inauguration of her husband as President in January 1953. As the decade progressed and confidence in the economy grew, a new whimsy came into jewellery. Animal brooches were fashionable. Inspiration might have come from the panther brooch commissioned from Cartier by the Duke of Windsor for the Duchess, a fashion icon of the

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(Far top) Model wearing Mellerio (Above) Pair of gold, yellow diamond and diamond earrings in the form of styalized cats heads by unidentified designer, c1960

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or many people the 1950s became a period when great new wealth was created. Industry and the economy began to rebuild themselves and consumerism began to emerge. America, comparatively unscathed by war, led the boom and it was here that the lifestyle of the 50s reached the height of its extravagance. In New York nighttime entertainment changed dramatically and the cocktail bar was born. A whole new dress code developed and a new style of jewellery was required to compliment the look. Day time, evening and formal evening wear called for different types of jewels and a clear distinction developed between day and night jewellery. For formal eveningwear diamonds were the gemstone par excellence and platinum was the preferred metal. The result was an abundance of all white jewels, which displayed lightness of movement and design that was achieved by cascades of gemstones falling from short necklaces. Earrings were in a scroll or foliate design and

the cascades of gemstones were often detachable, allowing the wearer to alternate between a button-like stud with a flowing drop, or the shorter version. Different cuts of diamond were combined in the same piece – graduated, channel-set baguette cut diamonds were combined with claw set brilliant and marquis cuts to form swirling, cascading motifs. Necklaces were short with foliate and scroll motifs set with different cuts, often with large single diamonds suspended in a bib form. The overall effect was a lighter version of the previous decade. In contrast to the white jewels of nighttime, day jewellery was dominated by yellow gold. The fashionable double clips of the 40s continued to be worn, but brooches were gradually becoming more popular. Combining naturalism and abstraction, they were spiky and jagged using gold wirework. Turquoise and amethyst were among the favoured stones, used together to create unusual colour combinations, while woven and plaited gold took on the look of fabric. Bracelets of the period were made with corded gold wire set with different coloured stones. Watches with concealed faces on bracelets of gold mesh took their inspiration from the 40s. Rings were more rounded than those of the 40s and some were set with semi precious mixed coloured stones. Cocktail Bars were the new form of entertainment and called for specific clothes and jewellery. This was a glamorous era; cocktail hats were worn with long gloves and fur stoles. Brooches appeared on dresses, jacket lapels and hats. The look was finished off with the must have fashion item of the period, the cocktail watch. A whole wardrobe of clothes and jewellery was created for the pleasure of drinking cocktails! America saw a boom in costume jewellery. Once the restrictions on


much publicised photograph of her wearing the gift started a craze for the pearl and diamond parure. The double strand of pearls with side elements was one of the most worn items of jewellery both for day and night. For night, strands of pearls were worn with diamonds and for day, beads of all descriptions were worn in multiple layers. Turquoise was a favourite and was often mixed with sapphire and amethyst, and set in rings, brooches and earrings. he 1950s was the last decade of the supremacy of the couturier. Paris had fifty-four couture houses registered. The skills and the showmanship at their fashion shows held fashionistas in awe. Fashion writers and prospective buyers travelled from all over the world and vied with each other for the best position at the shows. Dior had his clientele sit on the stairs to watch the show and even Marlene Dietrich was happy to sit on the bottom step! Throughout the 50s they supplied an increasingly wealthy clientele with impeccable clothes for day and evening. One wonders was it this admiration for fashion and fabric that produced one of the 50s most notable trends: gold fashioned as cloth and the introduction of passementerie (trimming of gold lace) in gold. In its simplest form, tassels made out of woven gold were added to earrings, necklaces and brooches. Van Cleef and Arpels made a woven gold bib necklace that looked like macramé studded with gem stones, while Mellerio created a gold bib necklace in gold chain mail. Perhaps the most unusual of all was the zip necklace (which could be converted to a bracelet) made by Van Cleef and Arpels, which looked and worked like a zip. Gold was used in the most imaginative ways possible,

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(Top) Design for the gold collier fermeture éclaire (zip necklace) by Van Cleef & Arpels, c1951. With the zip closed the necklace could be transformed into a bracelet.

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(Left) Pair of diamond pendent earrings by Van Cleef & Arpels, c1950s

period. Another fashion leader was the Woolworth heiress Barbara Hutton who commissioned a tiger clip brooch, also from Cartier, in 1957. Van Cleef and Arpels introduced novelty animal brooches in the mid 50s; like caricatures, they might well have been influenced by Walt Disney cartoons. In costume jewellery, novelty brooches became more and more innovative or ridiculous – light-up Christmas trees, champagne glasses, clowns that stuck out their tongues, and dressed animals of almost every species. Celebrities in the 50s were as influential in creating fashion trends as they are today. Film-star Grace Kelly, credited not only for the popularity of the Hermes Kelly bag but also the charm bracelet, received a pearl and diamond parure as a wedding gift from her fiancé Prince Rainier. The

from the use of gold wire to give big bold effect, to gold that looked like lace or fine gold mesh. This was the era of extravagant balls that gave jewellers the opportunity to create fabulous jewels. These jewels were designed to accompany the painfully tight, boned strapless bodices that created maximum cleavage to show off the magnificent short diamond necklaces. There are many 1950s brooches available to buy today, easily recognisable, with spiky separate elements sometimes with sapphires and rubies, or turquoise. They can often be found at bargain prices, so it is a good time to start collecting these underrated little jewels. The whimsical animal brooches have never lost their popularity and are more difficult to find. If you do decide to collect jewellery of the 50s think as follows: big cocktail rings, large spiky brooches in yellow gold, clip on, or large Creole earrings. Keep the word ‘cascade’ in you mind, and, if you can rise to a diamond necklace, look for combinations of different cuts. When you have remembered all of that, sit down with a cocktail in your hand, and watch the great 1953 movie ‘Gentlemen Prefer Blondes’ in which Marilyn Monroe sings, ‘Diamonds are a girls best friend’. Sing along and fix yourself a second Manhattan!


Irish Antique Fairs Fantastic display of unique items all under one roof from leading Irish antique dealers. See a vast range of jewellery, furniture, paintings, prints, silver, glass, rare books, ceramics, mirrors, clocks, lighting, carpets, rugs and objets d'art.

Dublin Antiques & Fine Art Fair 27-29 November 2009 RDS, Ballsbridge, Dublin 4

Irish International Antiques & Contemporary Art Fair 26-28 March 2010 RDS, Ballsbridge, Dublin 4

Irish Antique Dealers’ Association Fair 29 September - 3 October 2010

For further information contact Louis O'Sullivan, Irish Fairs on 01 285 9294

RDS, Ballsbridge, Dublin 4


IADA Yearbook 2009